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Diseases » Thrombosis » Glossary
 

Glossary for Thrombosis

  • Aarhus dysfibrinogenemia: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormal fibrinogen which is a protein essential to the blood clotting process. The Aarhus type was discovered in Aarhus.
  • Ales dysfibrinogenemia: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormal fibrinogen which is a protein essential to the blood clotting process. The Alès type was discovered in Alès.
  • Antithrombin III deficiency, congenital: A rare blood disorder where a congenital deficiency of antithrombin III causes excessive blood coagulation which results in blood clot formation.
  • Atheroma: A region of plaque occurring in atherosclerosis
  • Atrioventricular septal defect: A congenital heart defect where the valves and walls between the upper and lower heart chambers (atrial and ventricular septa and the atrioventricular valves) don't develop properly. Symptoms are determined by the severity of the malformation.
  • Baltimore dysfibrinogenemia: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormal fibrinogen which is a protein essential to the blood clotting process. The Baltimore type was discovered in Baltimore.
  • Bleeding and coagulation conditions:
  • Blood coagulation disorders, inherited: Inherited blood disorders where the ability to form clots is dysfunctional. The blood needs to be able to clot to prevent excessive bleeding in situations such as when the body suffers some sort of injury. With blood coagulation disorders, the blood's ability to clot may be impaired, resulting in excessive bleeding, or the blood may form clots too readily and result in thrombosis.
  • Blood conditions: Conditions that affect the blood
  • Blood vessel conditions: Conditions that affect the blood vessels
  • Circulatory system conditions: Medical conditions affecting the heart and the circulatory system.
  • Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 2D: Congenital disorders of glycosylation is a group of very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type 2d is caused by a defect on chromosome 9p13 and involves a defect in the gene for beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase.
  • Coronaro-cardiac fistula: An abnormal opening between a heart artery and a heart chamber or great vessel. This rare defect is present at birth and often causes no problems or symptoms until adulthood. The severity of the condition is determined by the size and exact location of the defect.
  • Deep vein thrombosis: Blood clot in vein, often in calf muscle vein in the leg.
  • Defibrination syndrome: The generation of fibrin in the blood and consumption of pro-coagulants and platelets occurring in complications of obstetrics
  • Eisenmenger Syndrome: Increased lung blood pressure that can result from conditions such as a hole in the wall between the two heart chambers.
  • Embolism: Blockage of an artery or blood vessel
  • Envenomization by the Martinique lancehead viper: Posionous bite by a snake called the Lancehead Viper. It is a very venomous pit viper found in Martinique. Death is not common as the bite usually only causes a localized reaction rather than a systemic one. 10-20% of untreated cases result in death.
  • Factor V Leiden mutation: A rare genetic condition where a abnormalities in the factor V protein prevent it from being inactivated by protein C which causes the blood to clot. The normal processes which regulate the blood coagulation process is impaired. The homozygous form of the condition carries a greater risk of blood clotting than the heterozygous form.
  • Heart attack: Serious and often fatal acute heart condition
  • Hemorrhoids: Swollen blood vessels around the anus.
  • Hypercoagulability syndrome, due to glycosylphosphatidylinositol deficiency: A genetic disorder where the deficiency of a glycolipid called glycosylphosphatidylinositol causes seizures and blood coagulation problems.
  • Hyperhomocysteinemia: Excessive homocysteine levels in blood. It is often associated with folate or cobalamin deficiency as well as genetic defects. Severity of symptoms is determined by how high the homocysteine levels are. Sufferers are generally asymptomatic until the onset of premature arterial disease later in life. Other symptoms such as mental retardation only occur in severe cases where the homocysteine levels are extremely high.
  • Kawasaki disease: A childhood illness that generally affects the skin, mouth and lymph nodes.
  • Maffucci Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by benign cartilage overgrowths, skeletal deformities and dark red irregular skin patches.
  • Marchiafava-Micheli disease: A blood disorder where abnormalities in erhtyrocyte membranes results in excessive destruction of red blood cells and hence anemia.
  • Mastoiditis: Inflammation of a bone behind the ear
  • Mucormycosis: An infectious disease caused by fungus from the order Mucorales which is normally found in the soil and in decaying plant matter. Transmission is usually through the inhalation of spores. It is generally harmless to healthy individuals but can cause infection in patients who are immunocompromised or who have a serious chronic illness such as uncontrolled diabetes. Symptoms and severity can vary considerable depending on the part of the body the infection occurs in - gastrointestinal tract, skin, lungs, central nervous system, eye orbit and the paranasal sinuses.
  • Nephrotic syndrome: Various kidney glomeruli conditions
  • Nipah virus encephalitis: Inflammation of the brain caused by the Nipah virus which can infect pigs and humans so transmission usually occurs through contact with pigs.
  • No symptoms: The absence of noticable symptoms.
  • Osler-Vaquez disease: An uncommon chronic blood disease involving an increased red blood cell count.
  • Paroxysmal Nocturnal Hemoglobinuria: A condition which is characterized by the occurrence of hemoglobinuria at night without any identifiable cause.
  • Peripheral vascular disease: Disease of arteries supplying the legs or sometimes arms
  • Phlebitis: Inflammation of a vein.
  • Polyarteritis nodosa: A serious blood vessel disease where small and medium-sized arteries become swollen and damaged and are unable to adequately supply oxygenated blood to various tissues in the body. The disease can occur in a mild form or a serious, rapidly fatal form.
  • Polycythemia: Excess red blood cells in the blood
  • Polycythemia rubra: An uncommon chronic blood disease involving an increased production of red blood cells by the bone marrow. The production of platelets and white blood cells may also be increased.
  • Protein C deficiency: A genetic condition where a person faces an increased risk of blood clot formation. It is characterized by a deficiency of functioning protein C which is a protein needed to regulate the blood clotting process. The homozygous form of the condition carries a much higher risk of thrombosis with severe thrombosis often occurring at birth.
  • Protein S acquired deficiency: A rare disorder involving a deficiency of a blood protein called protein S. Protein S prevents blood from clotting in the veins. A deficiency of protein S can be acquired through liver disease, chemotherapy, lack of vitamin K or through the use of oral anticoagulants or L-asparaginase.
  • Protein S deficiency: A genetic condition where a person faces an increased risk of blood clot formation. It is characterized by a deficiency of functioning protein S which is a protein needed to regulate the blood clotting process. The homozygous form of the condition carries a much higher risk of thrombosis with severe thrombosis often occurring at birth.
  • Pulmonary embolism: Blocked lung blood vessel often from a blood clot.
  • Stroke: Serious brain event from bleeding or blood clots.
  • Superficial thrombophlebitis: Inflammation of a vein wall
  • Thromboembolism: Lodgement of a blood clot causing blockage
  • Vague symptoms: Vague, unclear, mild or non-specific symptoms
  • Vaquez disease: An uncommon chronic blood disease involving an increased red blood cell count.
  • Wiesbaden dysfibrinogenemia: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormal fibrinogen which is a protein essential to the blood clotting process. The Wiesbaden type was discovered in Wiesbaden.
  • Zygomycosis: An infectious disease caused by fungus from the orders Mucorales and Entomophthorales which are normally found in the soil and in decaying plant matter. The infection differs from mucormycosis which only involves the order Mucorales. Transmission is usually through the inhalation of spores. It is generally harmless to healthy individuals but can cause infection in patients who are immunocompromised or who have a serious chronic illness such as uncontrolled diabetes. Symptoms and severity can vary considerable depending on the part of the body the infection occurs in - gastrointestinal tract, skin, lungs, central nervous system, eye orbit and the paranasal sinuses.

 

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