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Treatments for Heart attack

Treatments for Heart attack:

The most effective heart attack treatment plan uses a multifaceted approach. This includes preventive care aimed at minimizing the risk factors for having a heart attack. Preventive measures include regular medical care to monitor and address such risk factors as high cholesterol, obesity, smoking, diabetes, and excessive alcohol consumption.

Heart attacks are often diagnosed and treated in the emergency room setting. Treatment includes the administration of supplemental oxygen aimed at increasing the amount of oxygen that is delivered to the heart tissue. Treatment also involves intensive monitoring and stabilization of vital signs, which may require CPR, advanced life support measures and/or intravenous medications. Breathing may need to be supported by mechanical ventilation. Heart rhythm and cardiac enzymes are also monitored. Abnormal heart rhythms may need treatment with medications and possibly electrical defibrillation.

Medications, such as nitroglycerin, may be used to improved blood flow to the heart. Pain medications, such as morphine, may be used to reduce pain and anxiety and lower the amount of oxygen the heart needs. Drugs that stop the formation of clots, such as aspirin or heparin, may be used. Other drugs may include clot-dissolving drugs that can break up the clot in the coronary artery that is causing the heart attack.

Many people with heart attack s undergo a surgical procedure called an angioplasty. In this procedure, the blood clot is removed from the artery and the artery is widened using a balloon device and a stent is placed in the artery to keep it open.

Less commonly, a more invasive and riskier procedure called a coronary artery bypass is performed. In this surgery new graft arteries are placed to bypass the blocked artery or arteries. Blood flow is then redirected through healthy new graft arteries to the affected heart tissues.

Treatment List for Heart attack

The list of treatments mentioned in various sources for Heart attack includes the following list. Always seek professional medical advice about any treatment or change in treatment plans.

  • Call emergency immediately - 911 in the USA.
  • Go to a hospital immediately - if you cannot call emergency.
  • Emergency treatment
  • Hospitalization
  • Coronary angioplasty (balloon angioplasty)
  • Coronary artery bypass
  • Immediate self-help for heart attacks
    • Call for emergency medical help - usually 911 in the USA
    • Nitroglycerin pills - it may be possible to take your prescribed nitroglycerin pills for heart attack symptoms, according to your doctor’s orders. Call emergency immediately if the symptoms are occurring for the first time, severe, or unusual in any way. If symptoms stop quickly (less than 15 minutes), call your doctor for advice anyway. If symptoms continue, call emergency.
    • Aspirin - Taking aspirin may be helpful. Can be taken in addition to nitroglycerin pills. Can also be taken even if you are not on nitroglycerin pills. Call emergency immediately if the symptoms are occurring for the first time, severe, or unusual in any way. If symptoms stop quickly (less than 15 minutes), call your doctor anyway; if not, call emergency.
  • Aspirin
  • Statins
  • Clopidigrel
  • Betablockers

Alternative Treatments for Heart attack

Alternative treatments or home remedies that have been listed as possibly helpful for Heart attack may include:

  • Arnica homeopathic remedy
  • Aconite homeopathic remedy
  • Latrodectus mactans homeopathic remedy
  • Arsenicum album homeopathic remedy
  • more treatments »

Heart attack: Is the Diagnosis Correct?

The first step in getting correct treatment is to get a correct diagnosis. Differential diagnosis list for Heart attack may include:

Hidden causes of Heart attack may be incorrectly diagnosed:

Heart attack: Marketplace Products, Discounts & Offers

Products, offers and promotion categories available for Heart attack:

Heart attack: Research Doctors & Specialists

Research all specialists including ratings, affiliations, and sanctions.

Drugs and Medications used to treat Heart attack:

Note:You must always seek professional medical advice about any prescription drug, OTC drug, medication, treatment or change in treatment plans.

Some of the different medications used in the treatment of Heart attack include:

