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Glossary for White blood cell symptoms

Medical terms related to White blood cell symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • Abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the abdomen or digestive tract
  • Abnormal blood test symptoms: Abnormal results from diagnostic blood tests.
  • Acrodynia: A disease occurring in infants or young children. Symptoms include edema, pruritis, skin rash, extremities are pink, cheeks and nose are scarlet, profuse sweating, digestive disturbance, photophobia, polyneuritis, irritability, listlessness, apathy and failure to thrive.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- xylene: Xylene is an ingredient used in certain insecticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute basophilic leukaemia: A rare type of acute myeloid leukemia characterized by the presence of abnormal basophils.
  • Acute cholinergic dysautonomia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal red blood cells in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Allopurinol hypersensitivity syndrome: An immune reaction to the ingestion of a drug called allopurinol. It is a potentially fatal disorder.
  • Aseptic abscesses syndrome: A rare syndrome involving the development of deep, sterile lesions containing neutrophils. The lesions don't respond to antibiotics but do respond to corticosteroid therapy. The abscesses usually occur in the abdomen and are often associated with conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease and polychondritis. Although the abscesses respond to corticosteroids, more than half of the cases relapse.
  • Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease: Severe form of PKD, a genetic kidney disease.
  • Bacterial toxic-shock syndrome: A very rare, potentially fatal infection caused by toxins produced by bacteria, especially bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes. The condition is often associated with tampon use but can originate from other sources.
  • Banti Syndrome: A rare conditions where chronic congestive spleen enlargement causes it to destroy red blood cells too early. The spleen becomes enlarged due to an obstruction of blood flow in the organ and the resulting increase in blood pressure.
  • Banti's syndrome: A chronic, progressive condition marked by enlargement of the spleen which is associated with anemia, splenomegaly, ascites, jaundice, leucopenia, thrombocytopenia and gastrointestinal bleeding.
  • Black widow spider envenomation: The black widow spider bite is toxic to the nerves and can cause serious symptoms. The black widow spider is most commonly found in North America.
  • Bleeding symptoms: Any type of bleeding symptoms.
  • Blood conditions: Conditions that affect the blood
  • Blood symptoms: Symptoms affecting the blood and its blood cells.
  • Brucellosis: An infectious disease caused by the Brucella genus which is transmitted from animals to humans.
  • Bullis fever syndrome: A disease transmitted through tick bites (Ambylomma americanum). Symptoms include fever, rash and headache. The disease was first observed in soldiers training at Camp Bullis in America.
  • Callistin shellfish poisoning: The Callistin shellfish (Japanese Callista) is found primarily in Japan. Eating the whole shellfish can cause poisoning symptoms in humans. It is believed that the ovaries contain high levels of choline during spawning season which makes them toxic to humans. The symptoms that manifest are similar to a severe allergic reaction. Avoiding eating the ovaries is the best way to prevent poisoning - cooking does not destroy the toxin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2-Methyl-4-Chlorophenoxyacetic Acid: 2-Methyl-4-Chlorophenoxyacetic Acid is a chemical mainly used as a herbicide for field crops and turf. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetylene Tetrabromide: Acetylene Tetrabromide is a chemical used mainly in mineral separation and as a solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acrylonitrile: Acrylonitrile is a chemical used mainly in the production of acrylic and modacrylic fibers but also in the production of certain plastics, nylon dyes, drugs and pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benzene: Benzene is a chemical used mainly in gasoline fuel and as an industrial solvent. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorate salts: Chlorate salt is a chemical used mainly in herbicides and in the manufacture of matches and explosives. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorine Dioxide: Chlorine dioxide is a chemical used mainly in water treatment and disinfectant for various processing operations. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diethylene Glycol: Diethylene Glycol is a chemical used mainly in coolants, manufacture of plastic products and resins as well as other uses. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Glufosinate: Glufosinate is a chemical used mainly in herbicides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Glyphosate: Glyphosate is a chemical used mainly in herbicides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Imazapyr: Imazapyr is a chemical used mainly in herbicides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Lysergic Acid Diethylamide: Lysergic Acid Diethylamide is a hallucinogenic drug which is often misused. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Monosodium Methanarsenate: Monosodium Methanarsenate is a chemical used mainly as a herbicide or pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nickel Carbonyl: Nickel Carbonyl is a chemical used mainly in petroleum and rubber production and in electroplating. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrous Oxide: Nitrous Oxide is a chemical used mainly as rocket fuel, foaming agent and as an anesthetic. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Polychlorinated Dibenzofurans: Polychlorinated Dibenzofurans are a group of chemicals that are usually formed as a byproduct of various industrial processes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Sodium Oleate: Sodium Oleate is a chemical used mainly in insecticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Strychnine: Strychnine is used as a rodenticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thallium: Thallium is an element used for such things as electronic devices, selenium rectifiers, gamma radiation detection apparatus, transmission equipment and infrared radiation detection. It is also used as a catalyst in various manufacturing processes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chromosome 8, mosaic trisomy: A very rare chromosomal disorder where there is an extra copy of chromosome 8 in some of the body's cells. Some cases with this chromosomal abnormality have no clinical symptoms. The presence of abnormalities in some cases is dependent on which body cells contain the chromosomal defect.
