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Symptoms » Tendon symptoms » Glossary
 

Glossary for Tendon symptoms

Medical terms related to Tendon symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type 4: A rare genetic disorder where the body's cells are unable to make sufficient energy resulting in an accumulation in the body of 3-methylglutaconic acid. Type 4 is characterized by symptoms which overlap type 1 and 3.
  • ARTS syndrome: A rare lethal syndrome characterized by deafness, optic atrophy and ataxia.
  • Abnormal extensor reflex: also known as decerebrate posture
  • Abnormal flexor response: An abnormal flexor response is an abnormal reflex to stimulation.
  • Absent abdominal reflexes: the abdominal reflex includes contraction of abdominal muscles in the quadrant of the abdomen that is stimulated by scraping the skin tangential to or toward the umbilicus. This contraction can often be seen as a brisk motion of the umbilicus toward the quadrant that is stimulated, it is absent in ceratin conditions
  • Absent corneal reflex: Loss of blinking when the edge of the cornea is touched.
  • Absent corneal reflex in one eye: Absent corneal reflex in one eye is the lack of a blink reflex in one eye.
  • Achilles tendon bruise: An injury to underlying tissues or bone in which the skin is not broken, often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations.
  • Achilles tendon burning sensation: burning sensation of the Achilles tendon usually due to systemic disorders.
  • Achilles tendon bursitis due to running: It is estimated that Achilles tendonitis accounts for around 11% of all running injuries. The Achilles tendon is the large tendon at the back of the ankle. The achilles tendon can become inflamed through overuse as well as a number of contributory factors. The Achilles tendon has a poor blood supply which is why it is slow to heal.
  • Achilles tendon deformity: Alteration in the normal position and function of the Achilles tendon.
  • Achilles tendon infection: Infection of the Achilles tendon is usually due to any secondary infectious disorder.
  • Achilles tendon inflammation: Infection of the Achilles tendon.
  • Achilles tendon lump: Small palpable mass in the Achilles tendon.
  • Achilles tendon numb: Abnormal sensations felt in the Achilles tendon.
  • Achilles tendon pain: Achilles tendon also known as the calcaneal tendon is the tendon of the posterior part of the leg.
  • Achilles tendon redness: Erythematous changes in the skin overlying the Achilles tendon usually due to inflammation.
  • Achilles tendon sensitive: Increased responsiveness to stimulation.
  • Achilles tendon spasm: Sudden involuntary contraction of the Achilles tendon.
  • Achilles tendon stiff: tendon stiffness due to physical trauma or abnormal muscle contraction.
  • Achilles tendon swelling: Inflammatory changes associated with the Achilles tendon.
  • Achilles tendon tingling: Prickling or stinging sensation felt in the Achilles tendon.
  • Achilles tendonitis: Achilles tendonitis is a condition of irritation and inflammation of the large tendon in the back of the ankle.
  • Acid-Base Imbalance: A disruption to the normal acid-base equilibrium in the body. There are four main groups of disorder involving an acid-base imbalance: respiratory acidosis or alkalosis and metabolic acidosis or alkalosis. Obviously the severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of imbalance.
  • Acroosteolysis neurogenic: A very rare inherited condition characterized mainly by the loss of all sensations - the lose the ability to feel pain, temperature and touch. The loss of sensation generally starts at the toes and fingers and spreads up the limbs and the trunk may also be involved in some cases.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- xylene: Xylene is an ingredient used in certain insecticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute idiopathic polyneuritis: An inflammatory disorder of the peripheral nerves The condition is characterized by weakness, numbness or tingling in the legs or arms or occasionally loss of movement and feeling in the legs, arms, upper body and face. Some patients have minor symptoms and others suffer severe symptoms such as paralysis. Also called Guillain-Barre syndrome, infectious polyneuritis or acute febrile polyneuritis.
  • Adducted thumb syndrome recessive form: A rare recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by a small head, arthrogryposis (joint contractures), cleft palate and various other abnormalities.
  • Adducted thumbs -- arthrogryposis, Christian type: A rare recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by a small head, arthrogryposis (joint contractures), cleft palate and various other abnormalities.
  • Adult SMA: Form of Spinal Muscular Atrophy in adults.
  • Alagille syndrome: A genetic disorder affecting the liver and characterized by the absence of some or all of the liver bile ducts that transport bile within the liver.
  • Alcoholic polyneuropathy: A condition where damage to many peripheral nerves throughout the body results from excessive alcohol consumption. The sensory nerves tend to be affected more than the motor nerves and the legs are usually more affected than the arms.
  • Amitriptyline toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Amoxapine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2, juvenile: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2q33.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 3: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 18q21.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 4, juvenile: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 4 is caused by a defect on chromosome 9q34.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 5: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 5 is caused by a defect on chromosome 15q15.1-q21.1.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 6: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 16q12.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 7: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 7 is caused by a defect on chromosome 20p13.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 8: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 9 is caused by a defect on chromosome 20q13.3 and is a dominantly inherited, late-onset form.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 11: An inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 11 is differentiated by the origin of the genetic defect involved (6q21).
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, type 6: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 16q12.
  • Andersen disease: An rare inborn error of metabolism involving glycogen storage and characterized by cirrhosis and sometimes liver failure. Lack of the amyl-transglucosidase enzyme and abnormal glycogen causes the condition.
  • Angelman syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a puppet-like gait, fits of laughter and characteristic facial features.
  • Ankle clonus: a rhythmic contraction of the calf muscles following a sudden dorsiflexion of the foot, the leg being semiflexed
  • Areflexia: slowing or delayed reflexes
  • Arima syndrome: A rare disorder characterized mainly by eye and brain abnormalities.
  • Arizona Bark Scorpion poisoning: A bite from the Arizona Bark scorpion contains chemicals toxic to the nerve system and can cause serious, life-threatening symptoms.
  • Arthrogryposis due to muscular dystrophy: A rare disorder where a non-progressive muscle disease results in the presence of multiple joint contractures at birth.
  • Arthrogryposis, congenital -- myopathic seizures: A rare syndrome characterized by mental retardation and muscle problems.
  • Ataxia -- oculomotor apraxia, type 1: A nerve disorder which affects the motor nerves and results in movement problems which includes the eyes. Gait problems are usually the first symptom and this is followed by speaking difficulty, intention tremor and then eye movement problems.
  • Ataxia spastic congenital miosis: A rare, dominantly inherited disorder characterized mainly by ataxia, spasticity and small pupils that respond poorly to light.
  • Ataxia with Vitamin E Deficiency: A rare disorder where a genetic disorder results in impaired vitamin E deficiency which in turn causes progressive neurological problems such as ataxia.
  • Ataxia, Hereditary, Autosomal Dominant: A group of rare, dominantly inherited neuromuscular disorder involving degeneration of the brain and spinal cord. The range, progression and severity of symptoms can vary quite considerably depending on the genetic defect involved.
  • Ataxia, spastic, 3, autosomal recessive: A recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by spasticity and ataxia.
  • Ataxia-oculomotor apraxia syndrome: A nerve disorder which affects the motor nerves and results in movement problems which includes the eyes. Gait problems are usually the first symptom and this is followed by speaking difficulty, intention tremor and then eye movement problems.
  • Athabaskan severe combined immunodeficiency: A severe immunodeficiency disorder found in Navajo and Apache populations.
  • Autoimmune neuropathies: Nerve diseases from autoimmune damage.
  • Autoimmune peripheral neuropathy: Damage to peripheral nerves that occurs when the body's own immune system attacks it.
  • Autonomic hypereflexia: increase in the intensity of reflex to stimuli
  • Autonomic hyperreflexia: Autonomic hyperreflexia is a serious reaction of the involuntary nervous system to overstimulation that may include symptoms, such as hypertension, heart rate changes and excessive sweating.
  • Autonomic nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the autonomic nervous system
  • Autosomal recessive spastic paraplegia, type 11:
  • Babinski's reflex: Babinski's reflex occurs when the great toe flexes toward the top of the foot and the other toes fan out after the sole of the foot has been firmly stroked. This is normal in younger children, but abnormal after the age of 2
  • Babinski's sign: Extensor plantar reflex it can identify diseases of the brain and spinal cord. When non- pathological it is called plantar reflex while the term Babinski reflex is used for pathological form
  • Bahemuka Brown syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by spastic paraplegia and skin pigmentation irregularities.
  • Baraitser Brett Piesowicz syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by a small head and calcification in the brain.
  • Bartter Syndrome type 4: Bartter syndrome is a rare disorder where abnormal kidney metabolism results in low blood acidity an potassium levels. Type 4 also involves sensorineural deafness.
  • Bartter Syndrome type 4A: Bartter syndrome is a rare disorder where abnormal kidney metabolism results in low blood acidity an potassium levels. Type 4A also involves sensorineural deafness.
  • Bartter Syndrome type 4B: Bartter syndrome is a rare disorder where abnormal kidney metabolism results in low blood acidity an potassium levels. Type 4B also involves sensorineural deafness.
