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Treatments for Fungal infections

Treatments for Fungal infections:

The most effective treatment plan for fungal infections uses a multifaceted approach. The first step in treatment is prevention. Prevention measures include maintaining good oral, groin and skin hygiene. It is also important not to share towels, underwear and other personal items with other people.

Prevention also includes using antibiotics only when truly needed, which can help minimize fungal infections that result from antibiotic use.

To prevent transmission of fungal infections to a newborn infant, pregnant women should consult with their licensed health care provider if they have symptoms of a vaginal yeast infection, such as vaginal itching, burning with urination, and a cheesy white discharge. Nursing women who have nipple discharge or pain should also notify their provider so they can be examined for fungal infections of the nipples, which could be transmitted to the mouth of a nursing infant.

In many cases oral fungal infections (oral thrush) in infants can disappear within two weeks and may need no treatment other than watching the progress of the mouth lesions. Because oral thrush maybe painful in the mouth and affect feedings, the pediatrician should still be notified if symptoms appear in an infant.

A treatment plan may also include medications, including prescription topical or oral antifungal medications, such as fluconazole. For a severe fungal infection of the lungs, hospitalization and intravenous administration of antifungal medications may be necessary.

Treatment of fungal infections also includes diagnosing any underlying diseases that may increase the risk for the infection. These include HIV/AIDS and diabetes. Treating the high blood sugar levels of diabetes may resolve a current infection and is key to minimizing the risk of developing recurrent infections of fungal infections.

Therapy may also include eating yogurt or taking acidophilus supplements, which can help to correct the abnormal balance of microorganisms in the mouth and digestive tract, which leads to fungal infections. Using antiseptic mouth washes may also be recommended for oral thrush.

Treatment List for Fungal infections

The list of treatments mentioned in various sources for Fungal infections includes the following list. Always seek professional medical advice about any treatment or change in treatment plans.

  • Topical therapy - Used to treat tinea and localised mucocutaneous candidiasis. Not usually successful for infections involving the nail and hair.
  • Topical agents include
  • Other agents used to treat topical infection include benzoic acid with salicylic acid (Whitfield's ointment) and crystal violet but these tend to be less effective
  • Drying/antibacterial agents such as Condys crystals may be used in severe interdigital infection
  • Combination therapy with topical steroids may be useful to settle initial inflammation
  • Systemic therapy - used to treat deep or disseminated fungal infections, superficial infections involving the hair or nails, and mucocutaneous and vaginal Candida not responding to oral therapy.
  • Systemic agents include - griseofulvin
  • Predisposing factors should be sought and addressed - obesity, diabetes, antibiotics, immunosuppressive agents including steroids, neutropenia and immunodeficiency.
  • Topical therapy - Used to treat tinea and localised mucocutaneous candidiasis. Not usually successful for infections involving the nail and hair.
  • Topical agents include
  • Other agents used to treat topical infection include benzoic acid with salicylic acid (Whitfield's ointment) and crystal violet but these tend to be less effective
  • Drying/antibacterial agents such as Condys crystals may be used in severe interdigital infection
  • Combination therapy with topical steroids may be useful to settle initial inflammation
  • Systemic therapy - used to treat deep or disseminated fungal infections, superficial infections involving the hair or nails, and mucocutaneous and vaginal Candida not responding to oral therapy.
  • Systemic agents include
  • Predisposing factors should be sought and addressed - obesity, diabetes, antibiotics, immunosuppressive agents including steroids, neutropenia and immunodeficiency.

Drugs and Medications used to treat Fungal infections:

Note:You must always seek professional medical advice about any prescription drug, OTC drug, medication, treatment or change in treatment plans.

Some of the different medications used in the treatment of Fungal infections include:

  • Amphotericin B lipid complex
  • Abelcet
  • Amphotericin B Liposomal - mainly used in neutropenic patients
  • AmBisome - mainly used in neutropenic patients
  • Voriconazole - Serious fungal infections
  • VFEND - Serious fungal infections

Unlabeled Drugs and Medications to treat Fungal infections:

Unlabelled alternative drug treatments for Fungal infections include:

  • Flucytosine
  • 5-Fluorocytosine
  • 5-FC
  • Ancobon
  • Ancotil
  • Novo-triphyl

Latest treatments for Fungal infections:

The following are some of the latest treatments for Fungal infections:

Hospital statistics for Fungal infections:

These medical statistics relate to hospitals, hospitalization and Fungal infections:

  • 0.03% (3,734) of hospital episodes were for mycoses in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 81% of hospital consultations for mycoses required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 50% of hospital episodes for mycoses were for men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 50% of hospital episodes for mycoses were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • more hospital information...»

Discussion of treatments for Fungal infections:

Medicines applied directly to the infected area are available by prescription and over the counter for treating skin and nail fungal infections. Unfortunately, many people have had limited success with them. During the 1990s, oral prescription medicines became available for treating fungal infections of the skin and nails.

For many years, very powerful oral antifungal medicines were used only to treat systemic (within the body) fungal infections, such as histoplasmosis. Doctors usually prescribe oral antifungal medications cautiously because all of them, even the milder ones for skin and nail fungi, can have very serious side effects. (Source: excerpt from Microbes in Sickness and in Health -- Publications, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: NIAID)

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