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Glossary for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

  • Abdominal Pain: A condition which is characterized by the sensation of pain that is located in the abdomen
  • Achalasia: A rare motor disorder of the esophagus characterized by inability of the lower esophageal sphincter and esophageal muscle to relax as well as dilation of the esophagus.
  • Acid regurgitation: The regurgitation of stomach contents
  • Adenocarcinoma: A carcinoma derived from/within glandular tissue.
  • Angina Pectoris: Variant of Angina Pectoris, where episodic chest pain occurs without exertion or provocation, due to a transient spasm of a coronary artery; more common in women
  • Apnea: Cessation of breathing. Apnea can be caused by neurological diseases, strangulation, drugs and airway obstruction.
  • Asthma: Repeated attacks of breathing difficulty.
  • Asthma-like conditions: Medical conditions similar to asthma, or having similar symptoms.
  • Autonomic neuropathy: A disorder of the nervous system concerned with regulation of activity of cardiac muscle, smooth muscle, and glands, usually restricted to the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems
  • Barrett Esophagus: Pre-malignant syndrome of the lower oesophagus characteries by columnar epithelium with areas of metaplasia.
  • Barrett's esophagus: Damage to the cells lining the esophagus usually from refluxed acid.
  • Belching: The release of gas from the digestive tract through the mouth.
  • Bitter tastes: Sensation of bitter tastes in mouth
  • Caffeine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to caffeine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Chest pain: Pain in the chest area.
  • Cholelithiasis: Is the presence of gallstones in the gallbladder
  • Chronic cough: The chronic noisy sudden expulsion of air from the respiratory tract
  • Chronic digestive conditions: The chronic digestive conditions include Bowel Cancer, Coeliac Disease, Constipation, Diarrhoea, Diverticular disease, Flatulence, Haemorrhoids, Indigestion and heartburn, Inflammatory Bowel Disease (Crohn's Disease and ulcerative colitis), Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Lactose Intolerance, Ulcers
  • Colic: Abdominal spasms causing pain
  • Cough: The noise produced from the sudden expulsion of air from the lungs
  • Cyclic vomiting syndrome: A rare disorder involving repeated cyclic episodes of vomiting which occur for no obvious reason.
  • Decreased gastrointestinal motility: Decreased gastrointestinal motility is a lowered functioning of the gastrointestinal tract in which food is not digested and moved normally through the gastrointestinal tract.
  • Decreased intestinal motility: slowed peristalsis
  • Diabetic Gastroparesis: Gastroparesis is a diabetic complication that occurs from neuropathy of the stomach nerve (called the "vagus nerve"). This causes digestive difficulties as the food starts to move too slowly through the stomach.
  • Diffuse systemic sclerosi: A rare condition that characterized by skin tightness affecting the trunk and extremities as well as organ involvement. It involves an early period of internal inflammation which distinguishes it from other forms of scleroderma and the organ involvement can be severe and even life-threatening.
  • Digestive Diseases: Diseases that affect the digestive system
  • Duodenal ulcer: A peptic ulcer is erosion in the lining of the stomach or duodenum (the first part of the small intestine). The word "peptic" refers to pepsin, a stomach enzyme that breaks down proteins. If a peptic ulcer is located in the stomach it is called a gastric ulcer.
  • Esophageal ulcer: An ulcer erosion of the mucous membrane located in the esophagus
  • Esophagitis: Inflammation of the esophagus
  • Esophagus Cancer: Cancer of the esophagus in the throat.
  • Esophagus diseases: Diseases affecting the esophagus
  • Esophagus inflammation: Inflammation of the esophagus.
  • Gastric Ulcer: A gastric ulcer is a break in the normal tissue that lines the stomach.
  • Gastrinoma: Rare tumors secreting the digestive hormone gastrin.
  • Gastritis: Inflammation of the stomach lining
  • Gastroenteritis: Acute stomach or intestine inflammation
  • Heartburn: Pain from stomach acid coming back up the esophagus
  • Hiatal hernia: Hernia of the stomach through the diaphragm muscle.
  • Hoarse: Hoarseness or loss of voice
  • Indigestion: Various eating symptoms of indigestion (dyspepsia)
  • Intussusception: Bowel folding into itself sometimes creating bowel obstruction
  • Lansoprazole -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lansoprazole during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Laryngitis: Laryngitis is an inflammation of the mucous membrane lining the larynx which is located in the upper part of the respiratory tract.
  • Metabolic disorders: Disorders that affect the metabolic system in human
  • Mucus membrane conditions: Medical conditions affecting any of the mucus membranes.
  • Myocardial ischemia: Myocardial ischemia refers to a reduced blood flow and oxygen supply to the heart muscle.
  • Necrotizing enterocolitis: A rare disease that is tends to occur in premature infants and involves inflammation and destruction of gastrointestinal tissue. It usually occurs within weeks of birth - often after the start of milk feeding. The condition can be extremely serious and even fatal.
  • Nonulcer dyspepsia: Persistent indigestion not caused by a peptic ulcer.
  • Obesity: An increase in the body weight greater than that required for normal function that is characterised by the accumulation of excessive fat
  • Pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease: Gastroesophageal reflux is defined as the retrograde movement of gastric contents into the esophagus; it is a physiologic process that occurs in everyone, young and old, particularly after meals. Researchers have found that 10 percent of infants (younger than 12 months) with GER develop significant complications. The diseases associated with reflux are known collectively as Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD).
  • Peptic Ulcer: Ulcer on the lining of the stomach or duodenum
  • Pulmonary fibrosis: A scarring condition that affects the lungs
  • Pyloric stenosis: Narrowed opening between stomach and intestines
  • Reflux: Rising stomach acid up the esophagus
  • Regurgitation: The backflow of stomach contents and gas from stomach back into oesophagus or mouth
  • Rumination disorder: A chronic eating condition where the stomach contents are regurgitated, rechewed and swallowed again. It tends to occur predominantly in infants, young children and people with mental impairment but it can occur in otherwise healthy individuals. Sufferers often try to hide their condition for fear of being diagnosed as having bulimia. The condition is often misdiagnosed as gastroparesis or bulimia. The regurgitation can occur as soon as the food is swallowed or even up to an hour after finishing eating.
  • Sleep apnea: Childhood obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome is characterized by episodic upper airway obstruction that occurs during sleep.
  • Stomach Conditions: Any condition that affects a persons stomach
  • Sucralfate -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Sucralfate during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Zollinger-Ellison syndrome: A rare disorder where excessive levels of the hormone gastrin are released into the stomach which increases stomach acidity which results in peptic ulcer development. A hormone secreting pancreatic or duodenal tumor is usually the cause.

 

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