  • Chronic Granulomatous Disease: A very rare inherited blood disorder where certain cells involved with immunity (phagocytes) are unable to destroy bacteria and hence the patient suffers repeated bacterial infections.
  • Chronic Myeloproliferative Disease, Unclassified: A form of blood disorder characterized by the abnormal proliferation of myeloid precursors in the bone marrow. This category refers to cases of myeloproliferative disease which don't fit into any of the other specific type of myelproliferative diseases.
  • Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of certain blood cells - myelocytes and monocytes. The proliferation is slower than in acute forms of the disease.
  • Cluster headache: Also known as alarm headache, more common in young men, presents with unilateral headache, rhinorrhea and lacrimation
  • Complement component deficiency: Complement components are a part of the immune defense system involved in destroying and removing invading pathogens such as bacteria. A deficiency of the complement components can affect the ability of the body's immune system to function properly. The disorder which can be partial or complete and may be inherited or acquired. The severity of the symptoms is determined by which complement component (there are at least 30 of them) is deficient and whether the deficiency is partial or complete.
  • Complement receptor deficiency: Complement receptors are a part of the immune defense system and they initiate the process of destroying and removing invading pathogens. A deficiency of complement receptors thus affects the immune system. It may be inherited or be associated with autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus diabetic nephropathy patients on hemodialysis.
  • Cutler Syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by multisystem disorders including muscle wasting, ataxia, epilepsy, anemia and kidney disease. The kidney disease is most likely present at birth.
  • Darier Disease: A slowly progressing inherited skin disorder characterized by small brownish warty bumps and nail abnormalities. The skin disorder because the skin cells are not held together properly.
  • Digestive symptoms: Any symptoms affecting the digestive tract.
  • Eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome: A life-threatening condition caused by ingesting tryptophan.
  • Familial Cold Autoinflammatory Syndrome (FCAS): An inherited inflammatory disorder which causes periods of fever, rash and pain in joints after being exposed to cold conditions. Symptoms last less than a day and start within hours of exposure to the cold.
  • Fanconi pancytopenia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by upper limb defects and kidney abnormalities.
  • Fanconi-Albertini-Zellweger syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by congenital heart defect, brain abnormalities, unusual face and metabolic acidosis.
  • Farmer's lung: A condition that affects farmers who are exposed to mouldy hay or crops. The lungs become inflamed due to a hypersensitivity reaction to the exposure.
  • Gaucher disease type 3: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of the enzyme called glucocerebrosidase and accumulation of glycosylceramide (glucocerebroside). There are three forms of this disease: type 1, 2 and 3. Type 3 is a subacute neurological form which often first appears in childhood.
  • Generalized pustular psoriasis: This is a rare form of psoriasis is also known as von Zumbusch psoriasis. It can be life-threatening especially in the elderly. It is characterized by the development of pustules in the flexural areas - the backs of the knees, the insides of the elbows, the armpits and the groin. These pustules continue to spread and soon they join to form lakes of pus. The pustules rupture easily and can become infected. This condition can be fatal if the patient gets dehydrated, or the infection spreads to the bloodstream. Generalized pustular psoriasis is often triggered by stopping topical or oral steroids.
  • Ghosal syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by difficult to treat anemia and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Hawaiian Baby Woodrose poisoning: The Hawaiian Baby Woodrose is a woody vine that grows in tropical climates such as in Hawaii, India, Florida and California. The plant bears rose-colored flowers and black seeds. The seeds contain ergoline alkaloids which can produce effects similar to LSD if consumed. As little as three seeds can cause symptoms.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Heavy-chain diseases: A group of rare condition characterized by the production of the heavy chain portions of immunoglobulin molecules. Subtypes include y-chain disease, µ-chain disease and α-chain disease.
