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Symptoms » Urinary problems » Glossary
 

Glossary for Urinary problems

Medical terms related to Urinary problems or mentioned in this section include:

  • Abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the abdomen or digestive tract
  • Abnormal enlargement of bladder: rapid increase in the size of the urinary bladder
  • Abnormal vaginal discharge: Abnormal vaginal discharge includes any type of discharge from the vagina that is not expected or typical, is heavier than usual, is bloody, is more watery than usual, and/or has an unusual smell.
  • Abnormally decreased urination: known as oliguria
  • Abuse dwarfism syndrome: Retarded growth, intelligence and social behavior due to child abuse. The child abuse can take the form of mental or physical cruelty or neglect.
  • Acanthocytosis: A rare disorder where most of the red blood cells are abnormal with spiny projections due to lipid abnormalities. The blood abnormality is seen in conditions such as abetalipoproteinemia, severe liver disease and severe malnutrition. Symptoms and prognosis depend on the underlying disorder.
  • Accelerated hypertension: Accelerated hypertension is a condition characterized by a rapid increase in blood pressure. The condition is a medical emergency which can cause organ damage if not treated promptly.
  • Aceruloplasminemia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a lack of the protein ceruloplasmin in the blood resulting in a buildup of iron in the liver, brain and pancreas. This in turn causes diabetes and degeneration of the neural system causing tremors and walking abnormalities.
  • Acid-Base Imbalance: A disruption to the normal acid-base equilibrium in the body. There are four main groups of disorder involving an acid-base imbalance: respiratory acidosis or alkalosis and metabolic acidosis or alkalosis. Obviously the severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of imbalance.
  • Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease: Kidney disease causing kidney cysts.
  • Acquired angioedema: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative or autoimmune disorders which result in the dysfunction of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Acquired angioedema, type 1: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders which affects the function of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Acquired angioedema, type 2: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. Type 2 is an autoimmune disorder where patients develop autoantibodies which destroy the function of C1 esterase inhibitor.
  • Acute (or transient) urinary incontinence: Acute (or Transient) Incontinence is caused by a new or recent medical problem that can be treated.
  • Acute diarrhoea: A sudden onset of diarrhoea
  • Acute erythroleukemia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal blood cells (erythroblastic precursors) in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute intermittent porphyria: A rare inherited metabolic disorder caused by a disturbed porphyrin metabolism resulting in increased production of porphyrin or its precursors. Symptoms include abdominal pain, photosensitivity and neurological disturbances such as seizures, coma, hallucinations and respiratory paralysis.
  • Acute kidney failure: The sudden and acute loss of kidney function
  • Acute leukaemia of ambiguous lineage: A term used to describe a type of leukemia (a blood cancer) where the leukemic cells cannot be determined as myeloid or lymphoid or where both types of cells are present.
  • Acute megacaryoblastic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. More specifically, it involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes).
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 1: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of immature blood cells (blast cells).
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 2: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 3: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 3 involves the proliferation of promyelocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 4: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 4 involves the rapid proliferation of myelocytes and monocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 5: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 5 involves the rapid proliferation of monoblasts (immature precursors of monocytes) in particular.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 7: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 7 involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes) in particular.
  • Acute myelocytic leukemia: A malignant cancer of blood-forming tissues resulting in a high number of immature leukocytes. Symptoms include soft bleeding gums, anemia, fatigue, fever, dyspnea, moderate splenomegaly, joint and bone pains and frequent infections. Also called acute granulocytic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, myeloid leukemia, splenomedullary leukemia, splenomyelogenous leukemia.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to alkylating agent: The use of alkylating agents to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to topoisomerase type II inhibitor: The use of topoisomerase type II inhibitors to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, therapy related: Certain cancer therapies can result in the development of leukemia in some patients. These therapies includes topoisomerase type II inhibitors and alkylating agents.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia, adult: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute non lymphoblastic leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets. It is one of the most common forms of leukemia in adults but can occur in children.
  • Acute promyelocytic leukemia: A rare bone marrow cancer characterized by a lack of mature blood cells and excessive amounts of immature blood cells (promyelocytes).
  • Acute prostate-related urinary dribbling: weak urinary stream
  • Acute prostate-related urinary symptoms: Symptoms include urinary frequency, urgency, urgency incontinence, voiding at night (nocturia), weak urinary stream, hesitency (needing to wait for the stream to begin), intermittency (when the stream starts and stops intermittently), straining to void, dysuria (burning sensation in the urethra), and dribbling
  • Acute prostate-related weak urinary stream: weak urinary stream
  • Acute prostatitis: An acute condition which affects the prostate which is the result of infammation
  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome, Infant: A breathing disorder that occurs in infants. The underdeveloped lungs fail to functioning adequately and the body becomes deprived of oxygen. The condition is more likely to affect premature infants and the greater the prematurity, the greater the risk.
  • Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency: A rare genetic disorder where an enzyme (2, 8-dihydroxyadenine) deficiency results in urinary tract stone formation.
  • Adenocarcinoma, Clear Cell: A type of cancer that occurs mainly in the genitourinary tract and the cells that make up the tumor are clear. It is very rare and most cases occur in females whose mothers used a drug called DES (synthetic estrogen) while pregnant.
  • Adenosarcoma of the uterus: A tumor that develops from the glands that line the uterus.
  • Adrenal Cancer: A malignant cancer that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids. Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms: A tumor that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids.
  • Adrenal adenoma, familial: A benign tumor that develops in the adrenal gland and tends to run in families. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids . Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal gland hyperfunction: Excessive activity of the adrenal gland which causes excessive production of one or more adrenal hormones (aldosterone, corticosteroids, androgenic steroids, epinephrine and norepinephrine). The increased adrenal gland activity may be caused by an adrenal gland tumor or by excessive stimulation of the gland. Pituitary hormones stimulate adrenal gland activity.
  • Adrenal incidentaloma: A tumor of the adrenal gland that is discovered incidentally while performing an imaging examination for reasons other than an adrenal tumor. The tumor may be asymptomatic or can causes excessive secretion of adrenal hormones and resulting symptoms. The tumor may also be malignant or benign.
  • Adrenocortical carcinoma: A condition which is characterized by malignancy which affects the adrenocortex.
  • Adult-onset Renal Failure: A progressive kidney disease characterized by the presence of high blood pressure.
  • Alkaptonuria: A rare inherited metabolic disease characterized by homogentisic aciduria, arthritis and ochronosis. Symptoms include darkening of urine, alkinization due to overproduction of homogentisic acid, arthritis in the large joints and black ochronotic pigmentation of cartilage and collagen tissue. However, many of these symptoms may not occur until middle age. The condition may also be caused by chronic phenol poisoning.
  • Allergic tension-fatigue syndrome: Variable symptoms caused by food allergy.
  • Aloe poisoning: Aleo vera is often used on the skin to treat such things as burns and dermatitis. The sap from the leaves contain a chemical called anthraquinone glycoside which can cause skin irritation in susceptible people but can also cause poisoning symptoms.
  • Alpha thalassemia: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Alpha thalassemia involves defects in one or more of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The main symptom is anemia, the severity of which can vary amongst patients depending on how many defective genes are involved.
  • Alpha thalassemia -- Hemoglobin H disease: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Hemoglobin H disease involves defects in three of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The main symptom is moderate to severe anemia.
  • Alpha thalassemia major: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Alpha thalassemia major is very rare involves defects in all of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The condition leads to infant death before or soon after birth.
  • Alport Syndrome: A rare hereditary disorder involving the progressive deterioration of parts of the kidney resulting in chronic kidney disease.
  • Alport syndrome -- mental retardation -- midface hypoplasia -- elliptocytosis: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of Alport syndrome, mental retardation, underdeveloped midface and a blood abnormality (elliptocytosis). Alport syndrome is an inherited condition involving progressive kidney damage and hearing loss.
  • Alport syndrome with macrothrombocytopenia: A rare inherited syndrome characterized by progressive kidney damage and hearing loss as well as macrothrombocytopenia.
  • Alport syndrome, dominant type: A rare syndrome characterized by kidney problems and hearing loss. The condition is inherited as a dominant trait.
  • Alport syndrome, recessive type: A rare syndrome characterized by kidney problems and hearing loss. The condition is inherited as a recessive trait.
