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Diseases » Tinnitus » Glossary
 

Glossary for Tinnitus

  • Accelerated hypertension: Accelerated hypertension is a condition characterized by a rapid increase in blood pressure. The condition is a medical emergency which can cause organ damage if not treated promptly.
  • Acoustic Neurinoma: A benign tumor of the 8th cranial nerve which lies in the tube connecting the inner ear to the brain.
  • Acoustic neuroma: A benign tumor of the 8th cranial nerve which lies in the tube connecting the inner ear to the brain.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- xylene: Xylene is an ingredient used in certain insecticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute mountain sickness: A condition that occurs when an un-acclimatized person climbs to high altitudes.
  • Adrenal hypertension: Adrenal hypertension is high blood pressure caused by adrenal gland problems. For example, an adrenal tumor can cause excessive production of aldosterone which in turn causes salt-retention and high blood pressure. Severity of symptoms varies depending on the underlying cause.
  • Aerotitis syndrome: Trauma to the blood vessels in the ears caused by rapid changes in atmospheric pressure. Blockage of the Eustachian tube in the ear prevents equalization of air pressure and a vacuum develops inside the ear. Yawning or chewing can sometimes alleviate symptoms by opening up the Eustachian tube.
  • Age-Related Hearing Impairment: Progressive deterioration of hearing ability that affects both ears and occurs with aging. The hearing loss is sensorineural in nature and is most noticeable at high frequencies. There are a number of risk factors associated with age-related hearing impairment: smoking, ototoxic medication, cardiovascular disease and exposure to loud noise. It is estimated that a third of people over the age of 60 have some hearing loss and more than half of people over the age of 75 years have hearing loss.
  • Alcohol-induced hypertension: Alcohol-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by excessive drinking of alcohol.
  • Allergies: Immune system over-reaction to various substances.
  • Amphetamine-induced hypertension: Amphetamine-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by use of amphetamines. Patients with an existing history of hypertension may suffer further blood pressure increases while taking amphetamines and this can be serious. Severity of symptoms varies amongst patients depending on their susceptibility, underlying health and duration of amphetamine use.
  • Ancylostoma duodenale: An infestation with Ancylostoma duodenale which is a parasitic hookwork whichcan cause serious disease in humans - usually occurs in people who work barefoot in damp soil. The hookworms suck blood from the intestines of the host which can result in anemia if there is a large number of worms.
  • Anemia: Reduced ability of blood to carry oxygen from various possible causes.
  • Anemia, Iron-Deficiency: A lack of fully functioning red blood cells due to a deficiency of iron. The iron allows the body to make hemoglobin in red blood cells which in turn allows the red blood cell to carry oxygen.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. There are two types: type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a quarter of cases in type 1 and a third of cases in type 2.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts, type 1: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. Type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a quarter of cases in type 1.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts, type 2: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. Type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a third of cases in type 2.
  • Aneurysm: Dangerous ballooning of a weakened area of an artery
  • Aplastic anemia: A blood disorder where the bone marrow produces insufficient new blood cells.
  • Aspergillus niger infection: A rare fungal infection that often causes a black mould to appear on some fruit and vegetables but may also infect humans through inhalation of fungal spores.
  • Aspirin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Aspirin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Ataxia, episodic -- vertigo -- tinnitus -- myokymia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by episodes of incoordination and unsteadiness as well as tinnitus and vertigo. Stress, exhaustion, sudden movements and exertion may trigger the episodes. It is caused by a defect on chromosome 1q42.
  • Atherosclerosis: Atherosclerosis is a syndrome affecting arterial blood vessels. It is a chronic inflammatory response in the walls of arteries, in large part due to the accumulation of macrophage white blood cells and promoted by low density (especially small particle) lipoproteins (plasma proteins that carry cholesterol and triglycerides) without adequate removal of fats and cholesterol from the macrophages by functional high density lipoproteins (HDL). It is commonly referred to as a hardening or furring of the arteries. It is caused by the formation of multiple plaques within the arteries.
  • Ativan withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Ativan (Lorazepam) use is discontinued or reduced. Ativan is an anti-anxiety drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Autoimmune Inner Ear disease: A rare disorder where the body's own immune system attacks the inner ear.
  • BANF acoustic neurinoma: A type of tumor that affects hearing and is associated with a condition called BANF (bilateral acoustic neurofibromatosis). The tumor is benign an occurs in the cells that form the myelin sheath of the vestibulocochlear nerve. The symptoms vary depending on the size and exact location of the nerve. The tumor may become large enough to compress against various cranial nerves or even the brainstem.
