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What is Guillain-Barre Syndrome?

What is Guillain-Barre Syndrome?

  • Guillain-Barre Syndrome: A rare progressive form of ascending polyneuropathy believed to be an autoimmune response.
  • Guillain-Barre Syndrome: progressive ascending motor neuron paralysis of unknown etiology, frequently following an enteric or respiratory infection.
    Source - Diseases Database
  • Guillain-Barre Syndrome: a form of peripheral polyneuritis characterized by pain and weakness and sometimes paralysis of the limbs; cause is unknown.
    Source - WordNet 2.1

Guillain-Barre Syndrome is listed as a "rare disease" by the Office of Rare Diseases (ORD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This means that Guillain-Barre Syndrome, or a subtype of Guillain-Barre Syndrome, affects less than 200,000 people in the US population.
Source - National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Ophanet, a consortium of European partners, currently defines a condition rare when it affects 1 person per 2,000. They list Guillain-Barre Syndrome as a "rare disease".
Source - Orphanet

Guillain-Barre Syndrome: Introduction

Types of Guillain-Barre Syndrome:

Types of Guillain-Barre Syndrome:

Broader types of Guillain-Barre Syndrome:

How many people get Guillain-Barre Syndrome?

Prevalance of Guillain-Barre Syndrome: about 1 in 100,000 (NWHIC)
Prevalance Rate of Guillain-Barre Syndrome: approx 1 in 100,000 or 0.00% or 2,720 people in USA [about data]
Incidence (annual) of Guillain-Barre Syndrome: about 1 in 100,000 (NWHIC)
Incidence Rate of Guillain-Barre Syndrome: approx 1 in 100,000 or 0.00% or 2,720 people in USA [about data]
Prevalance of Guillain-Barre Syndrome: Guillain Barre Syndrome (GBS) is a rare disorder, afflicting about 1 person in 100,000. (Source: excerpt from NIAID Guillain Barre Fact Sheet: NIAID)
Incidence of Guillain-Barre Syndrome: The syndrome is rare, however, afflicting only about one person in 100,000. (Source: excerpt from Guillain-Barre Syndrome: NWHIC)

Who gets Guillain-Barre Syndrome?

Profile for Guillain-Barre Syndrome: affects both sexes of any age. (Source: excerpt from NIAID Guillain Barre Fact Sheet: NIAID) ... Guillain-Barre syndrome can affect anybody. It can strike at any age and both sexes are equally prone to the disorder. (Source: excerpt from Guillain-Barre Syndrome: NWHIC)

Gender Profile for Guillain-Barre Syndrome: Equally men and women.

Geography Profile for Guillain-Barre Syndrome: It is more common in Japan and China than in North America or Europe (Source: excerpt from NIAID Guillain Barre Fact Sheet: NIAID)

How serious is Guillain-Barre Syndrome?

Prognosis of Guillain-Barre Syndrome: Recovery within weeks for many. 30% still have weakness in 3 years. 3% have a relapse. Mortality rate around 3-4%.
Complications of Guillain-Barre Syndrome: see complications of Guillain-Barre Syndrome
Prognosis of Guillain-Barre Syndrome: Guillain-Barré syndrome can be a devastating disorder because of its sudden and unexpected onset. Most people reach the stage of greatest weakness within the first 2 weeks after symptoms appear, and by the third week of the illness 90 percent of all patients are at their weakest. The recovery period may be as little as a few weeks or as long as a few years. About 30 percent of those with Guillain-Barré still have a residual weakness after 3 years. About 3 percent may suffer a relapse of muscle weakness and tingling sensations many years after the initial attack. (Source: excerpt from NINDS Guillain-Barre Syndrome Information Page: NINDS) ... Most patients, however, recover from even the most severe cases of Guillain-Barre syndrome, although some continue to have minor problems. (Source: excerpt from Guillain-Barre Syndrome: NWHIC)

What causes Guillain-Barre Syndrome?

Causes of Guillain-Barre Syndrome: see causes of Guillain-Barre Syndrome
Causes of Guillain-Barre Syndrome: Usually Guillain-Barré occurs a few days or weeks after the patient has had symptoms of a respiratory or gastrointestinal viral infection. Occasionally, surgery or vaccinations will trigger the syndrome. The disorder can develop over the course of hours or days, or it may take up to 3 to 4 weeks. (Source: excerpt from NINDS Guillain-Barre Syndrome Information Page: NINDS) ... GBS can probably result following a number of bacterial and viral infections. Campylobacter jejuni induced diarrheal disease is most often recognized as the precedent infection. (Source: excerpt from NIAID Guillain Barre Fact Sheet: NIAID)
Risk factors for Guillain-Barre Syndrome: see risk factors for Guillain-Barre Syndrome

What are the symptoms of Guillain-Barre Syndrome?

Symptoms of Guillain-Barre Syndrome: see symptoms of Guillain-Barre Syndrome

Complications of Guillain-Barre Syndrome: see complications of Guillain-Barre Syndrome

Incubation period for Guillain-Barre Syndrome: 1 to 3 weeks after an infection or other event.

Incubation period for Guillain-Barre Syndrome: The disorder can develop over the course of hours or days, or it may take up to 3 to 4 weeks. (Source: excerpt from Guillain-Barre Syndrome: NWHIC)

Duration of Guillain-Barre Syndrome: usually a few weeks

Can anyone else get Guillain-Barre Syndrome?

Contagion of autoimmunity: generally not; see details in contagion of autoimmune diseases.

Guillain-Barre Syndrome: Testing

Diagnostic testing: see tests for Guillain-Barre Syndrome.

Misdiagnosis: see misdiagnosis and Guillain-Barre Syndrome.

How is it treated?

Treatments for Guillain-Barre Syndrome: see treatments for Guillain-Barre Syndrome
Prevention of Guillain-Barre Syndrome: see prevention of Guillain-Barre Syndrome
Research for Guillain-Barre Syndrome: see research for Guillain-Barre Syndrome

Society issues for Guillain-Barre Syndrome

Costs of Guillain-Barre Syndrome: $247 million to $1.8 billion for Campylobacter induced GBS (NIAID)
Costs of Guillain-Barre Syndrome: The medical costs associated with Campylobacter induced GBS has been estimated by the USDA to be between $57 and $425 million per year in the U.S. Total costs, which include days of lost productivity, are estimated to be between $247 million and $1.8 billion per year. (Source: excerpt from NIAID Guillain Barre Fact Sheet: NIAID)

Organs Affected by Guillain-Barre Syndrome:

Organs and body systems related to Guillain-Barre Syndrome include:

Name and Aliases of Guillain-Barre Syndrome

Main name of condition: Guillain-Barre Syndrome

Class of Condition for Guillain-Barre Syndrome: autoimmune

Other names or spellings for Guillain-Barre Syndrome:

Guillain-Barré Syndrome, GBS, acute polyneuritis, ascending paralysis, acute infective polyneuritis, Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Landry-Guillain-Barre syndrome, Acute inflammatory polyneuropathy

Guillain-Barre syndrome, Infectious polyneuritis, Landry's paralysis
Source - WordNet 2.1

Acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Acute inflammatory polyneuropathy, GBS, Landry-Guillain-Barre syndrome
Source - Office of Rare Diseases (ORD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Guillain-Barre Syndrome: Related Conditions

Research the causes of these diseases that are similar to, or related to, Guillain-Barre Syndrome:

 

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