  • Alsing syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by kidney problems, skeletal abnormalities and a hole in the coloboma of the eye.
  • Altered bladder habits: causes of retention
  • Altered bladder habits in pregnancy: Altered bladder habits in pregnancy are normal and consist of nocturia and frequency of micturition.
  • Amelogenesis Imperfeca, Hypoplastic, and Nephrocalcinosis: A rare disorder involving abnormal tooth development and kidney problems.
  • Aminoaciduria: Increased amino acid levels in the urine which could indicate inborn metabolic disorders which may be caused by deficiencies in certain enzymes e.g. cystinuria.
  • Amitriptyline toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Ammonia-smelling urine: Ammonia-smelling urine refers to urine with an odor of ammonia.
  • Ammonia-smelling urine in children: Ammonia-smelling urine in children is urine with an abnormal smell of ammonia, often indicating a urinary tract infection in children.
  • Amoxapine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Amyloidosis: A disease characterized by the accumulation of insoluble amyloid protein in tissues and organs which in turn affects the functioning of these tissues and organs.
  • Amyloidosis, familial visceral: A rare genetic disorder involving widespread amyloidosis (abnormal buildup of amyloid protein in tissues) which tends the affect the kidneys severely.
  • Anaesthesia complications: Complications that occur due to anaesthesia
  • Analgesic nephropathy syndrome: Kidney damage caused by excessive use of pain-killing drugs. Aspirin and phenacetin mixtures are the most common causes.
  • Andrade's syndrome: An inherited condition characterized by deposits of an abnormal protein called amyloid in various parts of the body including organs. The condition mainly involves neurological symptoms.
  • Anemic -- hematuria syndrome: An epidemic disease in Argentina which has a prolonged recovery time but usually there are no complications. Symptoms vary between seasons so that affected patients suffer anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea and dehydration in summer but suffer reduced urination, excess blood, albumin and renal casts in the urine. Other symptoms occur irrespective of the season.
  • Angiopathy, hereditary, with nephropathy, aneurysms and muscle cramps: An inherited disorder characterized by kidney disease, aneurysms, blood vessel disease and muscle cramps which can last from seconds to minutes.
  • Anorexia Nervosa: A disorder where a distorted sense of body image leads to self-starvation to the point of death in some cases.
  • Antepartum Eclampsia: Antepartum eclampsia is the development of seizures or coma in pregnant women suffering from high blood pressure. Antepartum means that it occurs before delivery. Eclampsia is a serious condition which requires urgent medical treatment. Eclampsia may be associated with moderate as well as significant increases in blood pressure. The blood pressure can return to normal after delivery or may persist for a period of time.
  • Anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody-mediated disease: A kidney disorder involving varying degrees of kidney impairment. Severe cases lead to kidney failure whereas mild cases have normal kidney function.
  • Anuria: Anuria is a lack of urine.
  • Anxiety disorder: A mental condition that is characterized by anxiety and avoidance behaviours
  • Aortic arches defect: A defect in the top part of the aorta (aortic arch) that consists of several arterial branches. There is a variety of defects that can occur and symptoms will be determined by the particular defect involved. Possible types of defects includes aortic coarctation and aortic arch hypoplasia.
  • Aplastic anemia: A blood disorder where the bone marrow produces insufficient new blood cells.
  • Apparent Mineralocorticoid Excess, type 2: A form of inherited high blood pressure that starts during early childhood. The condition is caused by a genetic defect which results in an inborn error of metabolism of peripheral cortisol. Type 2 causes similar symptoms to type 1 but the urinary steroid levels are different.
  • Apparent mineralocorticoid excess: A form of inherited high blood pressure that starts during early childhood. The condition results from a genetic defect which causes impaired metabolism of cortisol.
  • Arachnodactyly -- ataxia -- cataract -- aminoaciduria -- mental retardation: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by congenital cataracts, ataxia, mental retardation, abnormal amino acid metabolism and long, thin fingers.
  • Argentinean hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease caused by the Junin virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (usually the corn mouse) urine, feces or saliva. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks. The disease is most common in rural workers in Argentina.
  • Aristolochic Acid poisoning: Aristolochic acid is derived from a forest herb from the Aristocholochia family. It is often used in herbal preparations such as Aristolochia Fang Ch, Bragantia and Asarum. It is usually used in herbal preparations to promote weight loss. The substance is believed to cause kidney failure and urinary tract cancer.
  • Arnold-Chiari Malformation (Type 1): A rare malformation where the base of the brain enters into the upper spinal canal.
  • Ataxia, spastic, 3, autosomal recessive: A recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by spasticity and ataxia.
  • Atherosclerosis, premature -- deafness -- diabetes mellitus -- photomyoclonus -- nephropathy -- degenerative neurologic disease: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by deafness, diabetes, epilepsy, kidney disease and premature hardening of the arteries.
  • Aureobasidium pullulans exposure: Aureobasidium pullulans is a species of fungus which is capable of causing a variety of diseases in humans. The fungus is most often found in damp places either inside the home or in the environment. It is often pinkish or blackish. It is a rare cause of disease and is more likely to occur in immunosuppressed patients. It can cause infection in just about any part of the body depending on the nature of the exposure (inhalation, wound, ingestion etc.) and as such the type and severity of symptoms can vary considerably.
  • Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by an abnormal immune system response which leads to the destruction of red blood cells and hence anemia. The severity of the condition varies depending on the underlying cause e.g. cytomegalovirus, hepatitis, HIV and lupus. The condition may develop gradually or occur suddenly and cause serious symptoms.
  • Autoimmune Hepatitis: Liver inflammation caused due to autoimmune processes where the body's immune system attacks the liver.
  • Autoimmune Myelopathy: A disturbance functionally or pathological change in the spinal cord
  • Autoimmune Thrombocytopenia: Autoimmune disorder causing a lack of blood platelets.
  • Autoimmune oophoritis: An autoimmune condition where the body's own immune system attacks the ovaries and causes them to become inflamed. It can lead to ovarian function stopping prematurely.
  • Autoimmune orchitis: A inflammation of the testicles caused by an autoimmune reaction
  • Autonomic neuropathy: A condition which is characterized by a functional disturbance or pathological change in the autonomic nervous system
  • Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease: Severe form of PKD, a genetic kidney disease.
  • Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: Genetic kidney disease causing kidney cysts.
  • Azotemia, familial: A rare condition where high serum urea level is inherited in a familial pattern. The high level of urea occurs despite normal kidney function.
  • BEEC: A rare syndrome characterized by a birth defect where the bladder is inside out and protrudes from the lower abdominal wall. The urethra and genitals are also abnormally formed. The degree of malformation is variable.
  • Back Impairment: An impairment of the function of the back
  • Back conditions: A group of conditions that affect the back
  • Back tumour: The presence of tumour growth in the vertebra, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast.
  • Bacterial endocarditis: Infection and inflammation of the inner layers of the heart, most commonly the valves cause by bacteria.
  • Balanitis xerotica obliterans: A chronic, progressive skin condition involving sclerosis and atrophic processes of the penis.
  • Baneberry poisoning: Baneberries are toxic and can cause a skin reaction on contact or various poisoning symptoms.
  • Barraquer-Simons syndrome: A rare disorder that occurs in children and involves the progressive loss of fat layers under the skin which affects the face first and then spreads to the chest region and limbs.
  • Bartter Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder of kidney metabolism characterized by reduced blood acidity and low potassium levels.
  • Bartter Syndrome type 4: Bartter syndrome is a rare disorder where abnormal kidney metabolism results in low blood acidity an potassium levels. Type 4 also involves sensorineural deafness.
  • Bartter Syndrome type 4A: Bartter syndrome is a rare disorder where abnormal kidney metabolism results in low blood acidity an potassium levels. Type 4A also involves sensorineural deafness.
  • Bartter Syndrome type 4B: Bartter syndrome is a rare disorder where abnormal kidney metabolism results in low blood acidity an potassium levels. Type 4B also involves sensorineural deafness.
  • Bartter's syndrome, antenatal type 1: A rare genetic kidney disorder that causes hypokalemia. A defect in the NKCC2 gene impairs the functioning of the Na-Cl cotransporter and leads to electrolyte imbalance. The rate of death is high prior to diagnosis.