  • Benign congenital hypotonia: A rare condition where an infant has a severe lack of muscle tone which progressively improves and usually disappears within 10 years.
  • Bicipital tendinitis: Bicipital tendinitis, or biceps tendinitis, is an inflammatory process of the long head of the biceps tendon and is a common cause of shoulder pain due to its position and function.
  • Bicipital tendonitis: Inflammation of the bicipital tendon (the long head of the biceps tendon). It is often associated with some sort of trauma or overuse. It is usually associated with rotator cuff disease.
  • Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis: A rare condition where inflammation of the brainstem results in various symptoms such as ataxia and ophthalmoplegia. The onset of symptoms is usually acute.
  • Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis (BBE): A rare condition where inflammation of the brainstem results in various symptoms such as ataxia and ophthalmoplegia. The onset of symptoms is usually acute.
  • Black widow spider envenomation: The black widow spider bite is toxic to the nerves and can cause serious symptoms. The black widow spider is most commonly found in North America.
  • Boltshauser Syndrome: Boltshauser Syndrome is a rare condition reported in a few generations in one family. The condition is characterized by paralysis of the vocal cords, deafness and movement problems.
  • Bowel bypass syndrome: Negative effects such as chills, fever, jont pain and skin inflammation that may result from bowel bypass surgery.
  • Bowel-associated dermatosis-arthritis syndrome: An illness that sometimes occurs in people with gastrointestinal diseases. It is believed to be caused by a build up of bacteria in a pouch in the bowel which triggers the immune system into action.
  • Boylan-Dew-Greco syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by insufficient myelination of peripheral nerves and contractures at birth. The myelin sheath is a protective coating around nerves.
  • CAMFAK syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by cataracts, small head, failure to thrive and spinal curvature.
  • CANOMAD syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by a range of abnormalities caused by immune-mediated nerve demyelination. There is usually no loss of limb function associated with the disorder. The face, throat, mouth and eye symptoms (weakness of the muscles) usually come and go.
  • CDG syndrome type I: A rare genetic disorder where the body is unable to synthesize glycoproteins which results in multisystem problems.
  • CDG syndrome type Ic: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type 1C has a differs from the other subtypes by the type of enzyme which is deficient.
  • COFS syndrome: A genetic disorder involving degeneration of the brain and spinal cord that starts during the fetal stage.
  • Cataract -- ataxia -- deafness: A rare syndrome characterized by cataracts, ataxia and progressive deafness.
  • Cerebellar ataxia -- areflexia -- pes cavus -- optic atrophy -- sensorineural hearing loss: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by ataxia, absent reflexes, high foot arch (pes cavus), progressive optic nerve degeneration and hearing impairment. The ataxic symptoms tended to occur early in life after an illness involving fevers. The ataxia then tends to come and go but then persists into adulthood. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Cerebellar ataxia -- ectodermal dysplasia: A rare syndrome characterized by balance and coordination problems and teeth and hair abnormalities.
  • Cerebellar ataxia, X-linked: A disorder where degeneration of certain parts of the brain results in symptoms such as ataxia. The rate of progression can vary.
  • Cerebellar ataxia, areflexia, pes cavus, optic atrophy and sensorinural hearing loss: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by ataxia, absent reflexes, high foot arch (pes cavus), progressive optic nerve degeneration and hearing impairment. The ataxic symptoms tended to occur early in life after an illness involving fevers. The ataxia then tends to come and go but then persists into adulthood.
  • Cerebellar atrophy with progressive microcephaly: A very rare disorder characterized mainly by a small brain, small head, underdeveloped brain, brain degeneration, contractures, eye problems and seizures.
  • Cerebral Autosomal Recessive Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy: A rare inherited condition characterized primarily by progressive degeneration of the brain white matter and disease of the brain blood vessels as well as additional symptoms not involving the brain e.g. thin skin, alopecia and spinal disc disease.
  • Cerebral Palsy, Spastic Quadriplegic, 1: Spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy is a motor disorder (affects the muscles and movement) resulting from an injury to the brain. The main symptoms are spasticity, paralysis, poor muscle control and other neurological problems. Type 1 refers to a developmental brain abnormality linked to the GAD1 gene on chromosome 2q31.
  • Cerebral Palsy, Spastic Quadriplegic, 2: Spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy is a motor disorder (affects the muscles and movement) resulting from an injury to the brain. The main symptoms are spasticity, paralysis, poor muscle control and other neurological problems. Type 2 refers to a developmental brain abnormality linked to the ANKRD15 gene on chromosome 9p24.3.
  • Cerebral Palsy, Spastic Quadriplegic, 3: Spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy is a motor disorder (affects the muscles and movement) resulting from an injury to the brain. The main symptoms are spasticity, paralysis, poor muscle control and other neurological problems. Type 3 refers to a developmental brain abnormality linked to the AP4M1 gene on chromosome 7q22.1.
  • Cerebro oculo skeleto renal syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by brain, eye, skeletal and kidney abnormalities.
  • Cerebro-Oculo-Facio-Skeletal Syndrome: A genetic disorder involving degeneration of the brain and spinal cord that starts during the fetal stage.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disorder: Degeneration of limb muscles.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease deafness recessive type: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4D is inherited recessively and is caused by a defected in a gene in chromosome 8 and is a severe form of the disease that also involves deafness.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with ptosis and parkinsonism: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. This particular type of CMT also involves a drooping upper eyelid and parkinsonism.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with pyramidal features, autosomal dominant: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 5 has an autosomal dominant inheritance, progresses slowly and involves movement disorders.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 1B: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 1B is inherited as an autosomal dominant pattern and involves a defect in the MPZ gene on chromosome 1. The severity of the condition is variable depending on the age of onset with severe infantile cases resulting in the inability to walk at an early age.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 1C: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 1C is inherited as an autosomal dominant pattern and involves a defect in the LITAF/SIMPLE gene on chromosome 16.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2F: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2F has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect in the HSPB1 gene on chromosome 7.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2I: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2K: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2K has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect on chromosome 8.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2L: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2L has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect in the HSPB8 gene on chromosome 12.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 4C: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4B2 has an autosomal recessive inheritance and involves a defect in the KIAA1985 gene on chromosome 5. It involves motor and sensory problems as well as scoliosis.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 4E: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4B2 has an autosomal recessive inheritance and involves a defect in the EGR2 gene on chromosome 10.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 4H: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4H has an autosomal recessive form of inheritance and involves a defect on Chromosome 11.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, X-linked: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type X2 is an inherited defect of the X chromosome and affects males to a greater degree than females.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, X-linked recessive, 2: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type X2 is an inherited defect of the X chromosome and affects males to a greater degree than females.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, X-linked recessive, 3: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type X3 is an inherited defect of the X chromosome and affects males to a greater degree than females.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, X-linked, 1: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type X1 is an inherited defect of the X chromosome (defect in GJB1 gene) and affects males to a greater degree than females. Transient central nervous system symptoms are also sometimes involved.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 2: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormalities in the axon of the peripheral nerve cells instead of the myelin sheath coating of the nerves. The condition manifests as muscle weakness and wasting that usually starts in the legs and spreads to the hands and other parts of the body. The severity, age of onset and rate of progression of the condition varies depending on the genetic origin of the defect.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 4: A rare group of demyelinating motor and sensory neuropathies consisting of a number of subtypes. The various subtypes are caused by different genetic defects.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth, demyelinating, autosomal recessive: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4 has an autosomal recessive form of inheritance and is a severe form of the disease.
  • Chediak-Higashi like syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized mainly by albinism (lack of pigmentation). There are three different subtypes of the disorder (I, II and III) each with varying additional features such as immunodeficiency and neurological symptoms. Type 1 involves partial albinism and neurological symptoms, type II involves partial albinism, immunodeficiency and sometimes neurological symptoms and type III involves albinism only.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aftershave: Aftershave contains chemicals (ethyl alcohol, isopropyl alcohol) which can cause symptoms if ingested in sufficient quantities. Death from ingesting aftershave is considered unlikely. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ammonium Bifluoride: Ammonium Bifluoride is a chemical used wheel cleaners, herbicides and in the manufacture of magnesium. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Barium: Barium is an element used in fireworks, glassmaking, contrast X-rays and in the electronics industry . The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromates: Bromate is a chemical used mainly in perming solution neutralizers and in small amounts as a bread preservative. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fluoridated toothpaste: Fluoridated toothpaste contains fluoride and various other chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. As little as half a tube of children's paste can cause death in a 2 year old child and a whole tube can cause death in a 9 year old child. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Lysergic Acid Diethylamide: Lysergic Acid Diethylamide is a hallucinogenic drug which is often misused. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Metaldehyde: Metaldehyde is a chemical used mainly as a molluscicide, in heating fuel and in fire lighters. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Selenious Acid: Selenious Acid is a chemical used mainly in gun bluing agents. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Choreoacanthocytosis amyotrophic: A rare inherited disease involving neurological degeneration and abnormal red blood cell shape. The disorder progresses slowly and causes involuntary movements, loss of cognitive ability, behavioral changes and seizures.
