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Diseases » Vertigo » Glossary
 

Glossary for Vertigo

  • Acoustic neuroma: A benign tumor of the 8th cranial nerve which lies in the tube connecting the inner ear to the brain.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- xylene: Xylene is an ingredient used in certain insecticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Aerotitis syndrome: Trauma to the blood vessels in the ears caused by rapid changes in atmospheric pressure. Blockage of the Eustachian tube in the ear prevents equalization of air pressure and a vacuum develops inside the ear. Yawning or chewing can sometimes alleviate symptoms by opening up the Eustachian tube.
  • Aging brain syndrome: Aging processes in the brain can cause various psychological and neurological symptoms.
  • Alcohol use: Use of alcohol (as a symptom)
  • Alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase deficiency, Type II: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where deficiency of an enzyme (alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase) causes glycoplids to accumulate in body tissues and result in various symptoms. Type 2 occurs during the second or third decade of life and is milder than type I and doesn't involve neurological degeneration.
  • Anemia: Reduced ability of blood to carry oxygen from various possible causes.
  • Arachnoid Cysts: A rare disorder involving a fluid-filled cysts on the arachnoid membrane which is one of the thin layers of tissue that form a membrane which covers the spinal cord and brain. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the size and location of the cyst.
  • Arnold-Chiari Malformation (Type 1): A rare malformation where the base of the brain enters into the upper spinal canal.
  • Arnold-Chiari malformation type 3: An extremely rare malformation where the base of the brain enters into the upper spinal canal. Type 3 involves the herniation of brain or brain stem tissue out of the back of the neck or head. The condition generally has a poor prognosis.
  • Arnold-Chiari malformation type 4: Arnold-Chiari malformation is a rare malformation where the base of the brain enters into the upper spinal canal. Type 4 actually involves a lack of development of a portion of the base of the brain (cerebellum). The prognosis is very poor with death often occurring during infancy.
  • Ataxia, episodic -- vertigo -- tinnitus -- myokymia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by episodes of incoordination and unsteadiness as well as tinnitus and vertigo. Stress, exhaustion, sudden movements and exertion may trigger the episodes. It is caused by a defect on chromosome 1q42.
  • BANF acoustic neurinoma: A type of tumor that affects hearing and is associated with a condition called BANF (bilateral acoustic neurofibromatosis). The tumor is benign an occurs in the cells that form the myelin sheath of the vestibulocochlear nerve. The symptoms vary depending on the size and exact location of the nerve. The tumor may become large enough to compress against various cranial nerves or even the brainstem.
  • Balance disorders: Various disorders impairing the body's sense of balance.
  • Barre-Lieou syndrome: A rare condition where trauma (such as pinching by adjacent vertebrae or arthritis) to the sympathetic nerves located in the spinal area of the neck results in a variety of neurological symptoms.
  • Bartschi-Rochaix syndrome: A range of symptoms caused by compression of the cerebral artery.
  • Basilar Migraine: Variant form of migraine headache seen mainly in teenage girls, giving complex neurological symptoms prior to onset and during the migraine
  • Basilar artery insufficiency syndrome: A range of symptoms caused by impaired blood flow through the basilar artery. The symptoms may come and go according to variation in blood flow through the basilar artery. The blood flow may be impaired by such things as thrombosis, narrowed artery and blood vessel spasms. Symptoms vary depending on the exact location and extent of the artery involvement as well as whether the onset is gradual or sudden.
  • Basilar artery migraine: Basilar migraine (BM), also known as Bickerstaff syndrome, consists of headache accompanied by dizziness, ataxia, tinnitus, decreased hearing, nausea and vomiting, dysarthria, diplopia, loss of balance, bilateral paresthesias or paresis, altered consciousness, syncope, and sometimes loss of consciousness.
  • Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A condition where certain head movements cause extreme dizziness.
  • Benign paroxysmal torticollis of infancy: A harmless condition characterized by recurring periods of head tilting resulting from dystonia (sustained muscle contractions) of the neck muscles. Other symptoms such as vomiting and irritability may also occur variably. Episodes tend to occur without any noticeable triggers and may last from hours to days. Episodes can occur as often as every two weeks or as infrequently as every couple of months.
  • Bonnier's syndrome: A range of symptoms caused by damage to Dieter's nucleus (the lateral nucleus of the vestibular nerve) or its connections.
  • Brain cancer: Cancer of the brain.