  • Angiotensin Converting Enzyme - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • ACE Inhibitor - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Benazepril - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Lotensin - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Lotensin HCT - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Lotrel - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Captopril - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Apo-Capto - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Capoten - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Capozide - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Novo-Captopril - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Nu-Capto - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Syn-Captopril - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Enalapril - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Lexxel - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Vaseretic - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Vasotec - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Fosinopril - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Lin-Fosinopril - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Monopril - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Monopril HCT - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Lisinopril - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Prinivil - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Prinzide - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Zestoretic - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Zestril - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Quinapril - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Accupril - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Accuretic - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Ramipril - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Altace - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Ramace - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Aspirin
  • Acetylsalicylic acid
  • ASA
  • Added Strength Analgesic Pain Reliever
  • Adult Strength Pain Reliever
  • Aggrenox
  • Alka-Seltzer Effervescent Pain Reliever and Antacid
  • Alka-Seltzer Night Time
  • Alka-Seltzer Plus
  • Alka-Seltzer Plus Cold
  • Anacin
  • Anacin Maximum Strength
  • Anacin w/Codeine
  • Ancasal
  • APC
  • APC w/Codeine
  • APO-ASA
  • Arthritis Pain Formula
  • Arthritis Strength Bufferin
  • A.S.A. Enseals
  • Asasantine
  • Ascriptin
  • Ascriptin A/D
  • Aspergum
  • Aspirin PROTECT
  • Asprimox
  • Astrin
  • Axotal
  • Azdone
  • Bayer Aspirin
  • Bayer Children's Chewable Aspirin
  • Bayer Enteric Aspirin
  • Bayer Plus
  • BC Powder
  • Buffaprin
  • Bufferin
  • Bufferin Arthritis Strength
  • Bufferin Extra Strength
  • Bufferin w/Codeine
  • Cama Arthritis Pain Reliever
  • Cardioprin
  • Carisoprodol Compound
  • Cope
  • Coricidin
  • Coryphen
  • Coryphen-Codeine
  • C2 Buffered
  • Darvon Compound
  • Dorect Fpr,I;aru As[orom
  • Dristan
  • Easprin
  • Ecotrin
  • 8-Hour Bayer
  • Empirin
  • Empirin w/Codeine No. 2,4
  • Entrophen
  • Excedrin
  • Excedrin Extra Strength Geltabs
  • Excedrin Migraine
  • Fiorinal
  • Firoinal-C
  • Firoinal w/Codeine
  • Genacote
  • Genprin
  • Goody's Headache Powder
  • Halprin
  • Hepto
  • Lortab ASA
  • Low Dose Adult Chewable Aspirin
  • Marnal
  • Maximum Bayer Aspirin
  • Measurin
  • Midol Caplets
  • Momentum
  • Norgesic
  • Norgesic Forte
  • Norwich Aspirin
  • Mpvasem
  • Orphenadrine
  • PAP w/Codeine
  • Percodan
  • Percodan-Demi
  • Phenaphen
  • Phenaphen No. 2, 3, 4
  • Propoxyphene Compound
  • Riphen-10
  • Robaxisal
  • Robaxisal-C
  • Roxiprin
  • 692
  • SK-65 Compound
  • Soma Compound
  • St. Joseph Children's Aspirin
  • Supasa
  • Synalgos
  • Synalgos-DC Tablet
  • Triaphen-10
  • 217
  • 217 Strong
  • 292
  • Vanquish
  • Verin
  • Wesprin
  • Zorprin
  • Atenolol
  • Apo-Atenolol
  • Novo-Atenolol
  • Nu-Atenolol
  • PMS-Atenolol
  • Tenoretic
  • Tenormin
  • Warfarin
  • Athrombin-K
  • Carfin
  • Coumadin
  • PanWarfarin
  • Sofarin
  • Warnerin
  • Direct Formulary Aspirin
  • Halfprin
  • Novasen
  • Alteplase
  • Activase
  • Actilyse
  • Reteplase
  • Retavase
  • Streptokinase
  • Streptase
  • Tenecteplase
  • TNKase

Unlabeled Drugs and Medications to treat Heart attack:

Unlabelled alternative drug treatments for Heart attack include:

  • Betaxolol - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Betoptic - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Betoptic-Pilo - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Betoptic-S - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Kerlone - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Novo-Betaxolol - reduces risk of death following heart attack
  • Carvedilol - reduces the risk of death following a heart attack
  • Coreg - reduces the risk of death following a heart attack
  • Dilatrend - reduces the risk of death following a heart attack
  • Eucardic - reduces the risk of death following a heart attack
  • Proreg - reduces the risk of death following a heart attack
  • Infliximab
  • Anti TNF monoclonal antibody
  • Remicade
  • Isosorbide Mononitrate
  • Elan
  • Elantan
  • Imdur
  • Ismo
  • Monoket
  • Macrolide antibiotics - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Azithromycin - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Zithromax - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Clarithromycin - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Biaxin - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Biaxin XL - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Biaxin XL Pac - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Erythromycin - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Apo-Erythro Base - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Apo-Erythro E-C - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Apo-Erytrho-ES - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Apo-Erythro-S - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • E.E.S - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • E.E.S. 200 - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • E.E.S. 400 - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • E-Mycin Controlled Release - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • E-MycinE - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • E-Mycin 333 - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Eramycin - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Erybid - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • ERYC - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • EryPed - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Eryphar - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Ery-Tab - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Erythrocin - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Erythromid - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Ethril - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • ETS-2% - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Ilosone - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Ilotycin - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Novo-Rythro - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • PCE - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Pediamycin - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Pediazole - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • PMS-Erythromycin - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Robimycin - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • SK-Erythromycin - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Wyamycin E - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Wyamycin S - mainly used when heart attack is associated with Chlamydia pneumoniae

Latest treatments for Heart attack:

The following are some of the latest treatments for Heart attack:

Hospital statistics for Heart attack:

These medical statistics relate to hospitals, hospitalization and Heart attack:

  • 195 per 100,000 rate for Acute Myocardial Infarction hospitalizations in Canada 1995 Surveillance on-line, 1998 LCDC, Health Canada)
  • 1.033% (105,476) of hospital consultant episodes were for acute myocardial infarction in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 66% of hospital consultant episodes for acute myocardial infarction required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 62% of hospital consultant episodes for acute myocardial infarction were for men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 38% of hospital consultant episodes for acute myocardial infarction were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • more hospital information...»