  • Choreoathetosis-spasticity, episodic: A dominantly inherited movement disorder characterized by episodes of involuntary movments. Symptom episodes are often triggered by fatigue, alcohol, physical exertion and stress.
  • Choroid plexus calcification with mental retardation: A form of mental retardation associated with calcification of the choroids plexus which is the part of the brain involved in making cerebrospinal fluid.
  • Choroido cerebral calcification syndrome infantile form: A rare syndrome characterized by abnormal calcification in part of the brain and mental retardation.
  • Chromosome 1, 1p36 deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where deletion of a portion of chromosome 1 causes various abnormalities such as heart problems, mental retardation, developmental delay, facial dysmorphism and short stature. The symptoms are variable depending on the exact location of chromosomal deletion.
  • Chromosome 10, trisomy 10pter p13: A rare chromosomal disorder where duplication of a portion of chromosome 10 causes various abnormalities such as a wasted build, gut and heart placement abnormalities and lack of reflexes.
  • Chromosome 11, deletion 11p: A syndrome that is caused by the deletion of short arm (p) of chromosome 11. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount and exact location of the genetic material that is deleted.
  • Chromosome 12p tetrasomy syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are four copies of the short arm (p) of chromosome 12 rather than the normal two resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 18, Tetrasomy 18p: A rare chromosomal disorder where there are four copies of short arm of chromosome 18 instead of the normal two which results in various genital, kidney, digital, head and face abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 21 monosomy: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is only one copy of chromosome 21 instead of the normal two leading to various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 8q deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where a part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 8 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities depending on the location and length of missing genetic material.
  • Chromosome 9, trisomy 9q: A very rare genetic disorder where a portion of the genetic material on the long arm (q) of chromosome 9 is duplicated which results in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the size and location of the genetic material involved.
  • Chromosome 9q duplication: A very rare genetic disorder where a portion of the genetic material on the long arm (q) of chromosome 9 is duplicated which results in various abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the size and location of the genetic material involved.
  • Chromosome 9q duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 9 resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: A rare disorder involving swelling of nerve roots and destruction of the protective layer around nerves. Severe symptoms can take up to a year or more to develop.
  • Clomipramine Toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Clonus: An involuntary muscular contraction and relaxation in rapid succession.
  • Clonus in children: Clonus in children refers to a child who has repetitive, rhythmic muscle spasms when attempting to stretch the affected muscle.
  • Cockayne syndrome type 1: A rare inherited condition characterized by short stature, light sensitivity and a prematurely aged appearance. Type 1 is an early-onset form and involves progressive symptoms that usually start after 1 year of age.
  • Coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ10), deficiency: A rare inherited disorder characterized by the deficiency of Coenzyme Q 10. The range and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Coenzyme Q cytochrome c reductase deficiency of: A rare genetic defect where an enzyme deficiency (CoQ-Cytochrome C reductase) disrupts cellular processes. Any of a variety of the components of the enzyme may be missing or defective and hence the clinical presentation and severity may vary. The deficiency may result in a variety of symptoms and conditions of variable severity such as cardiomyopathy, fatal infant conditions and Leber's myopathy.
  • Coloboma chorioretinal cerebellar vermis aplasia: A very rare syndrome characterized by an eye anomaly (gap in eye structures such as choroids and retina) and abnormal development of the midline structure of the brain (cerebellar vermis aplasia).
  • Combarros Calleja Leno syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by the association of glaucoma at birth with a form of ataxia.
  • Complex 1 mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency: A rare genetic defect where an enzyme deficiency (NADH CoQ) disrupts cellular processes and causes various organic acid disorders. Any of a variety of the components of the enzyme may be missing or defective and hence the clinical presentation and severity may vary. Presentation may range from infantile death to various disorders such as Leigh's disease, Parkinson's disease and cardiomyopathy.
  • Congenital disorder of Glycosylation type Ic: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type 1C has a differs from the other subtypes by the type of enzyme which is deficient.
  • Congenital hypomyelination neuropathy: A rare neurological disorder that is apparent at birth and is characterized by breathing difficulty and muscle problems.
  • Congenital ichthyosis, microcephalus, quadriplegia: A rare birth disorder characterized by scaly skin, small head and paralysis of legs and arms.
  • Congenital myopathy: A very rare inherited disorder where muscles are overly-responsive to stimuli because of an abnormality in the muscle membranes. It causes prolonged muscle contraction which is muscle stiffness. The two main forms of myotonia congenital are Thomsen and Becker disease which are respectively inherited dominantly and recessively.
  • Corneal reflex, absent: The absence of reflex eye lid closure once the cornea is touched
  • Cortical dysplasia -- focal epilepsy syndrome: Abnormal development of the brain cortex which results in focal epilepsy and progressive neurological deterioration once the epilepsy starts in early childhood.
  • Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: A very rare degenerative brain disease that can be inherited, transmitted (eg in surgical transplants using infected tissue) or as a result of genetic mutations. The condition is fatal.
  • Cytochrome c oxydase deficiency, French-Canadian type: A rare, progressive, inherited metabolic disorder where a deficiency of the enzyme cytochrome C oxidase affects skeletal muscles, connective tissue, brain and liver.
  • De Barsy Syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized by loose, inelastic skin, involuntary limb movements, cloudy corneas and other abnormalities.
  • Death Camas poisoning: The Death Camas is a plant from the lily family. It contains a toxic chemical called zygacine. Young plants tend to be more toxic than older plants. It is most often found in dry areas of Western US. The bulb is often confused with edible wild onions - eating one or two bulbs can cause symptoms and all parts of the plant are poisonous.
  • Decreased ankle and knee reflexes: deep tendon reflexes are tonic contraction of the muscles in response to a stretching force, due to stimulation of muscle proprioceptors. Also called myotatic reflex, these may decrease in certain conditions
  • Decreased folate: Decrease in one of the B vitamins required for red blood cell production
  • Decreased reflex response: tendon reflexes that are slower or of decreased size than that expected; or completely absent
  • Decreased reflexes: Tendon reflexes that are slower or of decreased size than that expected; or completely absent.
  • Decreased responsiveness to light: the pupillary light reflex is the reduction of pupil size in response to light. A sluggish or slow pupillary response is known as an abnormal pupillary response to light
  • Decreased responsiveness to light in both eyes: Decreased responsiveness to light in both eyes is a lowered response of the pupils of the eyes to light stimulation.
  • Decreased responsiveness to light in one eye: Decreased responsiveness to light in one eye refers to a lowered response of the pupil of one eye to light stimulation.
  • Degenerative motor system disease: Any of a number of condition characterized by destruction of nerves that carry signals to muscles (motor neurons) and results in various muscle problems. The nerve destruction is often progressive leading to increasingly severe muscle problems.
  • Deletion 11p: A syndrome that is caused by the deletion of short arm (p) of chromosome 11. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount and exact location of the genetic material that is deleted.
  • Dermatoleukodystrophy: A very rare progressive brain disease associated with thick wrinkled skin. Only two reported cases with both dying within three years of birth.
  • Desipramine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Developmental delay -- hypotonia extremities hypertrophy: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by poor muscle tone, developmental delay.
  • Dexedrine overdose: Dexedrine is a prescription drug mainly used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and narcolepsy. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency: A metabolic error where a deficiency of an enzyme called dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase prevents the normal metabolism of certain proteins. High levels of certain proteins are excreted in the urine. The enzyme is also needed the breakdown a chemotherapy drug called 5-flurouracil and its absence can result in a severe toxicity reaction.
  • Diminished Deep tendon reflexes: hypoactive reflexes
  • Diminished Deep tendon reflexes in lower limb: Diminished deep tendon reflexes in lower limb refers to reduced deep tendon reflexes in a leg.
  • Diminished Moro's reflex: it is an infantile reflex which is usually present from 34 weeks gestation and lasts unto 4-5 months of age of the infant
  • Diminished corneal reflex: is a brisk reflex of blinking when the edge of the cornea is touched with a wisp of cotton. Damage to the corneal reflex ccurs due to damage to the ophalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve
  • Diminished corneal reflex in both eyes: Diminished corneal reflex in both eyes is a decreased response of the eyes to blink involuntarily (blink reflex) in response to a specific stimulation.
  • Diminished corneal reflex in one eye: Diminished corneal reflex in one eye is a decreased response of one eye to blink involuntarily (blink reflex) in response to a specific stimulation.
  • Diomedi-Bernardi-Placidi syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by epilepsy, mental retardation and progressive leg weakness and spasticity.
  • Doll's eye sign: Reflex movement of the eyes such that the eyes lower as the head is raised, indicating functional integrity of the nerve pathways involved in eye movement
  • Down's syndrome-like hypotonia: Hypotonia is not a specific medical disorder, but a potential manifestation of many different diseases and disorders that affect motor nerve control by the brain or muscle strength.
  • Doxepin toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Dykes-Markes-Harper syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by dry, scaly skin, enlarged liver and spleen and a incoordination.
  • Dysequilibrium syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation and nonprogressive incoordination.
  • Dysmorphism -- cleft palate -- loose skin: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by facial abnormalities, an opening in the roof of the mouth and loose skin.
