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Treatments for Angina

Treatments for Angina:

Treatment of angina begins with prevention. The damage done to the blood vessel of the body that lead to angina can often be prevented or controlled with prevention measures. They include regular exercise, not smoking, not drinking excessively, achieving and maintaining a healthy weight, and eating a heart-healthy well-balanced diet. Other risk factors, such as high cholesterol, diabetes, and hypertension, can be prevented or controlled through these lifestyle changes, regular medical care and/or medication.

In addition to lifestyle changes, the most effective angina treatment plan includes a multifaceted approach that includes regular medical monitoring and testing, and may include medications and surgery. Prognosis and outcomes of angina vary greatly depending on how quickly and effectively the underlying condition, such as anemia or atherosclerosis, was diagnosed and treated. Coexisting diseases, such as diabetes, lifestyle and other factors also influence outcomes.

Treatment of angina caused by atherosclerosis includes the use of the medication nitroglycerin administered under the tongue when symptoms of angina occur. Rest is also important. A variety of other medications may also be prescribed to treat underlying or coexisting conditions and disease, such as diabetes, and hypertension.

Treatment of angina caused by atherosclerosis or heart disease may also include beta blockers. Beta blockers are commonly prescribed medications that reduce the body's demand for oxygen and lower the risk of developing a heart attack. Aspirin may be recommended to help prevent the formation of clots in the coronary arteries. Cholesterol-lowering medications, such as statins, may be prescribed to lower cholesterol and minimize further narrowing of the arteries and the risk of heart attack.

Treatment of angina may also involve the administration of supplemental oxygen aimed at increasing the amount of oxygen that is delivered to the heart tissue.

Some people with angina that cannot be controlled with medication and is caused by atherosclerosis may undergo a surgical procedure called a coronary artery bypass. In this surgery new graft arteries are placed to bypass the blocked coronary artery or arteries. Blood flow is then redirected through healthy new graft arteries to the affected heart tissues.

A less invasive surgical procedure called an angioplasty is more commonly done for angina caused by atherosclerosis that cannot be controlled with medication. In this procedure, a narrowed coronary artery is widened using a balloon device and a stent is placed in the artery to keep it open.

For angina that is caused by anemia, blood transfusions and other treatments may be necessary.

Treatment List for Angina

The list of treatments mentioned in various sources for Angina includes the following list. Always seek professional medical advice about any treatment or change in treatment plans.

Alternative Treatments for Angina

Alternative treatments or home remedies that have been listed as possibly helpful for Angina may include:

Angina: Is the Diagnosis Correct?

The first step in getting correct treatment is to get a correct diagnosis. Differential diagnosis list for Angina may include:

Hidden causes of Angina may be incorrectly diagnosed:

Angina: Marketplace Products, Discounts & Offers

Products, offers and promotion categories available for Angina:

Angina: Research Doctors & Specialists

Research all specialists including ratings, affiliations, and sanctions.

Drugs and Medications used to treat Angina:

Note:You must always seek professional medical advice about any prescription drug, OTC drug, medication, treatment or change in treatment plans.

Some of the different medications used in the treatment of Angina include:

