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Diseases » Cercarial dermatitis » Contagiousness
 

Is Cercarial dermatitis Contagious?

Infection and Cercarial dermatitis

Cercarial dermatitis is an infectious disease that is not transmitted from person to person.

Discussion about Contagion of Cercarial dermatitis:

The adult parasite lives in the blood of infected animals such as ducks, geese, gulls, swans, as well as certain aquatic mammals such as muskrats and beavers. The parasites produce eggs that are passed in the feces of infected birds or mammals.

If the eggs land in the water, the water becomes contaminated. Eggs hatch, releasing small, free-swimming larvae. These larvae swim in the water in search of a certain species of aquatic snail.

If the larvae find one of these snails, they infect the snail and undergo further development. Infected snails release a different type of larvae (cercariae, hence the name cercarial dermatitis) into the water. This larval form then searches for a suitable host (bird, muskrat) so they can start the lifecycle over again. Although humans are not a suitable host, the larvae burrow into the skin of swimmers, which may cause an allergic reaction/rash. The larvae cannot develop inside a human and they soon die. (Source: excerpt from Cercarial dermatitis: DPD)

About contagion and contagiousness:

Contagion and contagiousness refers to how easily the spread of Cercarial dermatitis is possible from one person to another. Other words for contagion include "infection", "infectiousness", "transmission" or "transmissability". Contagiousness has nothing to do with genetics or inheriting diseases from parents. For an overview of contagion, see Introduction to Contagion.

 

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