  • Barotitis Media: Middle ear injury due to eustachian tube blockage
  • Barre-Lieou syndrome: A rare condition where trauma (such as pinching by adjacent vertebrae or arthritis) to the sympathetic nerves located in the spinal area of the neck results in a variety of neurological symptoms.
  • Basilar artery migraine: Basilar migraine (BM), also known as Bickerstaff syndrome, consists of headache accompanied by dizziness, ataxia, tinnitus, decreased hearing, nausea and vomiting, dysarthria, diplopia, loss of balance, bilateral paresthesias or paresis, altered consciousness, syncope, and sometimes loss of consciousness.
  • Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A condition where certain head movements cause extreme dizziness.
  • Brain Fag syndrome: A type of neurotic disorder that was first observed in white collar workers in Africa.
  • Bumetanide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Bumetanide during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Buzzing in ears: The occurrence of buzzing in the ears
  • Bárány syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by various symptoms associated with a headache that occurs on one side of the back of the head.
  • Caffeine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to caffeine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Caffeine poisoning: Excessive ingestion of caffeine.
  • Carbamazepine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Carbamazepine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cerebral Aneurysm: Dangerous swelling of a brain blood vessel that may rupture.
  • Cervical Spondylosis: Condition where bony changes within the cervical spine causes spinal cord compression with associated neck pain; usually seen in patients over 40 years of age.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetylsalicylic Acid: Acetylsalicylic Acid is also known as aspirin and is primarily used to relieve pain, fever and inflammation. Excessive exposure to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aniline: Aniline is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of perfumes, varnishes, resins, dyes, paint removers, herbicides, fungicides, explosives, solvents and photographic chemicals. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benzene: Benzene is a chemical used mainly in gasoline fuel and as an industrial solvent. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromates: Bromate is a chemical used mainly in perming solution neutralizers and in small amounts as a bread preservative. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dichlorphenamide: Dichlorphenamide is a chemical used mainly as a treatment for glaucoma. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hexane: Hexane is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of products such as glue, paint, shoes and furniture. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methanol: Methanol is a chemical used mainly in fuel, paint removers, solvent, antifreeze and in the production process of many other products. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetrahydrofuran: Tetrahydrofuran is a chemical used mainly as a plastic solvent and in the processing of varnish, ink, paint and glue. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Toluene: Toluene is a chemical used mainly in pesticides, degreasers, glues and pain removers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Cholesteatoma: Uncommon middle ear condition
  • Chronic Sinusitis: Chronic form of sinusitis, inflammation of the sinus cavities.
  • Chronic interstitial nephritis:
  • Cobalt poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to cobalt.
  • Cocaine-induced hypertension: Cocaine-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by use of cocaine. Patients with an existing history of hypertension may suffer further blood pressure increases while taking cocaine and this can be serious. Severity of symptoms varies amongst patients depending on their susceptibility, underlying health and duration of cocaine use.
  • Cogan's syndrome: A disorder primarily involving eye inflammation and hearing impairment and dizziness. Complete deafness usually occurs within a couple of years. The disorder is caused by inflammation of the arteries in the ear. Sometimes arteries in other parts of the body may also be affected e.g. skin, kidneys and other organs.
  • Cold antibody hemolytic anemia: A rare autoimmune condition where the body's defense system attacks and destroys red blood cells. The onset of the condition is triggered by temperatures 30°C or lower.
  • Conductive deafness: Any hearing loss or impairment caused by a defect in part of the ear that conducts sound.
  • Conductive hearing loss: Hearing loss due to a defect in the external auditory canal or middle ear.
  • Conn Syndrome-induced hypertension: Conn Syndrome-induced hypertension is high blood pressure associated with Conn Syndrome. It results from excessive production of a hormone called aldosterone by the adrenal glands. The high blood pressure often responds poorly to the usual medications. Death can result in severe cases.
  • Corticosteroid-induced hypertension: Corticosteroid-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by use of corticosteroids. Patients with an existing history of hypertension may suffer further blood pressure increases while taking corticosteroids. Severity of symptoms varies amongst patients depending on their susceptibility, underlying health and duration of corticosteroid therapy.
  • Cushing's syndrome-induced hypertension: Cushing's syndrome-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by a condition caused Cushing's syndrome where the adrenal glands produce excessive amounts of cortisol.
