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Treatments » Atropine
 

Atropine

Descriptions of Atropine

Atropine: A synthetically-derived form of the endogenous alkaloid isolated from the plant Atropa belladonna. Atropine functions as a sympathetic, competitive antagonist of muscarinic cholinergic receptors, thereby abolishing the effects of parasympathetic stimulation. This agent may induce tachycardia, inhibit secretions, and relax smooth muscles. (NCI04)
Source: Diseases Database

Atropine : anticholinergic alkaloid originally from Atropa belladonna; used as an antispasmodic to relax smooth muscles, to increase heart rate by blocking the vagus nerve, as an antidote for various toxic and anticholinesterase agents, and as an antisecretory, mydriatic, and cycloplegic.
Source: CRISP

Basic Information: Atropine

Count: Atropine is listed as a: treatment for 3 conditions; alternative treatment for 0 conditions; preventive treatment for 0 conditions; research treatment for 0 conditions.

Treatments: list of all treatments

List of Diseases with Atropine as a Treatment

The following list of conditions have 'Atropine' or similar listed as a treatment in our database:

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