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Diseases » Nausea » Glossary
 

Glossary for Nausea

  • ACTH Deficiency: A rare endocrine disorder involving a lack of ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone) and low levels of cortisol and steroid hormones.
  • AIDS: A term given to HIV patients who have a low CD4 count (below 200) which means that they have low levels of a type of immune cell called T-cells. AIDS patients tend to develop opportunistic infections and cancers. Opportunistic infections are infections that would not normally affect a person with a healthy immune system. The HIV virus is a virus that attacks the body's immune system.
  • APECED Syndrome: APECED is a recessively inherited genetic disease characterized by the presence of two of the following three conditions: impaired parathyroid function, yeast infection (candidiasis) and impaired adrenal gland function (Addison's disease). It is an autoimmune disease resulting from a genetic defect. The body's immune system malfunctions and attacks it's own body tissues.
  • Abdominal Cancer: Growth of abnormal cells (tumour) affecting the organs in the abdominal cavity; may be due to primary growth of a tumour or spread from another tumour (metastases, secondary tumour)
  • Abdominal Injuries: Any injury involving the abdomen. Injuries may penetrating or caused by a fall or blow to the abdomen. Symptoms are variable depending on the nature of the injury.
  • Abdominal Neoplasms: A tumor that occurs in the abdomen.
  • Abdominal abscess: An abscess that occurs anywhere in the abdomen.
  • Acanthamoeba infection: Infection with a microscopic, free-living ameba that is readily found in the environment - soil, air and water. Most people exposed to the ameba will not become infected but when infections do occur, they tend to affect the eyes, central nervous system or can cause widespread infection throughout the body.
  • Acanthamoeba infection of the central nervous system: Infection by an amoebic organism called Acanthamoeba. Infection usually occurs when the amoeba enters through a break in the skin or through the nose. Infection can be localized or systemic where it can involve the central nervous system and cause potentially fatal meningoencephalitis. Infection of the eye can occur by cleaning contact lenses in contaminated water.
  • Acetaminophen poisoning: Excessive ingestion of a drug called acetaminophen.
  • Acid-Base Imbalance: A disruption to the normal acid-base equilibrium in the body. There are four main groups of disorder involving an acid-base imbalance: respiratory acidosis or alkalosis and metabolic acidosis or alkalosis. Obviously the severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of imbalance.
  • Acidosis: Excess acidic toxins or waste products in the blood
  • Acinic cell carcinoma: A usually slow-growing malignant tumor that that can occur in various parts of the body but is most often found in the pancreas, salivary glands, palate and upper lip. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the growth.
  • Acorn poisoning: Acorns contain tannic acid which affects the metabolism of proteins and causing serious symptoms if large amounts are consumed. The amount of tannin in the acorn varies amongst species - higher tannin content results in a more bitter tasting acorn.
  • Acquired angioedema: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative or autoimmune disorders which result in the dysfunction of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Acquired angioedema, type 1: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders which affects the function of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Acquired angioedema, type 2: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. Type 2 is an autoimmune disorder where patients develop autoantibodies which destroy the function of C1 esterase inhibitor.
  • Acute Appendicitis: Infection of the appendix
  • Acute Chemical poisoning - Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha: Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha is an ingredient used in certain pesticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute Cholecystitis: Acute inflammation of the gall bladder, usually due to obstruction by a gall stone
  • Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis: A rare neurological disorder where an inflammation of the brain and spinal cord occurs due to damage to the protective covering (myelin sheath) around the nerves.
  • Acute Gastritis: Sudden onset, generally short-lived infection of the gastrointestinal tract causing vomiting; may be due to infective causes (viruses, bacteria or protozoa), or due to drug toxicity and irritation
  • Acute Nonulcer dyspepsia: Sudden acute indigestion not caused by a peptic ulcer.
  • Acute Pancreatitis: Sudden severe inflammation of the pancreas causing digestive complaints.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning - Ureas: Urea is a class of active ingredients used in certain defoliants, herbicides, insecticides and rodenticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning - xylene: Xylene is an ingredient used in certain insecticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute Renal Failure: Syndrome characterised by rapid decline in kidney function with accumulation of waste products in the blood, occurring over a period of days to weeks
  • Acute fatty liver of pregnancy: A rare complication of pregnancy that can occur in the second half of the pregnancy. It is characterized by excessive fatty deposits in the liver which can be fatal without prompt diagnosis and treatment which involves delivering the baby as soon as possible.
  • Acute infections: An infection that occurs acutely
  • Acute intermittent porphyria: A rare metabolic disorder characterized by a deficiency in the porphobilinogen deaminase enzyme which results in a build-up of porphyrins or its precursors in the body. Using certain drugs or eating certain foods can trigger the symptoms of the condition.
  • Acute kidney failure: Sudden failure of the kidneys
  • Acute megacaryoblastic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. More specifically, it involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes).
  • Acute radiation sickness: Tissue injury can result from exposure to radiation. The radiation dose, rate of dosing and tissues irradiated will determine the severity and type of symptoms. The effects may be chronic, delayed or acute. Acute irradiation sickness usually occurs after abdominal irradiation and lasts for hours or days.
  • Acute tin poisoning: Acute ingestion of tin can cause various adverse symptoms.
  • Acute zinc toxicity: Acute ingestion of zinc can cause symptoms.
  • Addison's Disease: A rare progressive hormonal disorder characterized by insufficient production of certain hormones called adrenal corticosteroids.
  • Adhesions: A fibrous band or structure by which parts abnormally adhere
  • Adrenal Cancer: A malignant cancer that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids. Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal adenoma, familial: A benign tumor that develops in the adrenal gland and tends to run in families. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids . Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal disorders: Disorders affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adrenal gland hyperfunction: Excessive activity of the adrenal gland which causes excessive production of one or more adrenal hormones (aldosterone, corticosteroids, androgenic steroids, epinephrine and norepinephrine). The increased adrenal gland activity may be caused by an adrenal gland tumor or by excessive stimulation of the gland. Pituitary hormones stimulate adrenal gland activity.
  • Adrenal hyperplasia: A group of disorder that occur when there is a problem in the process of making adrenal corticosteroids.
  • Adrenal incidentaloma: A tumor of the adrenal gland that is discovered incidentally while performing an imaging examination for reasons other than an adrenal tumor. The tumor may be asymptomatic or can causes excessive secretion of adrenal hormones and resulting symptoms. The tumor may also be malignant or benign.
  • Adrenal insufficiency: Where there is insufficient secretion of hormones secreted from the adrenal glands
  • Adrenal medulla neoplasm: A tumor that develops in the part of the adrenal gland called the medulla which produces adrenalin and noradrenaline. The tumor is usually benign but can be malignant.
  • Adrenomyeloneuropathy: A form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy characterized by spinal cord dysfunction and brain involvement may or may not be present. Those with brain involvement suffer serious symptoms that can eventually lead to total disability and even death.
  • Adult Panic-Anxiety Syndrome: A psychiatric disorder involving anxiety and panic attacks that occur for no obvious reason.
  • Adverse reaction: A reaction that is not anticipated and detrimentally affects the patient
  • Adverse reaction to chemical - 1-Propanol: 1-Propanol is a chemical used in various antiseptics, polishes, cleaners, cosmetics and lacquer. Some people can suffer an adverse reaction to the chemical which mainly involves irritation to the part of the body exposed to the chemical - eyes, skin and gastrointestinal. The severity of symptoms varies amongst patients.
  • Alcohol Withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when alcohol consumption is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Alcoholism: Excessive addictive use of alcohol.
  • Aldehyde syndrome: A metabolic anomaly where consumption of alcohol results in high levels of blood acetaldehyde which causes a variety of symptoms.
  • Allergic Disorders: A group of disorders that a caused by an allergic response to allergens
  • Alpine syndrome: A condition that occurs in some people who go to low altitude winter resorts (1500 metres). It tends to mostly affect people who have been fasting when they arrive.
