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Diseases » Acne » Summary
 

What is Acne?

What is Acne?

  • Acne: Pimples and blackheads on the face and skin.
  • Acne: an inflammatory disease involving the sebaceous glands of the skin; characterized by papules or pustules or comedones.
    Source - WordNet 2.1

Acne: Introduction

Types of Acne:

Types of Acne:

Broader types of Acne:

How many people get Acne?

Prevalance of Acne: 17 million Americans, almost 85% of people 12-24 years of age.
Prevalance Rate of Acne: approx 1 in 16 or 6.25% or 17 million people in USA [about data]
Lifetime risk of Acne: about 85% of people (mostly in the teen years)
Prevalance of Acne: Nearly 17 million people in the United States have acne, making it the most common skin disease. (Source: excerpt from Health Topics Questions and Answers About Acne: NIDDK) ... Nearly 17 million people in the United States have acne, making it the most common skin disease. (Source: excerpt from Questions and Answers About Acne: NIAMS)

Who gets Acne?

Patient Profile for Acne: Common in teens. Can sometimes start in 30's and 40's.

Profile for Acne: People of all races and ages get acne. It is most common in adolescents and young adults. Nearly 85 percent of people between the ages of 12 and 24 develop the disorder. For most people, acne tends to go away by the time they reach their thirties; however, some people in their forties and fifties continue to have this skin problem. (Source: excerpt from Health Topics Questions and Answers About Acne: NIDDK)

Gender Profile for Acne: Boys more than girls.

How serious is Acne?

Prognosis of Acne: Excellent. Not a major health problem, some risk of scarring. Usually resolves but may last into adulthood.
Complications of Acne: see complications of Acne
Prognosis of Acne: Although acne is not a serious health threat, severe acne can lead to disfiguring, permanent scarring, which can be upsetting to people who are affected by the disorder. (Source: excerpt from Questions and Answers About Acne: NIAMS)

What causes Acne?

Causes of Acne: see causes of Acne
Cause of Acne: Bacterial infection of clogged hair follicles
Causes of Acne: The exact cause of acne is unknown, but doctors believe it results from several related factors. One important factor is an increase in hormones called androgens (male sex hormones). These increase in both boys and girls during puberty and cause the sebaceous glands to enlarge and make more sebum. Hormonal changes related to pregnancy or starting or stopping birth control pills can also cause acne.

Another factor is heredity or genetics. Researchers believe that the tendency to develop acne can be inherited from parents. For example, studies have shown that many school-age boys with acne have a family history of the disorder. Certain drugs, including androgens and lithium, are known to cause acne. Greasy cosmetics may alter the cells of the follicles and make them stick together, producing a plug. (Source: excerpt from Health Topics Questions and Answers About Acne: NIDDK)
Risk factors for Acne: see risk factors for Acne

What are the symptoms of Acne?

Symptoms of Acne: see symptoms of Acne

Complications of Acne: see complications of Acne

Seasonality of Acne: Often worse in winter.

Can anyone else get Acne?

Contagion of Acne: Not contagious between people. Does not spread across the body.
More information: see contagiousness of Acne

Acne: Testing

Diagnostic testing: see tests for Acne.

Misdiagnosis: see misdiagnosis and Acne.

How is it treated?

Doctors and Medical Specialists for Acne: Dermatologist, Pediatrician ; see also doctors and medical specialists for Acne.
Treatments for Acne: see treatments for Acne
Alternative treatments for Acne: see alternative treatments for Acne
Prevention of Acne: see prevention of Acne
Research for Acne: see research for Acne

Society issues for Acne


Hospitalization statistics for Acne: The following are statistics from various sources about hospitalizations and Acne:

  • 0.003% (349) of hospital consultant episodes were for acne in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 100% of hospital consultant episodes for acne required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 44% of hospital consultant episodes for acne were for men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 56% of hospital consultant episodes for acne were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 4% of hospital consultant episodes for acne required emergency hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 4 days was the mean length of stay in hospitals for acne in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 1 days was the median length of stay in hospitals for acne in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • more statistics...»

Organs Affected by Acne:

Organs and body systems related to Acne include:

Name and Aliases of Acne

Main name of condition: Acne

Class of Condition for Acne: bacterial

Other names or spellings for Acne:

Pimples, Whiteheads, Blackheads

Acne: Related Conditions

Research the causes of these diseases that are similar to, or related to, Acne:

 

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