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Diseases » Viral meningitis » Glossary
 

Glossary for Viral meningitis

  • Acanthamoeba: Several conditions from infection with ameba.
  • Alveolar Hydatid Disease: Rare multi-organ tapeworm infection caught from animals.
  • American mountain fever: A viral disease transmitted through the bite of ticks (Rocky Mountain wood tick and American dog tick) who are infected with the virus. Because the virus infects blood cells including erythrocytes, transmission can also occur through transfusion with infected blood but this is uncommon. Infection is most common in Canada and parts of western US. The incubation period usually lasts between 3 and 6 days but can be as long as a few weeks. The virus tends to cause to periods of fever each lasting for a few days.
  • Arbovirus: Any group of viruses transmitted to humans by mosquitoes and ticks
  • Bacterial meningitis: Bacterial meningitis is a form of meningitis caused by bacteria that normally lives in the mouth and throat. When the immune system is unable to supress this bacteria, it travels to the cerebrospinal spinal fluid in the brain. From there it affects the membranes surrounding the brain.
  • Brain conditions: Medical conditions that affect the brain
  • Brain infection: Infection of the brain including encephalitis
  • Brain swelling: Swelling or enlargement of the brain
  • Candidiasis: Fungal infection of moist areas such as mouth or vagina
  • Cat scratch disease: An infectious disease transmitted through a cat's bite, scratch or lick and resulting primarily in lymph node pain and swelling. The condition can be mild or severe.
  • Chagas disease: A parasitic infection caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by insect bites or blood transfusions. The disease primarily involves the heart and gastrointestinal system.
  • Chickenpox: Common viral infection.
  • Child health conditions: Any medical conditions typically afflicting children.
  • Coccidioidomycosis: An infectious disease caused by a fungus called Coccidioides immitis which is found in the soil. Transmission usually occurs through inhalation but can rarely occur through the skin. Very rarely, infection can spread throughout the body to involve the skin, bones, joints, lungs and central nervous system which can be fatal if untreated.
  • Colorado tick encephalitis: A viral disease transmitted through the bite of ticks (Rocky Mountain wood tick and American dog tick) who are infected with the virus. Because the virus infects blood cells including erythrocytes, transmission can also occur through transfusion with infected blood but this is uncommon. Infection is most common in Canada and parts of western US. The incubation period usually lasts between 3 and 6 days but can be as long as a few weeks. The virus tends to cause to periods of fever each lasting for a few days.
  • Communicating hydrocephalus: Communicating hydrocephalus is a type of abnormal accumulation of fluid in the brain.
  • Conditions involving a pathogen: Medical conditions involving some type of pathogen, such as a virus or bacteria.
  • Cryptococcosis: A fungal infection caused by Cryptococcus neoformans which primarily affects the central nervous system and the lungs. People with weakened immune systems such as AIDS sufferers are generally more susceptible to this type of infection.
  • Cysticercosis: An infectious disease caused by the pork tapeworm Taenia solium. If the larvae are ingested then a mild or asymptomatic tapeworm infection occurs. However, ingested eggs pass into the bloodstream where they can then enter various tissues and form the cysts that characterize cysticercosis.
  • Cytomegalovirus: A easily transmissible viral infection that is common but generally causes no symptoms except in infants and people with weakened immune systems.
  • Encephalitis: Dangerous infection of the brain
  • Enterovirus antenatal infection: Fetal infection with enterovirus. The condition is extremely rare but infection around the time of birth often results in death or paralysis in survivors. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the exact type of virus involved and at what stage of development the infection occurs.
  • Enteroviruses: Viruses affecting the digestive tract.
  • Epstein-Barr virus: Common virus causing mononucleosis
  • Flu: Very common viral respiratory infection.
  • Flu-like conditions: Medical conditions similar to flu, or exhibition flu-like symptoms.
  • HIV/AIDS: HIV is a sexually transmitted virus and AIDS is the progressive immune failure that HIV causes.
  • Hand, Foot, & Mouth Disease: Common contagious viral infant or child condition
  • Head Conditions: Conditions that affect the head
  • Herpes: Virus with one subtype causing cold sores and another causing genital herpes.
  • High fever: Where a patient has an elevated temperature
  • Histoplasmosis: Lung infection from fungus Histoplasma capsulatum
  • Infantile multisystem inflammatory disease: A rare autoinflammatory disease characterized by fever, rash, arthritic changes, eye problems and chronic meningitis.
  • Leptospirosis: Bacterial infection usually caught from animal urine.
  • Lupus: Autoimmune disease with numerous effects on various organs and linings.
  • Lyme disease: Lyme disease is an emerging infectious disease caused by at least three species of bacteria belonging to the genus Borrelia.
  • Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis: Rodent-borne viral disease often causing meningitis or encephalitis
  • Malaria: A parasitic disease transmitted through mosquito bites.
  • Measles: Once common viral infection now rare due to vaccination.
  • Mefenamic Acid -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Mefenamic Acid during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Meningitis: Dangerous infection of the membranes surrounding the brain.
  • Meningococcal disease: Dangerous bacterial infection causing meningitis or bacteremia.
  • Mosquito-borne diseases: Diseases that are carried by the mosquito
  • Mountain fever: A viral disease transmitted through the bite of ticks (Rocky Mountain wood tick and American dog tick) who are infected with the virus. Because the virus infects blood cells including erythrocytes, transmission can also occur through transfusion with infected blood but this is uncommon. Infection is most common in Canada and parts of western US. The incubation period usually lasts between 3 and 6 days but can be as long as a few weeks. The virus tends to cause to periods of fever each lasting for a few days.
  • Mountain tick fever: A viral disease transmitted through the bite of ticks (Rocky Mountain wood tick and American dog tick) who are infected with the virus. Because the virus infects blood cells including erythrocytes, transmission can also occur through transfusion with infected blood but this is uncommon. Infection is most common in Canada and parts of western US. The incubation period usually lasts between 3 and 6 days but can be as long as a few weeks. The virus tends to cause to periods of fever each lasting for a few days.
  • Mumps: An acute viral disease that causes the salivary glands to become swollen, sore and inflamed. Immunization had greatly reduced the incidence of this disease.
  • Mycoplasma pneumoniae: Bacterial respiratory infection
  • NOMID syndrome: A rare autoinflammatory disease characterized by fever, rash, arthritic changes, eye problems and chronic meningitis.
  • Naegleria: Rare bacterial infection from contaminated water
  • Nausea: The queasy feeling of nausea and often also vomiting.
  • Neck pain: Pain affecting the neck
  • Nervous system conditions: Diseases affecting the nerves and the nervous system.
  • Neurocysticercosis: Brain/CNS infection with the tapeworm Cysticercosis
  • Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis: Limbic encephalitis is an inflammation of the limbic system which is the part of the brain responsible for basic autonomic functions. In the paraneoplastic type, the inflammation is caused by cancers such as small cell lung cancer.
  • Photophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of light.
  • Pneumococcal meningitis: Pneumococcal meningitis is an inflammation or infection of the membranes covering the brain and spinal cord caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (also called pneumococcus).
  • Polio: Dangerous virus now rare due to vaccination.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Lead: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Lead has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Relapsing fever: Tick-borne disease with symptoms that resolve and then relapse
  • Rickettsia: A self limiting condition that is transmitted by mites
  • Sarcoidosis: Rare autoimmune disease usually affecting the lungs.
  • Severe headache: A condition which is characterized by a severe headache
  • Stiff neck: Reduced mobility of the neck
  • Syphilis: A sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria (Treponema pallidum). The condition is often asymptomatic in the early stages but one or more sores may be present in the early stages. Untreated syphilis usually results in remission of visible symptoms but further severe damage may occur to internal organs and other body tissues which can result in death.
  • Togaviridae disease: Infection with any of a number of togaviridae viruses which can caused conditions such as Equine encephalitis, Ross River virus and Rubella virus. Symptoms are determined by the type of virus involved. Togaviridae are arboviruses and are transmitted by arthropods.
  • Toxoplasmosis: Infection often caught from cats and their feces.
  • Tuberculosis: Bacterial infection causing nodules forming, most commonly in the lung.
  • Typhus: A general name for various arthropod-borne rickettsial infections
  • Varicella zoster: A highly contagious disease caused by herpes virus 3
  • Viral diseases: Any disease that is caused by a virus
  • Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Syndrome: A rare condition characterized by poliosis and hair, skin, eye and ear abnormalities as well as retinal detachment and neurological involvement.
  • Vomiting: Vomiting or retching symptoms.
  • West Nile fever: Mosquito-borne infectious virus.
  • Western equine encephalitis: An infectious disease caused by an arbovirus (Alphavirus - Togaviraidae) and transmitted by infected mosquitoes. The infection primarily attacks that central nervous system and severity can range from asymptomatic to severe complications and even death in rare cases.
  • Whipple's Disease: Rare malabsorption disease from bacterial digestive infection

 

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