  • Cyclosporine-induced hypertension: Cyclosporine-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by taking cyclosporine. Patients with an existing history of hypertension may suffer further blood pressure increases while taking amphetamines and this can be serious. Severity of symptoms varies amongst patients depending on their susceptibility, underlying health and duration of cyclosporine use.
  • Darvocet overdose: Darvocet is a prescription drug mainly used to treat pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Drug-induced hypertension: Drug-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by taking certain drugs or medications e.g. corticosteroids, cyclosporine, amphetamines, alcohol and estrogens.
  • Ear and Hearing conditions: Medical conditions affecting the ears or the hearing systems.
  • Ear conditions: Any condition that affects the ear
  • Ear discharge: Discharge of fluid from the ear
  • Ear foreign body: Having a "foreign body" stuck inside the ear
  • Ear infection: An infection that affects the ear
  • Ear inflammation: Inflammation of the ear - may involve the middle and inner ear.
  • Ear sounds: Hearing ringing, buzzing, or noises in the ears
  • Ear wax: Buildup of wax (cerumen) inside the ear canal
  • Earache: Pain in the ear called "otalgia"
  • Endolymphatic sac tumors (ELST's) in Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) disease: A tumor that develops in the endolymph sacs which are structures inside the ear. These tumors occur predominantly in patients suffering from Von Hippel Landau disease. The tumors don't metastasize.
  • Epilepsy, partial, familial: A form of epilepsy that tends to run in families and is linked to damage or abnormalities in a specific part of the brain. Often sensory disturbances accompany or precede the seizures.
  • Episodic ataxia, type 3: A rare genetic disorder characterized by episodes of incoordination and unsteadiness as well as tinnitus and vertigo. Stress and exertion may trigger the episodes. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 1q42.
  • Episodic ataxia, type 7: A rare genetic disorder characterized by episodes of incoordination and unsteadiness which lasted from hours to days. Episodes occurred from monthly to yearly and the frequency tends to lessen with age. Stress and exertion may trigger the episodes. Type 7 is caused by a defect on chromosome 19q13.
  • Erythropoietin-induced hypertension: Erythropoietin-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by taking erythropoietin which is sometimes used to treat anemia in conditions such as chornic kidney failure. Patients with an existing history of hypertension may suffer further blood pressure increases while taking amphetamines and this can be serious. Severity of symptoms varies amongst patients depending on their susceptibility, underlying health and duration of erythropoietin use.
  • Eustachian tube disorders: Any disorder that affects the Eustachian tubes of the ear
  • Fabry's Disease: Genetic fat storage disorder
  • Familial hypertension: An inherited from of high blood pressure that tends to run in families.
  • Fibrosing Mediastinitis idiopathic: A rare condition characterized by excessive growth of fibrous tissue and collagen deposits inside the chest which can compress various parts inside the chest such as the esophagus, airways and even some blood vessels.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- chocolate: An intolerance to chocolate is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to chocolate. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize the food. The amount of chocolate required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- sulphite: An intolerance to sulphite is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to sulphite. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize the substance. The amount of sulphite required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Gentamicin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Gentamicin (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Glomus tympanicum: A rare, usually benign tumor found behind the ear drum. The tumor develops from glomus cells which are located along blood vessels involved in automatic body activities such as regulation of blood pressure and blood flow.
  • Gravitational headache: Headache following a lumbar puncture is a common and often debilitating syndrome. Continued leakage of cerebrospinal fluid from a puncture site decreases intracranial pressure, which leads to traction on pain-sensitive intracranial structures.
  • Head Conditions: Conditions that affect the head
  • Head injury: An injury to the head
  • Hearing Impairment: Reduced ability to hear sounds.
  • Heart Murmur: Unusual heart sound heard by stethoscope
  • Heart symptoms: Symptoms affecting the heart
  • Herpes zoster oticus: Facial and auditory effects of herpes zoster
  • High Blood Pressure/Hypertension:
  • Hyperaldosteronism-induced hypertension: Hyperaldosteronism -induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by excessive production of a hormone called aldosterone by the adrenal glands. The high blood pressure often responds poorly to the usual medications. Death can result in severe cases.
  • Hypertension: High blood pressure
  • Hypertension due to bilateral renal artery stenosis: Hypertension due to bilateral renal artery stenosis is high blood pressure resulting from narrowing kidney blood vessels which prevents the blood from flowing through the kidneys properly.