  • Bartter's syndrome, type 3: A rare condition characterized by an electrolyte imbalance caused by mutations of the chloride channel gene (ClCNKb). It differs from Bartter's syndrome type I and type II in the absence of nephrocalcinosis. The severity of the condition is greatly variable.
  • Bartters syndrome, antenatal , type 2: A rare genetic kidney disorder that causes hypokalemia. A defect in the ROMK gene impairs the ATP-regulated potassium channel functioning and leads to electrolyte imbalance.
  • Basal ganglia calcification, idiopathic 1: Abnormal calcium deposits in the part of the brain called the basal ganglia. Type 1 results in psychiatric, cognitive or neurological problems associated with the calcification. The symptoms experienced are variable.
  • Bedwetting in children: Bedwetting in children is the inability to control urination during sleep in a child who is old enough to be toilet trained.
  • Bence Jones Proteins: The presence of free light chains in the urine
  • Bence jones protein: Bence Jones protein is a type of abnormal protein that may be found in the urine associated with certain conditions and diseases that produce high levels of protein in the urine.
  • Benign Prostate Hyperplasia: Non-cancerous prostrate enlargement common with aging
  • Benign familial hematuria: A rare inherited kidney disorder characterized by periods of blood in the urine. The kidney is still able to function normally.
  • Besnier-Boeck-Schaumann disease: A rare disease where inflammatory granular nodules form in various organs.
  • Beta Thalassemia intermedia: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. There are two subtypes of the disorder (alpha and beta) depending on what portion of the hemoglobin is abnormally synthesized. Beta Thalassemia intermedia involves defects in both of the two genes required to make each ? protein chain. The condition causes varying degrees of moderate anemia.
  • Beta thalassemia: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Beta thalassemia involves defects in one or more of the two genes required to make each ? protein chain. The main symptom is anemia, the severity of which can vary amongst patients depending on how many defective genes are involved.
  • Bile acid synthesis defect, congenital, 2: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease. The defect is a deficiency of a particular enzyme (cholestasis with delta(4)-3-oxosteroid 5-beta-reductase) needed to make bile acid.
  • Bile acid synthesis defect, congenital, 4: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease.
  • Bile acid synthesis defects: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease.
  • Bile acid synthesis defects, congenital, 1: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease. The defect is a deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-beta-hydroxy-delta-5-C27-steroid oxidoreductase) needed to make bile acid.
  • Bile acid synthesis defects, congenital, 2: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease. The defect is a deficiency of a particular enzyme (cholestasis with delta(4)-3-oxosteroid 5-beta-reductase) needed to make bile acid.
  • Bile acid synthesis defects, congenital, 3: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease. The defect involved a deficiency of 7-alpha-hydroxylase which is an enzyme needed to prevent the accumulation of 27-hydroxycholesterol which is toxic to the liver.
  • Bile acid synthesis defects, congenital, 4: A defect which prevents the body from making bile acid which results in progressive liver disease.
  • Bile duct cysts: The formation of a cyst (dilation or swelling) in the bile duct which can obstruct the flow of bile and result in jaundice.
  • Biliary Atresia: A rare condition that can affect newborns where the bile duct that carries the bile from the liver to the small intestine is blocked or missing.
  • Biliary atresia, intrahepatic, syndromic form: Congenital obstruction of the passages in the liver that carry bile. The syndromic form is associated with other congenital abnormalities such as heart and visceral defects.
  • Biliary hypoplasia: An underdeveloped biliary duct system which is involved in transporting bile. The bile ductules may be completely absent or be fewer in number than normal.
  • Biliary tract cancer: Cancer that develops in the gallbladder or bile ducts.
  • Binswanger Disease: Multi-infarct dementia, caused by damage to deep white matter.
  • Binswanger's Disease: A type of senile dementia characterized by chronic cerebrovascular disease.
  • Birth control pill poisoning: Birth control pill contain hormones such as estrogen and progestin and excessive ingestion of the pills can result in relatively minor symptoms - usually there are no serious problems associated with the ingested of many birth control pills at one time. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Birth symptoms: Symptoms related to childbirth.
  • Black urine in children: Black urine in children refers to urine that is black in color in children.
  • Black widow spider envenomation: The black widow spider bite is toxic to the nerves and can cause serious symptoms. The black widow spider is most commonly found in North America.
  • Bladder burning sensation: Burning urination pain due to inflammatory bladder conditions.
  • Bladder cancer: Bladder cancer refers to any of several types of malignant growths of the urinary bladder. It is a disease in which abnormal cells multiply without control in the bladder.
  • Bladder conditions: Any condition affecting the bladder
  • Bladder distention: A condition which is characterized by anatomical distention of ones bladder
  • Bladder diverticulum: A defect where a part of the bladder lining forms a pouch in the muscle wall of the bladder. The defect may be congenital or acquired through conditions such as infection and urinary tract obstruction. The size of the diverticulum will determine the severity of the disorder with mild cases being asymptomatic.
  • Bladder fullness: distension of the lower central portion of the abdomen
  • Bladder immaturity syndrome: Urinary incontinence that occurs in young girls. Urine leakage can occur during the day or night and can sometimes be due to urinary tract infection.
  • Bladder incontinence: The inability to control ones bladder function
  • Bladder infection: Infection of the bladder.
  • Bladder infections: The occurrence of bacterial or other infections of the bladder
  • Bladder infections in pregnancy: Bladder infections in pregnancy cause pain in the suprapubic area, burning pain with micturition, urinary frequency, and are sometimes associated with pyelonephritis.
  • Bladder inflammation: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the epithelial lining of the bladder
  • Bladder lump: Irregular small swelling in the bladder.
  • Bladder obstruction: Bladder obstruction can be acute or chronic.
  • Bladder pain: Pain affecting the bladder
  • Bladder pain in pregnancy: Bladder pain in pregnancy is usually caused by a urinary tract infection.
  • Bladder papilloma: Benign tumor in the bladder
  • Bladder redness: Erythematous inflammation of the urinary bladder due to infection.
  • Bladder swelling: Bladder swelling can be acute or chronic in nature.
  • Bladder symptoms: Symptoms related to the bladder and urination.
  • Bladder symptoms in pregnancy: Bladder symptoms in pregnancy are usually represented by pain in the suprapubic area, burning pain with micturition, urinary frequency, and are sometimes associated with pyelonephritis.
  • Bladder ulcer: Break in the continuity of the lining mucous membrane of the bladder.
  • Bladder weakness: Weakness in the detrusor muscle contractility.
  • Blood in urine: Hematuria is blood in the urine.
  • Blood in urine in children: Blood in urine in children is a condition in which there is visible blood or microscopic blood in the urine of a child.
  • Bloody diarrhea: Diarrhea with blood in stool
  • Bloody vaginal discharge: discharge from the vagina other than normal menstruation
  • Blue Diaper Syndrome: A rare metabolic disorder characterized by vision problems, bluish urine, fever and digestive anomalies.
  • Blue urine: Blue coloration of the urine
  • Blue urine in children: Blue urine in children is a condition in which the urine is blue.
  • Boichis syndrome: A rare syndrome involving nephronophthisis (progressive destruction of kidney tissue) from birth which leads to kidney failure and liver fibrosis.
  • Bolivian hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease that occurs in Bolivia and is caused by the Machupo virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (Calomys callosus) droppings. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks.
  • Botulism food poisoning: Extremely dangerous food poisoning requiring medical attention, but not always recognized because of its non-abdominal symptoms.
  • Bowel incontinence: Loss of full control of the bowel
  • Brewery urine odor in children: Brewery urine odor in children refers to an abnormal brewery type smell of a child's urine.
  • Breynia officinalis poisoning: Ingestion of the Breynia officinalis plant can cause irritation to mucosal linings and liver problems. The plant is often used as a herbal drug (Chi R Yun) to treat such things as poor growth, heart failure and venereal disease.
  • Bright's Disease: A condition where the parts of the kidneys that are responsible for filtering become inflamed and results in blood and proteins accidentally leaking into the urine. The condition can occur after certain infections and serious kidney dysfunction can result in severe or chronic complications.
  • Brown Recluse spider poisoning: The Brown Recluse spider is poisonous and is found mainly in southern and central areas of the US.