  • Amanita polypyramis poisoning: Amanita polypyramis is a type of large-capped mushroom often found growing in the wild in the US. The mushroom tends to give off a chlorine-like odor. It is poisonous and death can result if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Amaryllis poisoning: The Amaryllis plant is a bulbous, flowering herb which originated from South America. The bulb contains alkaloids such as lycorine which are toxic but a large quantity would need to be eaten to cause poisoning.
  • Amebiasis: An intestinal infection caused by a parasitic amebic organism. It is usually associated with poor sanitation.
  • Amoebiasis: An infectious disease caused by a free-living amoebic parasite called Entamoeba histolytica. The organism infects the bowel and causes gastroenteritis. Infection occurs through ingesting contaminated food or water. It is more common in countries with poor sanitation. The incubation period may last from days to weeks before symptoms appear.
  • Anaphylaxis: A rare, potentially life-threatening allergic reaction.
  • Anchovy poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some anchovies contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the anchovy does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The anchovies are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Andersen-Tawil syndrome: A rare disorder where a genetic mutation causes periods of muscle weakness, heart rhythm abnormalities and various physical development abnormalities. It is believed to be caused by problems with the way the body utilizes potassium.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to anesthetic agents. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage - Chloroform: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called chloroform. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage - Cyclopropane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called cyclopropane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage - Ether: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called ether. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage - Halothane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called halothane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage - Methoxyflurane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called methoxyflurane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage - Nitrous Oxide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called nitrous oxide. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: Bleeding in the space around the brain that occurs from a leak in a weakened or dilated blood vessel under the arachnoid layer of the brain. Death can occur if treatment is not prompt.
  • Angiostrongyliasis: Infection by a parasitic worm (Angiostrongylus). Infection can occur through eating contaminated raw animals such as snails, slugs, prawns or crabs which act as hosts to these parasites.
  • Anisakiasis: Intestinal infection by a parasitic worm (Anisakidae). Infection usually occurs by eating seafood infected with the larvae.
  • Annular pancreas: An abnormality where a ring of pancreatic tissue forms around the duodenum and can block the flow of food through the digestive system. The severity of symptoms depends on the degree of constriction. Partial obstruction may not be detected until adulthood.
  • Anthrax: A serious infectious bacterial disease that can be fatal.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by taking certain antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage - Cephalosporin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Cephalosporin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage - Chloramphenicol: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antibiotic called Chloramphenicol. Chloramphenicol a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage - Clindamycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Clindamycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage - Erythromycin Ethyl succinate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Erythromycin Ethyl succinate antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage - Erythromycin estolate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure Erythromycin estolate antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage - Novobiocin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Novobiocin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage - Quinolone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Quinolone antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage - Spectinomycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Spectinomycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage - Sulfones: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to sulfone antiboitics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage - Telithromycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Telithromycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage - Tetracycline: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Tetracycline antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage - Nitrofuran: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Nitrofuran antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage - Penicillin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Penicillin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antibiotics-induced liver damage - Rifampicin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Rifampicin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to anticonvulsives. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage - Mephenytoin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called mephenytoin. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage - Phenobarbital: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called phenobarbital. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage - Phenytoin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called Phenytoin. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anticonvulsive-induced liver damage - Valproic Acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called valproic acid. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antifungal agents. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage - 5-Fluorocytosine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called 5-Fluorocytosine. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage - Amphotericin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Amphotericin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage - Griseofulvin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Griseofulvin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage - Ketoconazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Ketoconazole. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antifungal agent-induced liver damage - Saramycetin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Saramycetin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Antimetazoal agents. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage - Amodiaquine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antimetazoal agent called amodiaquine. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antimetazoal agent-induced liver damage - Hycanthone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called hycanthone. Antimetazoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antiprotozoal agents. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage - 8-Hydroxyquinolone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called 8-Hydroxyquinolone. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage - Carbarsone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called carbarsone@. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage - Emetine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called emetine. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage - Mepacrine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called mepacrine. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage - Metronidazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called Metronidazole. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiprotozoal agent-induced liver damage - Thiabendazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiprotozoal agent called Thiabendazole. Antiprotozoal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antituberculous agents. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage - Cycloserine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called cycloserine. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage - Ethionamide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called ethionamide. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage - Isoniazid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called isoniazid. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage - Rifampicin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called rifampicin. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antituberculous agent-induced liver damage - p-aminosalicylic acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called p-aminosalicylic acid. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antiviral agents. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage - Cytarabine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called cytarabine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage - Vidarabine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called vidarabine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage - idoxuridine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called idoxuridine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Antiviral agent-induced liver damage - xenylamine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called xenylamine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anxiety: A feeling of apprehension, and fear without apparent stimulus that is associated sometime with somatic responses
  • Aortic aneurysm, familial abdominal 1: A rare familial disorder where the abdominal aorta has a weak, bulging portion. The condition is asymptomatic but can result in death if it bursts. Type 1 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 19q13.
  • Aortic aneurysm, familial abdominal 2: A rare familial disorder where the abdominal aorta has a weak, bulging portion. The condition is asymptomatic but can result in death if it bursts. Type 2 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 4q31.
  • Aortic aneurysm, familial abdominal 3: A rare familial disorder where the abdominal aorta has a weak, bulging portion. The condition is asymptomatic but can result in death if it bursts. Type 3 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 9p21.
  • Appendix disorders: Disorders that affect the appendix
  • Apricot seed poisoning: Apricot seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the pit remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Most parts of the apricot plant contain the toxic chemical with the highest concentration in young leaves. Different species of apricots have different levels of toxic chemical. Severe symptoms or even death can occur if children consume more than ten kernels or adults consume more than forty kernels. Theories exist that apricot kernels may help cancer sufferers but there has been no scientific studies that have proven this.
  • Arachnidism: Poisoning from a spider bite.
  • Arachnoid Cysts: A rare disorder involving a fluid-filled cysts on the arachnoid membrane which is one of the thin layers of tissue that form a membrane which covers the spinal cord and brain. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the size and location of the cyst.
  • Arachnoiditis: A progressive disorder where the arachnoid membrane becomes inflamed and the brain and spinal cord may also become inflamed.
  • Aralia poisoning: Aralia is an evergreen shrub which produces clusters of small white flowers. The plant originated in Asia and Africa. The plant contains a toxic chemical called saponic glycoside and can cause skin irritation if skin contact occurs or other symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low toxicity.
  • Arbovirosis: An infectious disease caused by an arbovirus. The virus is transmitted by arthropods such as insects and ticks. Examples of arboviruses include Yellow Fever, Japanese encephalitis and tick-borne encephalitis. The symptoms may vary depending on the type of virus involved. The infection can lead to life-threatening brain inflammation.
  • Arbovirus: Any group of viruses transmitted to humans by mosquitoes and ticks
  • Arcobacter butzleri infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Arcobacter genus. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms but may also cause blood infections. The bacteria tends to originate in pigs, cattle, sheep and water.
  • Arcobacter cryaerophilus infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Arcobacter genus. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms but may also cause blood infections. The bacteria tends to originate in pigs, cattle, sheep and water.
  • Arcobacter infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Arcobacter genus. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms but may also cause blood infections. The bacteria tends to originate in pigs, cattle, sheep and water.
  • Arctic bearded seal poisoning: The Arctic Bearded seal is often used as a food source by the arctic inhabitants. Eating the liver and kidneys of the arctic bearded seal can result in a Vitamin A overdose which can cause serious symptoms and even death in extreme cases. It is believed that eating more than 100-250 grams of the seal liver can result in human death.
  • Ascaridida Infections: Infection with parasitic nematodes from the Ascaridida family. Specific infections include ascariasis, toxoscariasis and anisakiasis. Symptoms may vary depending on the specific nematode involved and the location of the infection.