  • Brain conditions: Medical conditions that affect the brain
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • Brainstem disorder:
  • Breynia officinalis poisoning: Ingestion of the Breynia officinalis plant can cause irritation to mucosal linings and liver problems. The plant is often used as a herbal drug (Chi R Yun) to treat such things as poor growth, heart failure and venereal disease.
  • Brun's syndrome: Various neurological symptoms caused by an obstruction of the flow of cerebrospinal fluid with certain head postures. The obstruction is often due to some sort of brain tumor or cyst. Symptoms come and go depending on the position of the head.
  • Bárány syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by various symptoms associated with a headache that occurs on one side of the back of the head.
  • Catamenial seizure: A type of seizure that is associated with the female menstrual cycle. It appears that flucutations in hormone levels leads to increased seizure activity in some women just before or during their menstrual cycle. Simple or complex partial seizures or generalized tonic-clonic seizures may be involved.
  • Catarrh: Nasal/sinus membrane inflammation
  • Cerebellar hypoplasia: A rare brain disorder where a part of the brain (cerebellum) fails to develop fully. The cerebellum is the part of the brain that controls balance and movement.
  • Cerebral Aneurysm: Dangerous swelling of a brain blood vessel that may rupture.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2,4-Dinitrotoluene: 2,4-Dinitrotoluene is a chemical used the production of explosives, vehicle air bags and polyurethane polymers. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromide: Bromide is a chemical used for many applications - flame retardant, industrial uses, pesticides, sanitary products, fumigants, medicines, dyes, photographic solutions and water purification. Bromides act as central nervous system depressants and the ingestion of excessive quantities can cause serious symptoms. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chloralose: Chloralose is a chemical used mainly in poisons for rodents and crows . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorinated naphthalene: Chlorinated naphthalene is a chemical used in a wide range of applications: plasticizers, rubber industries, manufacture of electrical equipment and the petroleum industry. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chloromethane: Chloromethane is a chemical used mainly in the production of silicones as well as agricultural chemicals, butyl rubber and other products. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylbenzene: Ethylbenzene is a chemical used mainly in paint thinners, fuels, asphalt, degreasers, manufacture of various as products and as a solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Gasoline: Gasoline is a chemical used as a fuel for combustion engines. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Kratom: Kratom is a plant used to make a tea which produce similar effects to opium . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phosphine: Phosphine is a chemical used mainly in pesticides and rodenticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chiari-1 Malformation: A rare malformation where the base of the brain enters into the upper spinal canal.
  • Chronic Pesticide poisoning -- xylene: Xylene is an ingredient used in certain insecticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Common cold: A cold is a relatively minor contagious infection of the nose and throat that can be caused by a number of different viruses (e.g. rhinoviruses, coronaviruses). There are over 200 different viruses that have the potential to cause the common cold. Although colds can cause discomfort they are not considered a serious condition.
  • Coordination and balance conditions: Medical disorders of the systems of balance and coordination.
  • Corn Lily poisoning: Corn Lily is a poisonous plant native to the Sierra Nevada mountains. It's appearance is similar to the corn grown as a crop. The plant poison primarily affects the nervous system.
  • Cycad nut poisoning: The cycad nut contains a toxic chemical called cyasin which can be leeched out by soaking in water. The nuts are often used as a food source but it is important to leech out the toxic chemicals first. Eating nuts that still contain the toxin can cause serious symptoms. Cycad nuts may also increase the risk of developing liver cancer.
  • Darvocet overdose: Darvocet is a prescription drug mainly used to treat pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Dizziness: Feelings of lightheadedness or giddiness.
  • Eagle's syndrome: A group of symptoms caused by calcification of the stylohyoid ligament and an abnormally long styloid process. The styloid process is a bone at the base of the skull which is attached to muscles and ligaments connected to the throat and tongue. If this bone is too long then actions such as swallowing and turning the head can cause pain and discomfort. The cause of the condition is unknown but trauma and inflammation may be the cause in some cases.
  • Ear conditions: Any condition that affects the ear
  • Ear symptoms: Symptoms affecting the ear or hearing
  • Ear wax: Buildup of wax (cerumen) inside the ear canal
  • Encephalitis: Dangerous infection of the brain
  • Episodic ataxia, type 2: A rare genetic disorder characterized by episodes of incoordination and unsteadiness as well as nystagmus (rapid, involuntary eye movements). Stress, exertion, alcohol and coffee may trigger the episodes which can last from hours to days. Type 2 is caused by a defect in the calcium ion gene on chromosome 19p13.
