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Diseases » Hypoglycemia » Hidden Causes
 

Misdiagnosis of Hidden Causes of Hypoglycemia

Underlying conditions list:

The list of possible underlying conditions mentioned in various sources for Hypoglycemia includes:

Other underlying conditions related to Hypoglycemia:

Source: Diseases Database

Hypoglycemia as a complication:

Other conditions that might have Hypoglycemia as a complication might be potential underlying conditions. The list of conditions listing Hypoglycemia as a complication includes:

Hypoglycemia as a symptom:

Conditions listing Hypoglycemia as a symptom may also be potential underlying conditions.

For a more detailed analysis of Hypoglycemia as a symptom, including causes, drug side effect causes, and drug interaction causes, please see our Symptom Center information for Hypoglycemia.

Discussion of underlying conditions of Hypoglycemia:

Hypoglycemia: NIDDK (Excerpt)

The most common cause of hypoglycemia is as a complication of diabetes. Diabetes occurs when the body cannot use glucose for fuel because either the pancreas is not able to make enough insulin or the insulin that is available is not effective. As a result, glucose builds up in the blood instead of getting into body cells.

The aim of treatment in diabetes is to lower high blood sugar levels. To do this, people with diabetes may use insulin or oral drugs, depending on the type of diabetes they have or the severity of their condition. Hypoglycemia occurs most often in people who use insulin to lower their blood sugar. All people with type 1 diabetes and some people with type 2 diabetes use insulin. People with type 2 diabetes who take oral drugs called sulfonylureas are also vulnerable to low blood sugar episodes. (Source: excerpt from Hypoglycemia: NIDDK)

Hypoglycemia: NIDDK (Excerpt)

Hypoglycemia in people who do not have diabetes is far less common than once believed. However, it can occur in some people under certain conditions such as early pregnancy, prolonged fasting, and long periods of strenuous exercise. People on beta blocker medications who exercise are at higher risk of hypoglycemia, and aspirin can induce hypoglycemia in some children. Drinking alcohol can cause blood sugar to drop in some sensitive individuals, and hypoglycemia has been well documented in chronic alcoholics and binge drinkers. Eating unripe ackee fruit from Jamaica is a rare cause of low blood sugar. (Source: excerpt from Hypoglycemia: NIDDK)

Hypoglycemia: NIDDK (Excerpt)

Fasting hypoglycemia occurs when the stomach is empty. It usually develops in the early morning when a person awakens. As with other forms of hypoglycemia, the symptoms include headache, lack of energy, and an inability to concentrate. Fasting hypoglycemia may be caused by a variety of conditions such as hereditary enzyme or hormone deficiencies, liver disease, and insulin-producing tumors.

In hereditary fructose intolerance, a disorder usually seen in children, the body is unable to metabolize the natural sugar fructose. Attacks of hypoglycemia, marked by seizures, vomiting, and unconsciousness, are treated by giving glucose and eliminating fructose from the diet.

Galactosemia, a rare genetic disorder, hampers the body's ability to process the sugar galactose. An infant with this disorder may appear normal at birth, but after a few days or weeks of drinking milk (which contains galactose), the child may begin to vomit, lose weight, and develop cataracts. The liver may fail to release stored glycogen into the blood, triggering hypoglycemia. Removing milk from the diet is the usual treatment.

A deficiency of growth hormone causes increased sensitivity to insulin. This sensitivity occurs because growth hormone opposes the action of insulin on muscle and fat cells. For this reason, children with growth hormone deficiency sometimes suffer from hypoglycemia, which goes away after treatment.

People with insulin-producing tumors, which arise in the islet cells of the pancreas, suffer from severe episodes of hypoglycemia.

To diagnose these tumors, called insulinomas, a doctor will put the patient on a 24- to 72-hour fast while measuring blood levels of glucose, insulin, and proinsulin. High levels of insulin and proinsulin in the presence of low levels of glucose strongly suggest an insulin-producing tumor. These tumors are usually benign and can be surgically removed.

In rare cases, some cancers such as breast cancer and adrenal cancer may cause hypoglycemia through secretion of a hormone called insulin-like growth factor II. The treatment is removal of the tumor, if possible. (Source: excerpt from Hypoglycemia: NIDDK)

About underlying conditions:

With a diagnosis of Hypoglycemia, it is important to consider whether there is an underlying condition causing Hypoglycemia. These are other medical conditions that may possibly cause Hypoglycemia. For general information on this form of misdiagnosis, see Underlying Condition Misdiagnosis or Overview of Misdiagnosis.

 

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