  • Asiatic porpoise poisoning: The Asiatic porpoise is eaten mainly in China. Eating the liver, internal organs and muscle tissue of the Asiatic porpoise can cause poisoning symptoms in humans if sufficient quantities are consumed. The nature of the toxin is unknown but it is believed that some cases result from very high levels of vitamin A in the liver.
  • Asparagus Fern poisoning: The asparagus fern is a slightly woody plant with a fern-like foliage. It has yellow-green fruit and bright red berries. The plant originated in South Arica. Skin contact with the plant sap can result in skin irritation and eating the berries can cause gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • Asthenopia: Eye conditions such as refractive error, weak eye muscles or intense use of eyes that result in eye pain, headaches, dizziness and vision problems.
  • Astrocytoma: A malignant tumour of the nervous system composed of astrocytes.
  • Atamasco lily poisoning: The atamasco lily is a bulbous plant with long thin leaves and single white or pink flowers. The plant originated in the US. All parts of the plant contain a toxic chemical called lycorine as well as alkaloids. The bulb is the most toxic part of the plant. Eating the bulb can result in death.
  • Ativan withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Ativan (Lorazepam) use is discontinued or reduced. Ativan is an anti-anxiety drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Atlantic mussel food poisoning: Atlantic mussels contain a toxin called domoic acid which can affect nerve tissue. The mussels are found in the North Atlantic and Pacific coast and the Gulf of Mexico.
  • Atrial flutter: Heart arrhythmia where atria beat more often than ventricles
  • Australian Sea Lion poisoning: The Australian Sea Lion is sometimes used as a food source and is found in the South-Southwest waters of Australia. Eating the liver of the Australian Sea Lion can result in a Vitamin A overdose which can cause serious symptoms and even death in extreme cases.
  • Australian Umbrella Tree poisoning: The Australian Umbrella tree is an evergreen shrub or tree which originated in Asia. The sap of the plant contains oxalate which can cause irritation symptoms. Skin contact with the sap from the plant can result in irritation and eating parts of the plant can cause symptoms. The plant is considered to have low toxicity if eaten and skin irritation tends to be minor.
  • Austrian syndrome: A condition where alcoholism is associated with heart failure and pneumococcal meningitis.
  • Autoimmune Vasculitis: A inflammation of the blood vessels caused by an autoimmune reaction
  • Autoimmune oophoritis: An autoimmune condition where the body's own immune system attacks the ovaries and causes them to become inflamed. It can lead to ovarian function stopping prematurely.
  • Autonomic Dysreflexia: A complication of spinal cord injury where a particular stimulus can trigger an excessive response from the autonomic nervous system which causes blood pressure to rise - sometimes to dangerous levels. Stimuli that can trigger the response include bladder irritation, bowel irritation (e.g. due to constipation, gas, enema), skin irritation (e.g. due to burns, pressure sores, ingrown toenails), broken bones, tight clothing, labour and temperature extremes. The severity and frequency of the condition is highly variable. The condition occurs in patients with tetraplegia or with loss of sensation above the lower rib cage.
  • Autumn crocus poisoning: The Autumn crocus is a perennial herb which bears purplish-pink flowers. The plant is often used as an ornamental indoor or outdoor plant. The plant contains a chemical called colchicine which can be very poisonous if eaten. The plant is considered to be very toxic if eaten. Boiling the leaves before eating them appears to increase their toxicity. Most cases of poisoning are through accidental ingestion. The plant is sometimes mistaken for wild garlic.
  • Azalea poisoning: Bacillus cereus is a bacterium that can cause food poisoning symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea. There are two types: Type I causes mainly vomiting and is associated with fried rice whereas type II causes mainly diarrhea and is associated with meats, cereals, vegetables and milk.
  • BANF acoustic neurinoma: A type of tumor that affects hearing and is associated with a condition called BANF (bilateral acoustic neurofibromatosis). The tumor is benign an occurs in the cells that form the myelin sheath of the vestibulocochlear nerve. The symptoms vary depending on the size and exact location of the nerve. The tumor may become large enough to compress against various cranial nerves or even the brainstem.
  • Babesiosis: A parastic infection by a particular protozoa (Babesia) which is transmitted through tick bites. The disease produces symptoms similar to malaria.
  • Bacillus cereus type I food poisoning: Bacillus cereus is a bacterium that can cause food poisoning symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea. There are two types: Type I causes mainly vomiting and is associated with fried rice whereas type II causes mainly diarrhea and is associated with meats, cereals, vegetables and milk.
  • Bacillus cereus type II food poisoning: Bacillus cereus is a bacterium that can cause food poisoning symptoms such as vomiting and diarrhea. There are two types: Type I causes mainly vomiting and is associated with fried rice whereas type II causes mainly diarrhea and is associated with meats, cereals, vegetables and milk.
  • Bacterial digestive infections: Bacterial infections affecting the gastrointestinal
  • Bacterial meningitis: A bacterial infection where inflammation of the membranes that surround the brain or spinal cord results affects the nervous system.
  • Balance disorders: Various disorders impairing the body's sense of balance.
  • Balantidiasis: Intestinal infection with a parasitic protozoa (Balantidium coli) resulting in intestinal inflammation. It is usually transmitted through direct or indirect contact with pig fecal matter.
  • Balsam apple poisoning: The Balsam apple is a climbing vine which produces yellowish fruit. The fruit contains toxins - resin, saponic glycoside and alkaloids - which can cause various symptoms if eaten. Large amounts of the fruit or seeds to be consumed to cause toxicity. The leaves of the plant may be cooked, drained and eaten safely.
  • Balsam pear poisoning: The Balsam pear is a climbing vine which produces yellowish fruit. The fruit contains toxins - resin, saponic glycoside and alkaloids - which can cause various symptoms if eaten. Large amounts of the fruit or seeds to be consumed to cause toxicity. The leaves of the plant may be cooked, drained and eaten safely.
  • Basilar Migraine: Variant form of migraine headache seen mainly in teenage girls, giving complex neurological symptoms prior to onset and during the migraine
  • Bearsfoot hellebore poisoning: The Bearsfoot hellebore is a relatively small, flowering evergreen plant which originated in Europe. All parts of the plant contain protoanemonin which can be toxic if large quantities are consumed.
  • Beeswax poisoning: Beeswax can cause a gastrointestinal blockage if excessive quantities are eaten.
  • Benign Fasciculation Syndrome: Common movement disorder manifesting in a fine (fast) tremor; it is an inherited condition of unknown cause.
  • Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A condition where certain head movements cause extreme dizziness.
  • Benign astrocytoma: Benign tumors that occur in the brain or spinal cord. Symptoms and severity depends on the location and size of the tumors.
  • Bicarbonate deficit: A condition caused by excessive organic or inorganic acids in the body. The excess may be due to abnormally high acid production such as occurs during fever and starvation or may occur as a result of excessive acid intake, acid retention or loss of bases.
  • Bile Duct Cancer: A malignancy arising in the bile ducts of the liver
  • Bile Duct Conditions: An inflammatory bacterial infection that affects the meninges
  • Biliary disorder: Any condition affecting the bile ducts
  • Bird cherry seed poisoning: Wild cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual.
  • Bird of Paradise poisoning: Various parts of the Bird of Paradise plant are poisonous - the seeds contain toxic tannins and the leaves can contain hydrocyanic acid. Eating five seed pods can result in poisoning symptoms but the plant is generally considered to have low toxicity.
  • Birth control pill poisoning: Birth control pill contain hormones such as estrogen and progestin and excessive ingestion of the pills can result in relatively minor symptoms - usually there are no serious problems associated with the ingested of many birth control pills at one time. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Bitter almond seed poisoning: Bitter almond seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Bitter almond plants grow mainly in Northern America. Various processes can be used to leach the toxic chemical out of the bitter almonds.