  • Dystonia with cerebellar atrophy: A recessively inherited movement disorder (dystonia) which responds poorly to Levodopa treatment and involves wasting of part of the brain.
  • Emerinopathy: A rare, progressive muscle disease that starts during childhood and involves muscle weakness and wasting.
  • Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, X-linked: A muscle wasting disorder mainly involving the muscles in the arms, legs, face, neck, spine and heart. Symptoms generally only occur in males but female carriers may have some symptoms.
  • Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, dominant type: A rare disorder characterized by slowly-progressing weakness and wasting of skeletal and heart muscles. The dominant form of the disease is associated with greater variability of symptoms.
  • Encephalopathy progressive -- optic atrophy: A rare birth disorder characterized by progressive brain disease, facial anomalies and eye problems.
  • Epileptic encephalopathy, early infantile, 1: A genetic form of epilepsy which is severe and starts during infancy. This form of the condition is caused by a defect on the ARX gene.
  • Erb-Goldflam: An inherited disorder characterized by a defect in the transmission of signals to the muscles which results in muscle weakness.
  • Erythrokeratodermia ataxia: A rare inherited condition characterized by skin and nervous system disorders
  • Erythrokeratodermia with ataxia: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of a skin disorder with slowly progressive neurological symptoms.
  • Eucalyptus Oil poisoning: Eucalyptus oil can be used for medicinal purposes but excessive ingestion can cause problems. Likewise, eating the leaves of the eucalyptus plant (very unlikely) can also cause poisoning symptoms.
  • Extensor tendonitis in runners: Inflammation of the extensor tendons causes pain and swelling. Inflammation of the tibialis anterior is most common but inflammation of the extensor digitorum muscles is rare.
  • FACWA syndrome: A rare progressive neurological disorder involving degeneration of part of the brain (basal ganglia) and muscle wasting.
  • Face symptoms: Symptoms affecting the face
  • Familial isolated deficiency of vitamin E: A rare neurodegenerative disorder caused by an inherited condition where the body is unable to absorb vitamin E from the food consumed.
  • Fanconi syndrome: Fanconi syndrome that occurs secondary to the accumulation of crystals of light-chain immunoglobulin molecules in the kidney tubules which affects their functioning.
  • Fara-Chlupackova syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by ear, face and neck abnormalities.
  • Fazio-Londe syndrome: A rare inherited motor neuron disease characterized by progressive muscle weakness which ultimately leads to premature death.
  • Fenton-Wilkinson-Toselano syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by ataxia, light sensitivity and short stature.
  • Fisher (M.) syndrome: A rare type of nerve disease involving muscle coordination problems, eye muscle paralysis and absent reflexes. It appears to be caused by the body's own immune system destroying the protective layer around nerves. The condition is usually preceded by a viral illness and is not life-threatening.
  • Fitzsimmons-McLachlan-Gilbert syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation paraplegia and thickened coarse skin on palms and soles.
  • Fitzsimmons-Walson-Mellor syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by spastic paraplegia, progressive kidney disease and deafness.
  • Friedreich ataxia: A progressive inherited neuromuscular disorder involving slow degeneration of the spinal cord and brain.
  • Friedreich's ataxia: Progressive muscle weakness from nerve damage.
  • Fryns macrocephaly: A rare syndrome characterized by a large head, seizures, spasticity, weakness and unusual facial appearance.
  • GM1 gangliosidosis: A rare biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (beta-galactosidase A) which results in the accumulation of harmful chemicals (GM1 gangliosides) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. Type 1 is a severe infantile form of the disorder and involves a greater degree of accumulation than type II or III.
  • Gag reflex abnormalities: reflex contraction of the back of the throat, evoked by touching the soft palate, that prevents something from entering the throat except as part of normal swallowing.
  • Ganglion: swelling that arises around joints and soft tissues
  • Gangliosidosis generalized GM1, type 1: A rare biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (beta-galactosidase A) which results in the accumulation of harmful chemicals (GM1 gangliosides) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. Type 1 is a severe infantile form of the disorder and involves a greater degree of accumulation than type II or III.
  • Gaucher disease type 2: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of the enzyme called glucocerebrosidase and accumulation of glycosylceramide (glucocerebroside). There are three forms of this disease: type 1, 2 and 3. Type 2 is acute neurological form apparent in infancy.
  • Glucose transport defect, blood-brain barrier: A rare metabolic disorder involving a deficiency of a molecule needed to transport glucose (GLUT1). The glucose is unable to be transported from the blood and into the brain and cerebrospinal fluid. Sugar transport to the brain is essential for normal development. The blood sugar level remains normal. Fasting exacerbates symptoms which can very in severity depending on the degree of deficiency.
  • Glut-1 Deficiency Syndrome: A condition which is characterized by a deficiency of the GLUT-1 transported of cells
  • Glycine synthase deficiency: A rare genetic disorder characterized by high blood glycine levels which is toxic to the body. The severity of the condition varies according to the degree of deficiency and age of onset. The classical neonatal form is generally quite severe, the atypical mild form which generally includes symptoms such as aggressiveness, behavioral problems and speech problems. The transient neonatal form involves high blood glycine levels at birth which then returns to normal within a couple of months - there was no neurological or developmental impairment.
  • Glycine synthase deficiency, type 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by high blood glycine levels. It is caused by a defect in the P protein (pyridoxal phosphate-dependent glycine decarboxylase) in the energy creating center of cells (mitochondria).
  • Glycine synthase deficiency, type 2: A rare genetic disorder characterized by high blood glycine levels. It is caused by a defect in the T protein (tetrahydrofolate-requiring enzyme) in the energy creating center of cells (mitochondria).
  • Glycogen storage disease type 2: A rare inherited biochemical disorder involving the harmful accumulation of certain chemicals (glycogen) in body tissues due to the deficiency of an enzyme (?-glucosidase or acid maltase) needed to break it down.
  • Glycogenosis type 2: A rare inherited biochemical disorder involving the harmful accumulation of certain chemicals (glycogen) in body tissues due to the deficiency of an enzyme (?-glucosidase or acid maltase) needed to break it down. The severity of the condition is variable and onset may occur during infancy, childhood or adulthood.
  • Gradual onset of hyperreflexia: Gradual onset of hyperreflexia is the slow development of overactive or overresponsive reflexes.
  • Gradual onset of hyperreflexia due to tumors: Gradual onset of hyperreflexia due to tumors is a condition in which reflexes are overactive as a result of a tumor.
  • Griscelli disease: A rare genetic disorder characterized mainly by albinism (lack of pigmentation). There are three different subtypes of the disorder (I, II and III) each with varying additional features such as immunodeficiency and neurological symptoms. Type 1 involves partial albinism and neurological symptoms, type II involves partial albinism, immunodeficiency and sometimes neurological symptoms and type III involves albinism, only.
  • Griscelli syndrome type II: A rare genetic condition characterized by a partial lack of pigmentation in the eye, skin and hair, clumps of pigmentation in hair shafts, immunodeficiency and neurological symptoms.
  • Guillain-Barre syndrome: An acute condition which is characterized by polyradiculoneuropathy that affects the peripheral nervous system
  • Haas-Robinson syndrome: A rare, recessively inherited disorder involving defective copper metabolism within the body which causes symptoms such as mental retardation, seizures and poor muscle tone.
  • Hartnup Disease: A disorder of amino acid transport resulting in light sensitive dermatitis, ataxia, migraines and personality changes.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Licorice: Licorice can be used as a herbal agent in cough medications and as a food additive in chewing gum and chewing tobacco. The herbal agent contains a chemical called glycyrrhizic acid which can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Cleistanthus Collinus: Cleistanthus collinus can be used as a herbal agent which is very toxic and has been used to commit suicide or murder. The herbal agent contains toxic chemicals such as dyphyllin, collinusin and glycosides.
  • Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia: A slow-progressing degeneration of the tract that connects the brain to the spinal cord (corticospinal tract) resulting in muscle spasticity, weakness and paralysis. The severity of symptoms is determined by the nature and extent of the damage.
  • Holoprosencephaly deletion 2p: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by the failure of the brain to separate into two lobes, facial deformities and various other anomalies.
  • Hydranencephaly: A very rare condition where fluid replaces a portion of the brain.
  • Hyperactive DTRs: hyperactive deep tendon reflexes (DTRs) are abnormally brisk muscle contractions that occur in response to a sudden stretch induced by sharply tapping the muscle's tendon of insertion
  • Hyperactive DTRs in the legs: hyperactive deep tendon reflexes (DTRs) are abnormally brisk muscle contractions that occur in response to a sudden stretch induced by sharply tapping the muscle's tendon of insertion
  • Hyperactive deep tendon reflexes: Hyperactive deep tendon reflexes are deep tendon reflexes that are over reactive to stimulation.
  • Hyperactive reflexes: An exaggerated reflex of the muscles.
  • Hyperactive reflexes in both lower limb: Hyperactive reflexes in both lower limbs is a condition in which lower limb reflexes are over reactive to stimulation.
