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Articles » NINDS Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Information Page: NINDS
 

NINDS Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Information Page: NINDS

Article title: NINDS Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Information Page: NINDS

Main condition: Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

Conditions: Progressive Supranuclear Palsy


What is Progressive Supranuclear Palsy?
Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a rare brain disorder that causes serious and permanent problems with control of gait and balance. The most obvious sign of the disease is an inability to aim the eyes properly, which occurs because of lesions in the area of the brain that coordinates eye movements. Some patients describe this effect as a blurring. PSP patients often show alterations of mood and behavior, including depression and apathy as well as progressive mild dementia. It must be emphasized that the pattern of signs and symptoms can be quite different from person to person. The symptoms of PSP are caused by a gradual deterioration of brain cells in a few tiny but important places at the base of the brain, in the region called the brainstem. PSP is often misdiagnosed because some of its symptoms are very much like those of Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and more rare neurodegenerative disorders, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The key to establishing the diagnosis of PSP is the identification of early gait instability and difficulty moving the eyes, the hallmark of the disease, as well as ruling out other similar disorders, some of which are treatable. Although PSP gets progressively worse, no one dies from PSP itself.

Is there any treatment?
There is currently no effective treatment for PSP, although scientists are searching for better ways to manage the disease. In some patients the slowness, stiffness, and balance problems of PSP may respond to antiparkinsonian agents such as levodopa, or levodopa combined with anticholinergic agents, but the effect is usually temporary. The speech, vision, and swallowing difficulties usually do not respond to any drug treatment.. Another group of drugs that has been of some modest success in PSP are antidepressant medications. The most commonly used of these drugs are Prozac, Elavil, and Tofranil. The anti-PSP benefit of these drugs seems not to be related to their ability to relieve depression. Non-drug treatment for PSP can take many forms. Patients frequently use weighted walking aids because of their tendency to fall backward. Bifocals or special glasses called prisms are sometimes prescribed for PSP patients to remedy the difficulty of looking down. Formal physical therapy is of no proven benefit in PSP, but certain exercises can be done to keep the joints limber. A surgical procedure, a gastrostomy, may be necessary when there are swallowing disturbances. This surgery involves the placement of a tube through the skin of the abdomen into the stomach (intestine) for feeding purposes.

What is the prognosis?
PSP gets progressively worse but is not itself directly life-threatening. It does, however, predispose patients to serious complications such as pneumonia secondary to difficulty in swallowing (dysphagia). The most common complications are choking and pneumonia, head injury, and fractures caused by falls. The most common cause of death is pneumonia. With good attention to medical and nutritional needs, however, most PSP patients live well into their 70s and beyond.

What research is being done?
Therapeutic trials with free radical scavengers (agents that can get rid of potentially harmful free radicals) are being planned for the future. is a Research is ongoing on Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Better understanding of those common, related disorders will go a long way toward solving the problem of PSP, just as studying PSP may help shed light on Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases.

 Organizations

Society for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy
Woodholme Medical Building
1838 Greene Tree Road, #515
Baltimore, MD 21208
spsp@psp.org
https://www.psp.org/
Tel: 410-486-3330 800-457-4777
Fax: 410-486-4283

Related NINDS Publications and Information

  • Parálisis Supranuclear Progresiva
    Information on Paralisis Supranuclear Progresiva/Spanish-language fact sheet on Progressive Supranuclear Palsy. Compiled by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS).
  • Patients with Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Sought
    Lay-language descriptions of new program announcements and clinical trials seeking patient volunteers.
  • Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Fact Sheet
    Progressive Supranuclear Palsy fact sheet compiled by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS).

    This fact sheet is in the public domain. You may copy it.Provided by:
    The National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
    National Institutes of Health
    Bethesda, MD 20892


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