  • Black henbane poisoning: Black henbane is a herb which has hairy stems and bears flowers and fruit. All parts of the plant contain tropane alkaloids which is toxic enough to cause death if eaten. Black henbane is often used for medicinal purposes to treat a variety of health conditions.
  • Black jetbead poisoning: The Black jetbead is a deciduous shrub which bears single white flowers and small groups of shiny black fruit. The fruit contains amygdalin which is very toxic and can cause severe poisoning or even death if eaten.
  • Black locust poisoning: The black locust is a large deciduous tree which has long clusters of scented flowers and flat fruit pods. The young leaves, seeds and inner bark contain various chemicals (robin, robinine and robitin) which can be toxic if large quantities are eaten. The flowers are considered edible if handled correctly.
  • Black nightshade poisoning: The Black Nightshade is a herb which bears small white or purple flowers and dull black berries. The plant originated in South America. The berries contain solanine alkaloid which can be toxic if eaten in large quantities. The leaves and unripe berries are considered toxic whereas the ripe fruit is possibly edible.
  • Black widow spider envenomation: The black widow spider bite is toxic to the nerves and can cause serious symptoms. The black widow spider is most commonly found in North America.
  • Blood lily poisoning: The Blood lily is a bulbous herb which produces red flowers and berries. The plant originated from Africa. The bulb contains a poisonous chemical called lycorine as well as other alkaloids which can cause symptoms if ingested. The bulb is considered to have relatively low toxicity.
  • Bloodroot poisoning: The Bloodroot is a flowering herb that bears fruit and whose stem contains red juices. The plant tends to grow in mountainous areas. The thickened roots (rhizomes) of the plant contain isoquinoline alkaloids which are very toxic and can cause death if eaten in sufficient quantities.
  • Blue-ringed octopus poisoning: The blue-ringed octopus is found in shallow Australian ocean water and can deliver venomous, potentially fatal bite. The poison is present in the saliva of the octopus. The venom affects the neuromuscular system.
  • Bonefish poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some bonefish contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the bonefish does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The bonefish are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Bonnier's syndrome: A range of symptoms caused by damage to Dieter's nucleus (the lateral nucleus of the vestibular nerve) or its connections.
  • Boron overuse: Consumption of high doses of the mineral boron can cause various symptoms.
  • Borries syndrome: Localized brain inflammation without the production of pus.
  • Bothriocephalosis: Infection with an intestinal parasite. The parasite is a fish tapeworm called Diphyllobothrium latum. Human infection is caused by eating undercooked contaminated fish.
  • Bottlebrush buckeye poisoning: The Bottlebrush buckeye is a deciduous shrub which bears clusters of white or pink flowers and smooth, leathery fruit containing shiny seeds. The plant originated in southern USA. The plant contains various toxic chemicals (glycoside esculin, saponin aescin) which can cause potentially fatal toxicity if sufficient quantities of the seeds or leaves are consumed.
  • Botulism food poisoning: Extremely dangerous food poisoning requiring medical attention, but not always recognized because of its non-abdominal symptoms.
  • Bowel conditions: Medical conditions that affect the bowels
  • Box Jellyfish poisoning: A sting from the Box jellyfish contains a chemical which is toxic to the nerves, heart and skin. This jellyfish is mainly found in the waters of Northern Queensland in Australia. The tentacles should not be removed from the patient as it can cause further injection of poison.
  • Boxwood poisoning: The boxwood is an evergreen, woody, flowering shrub often used as a hedge. The leaves contain steroidal alkaloids which can cause skin irritation upon skin contact with the sap or various other symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Brain Concussion: Trauma resulting in minor injury to the brain which causes a period of interrupted brain function. Simple concussions resolve themselves in about a week whereas more serious ones have persisting symptoms. The onset of symptoms may be delayed.
  • Brain abscess: Pus accumulating into an abscess on the brain
  • Brain cancer: Cancer of the brain.
  • Brainerd diarrhea: Diarrheal condition of unknown cause.
  • Breast Duct Papilloma: Tumour of the collecting duct of the breast; may be benign or malignant.
  • Brennemann syndrome: A condition that can occur in young children after a respiratory tract infection. It primarily involves inflammation and swelling of the lymph glands in the abdomen, fever, vomiting and nausea.
  • Brennemann's syndrome: Abdominal symptoms that can result from an upper respiratory infection. The abdominal symptoms are caused by inflammation of the abdominal lymph nodes. The condition is most likely to occur in children.
  • Broad bean poisoning: The broad bean is a vine which produces pea-like flowers and long, seed-filled pods. The seeds can be very toxic and can result in death if eaten. This toxic reaction only occurs to certain susceptible people who are unable to process certain chemicals in the plant. The resulting condition is called favism and is most common in people of Mediterranean descent.
  • Brown Recluse spider poisoning: The Brown Recluse spider is poisonous and is found mainly in southern and central areas of the US.
  • Brown snake poisoning: The Brown snake is a poisonous Australian snake. They are considered one of the most venomous snakes in the world and their bite can result in death without prompt medical attention. The snake venom contains toxins which affect the blood and nerve systems. Children tend to suffer more severe symptoms due to their smaller body size.
  • Buckthorn poisoning: The Buckthorn is a shrubby plant which bears black berries. The berries contain glycosides which can cause mild toxicity if eaten.
  • Budd-Chiari syndrome: A rare disorder where the major liver blood vessels are obstructed resulting in liver enlargement. The obstruction may be due to thrombosis and congenital structural defects.
  • Buffalo pea poisoning: The buffalo pea is a poisonous plant which contains a toxic compound called quinolizidine alkaloid. The plant is mainly found in Western Canada.
  • Burning bush poisoning: The burning bush is a shrub that has bright red leaves in autumn and bears red berries. The plant contains toxic chemicals such as lobelamine and lobeline which can cause symptoms if eaten in large quantities.
  • Bush lily poisoning: The Bush lily is a perennial herb which bears long strappy leaves, small funnel-shaped flowers and red berries. The plant originated in South Africa and is often grown in gardens or utilized as a houseplant. The plant contains alkaloids which can cause toxicity symptoms if eaten in large quantities.
  • Bushmaster poisoning: The Bushmaster is a poisonous snake found in America.
  • Busulfan toxicity syndrome: Symptoms caused by the use of a chemotherapy drug called Busulfan.
  • California buckeye poisoning: The California buckeye is a deciduous shrub which bears clusters of white or pink flowers and smooth, leathery fruit containing shiny seeds. The plant originated in California. The plant contains various toxic chemicals (glycoside esculin, saponin aescin) which can cause potentially fatal toxicity if sufficient quantities of the seeds or leaves are consumed.
  • Callistin shellfish poisoning: The Callistin shellfish (Japanese Callista) is found primarily in Japan. Eating the whole shellfish can cause poisoning symptoms in humans. It is believed that the ovaries contain high levels of choline during spawning season which makes them toxic to humans. The symptoms that manifest are similar to a severe allergic reaction. Avoiding eating the ovaries is the best way to prevent poisoning - cooking does not destroy the toxin.
  • Campylobacter fetus infection: Campylobacter fetus is a food borne bacterial infection which may vary in severity from mild to severe. The bacteria are opportunistic and mainly affect debilitated patients but can also occur in healthy patients. Abortion due to blood infection in the fetus can occur in pregnant women who become infected. The infection is less likely to cause gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhea than other Campylobacter infections but is prone to causing infection in other parts of the body such as the appendix, abdominal cavity, central nervous system (meningitis), gallbladder, urinary tract and blood stream. Cattle and sheep are the main source of this bacteria.
  • Campylobacter hylointestinalis infection: Campylobacter hyloinstesinalis is a food borne bacterial infection which may cause mild to severe gastroenteritis. Cattle, pigs, hamsters and deer are the main source of this bacteria.