  • Hepatorenal tyrosinemia: A rare genetic metabolic disorder characterized by a deficiency of particular enzymes which prevents the breakdown of tyrosine which then builds up in the liver. Type 1 involves a deficiency of the enzyme fumaril acetoacetate hydrolase.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Echinacea: Echinacea can be used as a herbal agent to treat arthritis, vaginal yeast infections, cold and flu as well as infections involving the respiratory system, urinary tract and skin. The herbal agent can produce and adverse reaction in some people.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Margosa oil: Margosa oil can be used as a herbal agent to treat parasitic infestations. The herbal agent contains various chemicals which can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Autumn Crocus: Autumn crocus can be used as a herbal agent to treat gout and rheumatoid conditions. The herbal agent contains chemicals such as colchicine and the ingestion of excessive amounts of this can result in symptoms. Severe overdose can result in death and chronic ingestion can also cause harmful effects.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Cleistanthus Collinus: Cleistanthus collinus can be used as a herbal agent which is very toxic and has been used to commit suicide or murder. The herbal agent contains toxic chemicals such as dyphyllin, collinusin and glycosides.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Garlic: Garlic can be used as a herbal agent to treat cholesterol problems, high blood pressure and to reduce inflammation and the risk of blood clots. The bulb of the garlic plant contain alliin and ajoene which can cause an adverse reaction in some people or various symptoms if excessive amounts are ingested.
  • High white cell count: A raised white cell count
  • Homologous wasting disease: A term used to describe the disease state resulting from a graft versus host reaction. Graft versus host reaction occurs when the immune system of a transplant patient attacks the transplanted tissue but in homologous wasting disease the immune cells in the transplanted tissue actually attacks the host tissues. The condition occurs most often after a bone marrow transplant.
  • Hydrocarbon poisoning: Excessive ingestion of hydrocarbon compounds such as turpentine, pine oil, cleaning agents, fuel, polishes, kerosene and car products.
  • Hyper IgE: Inherited immunodeficiency disorders involving excessive production of IgE and frequent bacterial (staphylococcal) infections mainly involving the skin as well as other problems. Recessively inherited forms of the condition tend to be more serious with bone problems.
  • Hyperdibasic aminoaciduria type 2: A rare inborn urea cycle disorder characterized by an enzyme defect in the amino acid transporter gene SLC7A7 (positive amino acid transporter).
  • Hypersplenism: A condition which is characterized by the exaggeration of blood degrading function of the spleen
  • Hypokalemic periodic paralysis: A rare inherited muscle condition characterized by periods of severe muscle weakness or paralysis which can last from hours to days. Episodes can occur as often as daily or only rarely.
  • Increased number of white blood cells in blood: Increased number of white blood cells in blood refers to an increase in the amount of white blood cells, cells in the blood that fight infection and potentially dangerous foreign substances in the body.
  • Infantile multisystem inflammatory disease: A rare autoinflammatory disease characterized by fever, rash, arthritic changes, eye problems and chronic meningitis.
  • Ivic Syndrome: A very rare disorder characterized by finger and hand bone abnormalities (radial ray defects), crossed eyes, deafness and other variable anomalies.
  • Jatropha multifida poisoning: The Jatropha multifida is a decorative garden plant which bears a sweet fruit. It is found in Africa, Australia and America. The oil from the plant is used in parts of Africa to treat parasitic infestations and rheumatism. The seeds, fruit and sap contain a chemical called curcin which can cause symptoms if ingested. Eating even one seed can cause symptoms in children.
  • Job syndrome: An immunodeficiency disorder characterized by excessive production of IgE and frequent bacterial infections mainly involving the skin.
  • Junin virus:
  • Juniper tar poisoning: Tar from the Juniper plant is sometimes used to treat skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis. Ingestion of the substance can cause poisoning symptoms.
  • Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A group of chronic inflammatory joint disorders that affects children. The condition generally involves periods of time where the condition is active followed by periods of abatement of symptoms. In some cases, the condition can be systemic and can cause symptoms such as fever and rash with organ involvement. There are three main types of juvenile idiopathic arthritis - oligoarticular, polyarticular and systemic (Still's disease).
  • Kawasaki disease: A childhood illness that generally affects the skin, mouth and lymph nodes.