  • Brown snake poisoning: The Brown snake is a poisonous Australian snake. They are considered one of the most venomous snakes in the world and their bite can result in death without prompt medical attention. The snake venom contains toxins which affect the blood and nerve systems. Children tend to suffer more severe symptoms due to their smaller body size.
  • Brown urine: The occurrence of brown urine
  • Burning during urination: The experience of burning sensation when urinating
  • Burning during urination in pregnancy: Burning during urination refers to discomfort when urinating in a woman who is pregnant.
  • Burning micturition: Burning micturition is an uncomfortable or painful burning sensation in the urethra while urinating.
  • Burning micturition in males: Burning micturition in males is a condition in which a male experiences an uncomfortable or painful burning sensation in the urethra while urinating.
  • Burning on urination in female children: Burning on urination in female children occurs when a girl experiences stinging or burning pain when urinating.
  • Burning on urination in male children: Burning on urination in male children occurs when a boy experiences stinging or burning pain when urinating.
  • Burning urination in female children: Burning urination in female children is a condition in which a girl experiences burning in the urethra while urinating.
  • Burning urination in male children: Burning urination in male children refers to a boy who experiences burning in the urethra while urinating.
  • Burning urination in pregnancy: Burning urination in pregnancy is a condition in which a pregnant woman has burning in the urethra while urinating.
  • Burning when urinating: burning micturition is a classical presentation of infection
  • Burning when you urinate: burning micturition is a classical presentation of infection
  • Byler Disease: A rare inherited conditions where bile is unable to drain from the liver where it builds up and causes progressive liver damage. The conditions has an early onset and usually leads to end-stage liver disease by the end of the second decade.
  • Bywaters' syndrome: A trauma or accident involving the crushing of soft tissues and associated symptoms. Severe cases can result in death.
  • C1esterase deficiency: C1esterase deficiency is a condition characterized by swelling under the skin or mucosal tissue - the skin, respiratory tract or gastrointestinal tract may be affected. The condition may be inherited or acquired. Symptoms tend to develop over a few days and then abate after two to five days. Swelling attacks may occur fairly regularly e.g. weekly or sporadically e.g. once or twice a year.
  • CDG syndrome type I: A rare genetic disorder where the body is unable to synthesize glycoproteins which results in multisystem problems.
  • Calcification of basal ganglia with or without hypocalcemia: Calcification of a part of the brain called the basal ganglia. That calcification may be associated with conditions such as hypothyroidism, cytomegalovirus, and AIDS or may occur for no apparent reason. The severity of the condition may vary greatly from asymptomatic to neurological, psychiatric and movement disorders. The disorder may also progress at variable rates or remain stable depending on the underlying disease process.
  • Campylobacter fetus infection: Campylobacter fetus is a food borne bacterial infection which may vary in severity from mild to severe. The bacteria are opportunistic and mainly affect debilitated patients but can also occur in healthy patients. Abortion due to blood infection in the fetus can occur in pregnant women who become infected. The infection is less likely to cause gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhea than other Campylobacter infections but is prone to causing infection in other parts of the body such as the appendix, abdominal cavity, central nervous system (meningitis), gallbladder, urinary tract and blood stream. Cattle and sheep are the main source of this bacteria.
  • Campylobacter jejuni infection: Campylobacter jejuni infection is a common food borne bacterial infection which may vary in severity from mild to severe. Death can occur in severe cases but tends to occur in patients with other existing illnesses such as HIV, cancer or liver disease. The infection can in rare cause infection in other parts of the body such as the appendix, abdominal cavity, central nervous system (meningitis), gallbladder, urinary tract and blood stream. Undercooked chicken is the main source of infection.
  • Cancer: Abnormal overgrowth of body cells.
  • Caramel urine odor in children: Caramel urine odor in children is a condition in which the urine has an abnormal caramel smell.
  • Cardiomyopathy, Alcoholic: A weakened heart mucle due to excessive alcohol consumption. Symptoms are usually not evident until the heart becomes severely damaged.
  • Carnitine Palmitoyl Transferase II Deficiency: A very rare inherited deficiency of a particular enzyme (Carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1) prevents fatty acids being transported to the part of the cell that converts it to energy. There are two main subtypes of the disorder with each involving a slightly different form of the enzyme. Type I can be readily managed through diet. Type II has three subtypes: the myopathic form affects mainly the muscles; the hepatocardiomuscular form affects the liver and heart muscle; and the lethal neonatal form affects muscles and organs and usually results in death during the first year of life.
  • Carnitine palmitoyl transferase 2 deficiency: A very rare inherited deficiency of a particular enzyme (Carnitine palmitoyl transferase) which prevents fatty acids being transported to the part of the cell that converts it to energy. There are two main subtypes of the disorder with each involving a slightly different form of the enzyme. Type I can be readily managed through diet. Type II has three subtypes: the myopathic form affects mainly the muscles; the hepatocardiomuscular form affects the liver and heart muscle; and the lethal neonatal form affects muscles and organs and usually results in death during the first year of life.
  • Carnitine palmitoyl transferase II deficiency, infantile hepatocardiomuscular type: A very rare metabolic disorder where deficiency of a particular enzyme (CPT II) prevents muscle fats being converted to energy. The infantile form of this disease affects the muscles and the liver and heart.
  • Carnitine palmitoyl transferase II deficiency, lethal neonatal form: A very rare metabolic disorder where deficiency of a particular enzyme (CPT II) prevents muscle fats being converted to energy. The lethal neonatal form affects various organs as well as the muscles and death usually occurs during the first year of life.
  • Carnitine palmitoyl transferase II deficiency, myopathic: A very rare metabolic disorder where deficiency of a particular enzyme (CPT II) prevents muscle fats being converted to energy. Prolonged exercise can cause an episode of muscle symptoms. The myopathic form of the condition is the least severe and tends to affect only the muscles.
  • Carnitine palmitoyl transferase deficiency: A very rare inherited deficiency of a particular enzyme (Carnitine palmitoyl transferase) which prevents fatty acids being transported to the part of the cell that converts it to energy. There are two main subtypes of the disorder with each involving a slightly different form of the enzyme. Type I can be readily managed through diet. Type II has three subtypes: the myopathic form affects mainly the muscles; the hepatocardiomuscular form affects the liver and heart muscle; and the lethal neonatal form affects muscles and organs and usually results in death during the first year of life.
  • Cast syndrome: Obstruction of the third part of the duodenum by an artery following the use of a body plaster cast or a Bradford frame.
  • Catastrophic Antiphospholipid Syndrome: A very rare disorder where the blood clotting system becomes dysfunctional and clots too easily due to the abnormal presence of antphospholipid antibodies. It results in blood flow blockages to various body organs. It is possible that the condition has autoimmune origins. The disorder is often triggered by infections, certain drugs (e.g. anticoagulants), minor surgery and hysterectomy.
  • Caterpillar complication poisoning: The spines on certain caterpillars can cause a skin reaction as well as systemic symptoms if ingested. The nature of the symptoms vary depending on the species of caterpillar involved. Some only produce skin reactions whereas others can produce systemic symptoms.
  • Caterpillar-induced bleeding syndrome: Caterpillars from the Lonomia genus have spines along their body which can penetrate human skin and cause blood coagulation problems. The severity of the symptoms vary depending on the degree of envenomation but serious cases can result in death.
  • Caterpillar-induced bleeding syndrome -- Lonomia achelous: Lonomia achelous caterpillars are native to Northern Brazil and Venezuela. They have spines along their body which can penetrate human skin and cause blood coagulation problems. The severity of the symptoms vary depending on the degree of envenomation but serious cases can result in death.
  • Caterpillar-induced bleeding syndrome -- Lonomia obliqua: Lonomia obliqua caterpillars are native to Southern Brazil and have spines along their body which can penetrate human skin and cause blood coagulation problems. The severity of the symptoms vary depending on the degree of envenomation but serious cases can result in death.
  • Catheter infection: Infection due to an inserted catheter
  • Cathinone poisoning: Cathinone comes from the leaves of the Khat plant which is native to eastern Africa. Cathinone is a stimulant as well as have pain killing, weight loss and neuromuscular effects. The psychoactive effects are usually utilized by chewing on the leaves of the plant but sometimes dried leaves are used.
  • Cauda equina syndrome: Is a neurological syndrome which occurs when a vertebral disc protrudes and compresses the spinal cord.