Hospitals & Medical Clinics: Heart attack

Research quality ratings and patient incidents/safety measures for hospitals and medical facilities in specialties related to Heart attack:

Hospital & Clinic quality ratings »

Choosing the Best Treatment Hospital: More general information, not necessarily in relation to Heart attack, on hospital and medical facility performance and surgical care quality:

Medical news summaries about treatments for Heart attack:

The following medical news items are relevant to treatment of Heart attack:

Discussion of treatments for Heart attack:

Facts About Heart Disease and Women: NHLBI (Excerpt)

Getting to the hospital fast allows use of thrombolytic (Source: excerpt from Facts About Heart Disease and Women: NHLBI)

Frequently Asked Questions About Heart Attack: NHLBI (Excerpt)

Clot-busting drugs and other artery-opening treatments work best when given within the first hour after a heart attack starts. The first hour also is the most risky time during a heart attack–it’s when your heart might stop suddenly. Responding fast to your symptoms really increases your chance of surviving. (Source: excerpt from Frequently Asked Questions About Heart Attack: NHLBI)

Frequently Asked Questions About Heart Attack: NHLBI (Excerpt)

Given that these new therapies are available, it’s very sad to know that so many people cannot receive these treatments because they delay too long before seeking care. The greatest benefits of these therapies are gained when patients come in early (preferably within the first hour of the start of their symptoms). (Source: excerpt from Frequently Asked Questions About Heart Attack: NHLBI)

Frequently Asked Questions About Heart Attack: NHLBI (Excerpt)

Emergency medical personnel—also called EMS, for emergency medical services—bring medical care to you. For example, they bring oxygen and medications. And they can actually restart someone’s heart if it stops after they arrive. Your wife/husband/friend/coworker can’t do that, or help you at all if they are driving. In the ambulance, there are enough people to give you the help you need and get you to the hospital right away. (Source: excerpt from Frequently Asked Questions About Heart Attack: NHLBI)

Frequently Asked Questions About Heart Attack: NHLBI (Excerpt)

I carry nitroglycerin pills all the time for my heart condition. If I have heart attack symptoms, shouldn’t I try them first?

Yes, if your doctor has prescribed nitroglycerin pills, you should follow your doctor’s orders. If you are not sure about how to take your nitroglycerin when you get chest pain, check with your doctor. (Source: excerpt from Frequently Asked Questions About Heart Attack: NHLBI)

Frequently Asked Questions About Heart Attack: NHLBI (Excerpt)

You should not delay calling 9-1-1 to take an aspirin. Studies have shown that people sometimes delay seeking help if they take an aspirin (or other medicine). Emergency department personnel will give people experiencing a heart attack an aspirin as soon as they arrive. So, the best thing to do is to call 9-1-1 immediately and let the professionals give the aspirin. (Source: excerpt from Frequently Asked Questions About Heart Attack: NHLBI)

Heart Attack: NWHIC (Excerpt)

Call or have someone else call 911. Don't delay. New medical treatments can stop heart attacks in its track. Don't wait because you think it will be embarrassing if it turns out not to be a heart attack! Treatments are most effective if given within one hour of when the attack begins. However, only 1 in 5 patients get to the hospital emergency department within one hour of when their heart attack symptoms begin. (Source: excerpt from Heart Attack: NWHIC)

Heart Attack: NWHIC (Excerpt)

The longer you wait to get medical treatment, the greater the likelihood that you will have severe, permanent damage to your heart or even die. The earlier the treatment, the more likely it is that damage to your heart will be kept to a minimum. (Source: excerpt from Heart Attack: NWHIC)

Heart Attack: NWHIC (Excerpt)

Once it is clear that a person is having a heart attack, immediate treatment usually includes drugs to help open the blocked artery, get blood flowing well to the heart muscle, and keep the blood from clotting again. Other treatment depends on the severity of the condition and the amount of damage the heart may have sustained, but may involve drugs, surgery, and other procedures. Cardiac rehabilitation programs are offered in most communities to help people recover from a heart attack and reduce the chances of having another attack. (Source: excerpt from Heart Attack: NWHIC)

Heart Attack: NWHIC (Excerpt)

Exercise is good for your heart muscle and overall health. It can help you lose weight, keep your cholesterol and blood pressure under control, reduce stress, and lift your mood. If you participate in a cardiac rehabilitation program, you will learn how to exercise safely and regularly to strengthen your heart and body. When exercising, you will need to watch out for signs of problems such as chest pain, shortness of breath, feeling dizzy or weak, irregular heartbeats, or cold sweats. If you develop these symptoms, stop exercising and call 911 for help right away. (Source: excerpt from Heart Attack: NWHIC)

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