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Statistics about Congenital conditions

Cause statistics for Congenital conditions:

The following are statistics from various sources about the causes of Congenital conditions:

  • Poorly controlled diabetes before conception and during first trimester of pregnancy can cause major birth defects in 5-10% of pregnancies in the US 2001 (National Diabetes Statistics fact sheet, NIDDK, 2003)
  • more about causes...»

Prevalence and incidence statistics for Congenital conditions:

See also prevalence and incidence page for Congenital conditions

Prevalance of Congenital conditions: 3-4% of babies (NWHIC)

Prevalance Rate: approx 1 in 33 or 3.00% or 8.2 million people in USA [about data]

Prevalance of Congenital conditions: Three to four percent of all babies are born with a major birth defect. (Source: excerpt from Prenatal Care: NWHIC)

Incidence statistics about Congenital conditions:

The following statistics relate to the incidence of Congenital conditions:

  • 29 infants were born alive with congenital disorders involving nervous system in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 5 fetal deaths or still births occurred due to congenital disorders involving nervous system in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 37 cases of induced abortions occurred following prenatal diagnosis of congenital disorders involving nervous system in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • Congenital disorders involving nervous system occurred in 24.15 per 10,000 births in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 7 infants were born alive with congenital disorders involving the eye in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 0 fetal deaths or still births occurred due to congenital disorders involving the eye in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 0 cases of induced abortions occurred following prenatal diagnosis of congenital disorders involving the eye in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • Congenital disorders involving the eye occurred in 2.38 per 10,000 births in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 4 infants were born alive with congenital disorders involving the ear in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 0 fetal deaths or still births occurred due to congenital disorders involving the ear in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 0 cases of induced abortions occurred following prenatal diagnosis of congenital disorders involving the ear in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • Congenital disorders involving the ear occurred in 1.36 per 10,000 births in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 270 infants were born alive with congenital heart disease in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 9 fetal deaths or still births occurred due to congenital heart disease in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 20 cases of induced abortions occurred following prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • Congenital heart disease occurred in 101.72 per 10,000 births in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 28 infants were born alive with congenital disorders of digestive system in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 2 fetal deaths or still births occurred due to congenital disorders of digestive system in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 10 cases of induced abortions occurred following prenatal diagnosis of congenital disorders of digestive system in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • Congenital disorders of digestive system occurred in 13.61 per 10,000 births in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 30 infants were born alive with congenital disorders of internal urogenital system in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 2 fetal deaths or still births occurred due to congenital disorders of internal urogenital system in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 14 cases of induced abortions occurred following prenatal diagnosis of congenital disorders of internal urogenital system in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • Congenital disorders of internal urogenital system occurred in 15.65 per 10,000 births in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 8 infants were born alive with congenital disorders of external genital system in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 2 fetal deaths or still births occurred due to congenital disorders of external genital system in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 5 cases of induced abortions occurred following prenatal diagnosis of congenital disorders of external genital system in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • Congenital disorders of external genital system occurred in 5.1 per 10,000 births in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 17 infants were born alive with congenital limb disorders in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 0 fetal deaths or still births occurred due to congenital limb disorders in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 10 cases of induced abortions occurred following prenatal diagnosis of congenital limb disorders in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • Congenital limb disorders occurred in 9.19 per 10,000 births in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 38 infants were born alive with congenital musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 5 fetal deaths or still births occurred due to congenital musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 19 cases of induced abortions occurred following prenatal diagnosis of congenital musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • Congenital musculoskeletal and connective tissue disorders occurred in 21.09 per 10,000 births in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 99 infants were born alive with congenital chromosomal disorders in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 11 fetal deaths or still births occurred due to congenital chromosomal disorders in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 66 cases of induced abortions occurred following prenatal diagnosis of congenital chromosomal disorders in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • Congenital chromosomal disorders occurred in 59.88 per 10,000 births in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 11 infants were born alive with congenital absence, atresia and/or stenosis of the small intestine in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 2 fetal deaths or still births occurred due to congenital absence, atresia and/or stenosis of the small intestine in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 0 cases of induced abortions occurred following prenatal diagnosis of congenital absence, atresia and/or stenosis of the small intestine in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • Congenital absence, atresia and/or stenosis of the small intestine occurred in 4.42 per 10,000 births in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 9 infants were born alive with congenital absence, atresia and/or stenosis of the duodenum in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 2 fetal deaths or still births occurred due to congenital absence, atresia and/or stenosis of the duodenum in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 0 cases of induced abortions occurred following prenatal diagnosis of congenital absence, atresia and/or stenosis of the duodenum in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • Congenital absence, atresia and/or stenosis of the duodenum occurred in 3.74 per 10,000 births in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 5 infants were born alive with ano-rectal atresia and stenosis in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 0 fetal deaths or still births occurred due to ano-rectal atresia and stenosis in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 3 cases of induced abortions occurred following prenatal diagnosis of ano-rectal atresia and stenosis in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • Ano-rectal atresia and stenosis occurred in 2.72 per 10,000 births in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 0 infants were born alive with bilateral renal agenesis in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 0 fetal deaths or still births occurred due to bilateral renal agenesis in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 3 cases of induced abortions occurred following prenatal diagnosis of bilateral renal agenesis in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • Bilateral renal agenesis occurred in 1.02 per 10,000 births in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 6 infants were born alive with tracheo-oesophagal fistula-oesophageal atresia and stenosis in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 0 fetal deaths or still births occurred due to tracheo-oesophagal fistula-oesophageal atresia and stenosis in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • 2 cases of induced abortions occurred following prenatal diagnosis of tracheo-oesophagal fistula-oesophageal atresia and stenosis in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • Tracheo-oesophagal fistula-oesophageal atresia and stenosis occurred in 2.72 per 10,000 births in the UK 2002 (University of Ulster, 2003)
  • more about incidence...»