  • Celery urine odor in children: Celery urine odor in children is a condition in which the urine has an abnormal smell similar to the smell of celery.
  • Cervical cancer: A condition which is characterized by the occurrence of malignancy on the cervix
  • Cervicitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the cervix
  • Chancroid: An sexually transmitted disease caused by the Haemophilus ducreyi bacteria and is characterized by painful genital ulceration.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2-Butoxyethanol: 2-Butoxyethanol is a chemical used mainly in dry cleaning, textile dyeing, protective coatings, glass cleaners, solvents, cleaning agents and paint thinners. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 3,3-Dichlorobenzidine: 3,3-Dichlorobenzidine is a chemical used mainly in the production of pigments for various items such as paint, ink, textiles and plastics. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 4,4-Methylenebis: 4,4-Methylenebis is a chemical used in the manufacture of epoxy resins, belt drives, gun mounts, shoe laces and various other manufactured goods. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 4-Aminodiphenyl: 4-Aminodiphenyl is a chemical used mainly in research and laboratory facilities. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acrylamide: Acrylamide is a chemical used mainly in the treatment of waste water, grout agent, paper strengthening agent and adhesive agents. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aldicarb: Aldicarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide, nematicide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aldrin: Aldrin is a chemical once used mainly in insecticides for crops and as a termite preventative. The chemical can readily be absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Amitraz: Amitraz is a chemical used mainly as a topical parasitic preventative in livestock and fruit trees. It is also used as an insect repellant and a prevention of mite infestation. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Anticoagulant rodenticide: Anticoagulant rodenticide is a chemical used to control rodents. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Antifreeze: Antifreeze is used in vehicles to prevent freezing or boiling over of the cooling system. The chemicals (methanol, ethylene and propylene glycol) in the antifreeze can cause severe poisoning symptoms if ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Arsine: Arsine is a chemical used in the making of semiconductors and in the metal refining industry. It is considered a possible chemical agent in chemical warfare. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Azinphos-methyl: Azinphos-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benzene: Benzene is a chemical used mainly in gasoline fuel and as an industrial solvent. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benzidine: Benzidine is a chemical used mainly in the production of azo dyes for such products as leather, paper and textiles. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Boric Acid: Boric Acid is a chemical used mainly in foods (preservative, emulsifier, neutralizer), antiseptics, pesticides and contact lens cleaners. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Application of boric acid directly to damaged skin can cause the chemical to be absorbed rapidly into the body and lead to death. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Brodifacoum: Brodifacoum is a chemical used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromadiolone: Bromadiolone is a chemical used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromophos: Bromophos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbon Tetrachloride: Carbon tetrachloride is a chemical used mainly in grain fumigants, insecticides and in the production of fluorocarbons. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorate salts: Chlorate salt is a chemical used mainly in herbicides and in the manufacture of matches and explosives. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chloromethane: Chloromethane is a chemical used mainly in the production of silicones as well as agricultural chemicals, butyl rubber and other products. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Clinitest tablet: Clinitest tablet are used to test sugar levels in urine. The tablets contain various chemicals (copper sulfate, sodium hydroxide, sodium carbonate) and eating them can cause serious symptoms. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cresols: Cresols are a group of chemicals that occur naturally in mammals and various plants. It is also manufactured and used in the production of disinfectants, deodorizers and pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cresylic acid: Cresylic acids are a group of chemicals that are used as solvents and in the manufacture of various products such as deodorants, disinfectants, pesticides, glues, paints, herbicides, pharmaceuticals as well as others. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cypermethrin: Cypermethrin is a widely used insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Demeton-S-methyl: Demeton-S-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diazinon: Diazinon is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dichlorvos: Dichlorvos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dicrotophos: Dicrotophos is a toxic insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dieldrin: Dieldrin is a chemical used mainly to prevent termite infestations. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. This chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dioxathion: Dioxathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Disulfoton: Disulfoton is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethion: Ethion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylene Glycol: Ethylene Glycol is a chemical used mainly in antifreeze, coolants and as a solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. Symptoms tend to occur in three phases: the first 12 hours involves inebriation, seizuresand brain swelling; the second and third day involves deterioration of lung and heart function and the third stage involves kidney damage and possibly failure. Death can occur during any of the stages.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fensulfothion: Fensulfothion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and nematicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fenthion: Fenthion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and avicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Gasoline: Gasoline is a chemical used as a fuel for combustion engines. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Glyphosate: Glyphosate is a chemical used mainly in herbicides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hair Bleach: Hair bleach contain chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested. The chemicals in the hair bleach can continue to cause gastrointestinal damage for weeks after ingestion. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hair Dye: Hair dyes contain chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested. The chemicals in the hair dye can continue to cause damage for weeks after ingestion. Some dyes contain lead or mercury which can cause neurological problems even if low level exposure occurs over an extended period of time. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Malathion: Malathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methidathion: Methidathion is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methiocarb: Methiocarb is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methomyl: Methomyl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Monocrotophos: Monocrotophos is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Monosodium Methanarsenate: Monosodium Methanarsenate is a chemical used mainly as a herbicide or pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Mouth Wash: Mouth wash contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Naphthalene: Naphthalene is a chemical used mainly as a moth repellant, toilet deodorizer and the manufacture of other chemicals. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrates: Nitrates are chemicals used mainly in explosives and ammunitions but are also an ingredient in cold packs. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Parathion: Parathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Petroleum Distillates -- Naphtha: Petroleum Distillates - Naphtha is a chemical used mainly in . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phosdrin: Phosdrin is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phosphine: Phosphine is a chemical used mainly in pesticides and rodenticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Polyethylene Glycol -- Low Molecular Weight: Low molecular weight polyethylene glycol is a chemical used mainly in hair products, cosmetics, topical medications and in Lava lamps. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Profenofos: Profenofos is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Solder: Solder contains various chemicals and heavy metals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Terbufos: Terbufos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and nematicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetraethyl Pyrophosphate: Tetraethyl Pyrophosphate is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Turpentine Oil: Turpentine Oil is a chemical used mainly as a solvent, paint thinner and various other applications such as deodorizing fragrances and antiseptics. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- acetic acid: Acetic acid is a chemical used for medicinal purposes such as superficial ear infections, jellyfish stings and bladder irrigation. Acetic acid is a also a component of vinegar which is used as a cooking ingredient. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chiari-1 Malformation: A rare malformation where the base of the brain enters into the upper spinal canal.
  • Child abuse: Physical, sexual, emotional abuse or neglect of child.
  • Childhood disintegrative disorder: A rare disorder where a period of normal development (a couple of years) is followed by delays in the development of motor, social and language skills. Previously acquired skills are lost.
  • Chlamydia: Common sexually transmitted disease often without symptoms.
  • Chlamydial infection: Infection from Chlamydia genus.
  • Chlorophacinone rodenticide poisoning: Chlorophacinone is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Cholera: An acute bacterial disease transmitted through food or water contaminated with human faeces. The intestinal infection is caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae.
  • Cholestasis: A condition where bile formation or flow is reduced.
  • Cholestasis -- pigmentary retinopathy -- cleft palate: A rare syndrome characterized by degeneration of retinal pigments, cleft lip, cleft palate, kidney problems and cholestasis (bile flow obstruction).
  • Cholestasis disease of pregnancy: A liver condition that can occur usually in the last stage of pregnancy. The flow of bile in the gallbladder or liver is impaired by the high levels of pregnancy hormones. The bile acids build up in the organs and then enter the bloodstream. The main symptom is usually itching. Symptoms usually resolve after delivering the baby. Risk factors includes existing liver condition, multiple pregnancy and a family history of the condition.
  • Cholestasis, progressive familial intrahepatic 1: A rare inherited condition where bile is unable to drain from the liver where it builds up and causes progressive liver damage.
  • Cholestasis, progressive familial intrahepatic 2: A rare inherited condition where bile is unable to drain from the liver where it builds up and causes progressive liver damage. The condition has an early onset and usually leads to end-stage liver disease by the end of the second decade. The various types of this condition differ in the origin of the genetic defect (liver-specific ATP-binding cassette transporter on chromosome 2q24). Type 2 is also associated with an increased risk of liver cancer in the first few years of life.
