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Diseases » Amebiasis » Summary
 

What is Amebiasis?

What is Amebiasis?

  • Amebiasis: An intestinal infection caused by a parasitic amebic organism. It is usually associated with poor sanitation.
  • Amebiasis: infection by a disease-causing ameba.
    Source - WordNet 2.1

Amebiasis is listed as a "rare disease" by the Office of Rare Diseases (ORD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This means that Amebiasis, or a subtype of Amebiasis, affects less than 200,000 people in the US population.
Source - National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Amebiasis: Introduction

Types of Amebiasis:

Types of Amebiasis:

Broader types of Amebiasis:

How many people get Amebiasis?

Incidence (annual) of Amebiasis: 54 cases in NJ 1998 (NJ DHSS)
Incidence Rate of Amebiasis: approx 1 in 150,800 or 0.00% or 1,803 people in USA [about data]

Who gets Amebiasis?

Profile for Amebiasis: Although anyone can have this disease, it is most common in people who live in developing countries that have poor sanitary conditions. In the United States, amebiasis is most often found
in immigrants from developing countries. It also is found in people who have traveled to developing countries and in people who live in institutions that have poor sanitary conditions. Men who have sex with men can become infected and can get sick from the infection, but they often do not have symptoms. (Source: excerpt from Amebiasis: DPD)

How serious is Amebiasis?

Deaths for Amebiasis: 10 reported deaths in USA 1999 for shigellosis and amebiasis (NVSR Sep 2001)

What causes Amebiasis?

Causes of Amebiasis: see causes of Amebiasis

What are the symptoms of Amebiasis?

Symptoms of Amebiasis: see symptoms of Amebiasis

Incubation period for Amebiasis: Usually 1 to 4 weeks later but sometimes more quickly or more slowly. (Source: excerpt from Amebiasis: DPD)

Can anyone else get Amebiasis?

More information: see contagiousness of Amebiasis
Inheritance: see inheritance of Amebiasis

Amebiasis: Testing

Diagnostic testing: see tests for Amebiasis.

Misdiagnosis: see misdiagnosis and Amebiasis.

How is it treated?

Treatments for Amebiasis: see treatments for Amebiasis
Prevention of Amebiasis: see prevention of Amebiasis
Research for Amebiasis: see research for Amebiasis

Society issues for Amebiasis


Hospitalization statistics for Amebiasis: The following are statistics from various sources about hospitalizations and Amebiasis:

  • 0.0007% (88) of hospital consultant episodes were for amoebiasis in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 74% of hospital consultant episodes for amoebiasis required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 67% of hospital consultant episodes for amoebiasis were for men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 33% of hospital consultant episodes for amoebiasis were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 77% of hospital consultant episodes for amoebiasis required emergency hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • more statistics...»

Name and Aliases of Amebiasis

Main name of condition: Amebiasis

Class of Condition for Amebiasis: bacterial

Other names or spellings for Amebiasis:

Amoebic dysentery due to Entamoeba histolytica, Amoebiasis due to Entamoeba histolytica, Amebic dysentery, Intestinal amebiasis

Amoebiasis, Amebiosis, Amoebiosis
Source - WordNet 2.1

Amoebiasis due to Entamoeba histolytica, Amoebic dysentery due to Entamoeba histolytica
Source - Office of Rare Diseases (ORD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Amebiasis: Related Conditions

Research the causes of these diseases that are similar to, or related to, Amebiasis:

 

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