  • Korovnikov syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by enlarged spleen and increased blood platelets which leads to bleeding problems. It is considered to by a form of Banti's disease.
  • Leigh syndrome: A rare, progressive, neurological disorder characterized by the degeneration of the brain and impaired function of various body organs. The condition is caused by a systemic deficiency of the cytochrome C oxidase enzyme.
  • Leigh syndrome, French Canadian type: A rare, progressive, inherited metabolic disorder where a deficiency of the enzyme cytochrome C oxidase affects skeletal muscles, connective tissue, brain and liver.
  • Leishmaniasis: A rare infectious disease caused by any of a number of parasitic Leishmania species. Infection can cause any of three different manifestations: cutaneous leishmaniasis, mucosal leishmaniasis and visceral leishmaniasis.
  • Leucocytosis: increase in the total number of white blood cells in the blood
  • Leucopenia: decrease in the number of circulating white blood cells
  • Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency, Type III: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormal neutrophil functioning which reduces the body's immunity as well as bleeding problems due to platelet adhesive problems. The abnormal neutrophils are unable to be transported to sites of infection due to their inability to adhere to certain blood vessel components which would normally lead them to the infection site. Infections may be life-threatening as the body is unable to destroy bacteria effectively. Bleeding problems result from the inability of the blood platelets to clump together and stem the flow of blood.
  • Leukocytosis: Increased concentration of white blood cells in the blood.
  • Leukocytosis in pregnancy: Elevated blood white cell count in a woman who is pregnant.
  • Leukopaenia: Reduced number of white cells in the blood.
  • Leukopenia: decreased concentration of white blood cells in the blood.
  • Low White Cells: Low white cells in the blood.
  • Low blood-cell counts: When there is low blood cell counts in ones blood
  • Low white blood cell count: When a person has an abnormally low white blood cell count in their blood
  • Mastocytosis: A disorder where excessive amounts of mast cells proliferate in organs such as the skin, liver, bone, spleen and gastrointestinal tract. Mast cells occur in connective tissue and defend the body against disease by releasing histamine to stimulate the immune system.
  • Maternally Inherited Leigh Syndrome: A rare condition where Leigh syndrome is inherited from the mother. Leigh syndrome is characterized by degeneration of the brain and impaired function of various organs.
  • Mayapple poisoning: The Mayapple is a small flowering plant which is often found growing naturally. It bears small single flowers and apple-like fruit which turns yellow when ripe. The unripe fruit and leaves contain a chemical called podophyllin which can cause poisoning if eaten. The plant is considered highly toxic and death can occur if sufficient quantities are eaten. The leaves, roots and unripe fruit are toxic but the ripe fruit is edible. The plant has been used to treat venereal warts.
  • Methotrexate toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Methylmalonic acidemia -- homocystinuria: A rare inborn error of metabolism which results in impaired vitamin B12 metabolism. There are a number of forms of this condition with variable severity.
  • Mouth symptoms: Symptoms of the mouth or oral area.
  • Myelodysplastic syndromes: A group of syndromes characterized by a disruption in the production of blood cells. Often the bone marrow increases production of various blood cells but because many of them are defective, they are destroyed before the reach the blood stream.
  • Myeloproliferative disease:
  • NOMID syndrome: A rare autoinflammatory disease characterized by fever, rash, arthritic changes, eye problems and chronic meningitis.
  • Nanukayami:
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neuroleptic malignant syndrome: A severe, potentially fatal reaction to antipsychotic drugs.
  • Noma: A gangrenous mouth infection that spreads to include the face.
  • Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, during pregnancy: A cancer that originates in the lymphatic system and occurs during pregnancy. The greatest problem is the fact that the cancer is usually quite aggressive and delays in delivery often results in delayed treatment and a poor prognosis.
  • O'Higgins disease: A condition that tends to occur in May in parts of Argentina and may be related to the chronic exposure to insecticides.
  • Pancreatic abscess: A localized pus-filled cavity (abscess) in the pancreas which usually occurs after pancreatitis. Death can occur if the abscess is not drained.
  • Plasma cell leukemia: A form of leukemia characterized by the proliferation of plasma cells in the peripheral blood system. The prognosis is generally poor for this usually aggressive condition.
  • Pneumonia, eosinophilic: Infiltration of the lungs by eosinophils (type of white blood cell) which can be caused by asthma or as a reaction to certain drugs or parasitic infections.
  • Polychondritis: A serious, progressive, episodic condition characterized by inflammation and degeneration of cartilage in the body. The duration and severity of the episodes can vary.