  • Cholestasis, progressive familial intrahepatic 3: A rare inherited condition where bile is unable to drain from the liver where it builds up and causes progressive liver damage. The condition has an early onset and usually leads to end-stage liver disease by the end of the second decade. The various types of this condition differ in the origin of the genetic defect (liver-specific ATP-binding cassette transporter on chromosome 2q24). Type 2 is also associated with an increased risk of liver cancer in the first few years of life.
  • Chordoma: Chordomas are tumors originating from embryonic remnants of the primitive notochord
  • Choriocarcinoma, infantile: A rare malignant cancer that originates in the placenta. It is an aggressive cancer which generally results in infant death.
  • Chromophil renal cell carcinoma: A type of kidney tumor where the cells that make up the tumor take up dye readily during pathology testing.
  • Chromophobe renal cell carcinoma: A rare type of kidney tumor. The cells that make up the tumor tend to be clear and do not readily take up dye during pathology analysis. Metastasis often only occurs late in the course of the disease and surgical removal usually leads to a good prognosis.
  • Chromosome 11, deletion 11p: A syndrome that is caused by the deletion of short arm (p) of chromosome 11. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount and exact location of the genetic material that is deleted.
  • Chromosome 19p duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where the short arm of chromosome 19 is duplicated resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chronic Chemical poisoning -- Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha: Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha is an ingredient used in certain pesticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Chronic Diarrhea: Chronic diarrhea is long-term, ongoing lose, watery and frequent stools.
  • Chronic Granulomatous Disease: A very rare inherited blood disorder where certain cells involved with immunity (phagocytes) are unable to destroy bacteria and hence the patient suffers repeated bacterial infections.
  • Chronic Kidney Disease: Long-term and generally irreversible disease of the kidneys due to infection, obstruction, congenital diseases or generalised diseases causing failure of the kidneys' normal functions.
  • Chronic diarrhoea: Diarrhoea lasting for more than 3 weeks
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome: A persistent debilitating fatigue of recent onset
  • Chronic interstitial cystitis:
  • Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of certain blood cells - myelocytes and monocytes. The proliferation is slower than in acute forms of the disease.
  • Chronic prostate-related urinary dribbling: weak urinary stream
  • Chronic prostate-related urinary symptoms: Symptomsinclude urinary frequency, urgency, urgency incontinence, voiding at night (nocturia), weak urinary stream, hesitency (needing to wait for the stream to begin), intermittency (when the stream starts and stops intermittently), straining to void, dysuria (burning sensation in the urethra), and dribbling
  • Chronic prostate-related weak urinary stream: weak urinary stream
  • Chronic pyelonephritis: chronic pyelonephritis is persistent kidney inflammation that can scar the kidneys and may lead to chronic renal failure
  • Chronic wasting disease (CWD) of mule deer and elk: A neurodegenerative disease which is caused by infectious agents called prions. and occurs in deer, elk and moose. The condition is progressive and leads to inevitable death. It is unknown as to whether the disease is transmissible to humans. Symptoms begin a long time after initial infection.
  • Chyluria in children: Chyluria in children refers to a child who has chyle in the urine stream making the urine appear milky.
  • Cipro -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cipro (a fluoroquinolone antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Ciprofloxacin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ciprofloxacin (a fluoroquinolone antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Classic Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis: A condition which is characterized by the formation of an acidosis due to a problem with the renal distal tubule
  • Clear cell renal cell carcinoma: A type of kidney tumor where the cells that make up the tumor are clear.
  • Clear urine: Urine that is clear or less yellow
  • Clomipramine Toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Cloudy urine: Cloudy or milky appearance of urine
  • Cloudy urine during pregnancy: Changes in appearance of urine in a woman who is pregnant.
  • Cloudy urine in children: Cloudy urine in children is urine that is hazy, opaque, or murky instead of clear.
  • Coffeeweed poisoning: The coffeeweed is an annual herb which bears yellow flowers and flattened fruit. The plant originated in warmer parts of America and is mainly found in coastal plains. The plant contains various chemicals (anthraquinones, emodin glycosides, toxalbumins, alkaloids) which can cause symptoms if large quantities are eaten.
  • Colchicine poisoning: Ingestion of toxic quantities of colchicines. Colchicine is primarily used as a medicinal theapy for conditions such as gout and familial Mediterranean fever, scleroderma, secondary amyloidosis and pericarditis. The chemical is a natural chemical found in a plant called meadow saffron and ingestion of the plant can also result in poisoning. The plant is found in the northern parts of the world.
  • Cold Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a condition where the body's immune system triggers the production of antibodies against the body's own red blood cells. The red cells are destroyed at an abnormally rapid rate which leads to anemia. Cold haemolytic anemia is characterized by the fact that the abnormal destruction of red blood cells is more active when the patient is exposed to cold temperatures. The severity of the condition varies depending on the underlying cause. The condition may develop gradually or occur suddenly and cause serious symptoms.
  • Collecting duct carcinoma: A rare, aggressive type of kidney cancer that arises from the kidney collecting ducts. The cancer cells can form irregular tubes.
  • Coloboma uveal with cleft lip palate and mental retardation: A very rare syndrome characterized by a cleft lip and palate, mental retardation and a gap or hole in the iris or uvea of the eye (iris or uveal coloboma).
  • Coloboma, cleft lip/palate and mental retardation syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by a cleft lip and palate, mental retardation and a gap or hole in the iris or uvea of the eye (iris or uveal coloboma).
  • Combat stress reaction: A term used in the military which refers to behaviors that result from the stress of fighting in a war.
  • Common migraine: Migraine headaches are recurrent headaches that may be unilateral or bilateral. Migraine headaches may occur with or without a prodrome. The aura of a migraine may consist of neurologic symptoms, such as dizziness, tinnitus, scotomas, photophobia, or visual scintillations (eg, bright zigzag lines).
  • Complement component deficiency: Complement components are a part of the immune defense system involved in destroying and removing invading pathogens such as bacteria. A deficiency of the complement components can affect the ability of the body's immune system to function properly. The disorder which can be partial or complete and may be inherited or acquired. The severity of the symptoms is determined by which complement component (there are at least 30 of them) is deficient and whether the deficiency is partial or complete.
  • Congenital Afibrinogenemia: A rare disorder involving the inability to make fibrinogen which is essential for the process of blood clotting.
  • Congenital aplastic anemia: A genetic disorder where the bone marrow does not produce enough blood cells. Fanconi's anemia is an example of congenital aplastic anemia.
  • Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 2H: Congenital disorders of glycosylation is a group of very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type IIh is caused by a defect on chromosome 16q22.1 and involves a defect on the COG8 gene.
  • Congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIH: Congenital disorders of glycosylation is a group of very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type IIh is caused by a defect on chromosome 16q22.1 and involves a defect on the COG8 gene.
  • Congenital giant megaureter: A rare condition where the patient is born with an abnormally dilated ureter. The anomaly is often associated with other defects or anomalies. The severity of the anomaly is variable.
  • Congenital hepatic porphyria: A rare congenital disorder where there is an excess of porphyrin (pigments) in the body. The liver is responsible for making porpyrins.
  • Congenital megalo-ureter: A birth defect where the ureter is abnormally dilated due to a structural obstruction of the end portion of the ureter.
  • Conn's adenoma: An uncommon (but possible highly underdiagnosed) condition characterized by the excessive production of a hormone called aldosterone by the adrenal gland. The condition may result from the presence of an adrenal adenoma. The severity of the condition is variable with some patients simply suffering high blood pressure and no other symptoms. Due to the high degree of variation in presenting symptoms, the condition may be frequently underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed.
  • Conn's syndrome: An adrenal gland disorder where excess aldosterone hormone is produced resulting in symptoms such as headache, fatigue, nocturia and increased urine production. Also called primary hyperaldosteronism.
  • Conn-Louis Carcinoma: An uncommon (but possible highly underdiagnosed) condition characterized by the excessive production of a hormone called aldosterone by the adrenal gland. The condition results from the presence of an adrenal carcinoma. The severity of the condition is variable with some patients simply suffering high blood pressure and no other symptoms. Due to the high degree of variation in presenting symptoms, the condition may be frequently underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed.
  • Constant nocturia in elderly females: Constant nocturia in elderly females is a steady need for an older woman to wake up at night to urinate.
  • Constant nocturia in elderly males: Constant nocturia in elderly males refers to a steady need for an older man to wake up at night to urinate.