  • Hyperactive reflexes in the lower limb: Hyperactive reflexes in the lower limb are reflexes in the lower limb or leg are over reactive to stimulation.
  • Hyperexplexia: A rare condition where the startle reflex is exaggerated. Triggers include sudden noise, movement or touch.
  • Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis: A rare inherited genetic condition characterized by temporary periods of severe muscle weakness. The condition tends to be more severe in males and can be triggered by stress, fasting, rest after exercise and eating foods high in potassium.
  • Hypermethioninemia due to S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase deficiency: A rare disorder involving an enzyme deficiency which results in increased methionine levels in the blood. The condition manifests as psychomotor delay and severe muscle disease.
  • Hyperreflexia: An exaggerated reflex of the muscles
  • Hyperreflexia in children: Hyperreflexia in children is a condition on which there are over active reflexes in a child.
  • Hypertrophic neuropathy of Dejerine-Sottas: An inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Hypoactive DTRs: hypoactive deep tendon reflexes (DTRs) are abnormally diminished muscle contractions that occur in response to a sudden stretch induced by sharply tapping the muscle's tendon of insertion
  • Hypoactive deep tendon reflexes: delayed tendon reflexes
  • Hypoactive deep tendon reflexes of the lower limb: Hypoactive deep tendon reflexes of the lower limb are reflexes that are underactive or underresponsive to certain stimulation.
  • Hypoactive reflexes: slowing or delayed reflexes
  • Hypokalemia: Abnormally low levels of potassium in the blood.
  • Hypomyelination and congenital cataract: An inherited disorder characterized by congenital cataract and progressive neurological impairment due to reduced myelination of nerves.
  • Hypomyelination neuropathy -- arthrogryposis: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by insufficient myelination of peripheral nerves and contractures at birth. The myelin sheath is a protective coating around nerves.
  • Hyporeflexia: A decreased reflex of the muscles
  • Hyporeflexia in children: Hyporeflexia in children refers to a child's reflexes that are underactive or underresponsive to certain stimulation.
  • Idiopathic Parkinson's disease: Idiopathic Parkinson's disease is Parkinson's disease for which no particular cause can be determined - it is the most prevalent form of the condition. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Imipramine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Inclusion Body Myositis: Progressive inflammatory muscle disease causing muscle weakness.
  • Increased (brisk) Reflexes: Tendon reflexes that are abnormally quick or exaggerated in range of movement.
  • Increased (brisk) reflexes in pregnancy: Brisk reflexes in pregnancy refers to tendon reflexes that are increased in response in a woman who is pregnant.
  • Increased tendon reflexes: Increased tendon reflexes are tendon reflexes that are more responsive than they have been in the past .
  • Infant botulism food poisoning: Very dangerous food poisoning needing medical attention.
  • Infantile axonal neuropathy: A very rare form of progressive nerve damage that starts early in life. The central nervous system is also usually involved.
  • Infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia: A rare disorder that has neurological origins and causes progressive ataxia, impaired tendon reflexes, abnormal limb movements, and sensory, eye muscle and hearing impairment.
  • Insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis: A rare disorder primarily involving insensitivity to pain with a lack of sweating.
  • Insensitivity to pain with anhydrosis:
  • Intermittent hyperreflexia: Intermittent hyperreflexia refers to periodic episodes of overactive reflexes.
  • Intermittent hyporeflexia: Intermittent hyporeflexia is underactive reflexes that occur in periodic episodes.
  • King Cobra poisoning: The King Cobra is a large venomous snake usually found in southeast Asia and India. Most bites from this snake results in envenomation due to the ferocity of their bite. The poison primarily affects the neuromuscular system but can also affect blood clotting.
  • Krabbe disease, atypical, due to saposin A deficiency: An inherited biochemical disorder which results in neurological regression within a few months of birth. Death usually occurs during the first few years of life. The disorder is similar to Krabbe disease but is differentiated by the genetic origin of the biochemical defect. Krabbe disease involves a defect in the galactocerebrosidase gene whereas atypical Krabbe disease involves a defect in the prosaposin gene which causes a deficiency of saposin A.
  • Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome: A condition where a patient with a carcinoma suffers from progressive muscular weakness.
  • Leigh syndrome: A rare, progressive, neurological disorder characterized by the degeneration of the brain and impaired function of various body organs. The condition is caused by a systemic deficiency of the cytochrome C oxidase enzyme.
  • Leigh syndrome, French Canadian type: A rare, progressive, inherited metabolic disorder where a deficiency of the enzyme cytochrome C oxidase affects skeletal muscles, connective tissue, brain and liver.
  • Leukoencephalopathy -- metaphyseal chondrodysplasia: A rare syndrome characterized by brain disease and abnormal skeletal development.
  • Lindsay-Burn syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, psychosis and enlarged testes.
  • Lowe Syndrome: An X linked condition characterized by vitamin D deficiency and causing an oculocerebrorenal syndrome
  • Lowe oculocerebrorenal syndrome: A rare inherited metabolic disorder characterized primarily by eye and bone abnormalities, mental retardation and kidney problems.
  • Macrogyria, pseudobulbar palsy and mental retardation: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal brain development which results in mild mental retardation, epilepsy, developmental delay and pseudobulbar palsy which affects speech, chewing and swallowing functions.
  • Marinesco-Sjogren syndrome: A group of recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by incoordination due to a brain anomaly.
  • Maternally Inherited Leigh Syndrome: A rare condition where Leigh syndrome is inherited from the mother. Leigh syndrome is characterized by degeneration of the brain and impaired function of various organs.
  • Mental Retardation, Joint Hypermobility With or without Metabolic Abnormalities: A rare syndrome observed in a small number of patients and characterized by the association of mental retardation, loose joints. Metabolic abnormalities occur in only some patients.
  • Mental retardation -- short stature -- deafness -- genital: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, short stature, deafness and genital abnormalities.
  • Mental retardation -- spasticity -- ectrodactyly: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, spasticity and a cleft hand. In the reported case, the parents came from the same bloodline.
  • Mental retardation, Smith-Fineman-Myers type: A rare inherited disorder characterized mainly by mental retardation and low facial muscle tone.
  • Mental retardation, X-linked, 94: A rare form of mental retardation inherited in a X-linked manner. It occurs as a result of a defect in the GRIA3 gene on chromosome Xq25-q26.
  • Mescal poisoning: The Mescal is a small rounded cactus which has no spines but has tufts of hairs and a flower in the centre. The plant is grown for use as a narcotic in some parts of the world due to its hallucinogenic effect. All above-ground parts of the plant contain toxic chemicals (mescaline, lophophorine) which can cause symptom if eaten. The plant itself is considered to have a low level of toxicity but the chemical mescaline derived from it can cause strong symptoms if ingested in excessive quantities. The psychic effects following plant ingestion can last from 6 to 12 hours.
  • Metaphyseal chondrodysplasia, recessive type: A recessively inherited skeletal disorder characterized by abnormal development of the bone metaphyses which results in short stature from birth.
  • Methylmalonic aciduria -- microcephaly -- cataract: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by excess methylmalonic acid in the urine, small head and cataracts.
  • Microcephaly -- cervical spine fusion anomalies: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a small head and fused neck vertebrae.
  • Microcephaly -- mental retardation -- retinopathy: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a small head, mental retardation and retinal disease.
  • Microlissencephaly -- micromelia: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by short arms, a brain defect called microlissencephaly, small head and early death.
  • Migraine with or without aura, susceptibility to, 4: A form of migraine caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 14q21.2-q22.3. Physical activity can exacerbate symptoms. The headaches can last between 4 hours and 3 days.
  • Miller Fisher Syndrome: Autoimmune nerve condition.
  • Mitochondrial Parkinson's disease: A form of Parkinson's disease that seems to be linked to mitochondrial defects - mitochondria are the energy-producing components of body cells. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy -- aminoacidopathy: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle and brain disease and an amino acid disorder.
  • Molybdenum, cofactor deficiency, inherited: A rare metabolic disorder characterized by excessive levels of xanthine in the urine. It is caused by a deficiency of the enzymes xanthine dehydrogenase (as in xanthinuria type I) and enzyme aldehyde oxidase (as in xanthinuria type II) as well as sulfite oxidase which are needed to metabolize xanthine. The metabolic abnormality causes severe xanthinuria with neurological symptoms. The condition may be an inherited or acquired (due to certain drug therapies) deficiency.
  • Monosomy 1p36: A rare chromosomal disorder where deletion of a portion of chromosome 1 causes various abnormalities such as heart problems, mental retardation, developmental delay, facial dysmorphism and short stature. The range and severity of symptoms is variable with some cases being relatively mild.
  • Moro's reflex: it is an infantile reflex which is usually present from 34 weeks gestation and lasts unto 4-5 months of age of the infant
  • Motor and Sensory Neuropathy with Sensorineural Hearing Loss, Bouldin type: A rare condition observed in two sibling and characterized by hearing loss during adulthood and motor and sensory neuropathy.
  • Movement symptoms: Changes to movement or motor abilities
  • Multifocal motor neuropathy with conduction block: A very rare disorder involving progressive destruction of the protective sheath around nerves. Usually arms are affected first and occasionally the legs are involved. It is believed to be an immune mediated disorder.