  • Episodic ataxia, type 3: A rare genetic disorder characterized by episodes of incoordination and unsteadiness as well as tinnitus and vertigo. Stress and exertion may trigger the episodes. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 1q42.
  • Episodic ataxia, type 4: A rare genetic disorder characterized by episodes of incoordination and unsteadiness. Stress and exertion may trigger the episodes. Type 4 is distinguished from the other types by it's late onset - 3rd to 6th decade.
  • Episodic ataxia, type 5: A rare genetic disorder characterized by episodes of incoordination, unsteadiness and seizures. Stress and exertion may trigger the episodes. Type 5 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2q22-q23.
  • Episodic ataxia, type 7: A rare genetic disorder characterized by episodes of incoordination and unsteadiness which lasted from hours to days. Episodes occurred from monthly to yearly and the frequency tends to lessen with age. Stress and exertion may trigger the episodes. Type 7 is caused by a defect on chromosome 19q13.
  • Fabry's Disease: Genetic fat storage disorder
  • Falls: When a person losses balance and falls over
  • Focal seizure: A focal seizure is an electrical disturbance that originates in only one part of the brain and resulting in symptoms related to the body functions or parts that are controlled by that part of the brain. During a focal seizure, movement, sensations, feelings or emotions may be affected. Focal seizures may spread to other parts of the brain and are then called generalized focal seizures. Focal seizures where the patient stays conscious are called simple focal seizures. If the patient loses consciousness then the seizure is called a complex focal seizure. Epilepsy is usually a focal seizure.
  • Focal seizures: A deficiency of folate in the body
  • Food allergies: Immune over-reaction to an eaten food.
  • Gerlier disease: A disease that occurs usually in farm workers who are exposed to cattle. The condition is usually seen in some parts of Switzerland. Symptoms tend to resolve themselves within a few months.
  • Giddiness: A feeling on unease and unsteadiness
  • Glenard syndrome: The downward displacement of internal organs.
  • Head injury: An injury to the head
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Sassafras Oil: Sassafras Oil can be used as a herbal agent to treat skin irritation such as insect bites. The herbal agent contains a chemical called safrole which can cause harmful effects if ingested .
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Peppermint Oil: Peppermint Oil can be used as an antispasmodic (to treat nausea, dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome) and as an antibacterial. The herbal agent contains various chemicals (menthol, menthone, methyl acetate) which can cause symptoms if excessive quantities are taken.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Wormwood: Wormwood can be used to treat worm infestations and as a sedative or hair tonic. The herbal agent contains chemicals which can cause various symptoms if excessive quantities are taken.
  • Hereditary paroxysmal cerebral ataxia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by episodes of incoordination and unsteadiness as well as nystagmus (rapid, involuntary eye movements). Stress, exertion, alcohol and coffee may trigger the episodes which can last from minutes to days.
  • Herpes zoster oticus: Facial and auditory effects of herpes zoster
  • Hoigne syndrome: Embolism (blood vessel blockage) and neurological problems associated with a procaine penicillin injection into the muscle. The condition is believed to be caused by some of the drug getting into the blood stream.
  • Homen syndrome: Lesion on a part of the brain called the lenticular nucleus which is involved in movement.
  • Hyperostosis frontalis interna: A disorder where the front bone of the skull becomes thicker than normal.
  • Hypertension: High blood pressure
  • Hypertension-like disorders:
  • Hypervitaminoses A and D: The excessive physiological effect of vitamin A or D cause by excessive intake of the vitamins
  • Hypomagnesemia primary: Low blood magnesium levels which is caused by the abnormal absorption and excretion of the mineral and can be caused by such things as kidney problems and intestinal malabsorption.
  • Intracranial arachnoid cysts: A rare disorder involving a fluid-filled cysts on the arachnoid membrane which is one of the thin layers of tissue that form a membrane which covers the brain. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the size and location of the cyst.
  • Kanzaki disease: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where deficiency of an enzyme (alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase) causes glycoplids to accumulate in body tissues and result in various symptoms. Type 2 occurs during the second or third decade of life and is milder than type I and doesn't involve neurological degeneration.
  • Labrynthitis: Inner ear condition affecting various ear structures
  • Marine turtle poisoning: Marine turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning -- Green Sea Turtle: Green Sea turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning -- Hawksbill Turtle: Hawksbill turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning -- Leatherback Turtle: Leatherback turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning -- Loggerhead Turtle: Loggerhead turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning -- Soft-shelled Turtle: Soft-shelled turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Middle ear infection: Infection of middle ear also called otitis media.