  • Polycystic kidney disease, infantile type: Severe form of polycystic kidney disease which is a genetic kidney disease. Symptoms develop very early in life and may even be present during the fetal stage.
  • Polymer Fume Fever: Polymer fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of fumes which can occur when Polytetrafluoroethylene (commercially known as Fluon, Teflon and Halon) is heated to high temperatures. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the polymer industry.
  • Postpericardiotomy syndrome: A complication that can occur after open-heart surgery. Symptoms can occur from days to weeks after the surgery. The condition is possibly caused by an autoimmune process triggered by a virus.
  • Pyridoxamine 5-prime-phosphate oxidase deficiency: A metabolic disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme called 5-prime-phosphate oxidase. Symptoms start soon after birth and involves seizures and other anomalies.
  • Raised White Cells: Raised levels of white cells in the blood.
  • Refractory anaemia with ringed sideroblasts: Refractory anaemia with ringed sideroblasts is a subtype of myelodysplastic syndrome
  • Reye's syndrome: is a potentially fatal disease that causes numerous detrimental effects to many organs, especially the brain and liver
  • SARS: Serious respiratory infection
  • Sabia virus: An arbovirus causing fever, rashes and hemorrhagic bleeding
  • Schnitzler syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of chronic urticaria as well as a blood abnormality called macroglobulinemia.
  • Skin symptoms: Symptoms affecting the skin.
  • Spirometra erinace-ieuropaei infection: Infection with a tapeworm species called Spirometra erinace-ieuropaei. Infection usually results from ingesting contaminated food or water. The parasite can migrate to any part of the body but usually resides under the skin where it develops into a nodule.
  • Spirometra mansoni infection: Infection with a tapeworm species called Spirometra mansoni. Infection usually results from ingesting contaminated food or water. The parasite can migrate to any part of the body but usually resides under the skin where it develops into a nodule.
  • Spirometra mansonoides infection: Infection with a tapeworm species called Spirometra mansonoides. Infection usually results from ingesting contaminated food or water. The parasite can migrate to any part of the body but usually resides under the skin where it develops into a nodule.
  • Spirometra theileri infection: Infection with a tapeworm species called Spirometra theileri. Infection usually results from ingesting contaminated food or water. The parasite can migrate to any part of the body but usually resides under the skin where it develops into a nodule.
  • Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome: A very rare, potentially fatal infection caused by the bacterial toxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes. The condition is often associated with tampon use but can originate from other sources.
  • Sweet Syndrome:
  • Systemic Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis: Onset of JRA with fevers and systemic symptoms
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus: chronic autoimmune disease that can be fatal, though with recent medical advances, fatalities are becoming increasingly rare.
  • TRAPS (TNF-receptor-associated periodic syndrome): A rare syndrome involving periods of fever and chills along with gastrointestinal symptoms and muscle pain. Symptoms last for two or three weeks.
  • Tick-borne diseases: Any disease that is transferred to humans by the tick
  • Trisomy 8 mosaicism: A very rare chromosomal disorder where there is an extra copy of chromosome 8 in some of the body's cells. Some cases with this chromosomal abnormality have no clinical symptoms. The presence of abnormalities in some cases is dependent on which body cells contain the chromosomal defect.
  • Typhoid fever: Fever from bacterial food poisoning.
  • Visceral leishmaniasis: A tropical disease caused by a protozoan organism and transmitted to humans through sand fly bites. Also called Assam fever, black fever, dumdum fever, ponos or kala-azar.
  • Visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar): A rare infectious disease caused by any of a number of parasitic Leishmania species. Infection can cause any of three different manifestations: cutaneous leishmaniasis, mucosal leishmaniasis and visceral leishmaniasis. Visceral leishmaniasis infection involves the spleen, liver and bone marrow and can be fatal if untreated.
  • White Chameleon poisoning: The white chameleon is a type of thistle found mainly in dry areas of the Mediterranean. The rhizomes contains chemicals which can cause poisoning symptoms if eaten. The plant is often mistaken for a wild artichoke. The root extract is sometimes used in alternative medicine and excessive doses can also result in poisoning.
  • Whitening: Whitening or reduced coloring of the skin
  • Wilson's disease: Wilson disease, or hepatolenticular degeneration, is a neurodegenerative disease of copper metabolism.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: White blood cell symptoms:

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Conditions listing medical complications: White blood cell symptoms:

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