  • Multiple Sclerosis: Autoimmune attack on spinal nerves causing diverse and varying neural problems.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 1: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p21.3.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 2: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10p15.1.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 3: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 5p13.2.
  • Multiple Sclerosis, Susceptibility To, 4: Multiple sclerosis is a nerve or spinal cord disease that causes random damage to parts of the nervous system. The result is a diverse range of possible symptoms depending on which parts of the cord are damaged, and how often the inflammation reoccurs. Typical symptoms are any kind of tingling, numbness, burning sensations, "pins-and-needles" or other types of sensory changes in various parts of the body. Researchers have discovered that some forms of multiple sclerosis are linked to a genetic defect. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 1p36.
  • Muscle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the muscles of the body
  • Muscular dystrophy -- white matter spongiosis: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle problems, seizures and mental retardation.
  • Muscular fibrosis, multifocal -- obstructed vessels: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle problems and immune system anomalies.
  • Musculoskeletal symptoms: Symptoms affecting muscles or bones of the skeleton.
  • Myoclonus: Contraction of a single muscle or muscle groups.
  • Myoclonus in children: Myoclonus in children refers to a child who has sudden jerking or twitching of a muscle or muscles.
  • Myopathy -- ophthalmoplegia -- hypoacousia -- areflexia: A rare disorder characterized mainly by muscle weakness, paralysis of eye muscles, lack of reflexes and partial hearing loss.
  • Myopathy, Mitochonrdrial Progressive, with Congenital Cataract, Hearing Loss and Developmental Delay: A rare condition characterized by muscle disease, congenital cataracts, hearing loss and developmental delay.
  • Myositis ossificans: A very rare progressive disorder involving calcification of muscles, tendons and ligaments.
  • NADH CoQ reductase, deficiency of: A rare genetic defect where an enzyme deficiency (NADH CoQ) disrupts cellular processes and causes various organic acid disorders. Any of a variety of the components of the enzyme may be missing or defective and hence the clinical presentation and severity may vary. Presentation may range from infantile death to various disorders neurodegenerative disorders such as Leigh's disease, Parkinson's disease and cardiomyopathy.
  • Nathalie syndrome: A very rare condition described in four children of one family. The condition is characterized by wasting of the spine muscles, abnormal heart electrical activity, cataracts, hypogonadism and hearing impairment.
  • Navajo neurohepatopathy: A rare genetic disease found in Navajo populations. It involves peripheral nerve degeneration, liver disease and corneal ulcers. The genetic disease is believed to be caused by maternal exposure to uranium from waters contaminated by old mines.
  • Nemaline myopathy, early onset type: A rare inherited muscle disorder and is characterized by muscle weakness caused by the presence of nemalin rods in the muscle tissue which affects its function. The muscle weakness may be severe but is generally not a progressive condition. The main muscles affected are the limbs, neck and face
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neuraminidase deficiency: A rare inherited disorder involving an enzyme (neuraminidase and beta-galactosidase) deficiency which results in a build up of glycoproteins (sialyloligosaccharides) in the urine.
  • Neuroaxonal dystrophy -- renal tubular acidosis: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle and kidney abnormalities.
  • Neuroaxonal dystrophy, infantile: An inherited disorder involving progressive muscular and coordination problems, impaired brain function and speech and vision impairment.
  • Neuronal intranuclear hyaline inclusion disease: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle problems and seizures. The disorder results from the presence of hyaline compounds inside nerve cells.
  • Neuronal intranuclear inclusion disease: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle and nerve degeneration.
  • Neuropathy: A condition which is characterized by a functional disturbance or pathological change in the peripheral nervous system
  • Neuropathy motor sensory type 2 deafness mental retardation: An inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Deafness and mental retardation are also involved.
  • Neuropathy sensory spastic paraplegia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by sensory nerve degeneration and spastic paraplegia. The extremities of the hands and feet have reduced pain sensation and disfiguring ulcers tend to develop.
  • Neuropathy, Hereditary Sensory, Type IV: A rare disorder characterized mainly by insensitivity to pain and inability to sweat.
  • Neuropathy, distal hereditary motor, type VIIA: An inherited neuromuscular disease that causes progressive muscle wasting and weakness in the limbs and vocal cord paralysis. There is no sensory impairment.
  • Neurosyphilis: Syphilis affecting the nervous system.
  • Neurosyphilis -- tabes dorsalis: A complication of untreated syphilis where the infection invades the spinal cord and progressively impairs muscle function and nerve damage may also occur. This form of the condition is progressive and life-threatening.
  • Nipah virus encephalitis: Inflammation of the brain caused by the Nipah virus which can infect pigs and humans so transmission usually occurs through contact with pigs.
  • Non-ketotic hyperglycemia:
  • Nortriptyline toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Oculorenocerebellar syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by eye, kidney and brain abnormalities.
  • Olivopontocerebellar atrophy -- deafness: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by brain abnormalities and deafness.
  • Olivopontocerebellar atrophy I: A disorder where degeneration of certain parts of the brain and spinal cord and results in symptoms such as muscle problems, chorea and speech disturbance.
  • Olivopontocerebellar atrophy type 3: A disorder where degeneration of certain parts of the brain and spinal cord results in symptoms such as blindness, tremor, speech problems and ataxia.
  • Opsoclonus in children: Opsoclonus in children refers to a child who has uncontrolled, irregular eye movements due to a neurological disorder.
  • Optic atrophy -- ophthalmoplegia -- ptosis -- deafness -- myopathy: A rare syndrome characterized by a variety of eye problems, deafness and muscle disease.
  • Optic atrophy, hearing loss and peripheral neuropathy, autosomal recessive: A very rare, recessively inherited syndrome characterized mainly by degeneration of the optic nerve, hearing impairment and peripheral neuropathy. The severity of the symptoms is variable.
  • Oriental Hornet poisoning: The Oriental hornet can deliver a venomous sting which can result in serious and even life-threatening symptoms. Allergies to the venom are also a possible life-threatening consequence. Multiple stings increase the severity of symptoms.
  • Ovarioleukodystrophy: A rare syndrome characterized by ovarian failure and degeneration of the brain white matter which causes mental and motor problems.
  • Paine syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized by a small head, mental and physical retardation and vision and movement problems.
  • Pallidopyramidal syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by pyramidal signs and parkinsonism caused by a degeneration of the pyramidal tract and the part of the brain called the pallidum.
  • Paramyotonia congenita: A rare inherited muscle condition where muscles are difficult to relax following contraction. The main muscles affected are in the face, neck, arms and hands. Repetition of movements makes the muscle stiffness become progressively worse. The condition is not progressive and exposure to cold can trigger symptoms.
  • Parkinson disease 10: A slow progressing form of Parkinson's disease caused by a mutation on chromosome 1p.
  • Parkinson disease 10 (PARK10): Type 10 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 1p32. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 11: A form of Parkinson's disease caused by a mutation on chromosome 2q36-q37.
  • Parkinson disease 11 (PARK11): Type 11 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 2q21.2. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 12: A X-linked form of Parkinson's disease caused by a mutation on chromosome Xq21-q25.
  • Parkinson disease 12 (PARK12): Type 12 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome Xq21-q25. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 13: A form of Parkinson's disease caused by a mutation in the serine protease gene on chromosome 2p12.
  • Parkinson disease 13 (PARK13): Type 13 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 2p12. This form of the condition tends to progress slowly. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 2, autosomal recessive juvenile (PARK2): Type 2 Parkinson disease is juvenile form of the condition and is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 6q25.2-q27. The condition may be inherited in a recessive manner and symptoms tend to be milder following sleep. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 3, autosomal dominant Lewy body (PARK3): Type 3 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 2p13. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 4, autosomal dominant Lewy body (PARK4): Type 4 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 4q21. This form of the condition tends to start around the age of 45 years and progresses rapidly. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 4, autosomal dominant, Lewy body: A form of Parkinson's disease caused by a triplication of the alpha-synuclein gene on chromosome 4q21.
  • Parkinson disease 5 (PARK5): Type 5 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 4p14. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 6, autosomal recessive early-onset (PARK6): Type 6 Parkinson disease is an early-onset form of the condition and is linked to a genetic mutation on the PINK1 gene on chromosome 1p36. The condition may be inherited in a recessive manner and symptoms tend to fluctuate during the day. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 6, autosomal recessive, recessive early-onset: A slow progressing form of Parkinson's disease caused by a mutation in the PINK1 gene on chromosome 1p36.
  • Parkinson disease 7, autosomal recessive early-onset (PARK7): Type 7 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation in the DJ1 gene on chromosome 1p36. This form of the condition tends to start before the age of 40 years and progresses slowly. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 7, autosomal recessive, early-onset: A recessively inherited form of Parkinson's disease caused by a mutation in the DJ1 gene on chromosome 1p36. Disease progression tends to be slow.
  • Parkinson disease 8: A form of Parkinson's disease caused by a mutation in the dardarin gene on chromosome 12q12.