  • Migraine: Chronic recurring headaches with or without a preceding aura.
  • Motion sickness: Nausea from any type of motion or travel
  • Multiple Sclerosis: Autoimmune attack on spinal nerves causing diverse and varying neural problems.
  • Méničre's disease: Ear fluid disorder causing balance problems.
  • Nasal congestion: The congestion of the nasal passages.
  • Nausea: The queasy feeling of nausea and often also vomiting.
  • Neurosyphilis -- general paresis: A complication of untreated syphilis where the infection invades the brain cells and causes a range of neurological symptoms. The condition is progressive and life-threatening.
  • Neurosyphilis -- meningovascular: A complication of untreated syphilis where the infection invades the central nervous system and causes cranial nerve palsies and pupil abnormalities.
  • Neurosyphilis -- tabes dorsalis: A complication of untreated syphilis where the infection invades the spinal cord and progressively impairs muscle function and nerve damage may also occur. This form of the condition is progressive and life-threatening.
  • Osler-Vaquez disease: An uncommon chronic blood disease involving an increased red blood cell count.
  • Otosclerosis: Genetic ear bone disorder
  • Partial seizure: A partial seizure is an electrical disturbance that originates in only one part of the brain and resulting in symptoms related to the body functions or parts that are controlled by that part of the brain. During a partial seizure movement, sensations, feelings or emotions may be affected. Partial seizures may spread to other parts of the brain and are then called generalized seizures. Partial seizures where the patient stays conscious are called simple partial seizures. If the patient loses consciousness then the seizure is called a complex partial seizure. Epilepsy is usually a partial seizure.
  • Perilymph fistula: A condition characterized by rupture of the round window with leakage of perilymph into the middle ear, causing sensorineural hearing loss
  • Perilymphatic fistula: An abnormal opening between the fluid-filled inner ear and air-filled middle ear. It generally causes sudden or fluctuating hearing loss.
  • Peripheral neuritis: A condition characterized by inflammation of the peripheral nerves
  • Pfiesteria piscicida poisoning: Pfiesteria piscicida is an estuarine microorganism (dinoflagellate) that can cause illness in humans as well as fish. The particular toxin involved has not yet been identified. The microorganism may release toxins into the water or it may be aerosolized which can result in skin, eye and respiratory exposure. The condition is not contagious and they symptoms may vary considerably amongst patients.
  • Pfiesteria poisoning: Pfiesteria is an estuarine microorganism (dinoflagellate) that can cause illness in humans as well as fish. The particular toxin involved has not yet been identified. The microorganism may release toxins into the water or it may be aerosolized which can result in skin, eye and respiratory exposure. The condition is not contagious and they symptoms may vary considerably amongst patients.
  • Pfiesteria shumwayae poisoning: Pfiesteria shumwayae is an estuarine microorganism (dinoflagellate) that can cause illness in humans as well as fish. The particular toxin involved has not yet been identified. The microorganism may release toxins into the water or it may be aerosolized which can result in skin, eye and respiratory exposure. The condition is not contagious and they symptoms may vary considerably amongst patients.
  • Polycythemia rubra: An uncommon chronic blood disease involving an increased production of red blood cells by the bone marrow. The production of platelets and white blood cells may also be increased.
  • Ramsay Hunt Syndrome type I: A rare condition involving progressive neurological degeneration. It tends to start in adulthood and progresses over a number of years before ultimately ending in death.
  • Ramsay Hunt syndrome Type II: A condition caused by a reactivation of the herpes simplex virus and resulting in facial paralysis, ear pain and skin blistering.
  • Rimbaud-Passouant-Vallat syndrome: A type of brain inflammation.
  • Secondarily generalized seizure: A partial seizure is an electrical disturbance that originates in only one part of the brain and resulting in symptoms related to the body functions or parts that are controlled by that part of the brain. During a partial seizure movement, sensations, feelings or emotions may be affected. When the partial spreads to both sides of the brain it is then called generalized seizures. These seizures usually only last a few minutes.
  • Seizures -- intellectual deficit due to hydroxylysinuria: A rare syndrome characterized by mental retardation, seizures and high levels of hydroxylysine in the urine.
  • Shingles: Infectious viral infection occuring years after chickenpox infection.
