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Diagnosis Mistakes » Hypopigmented macules of Pityriasis versicolor
 

Hypopigmented macules of Pityriasis versicolor

Pityriasis versicolor is a common skin infection which is caused by a yeast or fungus called Malassezia furfur (Pityrosporum ovale). This condition is commonly seen in tropical and sub tropical countries in young adults and is rare in children. Clinically it has a sudden onset and presents with multiple, small, recurrent, scaly, non anaesthetic, hypo pigmented macules which develop slowly over the skin of chest, back and shoulders. Face, hands and legs are usually not involved. This condition is often confused with other causes of hypopigmentation like pityriasis rosea, pityriasis alba, vitiligo etc.This condition can be diagnosed by the microscopic examination of scales. It is treated with topical anti fungal drugs and oral antifungal medication in severe cases.

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