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Diseases » Bronchiectasis » Glossary
 

Glossary for Bronchiectasis

  • Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis: An allergic reaction to a particular fungus called Aspergillus.
  • Aspergillosis: Infection with a fungus called Aspergillus.
  • Asthma: Repeated attacks of breathing difficulty.
  • Asthma in Adults:
  • Asthma in Children:
  • Asthma-like conditions: Medical conditions similar to asthma, or having similar symptoms.
  • Bad breath: Bad breath
  • Bronchiectasis -- oligospermia: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of bronchiectasis (enlarged bronchial airways) and a defect in the sperm ducts which affects the number of sperm produced. Patients suffer frequent bacterial infections.
  • Bronchiolitis: Inflammation of the bronchioles.
  • COPD: Severe obstruction of bronchial air flow typically from bronchitis and/or emphysema.
  • Chest conditions: Any condition affecting the chest
  • Chronic Bronchitis: Chronic bronchitis is a chronic inflammation of the bronchi (medium-size airways) in the lungs.
  • Chronic cough: The chronic noisy sudden expulsion of air from the respiratory tract
  • Chronic respiratory conditions: Chronic disorders of the respiratory (breathing) systems, such as COPD, emphysema, and others.
  • Ciliary dyskinesia, due to transposition of ciliary microtubules: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move adequately due to abnormal cilia structure. The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Cor pulmonale: Enlarged heart due to respiratory difficulty.
  • Cough: The noise produced from the sudden expulsion of air from the lungs
  • Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic fibrosis is a hereditary disease affecting the exocrine (mucus) glands of the lungs, liver, pancreas, and intestines, causing progressive disability due to multisystem failure.
  • Diffuse panbronchiolitis: A pulmonary disease involving chronic inflammation of the airways which causes obstruction and can lead to respiratory failure and even death if untreated.
  • Emphysema: Emphysema is a type of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It is defined as an abnormal, permanent enlargement of the air spaces distal to the terminal bronchioles accompanied by destruction of their walls and without obvious fibrosis.
  • Flail Chest: The separation of a portion of the rib cage from the rest of the chest wall - usually due to trauma. The severity of the condition varies depending on the extent of the damage.
  • Hay fever: An allergy which causes sneezing, runny nose or blocked nose for part of the year.
  • Hyper IgM syndrome 4: Hyper IgM syndrome is a rare inherited immunodeficiency disorder which causes frequent infections involving the ears, eyes, sinuses, lungs, skin, respiratory tract and other areas of the body. Type 4 does not involve an increased risk of opportunistic infections and is caused by a defect on chromosome 4.
  • Immotile cilia syndrome, due to defective radial spokes: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move adequately due to abnormal cilia structure. The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility.
  • Immotile cilia syndrome, due to excessively long cilia: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move adequately due to abnormally long cilia. The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Lung abscess: Pus (abscess) in the lung
  • Lung cancer: Lung cancer is a disease of uncontrolled cell growth in tissues of the lung. This growth may lead to metastasis, which is the invasion of adjacent tissue and infiltration beyond the lungs. Most lung tumors are malignant.
  • Lung conditions: Various conditions affecting the lungs or related airways.
  • Measles: Once common viral infection now rare due to vaccination.
  • Mounier-Kuhn syndrome: A rare congenital condition where the trachea and bronchi are enlarged which increases the risk of respiratory infections such as bronchitis and pneumonia.
  • Nezelof's syndrome: An immune deficiency disorder where the cells that normally fight infection don't work properly and patients suffer frequent severe infections.
  • Panacinar Emphysema: Panacinary (or panlobular) emphysema is related to the destruction of alveoli, because of an inflammation or deficiency of alpha 1-antitrypsin
  • Paragonimiases -- lung infection: Infection by a parasitic worm, Paragonimus westermani, which are a type of lung fluke which invade the lungs and other organs where they cause problems. Infection occurs through eating freshwater crabs and crayfish which have not been cooked sufficiently.
  • Paragonimiasis: Infection by a parasitic worm, Paragonimus westermani, which are a type of lung fluke which invade the lungs, and sometimes other organs, where they cause problems. Occasionally the parasites infect the brain which can occasionally result in death. Infection occurs through eating freshwater crabs and crayfish which have not been cooked sufficiently.
  • Paroxysmal coughing: episodic cough
  • Pleural effusion: Fluid in the pleural spaces.
  • Pneumoconiosis: A lung disease caused by breathing in air contaminated with particles of dust such as coal, kaolin, asbestos and talc. It is generally an occupation disease where people are exposed to the contaminated air for prolonged periods of time. Generally symptoms stop once the exposure ceases.
  • Pneumonia: Infection of the lung by bacteria, viruses or fungus.
  • Pneumothorax: Air in the pleural spaces around the lungs.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 10: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 10 differs from the other forms of primary ciliary dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (14q21.3). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 11: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 11 differs from the other forms of primary ciliary dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (6q22). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 12: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 12 differs from the other forms of primary ciliary dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (6p21.1). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 2: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 2 differs from the other forms of primary ciliar dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (19q13.3qter). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 3: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 3 differs from the other forms of primary ciliar dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (5p). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 4: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 4 differs from the other forms of primary ciliar dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (15q13.1-q15.1). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 5: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 5 differs from the other forms of primary ciliar dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (16p12.2-p12.1). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 6: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 6 differs from the other forms of primary ciliar dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (7p14-p13). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 7: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 7 differs from the other forms of primary ciliary dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (7p21). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 8: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 8 differs from the other forms of primary ciliary dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (15q24-q25). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 9: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 9 differs from the other forms of primary ciliary dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (17q25). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Pulmonary hypertension: Pulmonary hypertension refers to high blood pressure in the blood vessels that carry blood to the lungs. Blood pressure in other parts of the body is normal or sometimes even low. The condition may be caused by such things as lung conditions (e.g. emphysema, chronic bronchitis), heart conditions (e.g. congestive heart failure, birth defects involving heart), AIDS or medications such as fenfluramine (a diet drug). Sometimes it occurs for no apparent reason and is called primary pulmonary hypertension.
  • Respiratory conditions: Any condition that affects the respiratory system
  • Respiratory failure: Failure of the respiratory system
  • Respiratory symptoms: Symptoms affecting the breathing systems.
  • Sarcoidosis: Rare autoimmune disease usually affecting the lungs.
  • Sarcoidosis, pulmonary: A rare disease involving inflammation of the lungs which leads to the development of nodules, fibrosis and scarring of lung tissue.
  • Shell nail syndrome: A syndrome characterized by deterioration of the nail beds, clubbed fingers, inflammation around the bone and bronchiectasis.
  • Shortness of breath: The feeling of being short of breath
  • Smoking: The smoking of cigarettes
  • Tuberculosis: Bacterial infection causing nodules forming, most commonly in the lung.
  • Wet cough: Wet productive cough producing sputum
  • Wheezing: A whistling like continuous sound that is caused by the respiratory system
  • Whooping Cough: An infectious condition caused by the bacteria Bordetella pertussis
  • Williams-Campbell syndrome: A rare disorder involving a reduction or absence of cartilage in the bronchi which affects lung functioning. Severity of the symptoms depends on the scale of the defect.
  • Yellow nail syndrome: A rare nail condition characterized by thickened yellow nails as well as swelling of parts of the body due to lymphatic drainage problems resulting from blocked or damaged lymphatic system.
  • Young syndrome: Symptoms in a fetus that occur when the mother is suffering from advanced diabetes mellitus during pregnancy.

 

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