  • Amlodipine
  • Lotrel
  • Norvasc
  • Isosorbide Dinitrate
  • Angipec
  • Apo-ISDN
  • Cedocard-SR
  • Coradur
  • Coronex
  • Dilatrate-SR
  • Iso-BID
  • Isonate
  • Isordil
  • Isordil Tembids
  • Isordil Titradose
  • Isotrate Timecelles
  • Novo-Sorbide
  • Sorbitrate
  • Sorbitrate-SA
  • Metoprolol
  • Apo-Metoprolol
  • Betaloc
  • Co-Betaloc
  • Logimax
  • Lopressor
  • Lopressor Delayed-Release
  • Lopressor HCT
  • Lopressor OROS
  • Novo-Metoprol
  • Nu-Metop
  • Toprol
  • Toprol XL
  • Mibefradil
  • Nicardipine
  • Cardene
  • Cardene SR
  • Nifedipine
  • Adalat
  • Adalat CC
  • Adalat FT
  • Adalat P.A
  • Apo-Nifed
  • Gen-Nifedipine
  • Novo-Nifedin
  • Nu-Nifed
  • Procardia
  • Procardia XL
  • Scheinpharm Nifedipine XL
  • Nisoldipine
  • Sular
  • Nitroglycerin
  • Corobid
  • Deponit
  • Minitran Transdermal Delivery System
  • Nitrek
  • Nitro-Bid
  • Nitrocap TD
  • Nitrocine Timecaps
  • Nitrocine Transdermal
  • Nitrodisc
  • Nitro-Dur
  • Nitro-Dur II
  • Nitrogard
  • Nitrogard-SR
  • Nitroglyn
  • Nitrol
  • Nitrolin
  • Nitrolingual Spray
  • Nitrol TSAR Kit
  • Nitrong
  • Nitrong SR
  • Nitroquick
  • Nitrospan
  • Nitrostabilin
  • Nitrostat
  • Nitro Transdermal System
  • NTS Transdermal Patch
  • Transderm-Nitro
  • Trates S.R
  • Tridil
  • Nov-Acebutolol
  • Nu-Acebutolol
  • Norvas
  • Caduet - mainly used to treat patients with hypertension and angina
  • Amlodipine and Atorvastatin - mainly used to treat patients with hypertension and angina
  • Angiotrofin
  • Novo-Diltiazem-CD
  • Novo-Diltiazem SR
  • Nu-Diltiaz-CD
  • Ratio-Diltiazem CD
  • Rhoxal-Diltiazem CD
  • Rhoxal-Diltiazem SR
  • Gen-Diltiazem
  • Gen-Diltiazem SR
  • Apo-Diltiaz SR
  • Apo-Diltiaz CD
  • Alti-Diltiazem SR
  • Taztia XT
  • Syscor
  • Glyceryl Trinitrate
  • Anginine
  • Minitran
  • Rectogesic
  • Transiderm Nitro
  • Isosorbide Nitrate
  • Duride, Imdur Durules
  • Imtrate SR
  • Monodur
  • Sorbidin
  • Nicorandil
  • Ikorel

Unlabeled Drugs and Medications to treat Angina:

Unlabelled alternative drug treatments for Angina include:

Latest treatments for Angina:

The following are some of the latest treatments for Angina:

Hospital statistics for Angina:

These medical statistics relate to hospitals, hospitalization and Angina:

  • 1.13% (144,450) of hospital consultant episodes were for angina pectoris in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 73% of hospital consultant episodes for angina pectoris required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 58% of hospital consultant episodes for angina pectoris were for men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 42% of hospital consultant episodes for angina pectoris were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 85% of hospital consultant episodes for angina pectoris required emergency hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • more hospital information...»

Hospitals & Medical Clinics: Angina

Research quality ratings and patient incidents/safety measures for hospitals and medical facilities in specialties related to Angina:

Hospital & Clinic quality ratings »

Choosing the Best Treatment Hospital: More general information, not necessarily in relation to Angina, on hospital and medical facility performance and surgical care quality:

Medical news summaries about treatments for Angina:

The following medical news items are relevant to treatment of Angina:

Discussion of treatments for Angina:

NHLBI, ANGINA: NHLBI (Excerpt)

A person who has angina should learn the pattern of his or her angina--what cause an angina attack, what it feels like, how long episodes usually last, and whether medication relieves the attack. If the pattern changes sharply or if the symptoms are those of a heart attack, one should get medical help immediately, perhaps best done by seeking an evaluation at a nearby hospital emergency room. (Source: excerpt from NHLBI, ANGINA: NHLBI)

NHLBI, ANGINA: NHLBI (Excerpt)

The underlying coronary artery disease that causes angina should be attacked by controlling existing "risk factors." These include high blood pressure, cigarette smoking, high blood cholesterol levels, and excess weight. If the doctor has prescribed a drug to lower blood pressure, it should be taken as directed. Advice is available on how to eat to control weight, blood cholesterol levels, and blood pressure. A physician can also help patients to stop smoking. Taking these steps reduces the likelihood that coronary artery disease will lead to a heart attack.

