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Diagnosis Mistakes » Dermatomyositis in breast cancer
 

Dermatomyositis in breast cancer

Dermatomyositis is a serious connective-tissue disease related to polymyositis that is characterized by inflammation of the muscles and the skin. The cause is unknown, but it may result from either a viral infection or an autoimmune reaction. Some cases of dermatomyositis may overlap with another autoimmune disease such as lupus, scleroderma, or vasculitis The main symptoms include skin rash and symmetric proximal muscle weakness which may be accompanied by pain. Skin findings occur in DM but not PM and are generally present at diagnosis. It must be differentiated from other conditions such as Inclusion body myositis which can be done on biopsy. It is also a part of the paraneoplastic conditions which occurs in cases of breast cancers.

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