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Diseases » Flu-like conditions » Prevalence
 

Prevalence and Incidence of Flu-like conditions

Prevalance of types of Flu-like conditions:

For details see prevalence of types of Flu-like conditions analysis; summary of available prevalence data:

  • HIV-1A: HIV-1Accounts for about 26.7% of cases of HIV worldwide
  • HIV-1B: HIV-1B accounts for about 12.3% of cases of HIV worldwide
  • HIV-1C: HIV-1C accounts for about 47.2% of cases of HIV worldwide
  • HIV-1D: HIV-1D accounts for about 5.3% of cases of HIV worldwide
  • HIV-1M: HIV-1M accounts for about 90% of cases of HIV worldwide
  • HIV-1A3: HIV-1Accounts for about 26.7% of cases of HIV worldwide
  • HIV-1, CRF01_AE: HIV-1, CRF01_AE accounts for about 3.2% of cases of HIV worldwide
  • Cryptococcosis: 0.2-0.9 cases per 100,000 in the general population (DBMD)
  • HIV/AIDS: 900,000 Americans (NIAID, quarter are unaware)
  • Toxoplasmosis: More than 60 million in USA but few have symptoms (DPD)
  • Cytomegalovirus: 50% approximately; almost half of young adults (NIAID)
  • Epstein-Barr virus: as many as 20% of people carry the virus in their throats
  • Latent tuberculosis: estimated 10 to 15 million people in USA (NIAID)
  • more types of Flu-like conditions...»

Incidence of types of Flu-like conditions:

For details see incidence of types of Flu-like conditions analysis; summary of available incidence by type data:

  • Acute lymphocytic leukemia: 3,830 new cases for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia in the US 2004 (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
  • Acute myeloid leukemia: 11,920 new cases for Acute Myeloid Leukemia in the US 2004 (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
  • Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: 8,190 new cases for Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia in the US 2004 (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
  • Chronic myeloid leukemia: 4,600 new cases for Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in the US 2004 (Cancer Facts and Figures, American Cancer Society, 2004)
  • Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: 53,900 annual cases in USA (SEER 2002 estimate)
  • Hodgkin's Disease: 7,000 annual cases in USA (SEER 2002 estimate); less than 1 percent of all cases of cancer
  • Leukemia: 30,800 annual cases in USA (SEER 2002 estimate) including 10,800 lymphocytic, 15,000 myeloid and 5,000 other leukemias; about 29,000 cases annually (NCI); nearly 27,000 adults and more than 2,000 children annually.
  • Japanese encephalitis: 1 case annually in USA (DVBID)
  • Babesiosis: 7 cases in NJ 1998 (NJ DHSS)
  • Brucellosis: 82 annual cases notified in USA 1999 (MMWR 1999)
  • Lyme disease: estimated 100,000 cases annually (NIAID/USA)
  • Hemophilus influenzae B: 261 annual cases of invasive HIB in USA 1999 (MMWR 1999)
  • Barmah Forest virus: 4.6 new cases per 100,000 population of Barmah Forest Virus infection was notified in Australia 2002 (Yohannes K, Roche P, Blumer C et al. 2004, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • Ross River virus: 7.4 new cases per 100,000 population of Ross River Virus infection was notified in Australia 2002 (Yohannes K, Roche P, Blumer C et al. 2004, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • Blastomycosis: 1-2 cases per 100,000 (DBMD)
  • Coccidioidomycosis: 15 cases per 100,000 population in Arizona in 1995 (DBMD)
  • Cryptococcosis: 0.2-0.9 cases per 100,000 in the general population (DBMD)
  • Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers: 0 new cases of viral haemorrhagic fever per 100,000 population was notified in Australia 2002 (Yohannes K, Roche P, Blumer C et al. 2004, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • Infant Cytomegalic virus: 6,000 babies
  • Cryptococcal Meningitis: about 5 per million
  • Chickenpox: 120,624 annually (1995); 46,016 annual cases notified in USA 1999 (MMWR 1999); 199.14 per 100,000 in Canada 20001
  • HIV/AIDS: approximately 40,000 annual cases in USA (NIAID)
  • Flu: 36 per 100 (NHIS96); 35 million annually up to 50 million annually (NIAID/CDC); 10-20% yearly (NIAID)
  • Measles: 100 cases annually (1998); once common, now greatly reduced by MMR vaccination programs; 100 annual cases notified in USA 1999 (MMWR 1999)
  • Rubella: 364 cases annually (1998); incidence greatly reduced by MMR vaccination programs
  • Mumps: 387 annual cases notified in USA 1999 (MMWR 1999); rare due to MMR vaccination
  • Dengue fever: about 100 to 200 cases annually in USA (NIAID)
  • Yellow fever: 1 annual case notified in USA 1999 (MMWR 1999)
  • Hantavirus: 33 annual cases of Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome notified in USA 1999 (MMWR 1999)
  • Viral meningitis: 8,932 new cases in America 1995 (Meningitis Foundation of America, CDC, 1994)
  • Arbovirus: 0.1 new cases per 100,000 population of arbovirus infection was notified in Australia 2002 (Yohannes K, Roche P, Blumer C et al. 2004, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • Smallpox: 0 cases throughout the world.
  • Malaria: 1,800 cases annually (1997); 1,666 annual cases notified in USA 1999 (MMWR 1999)
  • Typhoid fever: 346 annual cases notified in USA 1999 (MMWR 1999)
  • Q fever: 3.9 new cases per 100,000 population of Q Fever were notified in Australia 2002 (Yohannes K, Roche P, Blumer C et al. 2004, Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • Rocky Mountain spotted fever: 579 annual cases notified in USA 1999 (MMWR 1999)
  • Leptospirosis: 100-200 cases annually in USA (DBMD)
  • Plague: 9 annual cases of plague notified in USA 1999 (MMWR 1999)
  • Legionnaires' disease: 1,108 annual cases notified in USA 1999 (MMWR 1999)
  • Tuberculosis: 18,361 cases annually in the USA (1998); 8 million people worldwide develop active TB and 3 million die; 17,531 annual cases notified in USA 1999 (MMWR 1999); 5.50 per 100,000 in Canada 20001
  • Ehrlichiosis: 302 annual cases (203 of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis and 99 of human monocytic ehrlichiosis) notified in USA 1999 (MMWR 1999)
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About prevalence and incidence statistics:

The term 'prevalence' of Flu-like conditions usually refers to the estimated population of people who are managing Flu-like conditions at any given time. The term 'incidence' of Flu-like conditions refers to the annual diagnosis rate, or the number of new cases of Flu-like conditions diagnosed each year. Hence, these two statistics types can differ: a short-lived disease like flu can have high annual incidence but low prevalence, but a life-long disease like diabetes has a low annual incidence but high prevalence. For more information see about prevalence and incidence statistics.

Footnotes:
1. Notifiable Diseases Online, PPHB, Canada, 2000

 

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