  • Campylobacter jejuni infection: Campylobacter jejuni infection is a common food borne bacterial infection which may vary in severity from mild to severe. Death can occur in severe cases but tends to occur in patients with other existing illnesses such as HIV, cancer or liver disease. The infection can in rare cause infection in other parts of the body such as the appendix, abdominal cavity, central nervous system (meningitis), gallbladder, urinary tract and blood stream. Undercooked chicken is the main source of infection.
  • Campylobacter jejuni subspecies doylei infection: A bacterial infection that involves bacteria from the Campylobacter family. It tends to cause gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • Campylobacter laridis infection: Campylobacter laridis is a food borne bacterial infection which may cause mild to severe gastroenteritis in healthy individuals and blood infection in immunocompromised patients.
  • Candelabra cactus poisoning: The Candelabra cactus is a spiny cactus with a milky sap. The sap contains a chemical called diterpene ester which is mildly toxic if eaten and can cause minor skin irritation upon skin contact.
  • Candle poisoning: Candles can cause a gastrointestinal blockage if excessive quantities are eaten.
  • Capecitabine poisoning: Capecitabine is used to treat metastatic colorectal and breast cancer . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Caper spruge poisoning: The caper spruge is a herb which has a milky sap and bears flowers and fruit. The plant originated in Europe and tends to grow in mountainous areas. The plant sap contains diterpene esters which is mildly toxic if eaten and can cause minor skin irritation if skin contact occurs.
  • Capillary leak syndrome with monoclonal gammopathy: A rare condition characterized by leaky blood vessels and an increased level of certain blood proteins (monoclonal gammopathy). Monoclonal gammopathy itself does not cause any symptoms unless it develops into plasma cell leukemia. The condition may vary from mild to severe enough to cause death.
  • Carbon monoxide poisoning: Poisoning from breathing air with too much carbon monoxide, usually from combustion.
  • Carcinoid syndrome: A rare malignancy (carcinoid tumor) characterized by slow-growing tumors that can occur in the bowel, stomach and/or pancreas and may then metastasize to the lungs, liver and ovaries. These tumors secret serotonin and other chemicals.
  • Carnation poisoning: The carnation is a perennial flowering herb with narrow grayish leaves. The plant originated in Eurasia and is often grown in gardens and used in flower arrangements. The leaves contain triterpenoid saponins which can cause symptoms if sufficient quantities are eaten. Skin irritation can also occur upon skin exposure. The plant is considered to have a low level of toxicity and large quantities would need to be eaten to cause any symptoms.
  • Carnitine overuse: Consumption of high doses of the supplement carnitine can cause various symptoms.
  • Caroli Disease: A rare disorder where the bile ducts inside the liver become enlarged resulting in infection, irritation and gallstone formation.
  • Carukia barnesi sting: The Irukandji jellyfish is a very small type of box jellyfish found mainly in the northern tropical waters of Australia. Their sting is not particularly painful by the ensuing symptoms can be severe and life-threatening.
  • Caterpillar-induced bleeding syndrome: Caterpillars from the Lonomia genus have spines along their body which can penetrate human skin and cause blood coagulation problems. The severity of the symptoms vary depending on the degree of envenomation but serious cases can result in death.
  • Caterpillar-induced bleeding syndrome - Lonomia achelous: Lonomia achelous caterpillars are native to Northern Brazil and Venezuela. They have spines along their body which can penetrate human skin and cause blood coagulation problems. The severity of the symptoms vary depending on the degree of envenomation but serious cases can result in death.
  • Caterpillar-induced bleeding syndrome - Lonomia obliqua: Lonomia obliqua caterpillars are native to Southern Brazil and have spines along their body which can penetrate human skin and cause blood coagulation problems. The severity of the symptoms vary depending on the degree of envenomation but serious cases can result in death.
  • Celandine poisoning: A biennial herb which bears small yellow flowers and a fruit capsule. The plant has a yellow-orange sap. Parts of the plant (mainly the roots) contain a highly toxic chemical called isoquinoline alkaloid which is toxic. Death can result if sufficient quantities of the root are consumed.
  • Central nervous system oxygen toxicity: High oxygen levels which affects the central nervous system. The condition can occur during deep dives with fatal consequences.
  • Cerebral Aneurysm: Dangerous swelling of a brain blood vessel that may rupture.
  • Cerebral astrocytoma, adult: A very rare tumor that occurs in adults and develops in brain cells called astrocytes. The part of the brain involved is the cerebrum at the top of the head which controls functions such as reading, writing, thinking, learning, speech, emotion and voluntary movement.
  • Cerebral ventricle neoplasm: A tumor that occurs in the fluid-filled spaces of the brain called the ventricles. Symptoms vary depending on the size and exact location of the tumor and whether it is cancerous or not.
  • Chemical poisoning - 1,1-Dimethylhydrazine: 1,1-Dimethylhydrazine is a chemical used mainly in jet fuel and rocket fuel, plant growth agent, photography and various other industrial uses. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - 1,2-Dibromo-3-Chloropropane: 1,2-Dibromo-3-Chloropropane is a chemical used in soil fumigants and as a nematocide for various field crops. Commercial examples include Fumagon, Nemagon, Fumazone, Nemapax, Nemafume. Excessive exposure to this chemical can cause relatively mild symptoms. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the route of exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - 1,3-Dichloropropene: 1,3-Dichloropropene is a chemical used in solvents and soil fumigants for nematode control. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - 1,3-Dinitrobenzene: 1,3-Dinitrobenzene is a chemical used mainly in explosives. The chemical can be readily absorbed through the skin and cause systemic symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - 1,4-Dioxane: 1,4-Dioxane is a chemical used mainly as a reagent in laboratries and as a solvent in chemical processing. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - 1-Pentanethiol: 1-Pentanethiol is a chemical used mainly in pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - 1-Propanol: 1-Propanol is a chemical used in various antiseptics, polishes, cleaners, cosmetics and lacquer. The main effects of an overdose of this chemical is depression of the central nervous system. However, some people can suffer an adverse reaction to the chemical.