Death and mortality statistics for Congenital conditions:

Deaths from Congenital conditions: 10,393 deaths reported in USA 1999 for congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities(NVSR Sep 2001)

Death rate extrapolations for USA for Congenital conditions: 10,393 per year, 866 per month, 199 per week, 28 per day, 1 per hour, 0 per minute, 0 per second. Note: this extrapolation calculation uses the deaths statistic: 10,393 deaths reported in USA 1999 for congenital malformations, deformations and chromosomal abnormalities(NVSR Sep 2001)

Death statistics for Congenital conditions:

The following are statistics from various sources about deaths and Congenital conditions:

  • congenital defects including chromosome conditions caused 20.8% of deaths for neonates in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001] [CDC NVSR 2001]
  • congenital defects including chromosome conditions caused 19.6% of deaths less than 1 year old in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
  • congenital defects including chromosome conditions caused 19.4% of deaths for non-neonate infants in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
  • congenital defects including chromosome conditions caused 10.5% of deaths for age 1-4 years in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
  • congenital defects including chromosome conditions caused 6.0% of deaths for age 5-9 years in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
  • congenital defects including chromosome conditions caused 5.4% of deaths for age 10-14 years in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
  • congenital conditions including chromosome conditions caused 1.6% of deaths for age 15-19 years in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
  • congenital defects including chromosome conditions caused 1.3% of deaths for age 20-24 years in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
  • congenital defects including chromosome conditions caused 1.1% of deaths for age 25-34 years in USA 1999 [NVSR 2001]
  • Congenital diseases caused 3 male deaths per 100,000 population in Australia 2002 (AIHW Mortality Database, Australia’s Health 2004)
  • Congenital disease caused 3 female deaths per 100,000 population in Australia 2002 (AIHW Mortality Database, Australia’s Health 2004)
  • 10,442 people of all ages died from birth defects or congenital anomalies each year in the US 2001 (Deaths: Final Data for 2001, NCHS, CDC)
  • 5,513 infants died from birth defects or congenital anomalies each year in the US 2001 (Deaths: Final Data for 2001, NCHS, CDC)
  • 136.9 infants per 100,000 live births died from birth defects or congenital anomalies each year in the US 2001 (Deaths: Final Data for 2001, NCHS, CDC)
  • Birth defects or congenital anomalies is ranked the number 1 leading cause of infant death each year in the US 2001 (Deaths: Final Data for 2001, NCHS, CDC)
  • 5 male deaths per 100,000 population due to congenital diseases in Australia 1994 (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2004)
  • 4 female deaths per 100,000 population due to congenital diseases in Australia 1994 (Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 2004)
  • more about deaths...»

