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Magnetic resonance imaging

Introduction: Magnetic resonance imaging

Description of Magnetic resonance imaging

Magnetic resonance imaging: An imaging technique involving magnetic fields and a complex computer used to deliver a high resolution image of the inside of a patient's body. Can assist in the diagnosis of conditions such as torn muscles, ligaments and cartilage, herniated disks and hip problems.

Magnetic resonance imaging: MRI. A procedure in which radio waves and a powerful magnet linked to a computer are used to create detailed pictures of areas inside the body. These pictures can show the difference between normal and diseased tissue. MRI makes better images of organs and soft tissue than other scanning techniques, such as CT or x-ray. MRI is especially useful for imaging the brain, spine, the soft tissue of joints, and the inside of bones. Also called nuclear magnetic resonance imaging.
Source: National Institute of Health

Magnetic resonance imaging: non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images; concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
Source: CRISP

Magnetic resonance imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
Source: MeSH 2007

Magnetic resonance imaging: Related Topics

These medical condition or symptom topics may be relevant to medical information for Magnetic resonance imaging:

Magnetic resonance imaging and Medical tests

Magnetic resonance imaging (medical test): Another name for MRI scan.

Magnetic resonance imaging (medical test): In MRI , a powerful magnet linked to a computer is used to make detailed pictures of areas in... (Source: excerpt from What You Need To Know About Cancer -- An Overview: NCI)

More information on medical test: MRI scan:

Terms associated with Magnetic resonance imaging:

Terms Similar to Magnetic resonance imaging:

  • Chemical Shift Imaging
  • MR Tomography
  • MRI Scans
  • MRI, Functional
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Functional
  • Magnetization Transfer Contrast Imaging
  • NMR Imaging
  • NMR Tomography
  • Tomography, NMR
  • Tomography, Proton Spin
  • fMRI

Source - MeSH 2007

Related Topics

Source - MeSH 2007

More specific terms for Magnetic resonance imaging:

Source - MeSH 2007

Source - CRISP

Broader terms for Magnetic resonance imaging

Source - MeSH 2007

Source - CRISP

Other terms that may be related to Magnetic resonance imaging:

Source: CRISP

The description of Magnetic resonance imaging may also be used for the following terms:

Source: CRISP

Hierarchical classifications of Magnetic resonance imaging

The following list attempts to classify Magnetic resonance imaging into categories where each line is subset of the next.

MeSH 2007 Hierarchy:

MeSH 2007 Hierarchy

Interesting Medical Articles:

Medical dictionaries:

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