  • Chemical poisoning - 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene: 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene is a chemical used mainly as an explosive agent and in the production of dyes and photographic chemicals. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - 2,4-Dinitrotoluene: 2,4-Dinitrotoluene is a chemical used the production of explosives, vehicle air bags and polyurethane polymers. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - 2-Aminopyridine: 2-Aminopyridine is a chemical used mainly in the production of various medicines (especially antihistamines and anti-inflammatories). Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - 2-Butoxyethanol: 2-Butoxyethanol is a chemical used mainly in dry cleaning, textile dyeing, protective coatings, glass cleaners, solvents, cleaning agents and paint thinners. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - 2-Methyl-4-Chlorophenoxyacetic Acid: 2-Methyl-4-Chlorophenoxyacetic Acid is a chemical mainly used as a herbicide for field crops and turf. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - 3-Aminopyridine: 2-Aminopyridine is a chemical used mainly as an intermediate in the production of dyes, pharmaceuticals and various agricultural chemicals. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - 4,4-Methylenebis: 4,4-Methylenebis is a chemical used in the manufacture of epoxy resins, belt drives, gun mounts, shoe laces and various other manufactured goods. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - 5,-Methoxy-N,N-Diisopropyltryptamine: 5,-Methoxy-N,N-Diisopropyltryptamine is a chemical used as a designer drug for its hallucinogen and aphrodisiac effects. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Acetaldehyde: Acetaldehyde is a chemical used in the production of various products - mirrors, disinfectants, plastics, explosives, varnish and food flavoring. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Acetonitrile: Acetonitrile is a chemical used as a solvent mainly in nail removing agents. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Acetophenone: Acetophenone is a chemical used mainly as a fragrance, food flavoring agent and as a solvent for plastics and resins. It is also found naturally in small quantities in foods such as bananas, apples and beef. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Acetylene Dichloride: Acetylene Dichloride is a chemical used mainly in the production of perfumes, dyes and thermoplastics. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Acetylene Tetrabromide: Acetylene Tetrabromide is a chemical used mainly in mineral separation and as a solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Acetylsalicylic Acid: Acetylsalicylic Acid is also known as aspirin and is primarily used to relieve pain, fever and inflammation. Excessive exposure to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Acrinathrin: Acrinathrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Acrylic acid: Acrylic acid is a chemical used mainly in the production of resins and acrylic acids which are usually used in adhesives and coatings. It is also used in water treatment and in the production of plastics and detergents. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Acrylonitrile: Acrylonitrile is a chemical used mainly in the production of acrylic and modacrylic fibers but also in the production of certain plastics, nylon dyes, drugs and pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Adiponitrile: Adiponitrile is a chemical used mainly in the production of hexamethylene diamine which in turn is used mainly to produce nylon. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Aftershave: Aftershave contains chemicals (ethyl alcohol, isopropyl alcohol) which can cause symptoms if ingested in sufficient quantities. Death from ingesting aftershave is considered unlikely. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Agrocide: Agrocide is a chemical insecticide used mainly to control scabies or lice as well as other agricultural insect pests. The insecticide is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Agronexit: Agronexit is a chemical insecticide used mainly as an agricultural insecticide. The insecticide is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Alachlor: Alachlor is a herbicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Alanycarb: Alanycarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and nematicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Aldicarb: Aldicarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide, nematicide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Aldoxycarb: Aldoxycarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Aldrin: Aldrin is a chemical once used mainly in insecticides for crops and as a termite preventative. The chemical can readily be absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Alkaline dry cell batteries: Alkaline dry cell batteries contain toxic chemicals and eating the batteries can cause various symptoms if the chemical is released from the battery. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Allethrin: Allethrin is a chemical used as an insecticide, mainly in households. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Allyl Glycidyl Ether: Allyl Glycidyl Ether is a chemical used mainly in the production of epoxies, thermoplastics, polyester resins, adhesives and elastomers. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Allyl alcohol: Allyl alcohol is a chemical used mainly as a weed killers and as a material in the production of other chemical compounds. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Allyl chloride: Allyl chloride is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of epichlorohydrin and glycerin but is also used in the production of products such as polyester, varnish plastic adhesive, insecticides, perfumes and pharmaceuticals. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Allyl trichloride: Allyl trichloride is a chemical used mainly as a varnish or paint remover, cleaning agent or degreasing agent. Exposure to the chemical can cause symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be carcinogenic.
  • Chemical poisoning - Allylamines: Allylamines is a chemical used mainly as an industrial solvent and in the manufacture of pharmaceutical products such as antiseptics, diuretics and sedatives . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Allyxycarb: Allyxycarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Aluminum Phosphide: Aluminum Phosphide is a chemical used mainly as a rodenticide and fumigant for grains. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Amidithion: Amidithion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Aminocarb: Aminocarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Amiton: Amiton is a chemical once used as an insecticide and acaricide - it is no longer in use due to its nerve toxicity. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Amitraz: Amitraz is a chemical used mainly as a topical parasitic preventative in livestock and fruit trees. It is also used as an insect repellant and a prevention of mite infestation. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Ammonia: Ammonia is a chemical used mainly in household cleaning products and bleach. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Ammonium Bifluoride: Ammonium Bifluoride is a chemical used wheel cleaners, herbicides and in the manufacture of magnesium. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Ammonium Chloride: Ammonium Chloride is a chemical used as a medical agent for conditions such as metabolic acidosis, in deodorizer cleaners and also used in industry in fertilizers, electroplating, galvanizing, soldering and in deodorizer cleaners. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Ammonium Nitrate: Ammonium Nitrate is a chemical used mainly in explosives, fireworks and fertilizers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Ammonium Sulfamate: Ammonium Sulfamate is a chemical used mainly in herbicides, fertilizers and. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Anisidine (o,p-Isomers): Anisidine (o,p-Isomers)is a chemical used mainly in the production process of pharmaceuticals and azo-dyes . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Anti-rust products: Anti-rust products contain various chemicals which are toxic if ingested. The ingested chemicals can continue to cause damage to the organs and gastrointestinal lining for weeks after the ingestion and severe cases can result in death. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Antifreeze: Antifreeze is used in vehicles to prevent freezing or boiling over of the cooling system. The chemicals (methanol, ethylene and propylene glycol) in the antifreeze can cause severe poisoning symptoms if ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Antimony: Antimony is a chemical often used as an alloy with other metals such as lead. It is used in solder, ammunition, pewter, sheet metal, pipe metal and cable sheaths. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Antu: Antu is used as a rodenticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Aparasin: Aparasin Aparasin. The insecticide is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Aphtiria: Aphtiria is a chemical insecticide used mainly to control scabies or lice. The insecticide is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Arsine: Arsine is a chemical used in the making of semiconductors and in the metal refining industry. It is considered a possible chemical agent in chemical warfare. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Asphalt: Asphalt is the substance used in road surfacing and is also used in electrical adhesive and paints. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Athyl-Gusathion: Athyl-Gusathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Automatic dishwashing detergent: Automatic dishwashing detergents contain chemicals which can cause severe symptoms if ingested. The chemicals in the dishwashing detergent cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Azinfos-methyl: Azinfos-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Azinfosethyl: Azinfosethyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Azinophos-methyl: Azinophos-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Azinphos: Azinphos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Azinphos-ethyl: Azinphos-ethyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Azinphos-methyl: Azinphos-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Azinphosmetile: Azinphosmetile is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Azothoate: Azothoate is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Baking Powder: Baking powder is generally considered non toxic and is used in cooking. However, excessive doses can cause gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • Chemical poisoning - Baking soda: Baking soda is generally considered non toxic and is used in cooking. However, excessive doses can cause various symptoms.
  • Chemical poisoning - Barium: Barium is an element used in fireworks, glassmaking, contrast X-rays and in the electronics industry . The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Barium Nitrate: Barium Nitrate is a chemical used mainly in fireworks, sparklers and ceramic glazes. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Barthrin: Barthrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Ben-Hex: Ben-Hex is a chemical insecticide used mainly to control scabies. The insecticide is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Bendiocarb: Bendiocarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly in . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Benfuracarb: Benfuracarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Benhexol: Benhexol is a chemical insecticide used mainly to control scabies or lice. The insecticide is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Benoxafos: Benoxafos is a chemical pesticide used as an acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Bentazon: Bentazon is a chemical used mainly in herbicides for various crop plants. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Benzene hexachloride: Benzene hexachloride is a chemical insecticide. The insecticide is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Beryllium: Beryllium is an element used mainly in vehicle electronics, optics, ore processing, microwave oven parts, fuel containers and disc brakes for aeroplanes. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Beta-cyfluthrin: Beta-cyfluthrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Bexol: Bexol is a chemical insecticide used mainly to control scabies or lice. The insecticide is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Bifenthrin: Bifenthrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Bioallethrin: Bioallethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Bioehtanomethrin: Bioehtanomethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Biopermethrin: Biopermethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Bioresmethrin: Bioresmethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Biphenyl: Biphenyl is a chemical used mainly as a fungicide for fruit packaging and in textile dyes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Borates: Borate is a chemical used in a wide variety of products - herbicides, paints, insecticides, rodenticides and various personal products such as skin creams, toothpastes and powders. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Boric Acid: Boric Acid is a chemical used mainly in foods (preservative, emulsifier, neutralizer), antiseptics, pesticides and contact lens cleaners. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Application of boric acid directly to damaged skin can cause the chemical to be absorbed rapidly into the body and lead to death. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Bromates: Bromate is a chemical used mainly in perming solution neutralizers and in small amounts as a bread preservative. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Bromide: Bromide is a chemical used for many applications - flame retardant, industrial uses, pesticides, sanitary products, fumigants, medicines, dyes, photographic solutions and water purification. Bromides act as central nervous system depressants and the ingestion of excessive quantities can cause serious symptoms. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Bromophos: Bromophos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Bromophos-ethyl: Bromophos-ethyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Bubble Bath soap: The ingestion of bubble bath soap can cause gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • Chemical poisoning - Bufencarb: Bufencarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Butacarb: Butacarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Butocarboxim: Butocarboxim is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Butoxcarboxim: Butoxcarboxim is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Butyl Alcohol: Butyl alcohol is a chemical used mainly in solvents and in pharmaceutical manufacturing processes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Butylamines: Butylamines are chemicals used in a variety of manufacturing processes such as in the production of pesticides, pharmaceuticals, plastics, dyes, textiles and in leather tanning and photography. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Cadmium: Cadmium is a chemical used mainly in batteries, solder, amalgams, cigarettes, PVC pigments and phosphate fertilizer production. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Cadusafos: Cadusafos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and nematicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Calcium Oxide: Calcium oxide is a chemical used mainly in sewage treatment, dry cement and in the manufacture of products such as aluminum, glass and steel. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Calcium Polysulfide: Calcium polysulfide is a chemical used mainly in antifungal treatments for trees. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Calcium hypochlorite: Calcium hypochlorite is a chemical used mainly in bleaching products, fungicides, algicides, disinfectants and deodorants. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Camphor: Camphor is a chemical used mainly in moth repellents, pharmaceuticals (preservative) cosmetics, explosives, varnishes and various therapeutic applications. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Captan: Captan is a chemical used as a fungicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical is considered to carry a low risk of poisoning through ingestion.