  • Hypertension-like disorders:
  • Indomethacin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Indomethacin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Jaw joint disorders: Any condition involving the jaw joint.
  • Jequier-Deonna Syndrome: A very rare condition described in two sisters. It is characterized by vision and hearing problems and incoordination.
  • Klonopin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Klonopin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Labile Hypertension: Labile hypertension is a term used to describe frequent fluctuations in blood pressure. The blood pressure can change dramatically within a day. A range of factors including anxiety, physical exertion, noncompliance with treatment and phaeochromocytoma can cause the variations in the blood pressure.
  • Labrynthitis: Inner ear condition affecting various ear structures
  • Labyrinthitis syndrome: A temporary condition which affects the inner ear workings and impairs hearing. It is often caused by an upper respiratory infection.
  • Lassa fever: Infectious rat-borne West African disease.
  • Leukemia: Cancer of the blood cells, usually white blood cells.
  • Licorice-induced hypertension: Licorice-induced hypertension is a relatively quick increase in blood pressure due to eating licorice (either in the form of candy or as a herb). Blood pressure usually resumes to normalisation quite rapidly. Patients with existing blood pressure problems should avoid consuming licorice as it can cause their blood pressure to rise to dangerously high levels.
  • Lidocaine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Lithium toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Malignant hypertension: Malignant hypertension is a condition characterized by very high blood pressure and swelling of the optic nerve. This type of hypertension is more common in people with kidney problems such as narrowed kidney blood vessels. The condition is a medical emergency which can cause organ damage if not treated promptly.
  • Meningioma: A slow-growing tumor of the meninges that is not cancerous. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the tumor.
  • Middle ear infection: Infection of middle ear also called otitis media.
  • Migraine: Chronic recurring headaches with or without a preceding aura.
  • Mosse syndrome: A condition involving the association of liver cirrhosis with polycythemia which is a chronic myeloproliferative disorder characterized by the excessive production of mainly red blood cells by the bone marrow.
  • Mumps: An acute viral disease that causes the salivary glands to become swollen, sore and inflamed. Immunization had greatly reduced the incidence of this disease.
  • Méničre's disease: Ear fluid disorder causing balance problems.
  • Nasal decongestant-induced hypertension: Nasal decongestant-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by taking nasal decongestants. Patients with an existing history of hypertension may suffer further blood pressure increases while taking nasal decongestants and this can be serious. Severity of symptoms varies amongst patients depending on their susceptibility, underlying health and duration of nasal decongestant use.
  • Nasopharyngeal carcinoma: A malignant cancer that occurs in the nasopharynx area which is the upper part of the throat. Often there are no symptoms until the cancer has metastasized to other parts of the body such as the neck.
  • Nasopharynx cancer: A condition which is characterized a malignancy located in the nasopharynx
  • Nephritis: Any type of kidney inflammation
  • Nervous system conditions: Diseases affecting the nerves and the nervous system.
  • Neuralgia: Pain associated with a particular nerve.
  • Neurofibromatosis-2: Genetic disorder often leading to tumors on nerves.
  • Noise-Induced Hearing Loss: Hearing loss from loud noise exposure.
  • Novo-Clopate -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Novo-Clopate during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Otitis externa: Infection of the outer ear canal
  • Otosclerosis: Genetic ear bone disorder
  • Otosclerosis, familial: Increased density of bones of the inner and middle ear which can affect hearing. Complete hearing loss is rare and progression is often slow.
  • Paget's disease of bone: A chronic, slowly progressing bone disorder where the bone is destroyed rapidly and replaced by abnormal bone which is dense and fragile.
  • Paraganglioma: A rare, usually benign tumor most often found in the abdomen, chest, head and neck areas. The tumor develops from glomus cells which are located along blood vessels involved in automatic body activities such as regulation of blood pressure and blood flow. Symptoms may vary depending on the exact location of the tumor.
  • Perforated eardrum: Hole occurring in the eardrum
  • Perilymph fistula: A condition characterized by rupture of the round window with leakage of perilymph into the middle ear, causing sensorineural hearing loss
  • Perilymphatic fistula: An abnormal opening between the fluid-filled inner ear and air-filled middle ear. It generally causes sudden or fluctuating hearing loss.
  • Pheochromocytoma-induced hypertension: Pheochromocytoma-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by an adrenal gland tumor. The high blood pressure often responds poorly to the usual medications. Death can result in severe cases.