  • Constant proteinuria: Constant proteinuria is an abnormal finding, in which there is a steady and continual presence of protein in the urine.
  • Constant pyuria: Constant pyuria is a steady condition in which a person has pus in the urine.
  • Continuous overflow dribbling: continous dribbling of urine
  • Convulsions: A series of involuntary contractions of voluntary muscles.
  • Copper toxicity: Excessive accumulation of copper in the body can cause symptoms.
  • Coumachlor rodenticide poisoning: Coumachlor is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Coumafuryl rodenticide poisoning: Coumafuryl is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Coumatetralyl rodenticide poisoning: Coumatetralyl is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Crack cocaine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Crack cocaine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Crush injury: An injury caused by a crushing mechanism
  • Cutaneomeningospinal angiomatosis: A rare inherited disorder involving a skin birthmark as well as a blood vessel malformation in the spinal cord (angioma). The severity of the spinal involvement is variable with neurological problems occurring as a result of compression of the spinal cord or bleeding. Other cases may be undiagnosed as the cause no symptoms.
  • Cystine stone: A stone caused by a defect in cystine metabolism
  • Cystinosis: A rare biochemical disorder involving the accumulation of a chemical called cystine in various parts of the body which can cause harmful effects.
  • Cystinuria: A rare inherited condition characterized by the abnormal transport of various amino acids (cystine, lysine, arginine, ornithine) resulting in excess amounts in the urinary system where it can form stones.
  • Cystitis: Bladder infection or inflammation
  • Cystitis in males:
  • Cystocele: Bladder falls down into the vagina.
  • D-plus hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS): A rare condition where gastroenteritis involving bloody diarrhea is caused by a bacteria (usually E.Coli) which leads to toxins being present in the blood. These circulating toxins affect red blood cells, kidneys and occasionally even the brain.
  • DEND syndrome: An inherited disorder characterized by developmental delay, epilepsy and diabetes.
  • Danubian endemic familial nephropathy: A form of slow-progressing kidney disease that occurs in a particular geographic area which includes countries such as Bulgaria, Yugoslavia and Romania. The condition can remain asymptomatic for many years until serious kidney damage has occurred.
  • Dark urine: A dark discolouration of the urine.
  • Dark urine in children: Dark urine in children refers to urine that is dark in color.
  • Darkened urine: Discoloration or darkening of urine color.
  • Dead fish urine odor in children: Dead fish urine odor in children is the abnormal smell of dead fish in a child's urine.
  • Deafness -- lymphoedema -- leukemia: A rare syndrome characterized by deafness, early-onset leukemia and lymphoedema in the lower legs.
  • Decreased cardiac output: descreased amount of blood pumped by the heart
  • Decreased urine chloride: A decrease in the urine chloride levels
  • Decreased urine output: Decreased urine output is defined as producing less than 500 milliliters of urine in 24 hours.
  • Decreased urine output in pregnancy: A decrease in the amount of urine a woman is producing compared to her normal bladder pattern whilst pregnant.
  • Decreased urine specific gravity: A decrease in the concentration of particles in the urine
  • Decreased urine stream: A perceived or observed decrease in the strength or flow of one's urine stream.
  • Deep yellow urine: Deep yellow urine is urine that is dark yellow.
  • Deep yellow urine in children: Deep yellow urine in children occurs when a child's urine is dark yellow.
  • Degenerative Disc Disease: Chronic or recurrent back and neck pain due to degeneration and occasionally prolapse of spinal discs.
  • Dehydration: Loss and reduction in body water levels
  • Del (2) (q23-q24.3): A rare chromosomal disorder characterized by various anomalies. The listed symptoms are those observed in one reported case. The manifestations linked to most genetic defects are often variable to some degree.
  • Deletion 11p: A syndrome that is caused by the deletion of short arm (p) of chromosome 11. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount and exact location of the genetic material that is deleted.
  • Dent syndrome: A rare X-linked inherited kidney disorder involving kidney tubule damage resulting in progressive kidney dysfunction.
  • Dent's disease: A rare kidney disease inherited in a X-linked manner. It involves kidney tubule damage which results in progressive kidney dysfunction. There are two types of Dent's disease and they differ in the origin of the genetic defect.
  • Dermatomyositis: A muscle disease characterized by chronic muscle inflammation resulting in progressive muscle weakness and a characteristic rash.
  • Desipramine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Diabetes Insipidus, Neurogenic: A disturbed water balance due to a deficiency of vasopressin (antidiuretic) hormone which causes excessive thirst and urination. Causes include autoimmune disease, malignancy, trauma, infection and blood vessel disease.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 1: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p21.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 10: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 10 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10p15.1.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 11: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 11 is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q24.3-q31.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 12: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 12 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q33.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 13: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 13 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q34.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 15: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 15 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q21.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 17: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 17 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q25.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 18: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 18 is linked to a defect on chromosome 5q31.1-q33.1.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 19: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 19 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q24.3.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 2: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11p15.5.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 20: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 20 is linked to a defect on chromosome 12q24.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 21: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 21 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q25.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 22: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 22 is linked to a defect on chromosome 3p21.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 23: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 23 is linked to a defect on chromosome 4q27.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 24: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 24 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q23.31.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 3: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 15q26.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 4: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11q13.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 5: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q25.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 6: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 6 is linked to a defect on chromosome 18q21.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 7: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 7 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q31.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 8: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 81 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q25-q27.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Noninsulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 1: Noninsulin-dependent diabetes (Type 2 diabetes) is a type of diabetes that doesn't respond to insulin but does tend to respond to dietary measures and diabetes medication. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q37.3.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Noninsulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 2: Noninsulin-dependent diabetes (Type 2 diabetes) is a type of diabetes that doesn't respond to insulin but does tend to respond to dietary measures and diabetes medication. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 12q24.2.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Noninsulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 3: Noninsulin-dependent diabetes (Type 2 diabetes) is a type of diabetes that doesn't respond to insulin but does tend to respond to dietary measures and diabetes medication. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 20q12-q13.1.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Noninsulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 4: Noninsulin-dependent diabetes (Type 2 diabetes) is a type of diabetes that doesn't respond to insulin but does tend to respond to dietary measures and diabetes medication. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 5q34-q35.2.
  • Diabetes insipidus: A condition which is characterized by polyuria causing dehydration and resulting in great thirst
  • Diabetes insipidus primary central: A rare dominantly inherited form of diabetes insipidus. It is caused by the progressive degeneration of a part of the hypothalamus which reduces the production of a hormone called arginine vasopressin.
  • Diabetes insipidus, nephrogenic type 2: A rare congenital condition where the kidney fails to respond to the antidiuretic hormone (arginine vasopressin), thus preventing reabsorption of water. This results in excessive urination and thirst. Type II is specifically caused by a defect in the AQP2 gene on chromosome 12q13.
  • Diabetes insipidus, nephrogenic, dominant type: A rare dominantly inherited, congenital condition where the kidney fails to respond to the antidiuretic hormone (arginine vasopressin), thus preventing reabsorption of water. This results in excessive urination and thirst. The condition is specifically caused by a defect in the AQP2 gene on chromosome 12q13.
  • Diabetes insipidus, nephrogenic, recessive type: A rare recessively inherited, congenital condition where the kidney fails to respond to the antidiuretic hormone (arginine vasopressin), thus preventing reabsorption of water. This results in excessive urination and thirst. The condition is specifically caused by a defect in the AQP2 gene on chromosome 12q13.
  • Diabetes mellitus, transient neonatal: A form of infant diabetes that starts usually in the month of life but then usually disappears within a year. The condition predisposes the infant to diabetes later in life.
  • Diabetes-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of diabetes
  • Diabetic neuropathy: nerve damage which maybe motor, sensory and autonomic
  • Diarrhea: Loose, soft, or watery stool.
  • Diencephalic Syndrome: A condition characterized by dysfunction of the diencphalon of the brain
  • Difenacoum rodenticide poisoning: Difenacoum is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Difethialone rodenticide poisoning: Difethialone is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Difficulty going to bathroom: difficulty in bowel movements or passing urine
  • Difficulty starting a stream: difficulty to initiate micturition
  • Difficulty starting to urinate: difficulty initiating onset of micturition
  • Diffuse leiomyomatosis with Alport syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by multiple tumors (in the esophagus, female genitals, trachea and bronchus) and Alport syndrome which involves progressive kidney dysfunction.