Life Expectancy & Years of Life Lost for Congenital conditions

Average life years lost for Congenital conditions: 59.2 for birth defects in North Carolina1.

Society statistics for Congenital conditions

Hospitalization statistics for Congenital conditions:

The following are statistics from various sources about hospitalizations and Congenital conditions:

  • 207,000 hospital discharges for birth defects or congenital anomalies in the US 2001 (2001 National Hospital Discharge Survey, NCHS, CDC)
  • Average length of stay in hospitals for birth defects or congenital anomalies was 5.5 days in the US 2001 (2001 National Hospital Discharge Survey, NCHS, CDC)
  • 0.79% (100,527) of hospital episodes were for congenital malformations in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 93% of hospital consultations for congenital malformations required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 58% of hospital episodes for congenital malformations were for men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 42% of hospital episodes for congenital malformations were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 10% of hospital admissions for congenital malformations required emergency hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 4.3 days was the mean length of stay in hospitals for congenital malformations in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 2 days was the median length of stay in hospitals for congenital malformations in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 11 was the mean age of patients hospitalised for congenital malformations in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 19% of hospitalisations for congenital malformations occurred in 15-59 year olds in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 1% of hospitalisations for congenital malformations occurred in people over 75 in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 27% of hospitalisations for congenital malformations were single day episodes in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 0.51% (268,966) of hospital bed days were for congenital malformations in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • Hospitalization statistics in Australia:
    • 0.58% (23,190) of hospital episodes were for congenital abnormalities in public hospitals in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • 48% of hospitalisations for congenital abnormalities were single day episodes in public hospitals in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • 80% of hospitalisations in public hospitals for congenital abnormalities were by public patients in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • 20% of hospitalisations in public hospitals for congenital abnormalities were by private patients in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • Hospitalisations for congenital abnormalities at public hospitals occurred in 11.9 people per 10,000 population in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • 3.7 days was the mean length of stay in hospitals for congenital abnormalities in public hospitals in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • Excluding same day episodes, 6.3 days was the mean length of stay in public hospitals for congenital abnormalities in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • 0.44% (10,697) of private hospital episodes were for congenital abnormalities in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • 56.1% of hospitalisations in private hospitals for congenital abnormalities were single day in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • 1.9% of hospitalisations in private hospitals for congenital abnormalities were by public patients in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • 98% of hospitalisations in private hospitals for congenital abnormalities were by private patients in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • Hospitalisations in private hospitals for congenital abnormalities occurred in 5.5 people per 10,000 population in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • 2.1 days was the mean length of stay in private hospitals for congenital abnormalities in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)
    • Excluding same day episodes, 3.4 days was the mean length of stay in private hospitals for congenital abnormalities in Australia 2001-02 (Australian Hospital Data, AIHW, Australia, 2001-02)

About statistics:

This page presents a variety of statistics about Congenital conditions. The term 'prevalence' of Congenital conditions usually refers to the estimated population of people who are managing Congenital conditions at any given time. The term 'incidence' of Congenital conditions refers to the annual diagnosis rate, or the number of new cases of Congenital conditions diagnosed each year. Hence, these two statistics types can differ: a short-lived disease like flu can have high annual incidence but low prevalence, but a life-long disease like diabetes has a low annual incidence but high prevalence. For more information see about prevalence and incidence statistics.



Footnotes: 1. Years of Potential Life Lost in North Carolina, NCMJ March/April 2002, Volume 63, Number 2

 

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