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Diseases » Tonic-Clonic seizure » Glossary
 

Glossary for Tonic-Clonic seizure

  • Brain conditions: Medical conditions that affect the brain
  • Ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal 2, late infantile type: A rare inherited biochemical disorder involving the progressive accumulation of certain chemicals (lipopigments) in body tissues due to deficiency of an enzyme (protease tri-peptidyl-peptidase) needed to process it.
  • Chromosome 22, trisomy: A very rare disorder where there is an extra copy of chromosome 22 in all the body cells. The condition is usually fatal soon after birth or during the fetal stage.
  • Convulsions benign familial neonatal dominant form: A rare dominantly inherited type of epilepsy that occurs in newborns. The seizures can occur during sleep or while awake and may be partial or generalized.
  • Epilepsy: Brain condition causing seizures or spasms.
  • Falling: The unintentional motion of falling
  • GM1 gangliosidosis: A rare biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (beta-galactosidase A) which results in the accumulation of harmful chemicals (GM1 gangliosides) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. Type 1 is a severe infantile form of the disorder and involves a greater degree of accumulation than type II or III.
  • Gangliosidosis generalized GM1, type 1: A rare biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (beta-galactosidase A) which results in the accumulation of harmful chemicals (GM1 gangliosides) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. Type 1 is a severe infantile form of the disorder and involves a greater degree of accumulation than type II or III.
  • Generalized Epilepsy with Febrile Seizures Plus: An inherited seizure disorder characterized by febrile seizures during early childhood and persisting seizures after early childhood which may or may not involve fever. The range and severity of symptoms is variable and may include febrile seizures, partial seizures and generalized seizures. The seizure disorder persists after the age of six which differentiates it from the similarly names seizure disorder called generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures. There are five (perhaps more) subtypes of the condition, each originating from a different genetic defect.
  • Generalized Epilepsy with Febrile Seizures Plus, type 1: Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus is an inherited seizure disorder characterized by febrile seizures during early childhood and persisting seizures after early childhood which may or may not involve fever. The range and severity of symptoms is variable and may include febrile seizures, partial seizures and generalized seizures. The seizure disorder persists after the age of six which differentiates it from the similarly names seizure disorder called generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures. There are five (perhaps more) subtypes of the condition, each originating from a different genetic defect. Type 1 is caused by a defect on chromosome 19q13.
  • Generalized Epilepsy with Febrile Seizures Plus, type 2: Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus is an inherited seizure disorder characterized by febrile seizures during early childhood and persisting seizures after early childhood which may or may not involve fever. The range and severity of symptoms is variable and may include febrile seizures, partial seizures and generalized seizures. The seizure disorder persists after the age of six which differentiates it from the similarly names seizure disorder called generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures. There are five (perhaps more) subtypes of the condition, each originating from a different genetic defect. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2q24.
  • Generalized Epilepsy with Febrile Seizures Plus, type 3: Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus is an inherited seizure disorder characterized by febrile seizures during early childhood and persisting seizures after early childhood which may or may not involve fever. The range and severity of symptoms is variable and may include febrile seizures, partial seizures and generalized seizures. The seizure disorder persists after the age of six which differentiates it from the similarly names seizure disorder called generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures. There are five (perhaps more) subtypes of the condition, each originating from a different genetic defect. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 15q31.1-q33.1.
  • Generalized Epilepsy with Febrile Seizures Plus, type 5: Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus is an inherited seizure disorder characterized by febrile seizures during early childhood and persisting seizures after early childhood which may or may not involve fever. The range and severity of symptoms is variable and may include febrile seizures, partial seizures and generalized seizures. The seizure disorder persists after the age of six which differentiates it from the similarly names seizure disorder called generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures. There are five (perhaps more) subtypes of the condition, each originating from a different genetic defect. Type 5 is caused by a defect on the GABRD gene.
  • Generalized Epilepsy with Febrile Seizures Plus, type 6: Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus is an inherited seizure disorder characterized by febrile seizures during early childhood and persisting seizures after early childhood which may or may not involve fever. The range and severity of symptoms is variable and may include febrile seizures, partial seizures and generalized seizures. The seizure disorder persists after the age of six which differentiates it from the similarly names seizure disorder called generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures. There are five (perhaps more) subtypes of the condition, each originating from a different genetic defect. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 8p23-p21.
  • Hemiconvulsion-Hemiplegia-Epilepsy syndrome: An uncommon condition characterized by prolonged clonic seizures (usually involving one side of the body) followed by paralysis on the same side of the body affected by the seizure. Within a few years of this episode, partial epilepsy develops. The convulsions are usually preceded by an episode of fever and they may last for hours if left untreated.
  • Infantile convulsions and paroxysmal choreoathetosis, familial: A very rare inherited syndrome characterized mainly by convulsions during infancy and choreoathetosis which can occur randomly or be triggered by certain stimuli such as exercise.
  • Level of consciousness symptoms: Symptoms related to consciousness such as coma or loss of consciousness.
  • Muscle conditions: Any condition that affects the muscles of the body
  • Muscle rigidity: The occurrence of resistance to passively moving a muscle
  • Muscle stiffness: A difficulty in stretching a muscle
  • Nervous system conditions: Diseases affecting the nerves and the nervous system.
  • Sialidosis type 1 and 3: A rare inherited biochemical disorder involving the deficiency of an enzyme (alpha-N-acetylneuraminidase) which results in the harmful accumulation of certain chemicals (sialyloligosaccharides and sialylglycopeptides) in various body tissues.
  • Spastic paraplegia 6, autosomal dominant: A rare genetic disorder characterized by progressive leg spasticity and weakness.

 

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