  • Presbycusis: Progressive deterioration of hearing ability that affects both ears and occurs with aging. The hearing loss is sensorineural in nature and is most noticeable at high frequencies. There are a number of risk factors associated with age-related hearing impairment: smoking, ototoxic medication, cardiovascular disease and exposure to loud noise. It is estimated that a third of people over the age of 60 have some hearing loss and more than half of people over the age of 75 years have hearing loss.
  • Probable human carcinogen -- Cisplatin: Cisplatin (a chemotherapy drug) is a substance deemed to be a probable carcinogen to humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Psychological disorders: Any condition that affects ones mind
  • Quinidine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Quinidine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Quinine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Quinine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Ramsay Hunt syndrome Type II: A condition caused by a reactivation of the herpes simplex virus and resulting in facial paralysis, ear pain and skin blistering.
  • Renal hypertension: Renovascular hypertension is high blood pressure resulting from narrowing or damage to kidney blood vessels which prevents the blood from flowing through the kidneys properly.
  • Renovascular Hypertension: Renovascular hypertension is high blood pressure resulting from narrowing or damage to kidney blood vessels which prevents the blood from flowing through the kidneys properly.
  • Resistant hypertension: Resistant hypertension is a form of high blood pressure that doesn't respond to treatment. Blood pressure remains high even when a combination of three drugs is used. It can be caused by such things a secondary hypertension, fluid retention or if the patient doesn't stick to the treatment plan.
  • Ringing in ears: Hearing noises in the ears: ringing, roaring, clicks, whistling, or hissing.
  • Schwannoma: Solid, benign tumour derived from Schwann cells. Primarily found in the cerebellopontine angle.
  • Secondary Hypertension: Secondary hypertension is high blood pressure resulting from an underlying cause such as kidney disease. Hypertension is a serious health condition due to the fact that it often causes no symptoms until it is severe.
  • Stress-Induced Hypertension: Stress-induced hypertension is high blood pressure associated with physical or emotional stress. Chronic stress and associated high blood pressure can cause problems and treatment with anti-anxiety medication is usually prescribed.
  • Superior vena cava syndrome: A condition caused by compression or obstruction to the normal circulation of the superior vena cava which carries deoxygenated blood from the body tissues back to the heart.
  • Susac syndrome: A very rare characterized by poor blood supply resulting in damage to chochlear, retinal and brain tissue. It is results form inflammation of small blood vessels. Recurring attacks occur over a couple a couple of years and are months apart. The condition resolves itself eventually and the severity of persisting symptoms is variable.
  • Syphilis: A sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria (Treponema pallidum). The condition is often asymptomatic in the early stages but one or more sores may be present in the early stages. Untreated syphilis usually results in remission of visible symptoms but further severe damage may occur to internal organs and other body tissues which can result in death.
  • Tinnitus: Hearing noises in the ears: ringing, roaring, clicks, whistling, or hissing.
  • Toxic mushrooms -- Renal toxic (orelline): Some mushrooms (Amanita smithiana) contain chemicals (allenic norleucine, chlorocrotyglycine) which can cause kidney damage.
  • Tranxene -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Tranxene during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Typhoid fever: Fever from bacterial food poisoning.
  • Uremia: Excessive urea and waste products in the blood
  • Vestibulocochlear Nerve Diseases: Diseases that affect the vestibular and/or cochlear nerves of the hearing system. Such diseases include cochlear neuritis, acoustic neuroma, and vestibular neuritis. Symptoms depend on which of the nerves are involved.
  • Vestibulocochlear dysfunction progressive familial type: An inherited disorder involving progressive hearing loss due to inner ear abnormalities.
  • Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Syndrome: A rare condition characterized by poliosis and hair, skin, eye and ear abnormalities as well as retinal detachment and neurological involvement.
  • Warthin's tumor: A benign salivary (parotid) gland tumor.
  • Wheezing: A whistling like continuous sound that is caused by the respiratory system
  • Whiplash Injuries: An injury to the neck when the neck is rapidly forced backward and then forwards or vice versa. It most commonly occurs in vehicle accidents when the vehicle is stopped abruptly or pushed forwards suddenly.
  • Wyburn Mason's syndrome: A rare genetic condition mainly involving enlarged brain blood vessels and skin and eye abnormalities.
  • Wyburn-Mason Syndrome: A condition which is characterized by arteriovenous aneurysms on one or both sides of the brain

 

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