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Treatments for Transient Ischemic Attack

Treatments for Transient Ischemic Attack:

The most effective transient ischemic attack treatment plan uses a multifaceted approach. This includes preventive care aimed at minimizing the risk factors for developing transient ischemic attack and a subsequent stroke. Preventive measures include regular medical care to monitor and address such risk factors as high cholesterol, obesity, smoking, diabetes, hypertension and excessive alcohol consumption. Treatment includes lifestyle and dietary interventions and possibly medications.

Transient ischemic attack and stroke is often diagnosed and treated in the emergency room setting. Treatment includes the administration of supplemental oxygen aimed at increasing the amount of oxygen that is delivered to the brain tissue. Treatment also involves intensive monitoring and stabilization of vital signs. Cardiac rhythm is also monitored for arrhythmias, such a atrial fibrillation, which can cause the development of blood clots and lead to transient ischemic attack or stroke. Arrhythmias are treated as needed with medications.

Drugs that stop the formation of new clots such as antiplatelets (aspirin, Plavix) or anticoagulants (heparin, Coumadin) are generally prescribed to reduce the risk of stroke.

For some people a surgical procedure called a carotid endarterectomy may be an option to prevent a stroke. This surgery removes the build-up of plaque in the carotid arteries to improve blood flow to the brain. Another surgical option for some cases is carotid angioplasty. In a carotid angioplasty, a balloon-like device is treaded into the carotid artery to remove a blockage and a device called a stent is inserted into the artery to keep it open.

Treatment List for Transient Ischemic Attack

The list of treatments mentioned in various sources for Transient Ischemic Attack includes the following list. Always seek professional medical advice about any treatment or change in treatment plans.

Transient Ischemic Attack: Is the Diagnosis Correct?

The first step in getting correct treatment is to get a correct diagnosis. Differential diagnosis list for Transient Ischemic Attack may include:

Hidden causes of Transient Ischemic Attack may be incorrectly diagnosed:

Transient Ischemic Attack: Marketplace Products, Discounts & Offers

Products, offers and promotion categories available for Transient Ischemic Attack:

Transient Ischemic Attack: Research Doctors & Specialists

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Hospital statistics for Transient Ischemic Attack:

These medical statistics relate to hospitals, hospitalization and Transient Ischemic Attack:

  • 0.158% (20,124) of hospital consultant episodes were for unspecified transient cerebral ischaemic attack in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 74% of hospital consultant episodes for unspecified transient cerebral ischaemic attack required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 48% of hospital consultant episodes for unspecified transient cerebral ischaemic attack were for men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 52% of hospital consultant episodes for unspecified transient cerebral ischaemic attack were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • more hospital information...»

Discussion of treatments for Transient Ischemic Attack:

NINDS Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) Information Page: NINDS (Excerpt)

Because there is no way to tell whether symptoms are from a TIA or an acute stroke, patients should assume that all stroke-like symptoms signal an emergency and should not wait to see if they go away. A prompt evaluation (within 60 minutes) is necessary to identify the cause of the TIA and determine appropriate therapy. Depending on a patientís medical history and the results of a medical examination, the doctor may recommend drug therapy or surgery to reduce the risk of stroke in people who have had a TIA. The use of antiplatelet agents, particularly aspirin, is a standard treatment for patients at risk for stroke. People with atrial fibrillation (irregular beating of the heart) may be prescribed anticoagulants. (Source: excerpt from NINDS Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) Information Page: NINDS)

NINDS Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) Information Page: NINDS (Excerpt)

The most important treatable factors linked to TIAs and stroke are high blood pressure, cigarette smoking, heart disease, carotid artery disease, diabetes, and heavy use of alcohol. Medical help is available to reduce and eliminate these factors. Lifestyle changes such as eating a balanced diet, maintaining healthy weight, exercising, and enrolling in smoking and alcohol cessation programs can also reduce these factors. (Source: excerpt from NINDS Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) Information Page: NINDS)

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