Most people with angina learn to adjust their lives to minimize episodes of angina, by taking sensible precautions and using medications if necessary.

Usually the first line of defense involves changing one's living habits to avoid bringing on attacks of angina. Controlling physical activity, adopting good eating habits, moderating alcohol consumption, and not smoking are some of the precautions that can help patients live more comfortably and with less angina. For example, if angina comes on with strenuous exercise, exercise a little less strenuously, but do exercise. If angina occurs after heavy meals, avoid large meals and rich foods that leave one feeling stuffed. Controlling weight, reducing the amount of fat in the diet, and avoiding emotional upsets may also help.

Angina is often controlled by drugs. The most commonly prescribed drug for angina is nitroglycerin, which relieves pain by widening blood vessels. This allows more blood to flow to the heart muscle and also decreases the work load of the heart. Nitroglycerin is taken when discomfort occurs or is expected. Doctors frequently prescribe other drugs, to be taken regularly, that reduce the heart's workload. Beta blockers slow the heart rate and lessen the force of the heart muscle contraction. Calcium channel blockers are also effective in reducing the frequency and severity of angina attacks.

What if medication fails to control angina?

Doctors may recommend surgery or angioplasty if drugs fail to ease angina or if the risk of heart attack is high. Coronary artery bypass surgery is an operation in which a blood vessel is grafted onto the blocked artery to bypass the blocked or diseased section so that blood can get to the heart muscle. An artery from inside the chest (an "internal mammary" graft) or long vein from the leg (a "saphenous vein" graft) may be used.

Balloon angioplasty involves inserting a catheter with a tiny balloon at the end into a forearm or groin artery. The balloon is inflated briefly to open the vessel in places where the artery is narrowed. Other catheter techniques are also being developed for opening narrowed coronary arteries, including laser and mechanical devices applied by means of catheters. (Source: excerpt from NHLBI, ANGINA: NHLBI)

Angina: NWHIC (Excerpt)

Lifestyle changes and medicine are the most common ways to control stable angina. Although angina may be brought on by exercise, this does not mean that you should stop exercising. In fact, you should keep doing an exercise program that has been approved by your health care provider.

Risk factors for coronary artery disease should be controlled, including high blood pressure, cigarette smoking, high blood cholesterol, and excess weight. By eating healthfully, not smoking, limiting how much alcohol you drink, and avoiding stress, you may live more comfortably and with fewer angina attacks. You may need medicine to help lower your blood pressure or your cholesterol.

Drugs are often used to control angina. The most commonly used drug for angina is nitroglycerin, which relieves pain by relaxing blood vessels. This allows more blood to flow to the heart muscle and also decreases the workload of the heart. Nitroglycerin is taken when discomfort occurs or is expected. Your health care provider may prescribe other drugs to be taken every day to help reduce the heart's workload. Two types of drugs often used are called beta-blockers and calcium channel blockers. (Source: excerpt from Angina: NWHIC)

Angina: NWHIC (Excerpt)

Talk to your health care provider about changes you can make to improve your heart health and your angina. You may benefit from:

  • weight loss

  • increasing your physical activity

  • eating healthy foods and not overeating

  • controlling stress in your life

  • quitting smoking

  • drinking less alcohol.

(Source: excerpt from Angina: NWHIC)

Angina: NWHIC (Excerpt)

If lifestyle changes and drugs fail to ease angina, or if your risk of heart attack is high, you may need additional tests and treatment. One common test is cardiac catheterization. This test involves inserting a catheter (a thin tube) into a forearm or groin artery and threading the catheter into the heart. A dye can be injected and tracked by computerized x-ray (coronary angiography or arteriography) to show where the arteries are blocked. Balloon angioplasty may be used to open up narrowed arteries. This procedure uses a tiny balloon that is inflated briefly inside the artery. Sometimes a stent (a tiny metal mesh tube) is put in to help keep the artery open. (Source: excerpt from Angina: NWHIC)

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