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Causes of Acne

List of causes of Acne

Following is a list of causes or underlying conditions (see also Misdiagnosis of underlying causes of Acne) that could possibly cause Acne includes:

More causes:see full list of causes for Acne

Acne Causes: Risk Factors

The following conditions have been cited in various sources as potentially causal risk factors related to Acne:

Acne Causes: Male-Female Gender Ratio

Gender of Patients for Acne: Boys more than girls....more »

Acne: Related Medical Conditions

To research the causes of Acne, consider researching the causes of these these diseases that may be similar, or associated with Acne:

Acne: Causes and Types

Causes of Types of Acne: Review the cause informationfor the various types of Acne:

Causes of Broader Categories of Acne: Review the causal information about the various more general categories of medical conditions:

Acne as a complication of other conditions:

Other conditions that might have Acne as a complication may, potentially, be an underlying cause of Acne. Our database lists the following as having Acne as a complication of that condition:

Acne as a symptom:

Conditions listing Acne as a symptom may also be potential underlying causes of Acne. Our database lists the following as having Acne as a symptom of that condition:

Medications or substances causing Acne:

The following drugs, medications, substances or toxins are some of the possible causes of Acne as a symptom. This list is incomplete and various other drugs or substances may cause your symptoms. Always advise your doctor of any medications or treatments you are using, including prescription, over-the-counter, supplements, herbal or alternative treatments.


Drug interactions causing Acne:

When combined, certain drugs, medications, substances or toxins may react causing Acne as a symptom.

The list below is incomplete and various other drugs or substances may cause your symptoms. Always advise your doctor of any medications or treatments you are using, including prescription, over-the-counter, supplements, herbal or alternative treatments.

  • Flunisolide and Stanozolol interaction
  • AeroBid and Stanozolol interaction
  • AeroBid-M and Stanozolol interaction
  • Bronalide and Stanozolol interaction
  • Nasalide and Stanozolol interaction
  • more interactions...»

What causes Acne?

Causes: Acne: Bacterial infection of clogged hair follicles
The exact cause of acne is unknown, but doctors believe it results from several related factors. One important factor is an increase in hormones called androgens (male sex hormones). These increase in both boys and girls during puberty and cause the sebaceous glands to enlarge and make more sebum. Hormonal changes related to pregnancy or starting or stopping birth control pills can also cause acne.

Another factor is heredity or genetics. Researchers believe that the tendency to develop acne can be inherited from parents. For example, studies have shown that many school-age boys with acne have a family history of the disorder. Certain drugs, including androgens and lithium, are known to cause acne. Greasy cosmetics may alter the cells of the follicles and make them stick together, producing a plug. (Source: excerpt from Health Topics Questions and Answers About Acne: NIDDK)
Article excerpts about the causes of Acne:

Health Topics Questions and Answers About Acne: NIDDK (Excerpt)

Doctors describe acne as a disease of the pilosebaceous units (PSUs). Found over most of the body, PSUs consist of a sebaceous gland connected to a canal, called a follicle, that contains a fine hair (see "Normal Pilosebaceous Unit" diagram, below). These units are most numerous on the face, upper back, and chest. The sebaceous glands make an oily substance called sebum that normally empties onto the skin surface through the opening of the follicle, commonly called a pore. Cells called keratinocytes line the follicle.

Normal Pilosebaceous Unit

The hair, sebum, and keratinocytes that fill the narrow follicle may produce a plug, which is an early sign of acne. The plug prevents sebum from reaching the surface of the skin through a pore. The mixture of oil and cells allows bacteria Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) that normally live on the skin to grow in the plugged follicles. These bacteria produce chemicals and enzymes and attract white blood cells that cause inflammation. (Inflammation is a characteristic reaction of tissues to disease or injury and is marked by four signs: swelling, redness, heat, and pain.) When the wall of the plugged follicle breaks down, it spills everything into the nearby skin--sebum, shed skin cells, and bacteria--leading to lesions or pimples.