  • Digestive symptoms: Any symptoms affecting the digestive tract.
  • Diphacinone rodenticide poisoning: Diphacinone is used as a rodenticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Disorders of the urinary bladder:
  • Diuresis: increased production of urine by the kidney
  • Dobriner syndrome: An inherited metabolic disorder involving a deficiency of coproporphyrinogen oxidase. The condition is similar to but milder than intermittent porphyria and sometimes includes photosensitivity.
  • Donepezil toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Double uterus-hemivagina-renal agenesis: A very rare malformation of the uterus and vagina.
  • Doxepin toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Duodenal atresia: A rare birth defect where a portion of the small intestine is absent or completely closed off and the digestive products cannot pass through. It is usually associated with other birth defects.
  • Duodenal atresia tetralogy of Fallot: A rare birth defect characterized by a heart defect and an intestinal malformation where the duodenum is absent or closed off which prevents digested material passing through.
  • Dup (2) (q33-qter): A rare chromosomal disorder characterized by various anomalies. The listed symptoms are those observed in the few reported cases. The manifestations linked to most genetic defects are often variable to some degree.
  • Dup (3) (pter-p24): A rare chromosomal disorder characterized by various anomalies. The listed symptoms are those observed in one reported case. The manifestations linked to most genetic defects are often variable to some degree.
  • Duplication of urethra: A rare birth defect where the urethra is duplicated. The extent of the duplication is variable with a complete duplication of the urethra being very rare. Complete duplication involves two external urinary outlets which results in two urinary streams.
  • Dyschondrosteosis -- nephritis: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal bone development and kidney disease.
  • Dysuria: Painful urination
  • Dysuria in children: Dysuria in children is difficulty urinating in a child.
  • East Syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, deafness, ataxia and electrolyte imbalance.
  • Eclampsia: serious complication of pregnancy and is characterised by high blood pressure and convulsions
  • Ectopic ACTH Syndrome: A tumour arising in the body which releases excess quantities of ACTH
  • Ectopic urethra:
  • Electrolyte abnormality: An imbalance in the level of any of a number of chemicals (electrolytes) in the blood stream e.g. chloride, sodium, magnesium, potassium, calcium, phosphate and bicarbonate. Symptoms can vary depending on which electrolyte is involved and the severity of the imbalance - severe cases can readily lead to death. An electrolyte abnormality can be caused by such things excessive loss of body fluid through vomiting or diarrhea, kidney conditions, malabsorption and various drugs such as diuretics and chemotherapy drugs.
  • Elevated urinary 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid: An increase in the urinary 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid in the urine
  • Emanuel syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of chromosome 11 is translocated with a portion of chromosome 22. The disorder involves a wide range of abnormalities such as kidney, genital and heart abnormalities, mental retardation, small head and failure to thrive.
  • Endometrial Cancer: Cancer of the endometrium (uterus lining).
  • Endometrial stromal sarcoma: A rare type of cancer that develops from the endometrial layer of the uterus. The cancer may be slow-growing or aggressive and may metastasize.
  • Endometritis: Inflammation of the endometrium (uterine lining)
  • Enlarged prostate: Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a noncancerous enlargement of the prostate gland that may restrict the flow of urine from the bladder.
  • Enuresis: The involuntary discharge of urine occurring at night
  • Enuresis in children: Enuresis in children refers to bedwetting in a child.
  • Eosinophilic cystitis: Eosinophilic cystitis is an unusual variant of cystitis that may be characterized by dysuria and hematuria. Biopsy is essential to establish the diagnosis. It usually causes irritative voiding symptoms and hematuria and in its rare tumor-like appearance the disease may mimic an invasive bladder neoplasm.
  • Ependymoma: A tumor that occurs in the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). Symptoms vary according to the aggressiveness, size and exact location of the tumor.
  • Epidermolysis bullosa: A group of rare inherited skin diseases characterized by fragile skin which forms blisters with even minor injuries. The blisters can be painful and can occur anywhere on the skin and even inside the digestive tract.
  • Epispadias: Is a congenital abnormality of the location of the opening of the urethra
  • Erdheim-Chester Disease: A condition which is defined as a non langerhans cell histiocytosis
  • Erdheim-Chester syndrome: A very rare lipid storage disorder involving lipid deposits in various organs and hardening of the ends of long bones which affects the growth of the bone. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Essential mixed cryoglobulinemia: A rare autoimmune disorder characterized by the presence of a mixture of various types of antibodies (crylglobulins) in the blood.
  • Eugenol oil poisoning: Eugenol oil is used as a supplement or as a therapeutic ingredient in various medications and foods but excessive doses of undiluted oil can cause symptoms. Smoking undiluted cloves in cigarettes can also cause symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Excessive thirst and urination in children: Excessive thirst and urination in children is the condition of having an unusually sizable thirst coupled with copious urination.
  • Excessive urination at night: known as nocturia is the increased frequency in passing urine during night time
  • Excessive urination in children: Excessive urination in children refers to greater than normal amounts of urination.
  • Exercise: The use of the human muscles to improve ones health
  • Exstrophy of the bladder: A rare congenital malformation the bladder is inside out and is protrudes through the wall of the abdomen.
  • Factor V Quebec: An inherited bleeding disorder reported in Quebec, Canada.
  • Factor X deficiency: A rare blood clotting disorder which may be inherited or acquired in people suffering from conditions such as liver disease, amyloidosis, leprosy and certain cancers. The underlying cause is the deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The condition may cause mild to severe bleeding depending on the degree of deficiency of Factor X.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Friuli: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Fruili variant tends to only cause moderate bleeding problems and occurs mainly in an area of Italy called Fruili.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Kanazawa: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Kanazawa variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Ketchikan: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Ketchikan variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Nottingham: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Nottingham variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Padua: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Padau variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- San Antonio: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The San Antonia variant results in 14% of normal Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Santo Domingo: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Santo Domingo variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Shanghai: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Shangai variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- St. Louis II: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The St. Louis II variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Stockton: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Stockton variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Taunton: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Taunton variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Tokyo: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Tokyo variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Vorarlberg: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Vorarlberg variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Wenatchee I: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Wenatchee I variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- Wenatchee II: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The Wenatchee II variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Factor X deficiency -- autosomal dominant: A rare inherited blood clotting disorder where there is a deficiency of a protein (Factor X) which is needed for the blood to clot properly. The autosomal dominant variant results in reduced Factor X blood clotting activity.
  • Fallopian tube conditions: Conditions that affect the fallopian tubes of a woman
  • Fallopian tube symptoms: Symptoms affecting the female fallopian tubes
  • Familial Wilms tumor 2: A familial form malignant kidney tumor that occurs in children. Type 2 differs from other forms of Wilms tumor by the origin of the genetic defect (chromosome 19q13.4).
  • Familial hematuria, autosomal dominant -- retinal arteriolar tortuosity -- contractures: A rare inherited disorder characterized by blood in the urine, contractures and retinal anomalies.
  • Familial hypopituitarism: Impaired pituitary gland hormone-producing activity that tends to run in families. The failure of the pituitary gland in turn affects other hormone-producing glands which rely on the hormones from the pituitary gland for their activity. Symptoms are determined by the degree and type of hormone deficiency involved.
  • Familial renal cell carcinoma: A genetic form of kidney cancer that develops in the lining of the tubules in the kidney and tends to run in families.
  • Familial visceral myopathy: A rare condition where the duodenum is dilated and the muscles don't function normally which affects the movement of digestive waste material through the intestines. The symptoms of the condition are similar to that caused by an intestinal obstruction.
  • Fanconi syndrome: Fanconi syndrome that occurs secondary to the accumulation of crystals of light-chain immunoglobulin molecules in the kidney tubules which affects their functioning.
  • Fanconi's syndrome: A sometimes genetic condition where a kidney disorder leads to loss of important chemicals and nutrients through the urine. This leads to symptoms such as osteomalacia, acidosis, rickets and hypokalemia.
  • Fecal incontinence: The loss of control of a persons bowel motions

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Urinary problems:

The following list of conditions have 'Urinary problems' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions which include a symptom of Urinary problems or choose View All.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Urinary problems:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Urinary problems' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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