  • Simple partial seizure: A partial seizure is an electrical disturbance that originates in only one part of the brain and resulting in symptoms related to the body functions or parts that are controlled by that part of the brain. Partial seizures where the patient stays conscious are called simple partial seizures. During a simple partial seizure movement, sensations, feelings or emotions may be affected. Partial seizures may spread to other parts of the brain and are then called generalized seizures. These seizures usually only last a couple of minutes.
  • Sinus bradycardia: A condition which is characterized by a slow heart rate
  • Spinal Cord Disorders: Any condition that affects the spinal cord
  • Stroke: Serious brain event from bleeding or blood clots.
  • Stroke symptoms: Brain-related symptoms of bleeding or blockage.
  • Superior vena cava syndrome: A condition caused by compression or obstruction to the normal circulation of the superior vena cava which carries deoxygenated blood from the body tissues back to the heart.
  • Susac syndrome: A very rare characterized by poor blood supply resulting in damage to chochlear, retinal and brain tissue. It is results form inflammation of small blood vessels. Recurring attacks occur over a couple a couple of years and are months apart. The condition resolves itself eventually and the severity of persisting symptoms is variable.
  • Syringobulbia: A neurological disorder that progresses slowly and is characterized by a fluid filled cavity in the spinal cord and brain stem.
  • Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome: A rare disease where episodes of leaking blood capillaries results in a rapid drop in blood pressure which can be life-threatening. Episodes usually last for a few days. The range and severity of symptoms experienced may range somewhat amongst patients.
  • Takayasu arteritis: A rare disorder involving inflammation of large elastic arteries including the aorta which impairs blood flow to the upper body.
  • Tinnitus: Hearing noises in the ears: ringing, roaring, clicks, whistling, or hissing.
  • Toxic mushrooms -- Monomethylhydrazine: Some mushrooms contain a toxic chemical called gyromitrin which is converted to monomethylhydrazine after digestion. Mushroom species from this group include certain species of Gyromitra, Helvella, Sarcosphaera and Peziza. Poisoning may occur from inhaling fumes from cooking mushrooms. The amount of toxin varies amongst and within species but some are toxic enough to cause death. Urgent medical attention should be sought if mushroom poisoning is suspected.
  • Transient Ischemic Attack: Temporary disturbance of blood supply to a restricted area of the brain, resulting in brief neurologic dysfunction that persists, by definition, for less than 24 hours.
  • Vaquez disease: An uncommon chronic blood disease involving an increased red blood cell count.
  • Vertebral Artery Dissection: A tear that develops in the vertebral artery and tends to result in a stroke. It is the most common cause of stroke in young people. Vertebral artery dissections can be caused by trauma to the neck, manipulation of the spine (chiropractics), high blood pressure or even blowing the nose in some cases.
  • Vertigo: The odd balance sensation of inappropriate spinning or movement of the environment
  • Vertigo, benign paroxysmal, in childhood: A rare harmless disorder in children which causes short periods of dizziness, nausea and involuntary eye movements.
  • Vestibular neuronitis: Infection of vestibular nerve.
  • Vestibular seizure: Abnormal electrical signals in a particular part of the brain that results in a seizure consisting of episodes of symptoms such as vertigo, dizziness and a tilting sensation.
  • Vestibulocochlear Nerve Diseases: Diseases that affect the vestibular and/or cochlear nerves of the hearing system. Such diseases include cochlear neuritis, acoustic neuroma, and vestibular neuritis. Symptoms depend on which of the nerves are involved.
  • Vestibulocochlear dysfunction progressive familial: A condition which is characterised by vestibulocochlear dysfunction that occurs in a familial pattern
  • Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Syndrome: A rare condition characterized by poliosis and hair, skin, eye and ear abnormalities as well as retinal detachment and neurological involvement.
  • Vomiting: Vomiting or retching symptoms.
  • Wallenberg's Syndrome: A rare neurological condition caused by a stroke (involving the cerebellar artery) and resulting in symptoms such as facial paralysis or weakness on one side of body.
  • Westphal-Leyden ataxia: A form of ataxia that starts in childhood and is associated with symptoms such as vomiting, vertigo, rigid muscles, seizures, mental disorder, loss of control over voluntary movements and dementia. Death generally occurs within a decade of onset of symptoms.
  • Whiplash Injuries: An injury to the neck when the neck is rapidly forced backward and then forwards or vice versa. It most commonly occurs in vehicle accidents when the vehicle is stopped abruptly or pushed forwards suddenly.

 

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