  • Parkinson disease 8 (PARK8): Type 8 Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 1p32. This form of the condition tends to progress slowly. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease 9 (PARK9): Type 9 Parkinson disease is linked to a mutation in the ATP13A2 gene on chromosome 1p36. This condition progresses rapidly and usually starts during the second decade of life. Dementia, eye movement problems and wasting of the brain tissue occur in addition to the typical symptoms of Parkinson's disease. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson disease, familial, type 1 (PARK1): Type 1 familial Parkinson disease is linked to a genetic mutation on chromosome 4q21. Parkinson's disease is a chronic, progressive, degenerative brain disorder characterized by tremors, muscle rigidity and slowed movements.
  • Parkinson's Disease: Degenerative brain condition characterised by tremor.
  • Pathological reflexes: they are abnormal responses to normal stimuli
  • Pathologies of the Achilles tendon related to sports: The Achilles tendon can grow weak and thin with age and lack of use. Then it becomes prone to injury or rupture. Certain illnesses (such as arthritis and diabetes) and medications (such as corticosteroids and some antibiotics) can also increase the risk of pathology.
  • Pena-Shokeir syndrome Type 2: A rare progressive congenital syndrome involving degeneration of the brain and spinal cord and characterized by facial, head, skeletal and muscular abnormalities as well as eye abnormalities.
  • Peroneal tendonitis: Peroneal tendonitis is acute inflammation of the peroneal tendon. It is associated with pain and swelling on the outside of the ankle or heel. The pain is worse during activity and gets better with rest.
  • Phenothiazine antenatal infection: Maternal use of a drug called phenothiazine has not been proven to cause problems in offspring. Animal studies show there is a risk but no definitive studies have been done on humans. Phenothiazine is used to treat mental and emotional disorders such as schizophrenia. The biggest risks are likely to occur during the first trimester (malformations) and towards the end of the pregnancy (poor muscle tone, poor reflexes and jaundice).
  • Pilo dento ungular dysplasia -- microcephaly: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by hair, tooth and nail abnormalities as well as a small head.
  • Polymicrogyria, Bilateral Frontoparietal: Polymicrogyria refers to abnormal brain development where the brain has abnormally smooth gyri (convolutions) on the surface of the brain. In the bilateral frontoparietal form, both sides of the portion of the brain called the frontoparietal region are affected.
  • Polyneuropathy -- mental retardation -- acromicria -- premature menopause: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by premature menopause, sensory impairment, mental retardation and small, delicate facial bones.
  • Polyneuropathy, Hearing Loss, Ataxia, Retinitis Pigmentosa and Cataract: A very rare, recessively inherited condition characterized by the association of vision, hearing and neurological problems. The condition generally starts during the second decade of life and progresses slowly.
  • Polyradiculoneuropathy: An inflammatory disorder that affects the peripheral nerves and the spinal nerve roots. The onset and progression of the disease is variable with severe cases resulting in premature death. The condition is chronic and progressive but periodic relapses can occur.
  • Pompe disease: A rare inherited biochemical disorder where insufficient maltase acid results in accumulation of glycogen. The condition is often fatal in infants, causes mental retardation, hypotonia and a short life in children and progressive muscle weakness in adults. Also called glycogen storage disease type II.
  • Potassium deficiency: A deficiency of potassium in the body
  • Premature chromosome condensation with microcephaly and mental retardation: A genetic disorder characterized mainly by a small head and mental retardation.
  • Primary lateral sclerosis, adult: A rare adult-onset genetic disorder characterized by increasing weakness and stiffness of the limb muscles due to damage to nerve cells that control motor movement.
  • Progressive External Opthhalmoplegia, Autosomal Dominant, 1: A slow progressive paralysis of the motor nerves of the eye (external eye muscles). The condition is often abbreviated to PEO and is caused by a mitochondrial disease called mitochondrial myopathy which affects the muscles which can include the eye muscles. There are a number of different subtypes, each linked to a different genetic defect. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 15q25.
  • Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: A disorder characterized by reduced motor control, dementia and eye movement problems.
  • Progressive muscular atrophy: A condition which is characterized by painless, degenerative myopathies.
  • Progressive spinal muscular atrophy: A group of inherited motor neuron diseases involving progressive muscle weakness and wasting due to degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord. The severity of symptoms and survival varies depending on the particular form of the condition. Death can occur as early as infancy whereas some forms allow survival into adulthood.
  • Protriptyline toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Proximal spinal muscular atrophy: A rare group of muscle disorders which mainly affects the muscles closest to the trunk of the body. Muscles become progressively weak and wasted due to damage to motor neurons in the spinal cord and brainstem.
  • Psoas sign: The occurrence of pain whilst contracting the psoas muscle may indicate an appendicitis the is located posteriorly
  • Ptosis: ptosis is an abnormally low position (drooping) of the upper eyelid
  • Reduced tendon reflexes: Reduced tendon reflexes refers to tendon reflexes that are less reactive than normal.
  • Reflex Abnormality: Any aberrance in normal body tendon reflexes
  • Reflex sympathetic dystrophy: chronic pain conditions
  • Reflex symptoms: Changes to the nerve reflexes
  • Reiterís syndrome: A form of reactive arthritis characterized by arthritis, urethritis, conjunctivitis and skin lesions.
  • Respiratory acidosis: respiratory acidosis is acidosis (abnormally increased acidity of the blood) due to decreased ventilation of the pulmonary alveoli, leading to elevated arterial carbon dioxide concentration
  • Richards-Rundle syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, ataxia, deafness and ketoaciduria.
  • Ritalin overdose: Ritalin is a prescription drug used to treat ADHD. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Robinson syndrome: A very rare condition observed in a West Coast Indian family. The condition is characterized by scoliosis, hearing impairment, ataxia and sensory loss. The severity, rate of progression and age of onset of the neuropathic symptoms was highly variable. Sensory symptoms tend to be most prominent in the hands and feet.
  • Rommen-Mueller-Sybert syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by heart defects, short stature and craniofacial anomalies.
  • Roy-Maroteaux-Kremp syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by skin lesions abnormal bone development and spastic paraplegia.
  • Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome: A rare congenital disorder characterized by very small stature, broad thumbs and toes, slanted palpebral fissures and hypoplastic maxilla.
  • Scapuloperoneal amyotrophy: An inherited disorder characterized by muscle wasting and weakness in the shoulder and lower leg.
  • Schwartz-Jampel Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by myotonia, blepharophimosis and joint limitation.
  • Sea snake poisoning: The Sea snake is a poisonous snake found in the warmer western parts of the Pacific and Indian Ocean. Sea snakes have scales but not gills or fins so they still need to go to the surface of the water to breathe. Sea snake venom is particularly poisonous but their bite fails to achieve any significant envenomation. The venom is toxic to the nervous system and muscles.
  • Seemanova-Lesny syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by spasticity, seizures, absent abdominal reflexes, small head and mental retardation.
  • Serotonin Syndrome: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Serotoninergic syndrome: A disorder involves high levels of serotonin which can result from use of medications such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.
  • Severe infantile axonal neuropathy: A rare disorder involving the early onset of severe neuropathy.
  • Sialidosis type 1 and 3: A rare inherited biochemical disorder involving the deficiency of an enzyme (alpha-N-acetylneuraminidase) which results in the harmful accumulation of certain chemicals (sialyloligosaccharides and sialylglycopeptides) in various body tissues.
  • Skeletal dysplasia -- mental retardation: A rare recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by mental retardation, a small head, arthrogryposis (joint contractures), cleft palate and various other abnormalities.
  • Slow relaxing reflexes: The occurrence of reflexes that are slow and relaxing
  • Slowly Progressive Bokhoror: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Slowly Progressive VE: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. . Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Slowly Progressive Viliuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Slowly Progressive Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Slowly Progressive Vilyuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Slowly Progressive Vilyuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The slowly progressive form is the most common form and it has four phases: acute, recurrent-exacerbative, fully developed and terminal. Initial acute symptoms last for about 2 to 6 weeks.
  • Smith-Fineman-Myers syndrome 1: A rare inherited disorder characterized mainly by mental retardation and low facial muscle tone. The genetic defect occurs on chromosome Xq13.
  • Smith-Magenis Syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by various developmental problems as well as various physical defects primarily affecting the head and the face.
  • Soto's Syndrome: A rare hereditary disorder characterized by excessive growth during the first few years of life as well as various other mental and physical anomalies.
  • Southwestern Athabaskan genetic diseases: A group of four genetic diseases that are unique to the Navajo and Apache (Southwestern Athabaskan) populations. The disease are Athabaskan severe combined immunodeficiency, Navajo neurohepatopathy, Navajo poikiloderma and Athabaskan brainstem dysgenesis.
  • Spastic paraparesis: A rare disorder where parts of the body develop spasticity and weakness. Usually the limbs are involved. The disorder is usually an inherited condition.
  • Spastic paraparesis deafness: A syndrome that is characterized with spastic paraparesis and deafness.