People with acne frequently have a variety of lesions, some of which are shown in the diagrams below. The basic acne lesion, called the comedo (KOM-e-do), is simply an enlarged and plugged hair follicle. If the plugged follicle, or comedo, stays beneath the skin, it is called a closed comedo and produces a white bump called a whitehead. A comedo that reaches the surface of the skin and opens up is called a blackhead because it looks black on the skin's surface. This black discoloration is not due to dirt. Both whiteheads and blackheads may stay in the skin for a long time.

Types of Lesions

Other troublesome acne lesions can develop, including the following:

  • Papules--inflamed lesions that usually appear as small, pink bumps on the skin and can be tender to the touch
  • Pustules (pimples)--papules topped by pus-filled lesions that may be red at the base
  • Nodules--large, painful, solid lesions that are lodged deep within the skin
  • Cysts--deep, painful, pus-filled lesions that can cause scarring.
(Source: excerpt from Health Topics Questions and Answers About Acne: NIDDK)

Questions and Answers About Acne: NIAMS (Excerpt)

Doctors describe acne as a disease of the pilosebaceous units (PSUs). Found over most of the body, PSUs consist of a sebaceous gland connected to a canal, called a follicle, that contains a fine hair (see "Normal Pilosebaceous Unit" diagram, below). These units are most numerous on the face, upper back, and chest. The sebaceous glands make an oily substance called sebum that normally empties onto the skin surface through the opening of the follicle, commonly called a pore. Cells called keratinocytes line the follicle.

Normal Pilosebaceous Unit

The hair, sebum, and keratinocytes that fill the narrow follicle may produce a plug, which is an early sign of acne. The plug prevents sebum from reaching the surface of the skin through a pore. The mixture of oil and cells allows bacteria Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) that normally live on the skin to grow in the plugged follicles. These bacteria produce chemicals and enzymes and attract white blood cells that cause inflammation. (Inflammation is a characteristic reaction of tissues to disease or injury and is marked by four signs: swelling, redness, heat, and pain.) When the wall of the plugged follicle breaks down, it spills everything into the nearby skin--sebum, shed skin cells, and bacteria--leading to lesions or pimples. (Source: excerpt from Questions and Answers About Acne: NIAMS)

Questions and Answers About Acne: NIAMS (Excerpt)

The exact cause of acne is unknown, but doctors believe it results from several related factors. One important factor is an increase in hormones called androgens (male sex hormones). These increase in both boys and girls during puberty and cause the sebaceous glands to enlarge and make more sebum. Hormonal changes related to pregnancy or starting or stopping birth control pills can also cause acne.

Another factor is heredity or genetics. Researchers believe that the tendency to develop acne can be inherited from parents. For example, studies have shown that many school-age boys with acne have a family history of the disorder. Certain drugs, including androgens and lithium, are known to cause acne. Greasy cosmetics may alter the cells of the follicles and make them stick together, producing a plug. (Source: excerpt from Questions and Answers About Acne: NIAMS)

Acne: NWHIC (Excerpt)

Acne pimples form when oil glands make too much sebum, an oily substance. Sebum is made in much larger amounts during and right after puberty than at other times in a woman's life. Sebum then blocks pores to form whiteheads, which form under the skin, and blackheads, which are open to the air. Blackheads are black because the air causes a chemical reaction with the oily debris inside, not because they are dirty. Yeast and bacteria in the skin cause whiteheads to become inflamed, making red, sometimes pus-filled pimples. (Source: excerpt from Acne: NWHIC)

Acne: NWHIC (Excerpt)

Hormonal changes can cause acne after adolescence. For instance, many women experience acne during pregnancy. This usually gets better after the baby is delivered and hormonal levels go back to normal. (Source: excerpt from Acne: NWHIC)

What triggers Acne?

The following conditions are listed as possible triggers for Acne:

  • Skin rubbing
  • Skin picking or squeezing
  • Pollution
  • High humidity
  • Skin scrubbing
  • Menstrual periods - usually 2-7 days before it starts.
  • Stress (Note that stress does not cause acne, but stress may lead to an outbreak/flare)

Medical news summaries relating to Acne:

The following medical news items are relevant to causes of Acne:

Related information on causes of Acne:

As with all medical conditions, there may be many causal factors. Further relevant information on causes of Acne may be found in:

 

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