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Diseases » Nasal polyp » Glossary
 

Glossary for Nasal polyp

  • Allergic rhinitis: Allergic rhinitis involves inflammation of the mucous membranes of the nose, eyes, eustachian tubes, middle ear, sinuses, and pharynx.
  • Allergy-like conditions: Medical conditions with similar effects to those of allergies.
  • Antrochoanal polyp:
  • Breathing difficulties: Various types of breathing difficulty (dyspnea).
  • Ciliary dyskinesia, due to transposition of ciliary microtubules: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move adequately due to abnormal cilia structure. The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Common cold: A cold is a relatively minor contagious infection of the nose and throat that can be caused by a number of different viruses (e.g. rhinoviruses, coronaviruses). There are over 200 different viruses that have the potential to cause the common cold. Although colds can cause discomfort they are not considered a serious condition.
  • Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic fibrosis is a hereditary disease affecting the exocrine (mucus) glands of the lungs, liver, pancreas, and intestines, causing progressive disability due to multisystem failure.
  • Esthesioneuroblastoma: A rare type of tumor that occurs in the upper nasal cavity. The tumor may obstruct one or both nostrils.
  • Ethmoidal polyp:
  • Head Conditions: Conditions that affect the head
  • Immotile cilia syndrome, due to defective radial spokes: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move adequately due to abnormal cilia structure. The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility.
  • Immotile cilia syndrome, due to excessively long cilia: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move adequately due to abnormally long cilia. The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Intestinal polyp:
  • Kartagener syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by enlarged bronchial tubes, sinusitis and cross-positioning of body organs.
  • Mucus membrane conditions: Medical conditions affecting any of the mucus membranes.
  • Nose conditions: Any condition that affects the nose
  • Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by the development of numerous benign nodules on the inside lining of the intestinal wall as well as excess skin pigmentation usually around the lips and inner lining of the mouth.
  • Polyp: An growth or protrusion that extends from a mucous membrane
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 10: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 10 differs from the other forms of primary ciliary dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (14q21.3). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 11: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 11 differs from the other forms of primary ciliary dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (6q22). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 12: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 12 differs from the other forms of primary ciliary dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (6p21.1). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 2: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 2 differs from the other forms of primary ciliar dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (19q13.3qter). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 3: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 3 differs from the other forms of primary ciliar dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (5p). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 4: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 4 differs from the other forms of primary ciliar dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (15q13.1-q15.1). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 5: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 5 differs from the other forms of primary ciliar dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (16p12.2-p12.1). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 6: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 6 differs from the other forms of primary ciliar dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (7p14-p13). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 7: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 7 differs from the other forms of primary ciliary dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (7p21). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 8: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 8 differs from the other forms of primary ciliary dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (15q24-q25). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Primary ciliary dyskinesia, 9: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. Type 9 differs from the other forms of primary ciliary dyskinesia in the location of the genetic defect (17q25). The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Respiratory system conditions: Conditions affecting the respiratory (breathing) systems, such as lungs and airways.
  • Rhinosporidiosis: An infectious disease caused by Rhinosporidium seeberi which occurs mainly in the nasal cavity or nearby mucosa-lined structures such as the conjunctiva. On rare occasions other parts of the body may be infected e.g. genital, rectum, ear and skin. The infection tends to persist for long periods of time (sometimes decades) and occasionally secondary bacterial infection can occur. Infection usually occurs through exposure to stagnant water contaminated with the infectious agent.
  • Sinusitis: Sinusitis is an inflammation of the paranasal sinuses.
  • Snoring: is the vibration of respiratory structures and the resulting sound, due to obstructed air movement during breathing while sleeping.
  • Vasomotor rhinitis: Type of rhinitis related to dry air

 

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