  • Spastic paraplegia -- neuropathy -- poikiloderma: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by progressive stiffness and weakness of the legs, peripheral nerve degeneration and a skin disorder called poikiloderma. The eyelashes and eyebrows are usually gone by the age of three.
  • Spastic paraplegia 11, autosomal recessive: A rare genetic disorder characterized by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower legs as well as mental retardation.
  • Spastic paraplegia 14, autosomal recessive: A rare genetic disorder characterized mainly by lower leg spasticity and mild mental retardation.
  • Spastic paraplegia 2, X-linked: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by lower leg spasticity and weakness. It has an early onset, progresses slowly and eventually the brain becomes involved as well which produces sensory, speech and eye problems.
  • Spastic paraplegia 26, autosomal recessive: A rare genetic disorder characterized mainly by progressive weakness of the lower legs. The condition also involves herniation of spinal discs.
  • Spastic paraplegia 31, autosomal dominant: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by progressive stiffness and increased reflexes in the leg muscles.
  • Spastic paraplegia epilepsy mental retardation: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by epilepsy, mental retardation and progressive leg weakness and spasticity.
  • Spastic paraplegia glaucoma precocious puberty: A rare syndrome characterized by premature puberty, mental retardation, glaucoma and progressive spastic paraplegia.
  • Spastic paraplegia nephritis deafness: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by spastic paraplegia, progressive kidney disease and deafness.
  • Spastic tetraplegic -- cerebral palsy: A rare disorder characterized by the association of spasticity (muscle tightness of the arms and legs as well as cerebral palsy.
  • Spasticity: When there are hypertonic movements of the muscles and they are stiff
  • Spinal Muscular Atrophy: A rare condition characterized by progressive degeneration of the spinal and brainstem motor neurons. During fetal development excess primary neurons are formed. The body automatically destroys the extra primary neurons so that only some survive and mature into neurons. In spinal muscular dystrophy, the process that destroys the excess primary neurons doesn't switch off and continues destroying the neurons resulting in progressive motor problems. Various types of the condition range from mild to severe enough to cause death within a couple of years of birth.
  • Spinal Muscular Atrophy type I: Type of SMA, a genetic motor neuron disease affecting nerves and muscles.
  • Spinal Muscular Atrophy type II: Type of SMA, a genetic motor neuron disease affecting nerves and muscles.
  • Spinal bulbar motor neuropathy: A rare inherited disease that affects the nerves in the spine and in the bulbous (bulbar) part of the brain stem. The main signs are muscle weakness and wasting.
  • Spinal cord injury: spinal cord injury causes myelopathy or damage to white matter or myelinated fiber tracts that carry sensation and motor signals to and from the brain
  • Spinal muscular atrophy type 2: A group of inherited motor neuron diseases involving progressive muscle weakness and wasting due to degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord.
  • Spinal muscular atrophy, Ryukyuan type: A recessively inherited disorder occurring in males from a Japanese inhabitants of Ryukyu Islands. The disorder is characterized by muscle wasting and weakness that affects the lower legs more than the arms.
  • Spinal shock: A state of spinal shock accompanied by temporary paralysis of the lower extremities often associated with spinal injury.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia -- amyotrophy -- deafness: A very rare syndrome characterized by muscle weakness and wasting, ataxia and deafness.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia -- dysmorphism: A rare inherited syndrome characterized by ataxia and unusual facial appearance.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 11: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 15q14-21.3 defect) characterized by gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder). This form of the condition progresses slowly and doesn't affect life expectancy.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 12: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 5q31-q33 defect) characterized by variable symptoms such as arm tremors, gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) with other.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 13: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 19 defect) characterized by progressive mental retardation. Gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) also occur and are symptoms common to all the spinocerebellar ataxia types.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 17: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 6q27 defect) characterized by . Gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) also occur and are symptoms common to all the spinocerebellar ataxia types.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 18: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 7q22-31 defect) characterized by muscle atrophy and sensory loss. The severity of symptoms is variable. Gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) also occur and are symptoms common to all the spinocerebellar ataxia types.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 19: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 1p21-q21 defect) characterized by mild cognitive impairment and myoclonus. Gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) also occur and are symptoms common to all the spinocerebellar ataxia types.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 21: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 7p21.3-p15.1 defect) characterized by extrapyramidal features and cognitive impairment. The condition progresses slowly over decades. Gait ataxia and dysarthria (speech disorder) also occur and are symptoms common to all the spinocerebellar ataxia types.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 22: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome defect) characterized by ataxia, eye movement problems and dysarthria (speech disorder). The condition progresses slowly over decades.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 23: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 20p13-12.3 defect) characterized by ataxia, sensory loss and pyramidal signs. It is a slowly progressing condition.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 25: A rare genetic disorder (chromosome 2p15-p21 defect) characterized by sensory neuropathy and damage to the motor control part of the brain (cerebellar atrophy) resulting in ataxia. It is a slow progressing condition.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 4: An inherited disorder where degeneration of certain parts of the brain and spinal cord results in symptoms such as ataxia, sensory neuropathy and spastic paraplegia.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal dominant: A group of disorder involving slow progressing incoordination and speech and eye movement problems due to degeneration of the cerebellum of the brain. The various forms of the disorder vary according to the degree and range of muscle involvement.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 1: A neurological disorder characterized by progressive ataxia, tremor and muscle weakness and wasting. The rate of progression and severity is variable with some needing wheelchairs in their second decade and others still capable of some walking in their 4th decade.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 4: A rare neurological disorder caused by a genetic defect (chromosome 1p36, recessive) and resulting in ataxia and eye movement problems.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive, with axonal neuropathy: A rare neurological disorder caused by a genetic defect (chromosome 114q31-q32, recessive) and resulting in ataxia and dysarthria.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia-dysmorphism syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by characteristic facial anomalies, ataxia, delayed psychomotor development and various skeletal deformities.
  • Sports related tendonitis: Tendonitis injuries are common in the upper and lower limbs (including the rotator cuff attachments), and are less common in the hips and torso.
  • Stroke symptoms: Brain-related symptoms of bleeding or blockage.
  • Sturge-Weber Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by excessive blood vessel growth, calcium accumulation inside the brain and seizures.
  • Subarachnoid haemorrhage: A condition which is characterized by haemorrhage of blood into the subarachnoid space
  • Subarachnoid hemorrhage: subarachnoid hemorrhage is bleeding in the area between the brain and the thin tissues that cover the brain. This area is called the subarachnoid space
  • Sucking reflex diminished: is an infant reflex which is present at birth
  • Sudden loss of corneal reflex: Sudden loss of corneal reflex is a quick onset of a lack of a normal blink reflex.
  • Sudden onset of Achilles tendonitis:
  • Sudden onset of ankle clonus: Sudden onset of ankle clonus is the rapid development of involuntary ankle muscle contractions and relaxations when trying to keep those muscles stretched.
  • Sudden onset of extensor tendonitis:
  • Sudden onset of hyperreflexia of the lower limbs: Sudden onset of hyperreflexia of the lower limbs refers to the rapid development of overactive reflexes in the legs.
  • Sudden onset of increased deep tendon reflexes in the lower limbs: Sudden onset of increased deep tendon reflexes in the lower limbs is the rapid development of over-reactive deep tendon reflexes.
  • Sudden onset of peroneal tendonitis:
  • Symmetrical deep tendon reflexes: Symmetrical deep tendon reflexes is a condition in which the deep tendon reflexes are equal on both sides of the body.
  • Syncope: Loss or interruption of consciousness.
  • Tang Hsi Ryu syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by enlarged liver and spleen, increased pigmentation and abnormal peripheral nerve functioning.
  • Tendinitis: a painful inflammation of a tendon
  • Tendon bleeding: Bleeding that occurs in the tendinous areas of the body.
  • Tendon blister: Blisters that occur in the tendinous areas of the body.
  • Tendon bruise: Bruising of the connective tissue of the body.
  • Tendon burning sensation: Burning sensation felt in the connective tissue of the body.
  • Tendon coldness: Abnormal sensations of coldness felt in the connective tissue of the body.
  • Tendon deformity: Malformations or distortion of the connective tissue of the body.
  • Tendon infection: Infection of the connective tissue of the body.
  • Tendon itch: Itching sensation due to inflammation of the connective tissue of the body.
  • Tendon numb: Abnormal sensation in the connective tissue of the body.
  • Tendon pain: Pain due to inflammation of the connective tissue of the body.
  • Tendon rash: Rash that occurs in the tendinous areas of the body.
  • Tendon redness: Erythema due to inflammation of the connective tissue of the body.
  • Tendon sensitive: Abnormal sensitivity to external stimuli of the connective tissue of the body.
  • Tendon spasm: Involuntary muscle contractions that occur in the tendinous areas of the body.
  • Tendon stiff: Stiffness of the connective tissue of the body.
  • Tendon swelling: Swelling due to inflammation of the connective tissue of the body.
  • Tendon tingling: Abnormal sensations of the connective tissue of the body.
  • Tendon weakness: Weakness of the connective tissue of the body.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Tendon symptoms:

The following list of conditions have 'Tendon symptoms' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Tendon symptoms:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Tendon symptoms' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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