  • Chemical poisoning - Carbanolate: Carbanolate is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Carbaryl: Carbaryl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Carbofuran: Carbofuran is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide, nematicide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Carbon Disulfide: Carbon Disulfide is a chemical used mainly in corrosion inhibitors, cold and nickel plating, photography applications and as a solvent in gums and resins. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Carbon Tetrachloride: Carbon tetrachloride is a chemical used mainly in grain fumigants, insecticides and in the production of fluorocarbons. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Carbophenothion: Carbophenothion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Carbosulfan: Carbosulfan is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and nematicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Castor oil: Castor oil is a type of vegetable oil often used in medicinal or therapeutic products that improve bowel functioning. However, excessive ingestion of castor oil can cause various symptoms.
  • Chemical poisoning - Caulking products: Caulking products (e.g. silicon, acrylic, neoprene) are used to seal gaps and the chemicals in them can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Chalk: Swallowing chalk can cause a variety of gastrointestinal symptoms in some people if sufficient quantities are eaten. Eye irritation can also result from eye exposure. The chalk dust can also cause respiratory symptoms in some people. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Chloralose: Chloralose is a chemical used mainly in poisons for rodents and crows . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Chlorate salts: Chlorate salt is a chemical used mainly in herbicides and in the manufacture of matches and explosives. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Chlordane: Chlordane is a poison use to control termites - is banned in the US and many other countries due to its harmful effects. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Chloresene: Chloresene is a chemical insecticide used mainly to control scabies or lice. The insecticide is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Chlorfenvinphos: Chlorfenvinphos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Chlorine: Chlorine is a chemical used mainly in bleaches, water disinfectants and in pulp mills. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Chlorine is very corrosive and extensive damage to body tissues can result. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Chlorine Dioxide: Chlorine dioxide is a chemical used mainly in water treatment and disinfectant for various processing operations. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Chloroacetophenone: Chloroacetophenone is a chemical used mainly in tear gas for riot control purposes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Chlorobenzene: Chlorobenzene is a chemical used mainly as a solvent and in the production of various other chemicals. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Chlorobenzylidene Malononitrile: Chlorobenzylidene Malononitrile is a chemical used mainly in tear gas. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Chlorodiphenyl: Chlorodiphenyl is a chemical used mainly in electrical cables and wires, electric condensers, lubricants and foundry coating and in the manufacture of paper, resins, rubbers, textiles, wood preservatives, electrical components, lacquers, herbicides and plasticizers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Chloroform: Chloroform is a chemical used mainly as a refrigerant but also as a solvent in various processing and industrial applications. It's use as an anesthetic is relatively uncommon these days. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Chloromethane: Chloromethane is a chemical used mainly in the production of silicones as well as agricultural chemicals, butyl rubber and other products. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Chloropicrin: Chloropicrin is a chemical used mainly in fumigants for grain storage. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Chloropyrifos: Chloropyrifos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide, nematicide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Chlorpyrifos: Chlorpyrifos is a chemical used mainly in as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Chlorpyrifos methyl: Chlorpyrifos methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Chromium: Chromium is a chemical used mainly as an alloy in manufactured steel goods, anti-corrosive plating and also has industrial applications . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Cismethrin: Cismethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Clinitest tablet: Clinitest tablet are used to test sugar levels in urine. The tablets contain various chemicals (copper sulfate, sodium hydroxide, sodium carbonate) and eating them can cause serious symptoms. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Cloethocarb: Cloethocarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and nematicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Cloth Dyes: Cloth dyes contain chemicals which are considered not toxic but the ingestion of large amounts cay cause symptoms. Some dyes contain corrosive ingredients which can cause severe gastrointestinal damage and even death in severe cases. Most household cloth dyes don't contain corrosive chemicals. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Cologne: Colognes contain chemicals such as ethanol and isopropanol which can cause symptoms if ingested or inhaled in excessive quantities. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Coumaphos: Coumaphos is used as a pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Cresols: Cresols are a group of chemicals that occur naturally in mammals and various plants. It is also manufactured and used in the production of disinfectants, deodorizers and pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Cresylic acid: Cresylic acids are a group of chemicals that are used as solvents and in the manufacture of various products such as deodorants, disinfectants, pesticides, glues, paints, herbicides, pharmaceuticals as well as others. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Cyanthoate: Cyanthoate is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Cyclethrin: Cyclethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Cyclohexanol: Cyclohexanol is a chemical used mainly as an industrial solvent and used in the manufacture of products such as plastic, nylon, soap, varnish, paint, lacquer, degreasers, detergent and insecticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Cyclohexanone: Cyclohexanone is a chemical used mainly as an industrial solvent, in processes involving oxidative reactions and in the manufacture of certain resins, nylons, insecticides, herbicides, paints, varnish, polishes, degreasers and pharmaceuticals. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Cyclohexylamine: Cyclohexylamine is a chemical used industrial and household applications: pesticides, dry-cleaning soaps, plasticizers, textile chemicals, artificial sweeteners, dyes and corrosion inhibitors. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Cyfluthrin: Cyfluthrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Cyhalothrin: Cyhalothrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Cyllprothrin: Cyllprothrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Cypermethrin: Cypermethrin is a widely used insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Cyphenothrin: Cyphenothrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - DDD: DDD is a chemical used mainly as a pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - DDT: DDT is a chemical used mainly as a pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Decarbofuran: Decarbofuran is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Deltamethrin: Deltamethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Demeton: Demeton-S is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Demeton-O: Demeton-O is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Demeton-O-methyl: Demeton-O-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Demeton-S-methyl: Demeton-S-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Demeton-S-methylsulphon: Demeton-S-methylsulphon is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Demeton-methyl: Demeton-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Deoderant: Deoderants contain various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Depilatories: Depilatories are used to remove hair from parts of the body. They contain various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are ingested. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Dialifos: Dialifos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Diazinon: Diazinon is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Diborane: Diborane is a chemical used mainly as a rocket propellant and in the manufacture of rubbers and electronics manufacture. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Dichloronaphthoquinone: Dichloronaphthoquinone is a chemical used mainly as a fungicide, seed disinfectant and a herbicide for water. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Dichlorphenamide: Dichlorphenamide is a chemical used mainly as a treatment for glaucoma. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Dichlorvos: Dichlorvos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Dicresyl: Dicresyl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Dicrotophos: Dicrotophos is a toxic insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Dieldrin: Dieldrin is a chemical used mainly to prevent termite infestations. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. This chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Diesel oil: Diesel oil is a commonly used fuel. Ingestion is unlikely due to the foul taste and smell. Accidental or purposeful ingestion can result in internal burns and various other symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Diethyl Phthalate: Diethyl Phthalate is a chemical used mainly in cosmetic and as a plasticizer in the production of various plastic products. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Diethylene Glycol: Diethylene Glycol is a chemical used mainly in coolants, manufacture of plastic products and resins as well as other uses. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Dimefluthrin: Dimefluthrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Dimetan: Dimetan is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Dimethoate: Dimethoate is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide, nematicide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Dimethrin: Dimethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Dimethyl Phthalate: Dimethyl Phthalate is a chemical used mainly as an insect repellant . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Dimethylnitrosamine: Dimethylnitrosamine is a chemical used mainly as a solving in the manufacture of plastics, rubbers, lubricants and rocket fuel. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Dimetilan: Dimetilan is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Dinitrocresol: Dinitrocresol is a chemical used mainly as a herbicide and fungicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Dinitrophenol: Dinitrophenol is a chemical that has various applications: herbicide, pesticide, fungicide, acaricide, manufacture of dyes and wood preservative. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Dioxacarb: Dioxacarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Dioxathion: Dioxathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Diquat Dibromide: Diquat Dibromide is a chemical used mainly in herbicides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Disulfiram: Disulfiram is a drug used mainly to manage alcoholism. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Disulfoton: Disulfoton is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Drain Cleaners: Drain cleaners contain chemicals which can cause severe symptoms if ingested. The chemicals in the drain cleaners cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Drainpipe Cleaners: Drainpipe Cleaners contain chemicals which can cause severe symptoms if ingested. The chemicals in the drainpipe cleaners cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Dye remover: Dye removers can contain chemicals which are corrosive and can cause severe gastrointestinal damage and even death in severe cases. The damage may continue for a few weeks after ingestion so death can occur weeks after the incident. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - EMPC: EMPC is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Empenthrin: Empenthrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Emulsion paints: Emulsion paints (latex or water-based) contain various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Endosulfan: Endosulfan is a chemical used mainly as a crop pesticide and wood preservative. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Endothion: Endothion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Epichlorohydrin: Epichlorohydrin is a chemical used for a variety of applications - epoxy production, insecticides, solvent and agricultural chemical. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Esfenvalerate: Esfenvalerate is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Ether: Ether is a chemical used mainly as an anesthetic and industrial solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Ethiofencarb: Ethiofencarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Ethion: Ethion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Ethoate-methyl: Ethoate-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Ethoprophos: Ethoprophos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Ethyl Mercaptan: Ethyl Mercaptan is a chemical used mainly in the production of fungicides, insecticides and plastics as well as an odorizing agent for natural gas. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Ethyl Methacrylate: Ethyl Methacrylate is a chemical used mainly in . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Ethyl-guthion: Azinphos-ethyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Ethylamine: Ethylamine is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of dyes, rayon, rocket propellant, as a fuel additive and in leather-tanning and cellulose treatment. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Ethylbenzene: Ethylbenzene is a chemical used mainly in paint thinners, fuels, asphalt, degreasers, manufacture of various as products and as a solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Ethylene Dichloride: Ethylene Dichloride is a chemical used mainly in fat solvents and as a fumigant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Ethylene Glycol: Ethylene Glycol is a chemical used mainly in antifreeze, coolants and as a solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. Symptoms tend to occur in three phases: the first 12 hours involves inebriation, seizuresand brain swelling; the second and third day involves deterioration of lung and heart function and the third stage involves kidney damage and possibly failure. Death can occur during any of the stages.
  • Chemical poisoning - Ethylene Glycol Dinitrate: Ethylene Glycol Dinitrate is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of commercial dynamite and blasting gelatin. The chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Ethylene Oxide: Ethylene oxide is a chemical used mainly in detergents, plasticizers, fumigants, inks, cosmetics and brake fluid. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Ethyleneamine: Ethyleneamine is a chemical which is widely used in the manufacture of products such as adhesive, paper, textiles, fuels, lubricants, varnishes, lacquers, coating resins, cosmetics, photographic chemicals and agricultural chemicals. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Etrimfos: Etrimfos is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Face Powder: Face powder contains various chemicals that can cause symptoms if ingested although this is rare. Eye and inhalation exposure can also cause symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Fenchlorphos: Fenchlorphos is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Fenethacarb: Fenethacarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Fenfluthrin: Fenfluthrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Fenitrothion: Fenitrothion is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Fenobucarb: Fenobucarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Fenpirithrin: Fenpirithrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Fenpropathrin: Fenpropathrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide and acarcide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Fensulfothion: Fensulfothion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and nematicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Fenthion: Fenthion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and avicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Fenvalerate: Fenvalerate is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Fipronil: Fipronil is a chemical used mainly in pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Flucythrinate: Flucythrinate is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Flufenprox: Flufenprox is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Fluoridated toothpaste: Fluoridated toothpaste contains fluoride and various other chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. As little as half a tube of children's paste can cause death in a 2 year old child and a whole tube can cause death in a 9 year old child. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Fluvalinate: Fluvalinate is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Fonophos: Fonophos is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Formothion: Formothion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Furathiocarb: Furathiocarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Furethrin: Furethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Furfural: Furfural is a chemical used mainly as an industrial solvent and in the manufacture of fuels, foods and ant poisons. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Furniture polish: Furniture polish contains chemicals (hydrocarbons) which can cause serious symptoms if ingested. The ingested chemicals can continue to cause damage to the organs and gastrointestinal lining for weeks after the ingestion and severe cases can result in death. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Gasoline: Gasoline is a chemical used as a fuel for combustion engines. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Glaze: Glazes are used to put a shiny finish on various surfaces such as pottery. Glazes contain chemicals such as lead and zinc oxide which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are eaten. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Glutaraldehyde: Glutaraldehyde is a chemical used mainly in sterilizing agents, herbicides, pesticides and disinfectants. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Glyphosate: Glyphosate is a chemical used mainly in herbicides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Guthion (ethyl): Guthion (ethyl) is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - HCH-gamma: HCH-gamma is an insecticide which is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Hair Bleach: Hair bleach contain chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested. The chemicals in the hair bleach can continue to cause gastrointestinal damage for weeks after ingestion. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Hair Dye: Hair dyes contain chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested. The chemicals in the hair dye can continue to cause damage for weeks after ingestion. Some dyes contain lead or mercury which can cause neurological problems even if low level exposure occurs over an extended period of time. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Halfenprox: Halfenprox is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Helium: Helium is a chemical used mainly in helium balloons, neon signs and diving gas. The gas is sometimes misused as an inhalant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Heptachlor: Heptachlor is a chemical used mainly in pesticides to control termites and fire ants. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Heptenophos: Heptenophos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Hexachlorocyclohexane (gamma): Hexachlorocyclohexane (gamma) is an insecticide which is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Hexachlorocyclopentadiene: Hexachlorocyclopentadiene is a chemical used mainly in the production of chlorinated pesticides, flame retardants, dyes and certain resins. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Hexane: Hexane is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of products such as glue, paint, shoes and furniture. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Hydrogen Chloride: Hydrogen Chloride is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of rubber and vinyl chloride . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Hydrogen Fluoride: Hydrogen Fluoride is a chemical used mainly in car cleaning products and in the production of integrated circuits. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Hydrogen Sulfide: Hydrogen Sulfide is a chemical that can be used in production processes (paper, tanneries, sulfide ores) or it may be a byproduct of certain industries. It is also found naturally in sewers and manure. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Hydroquinone: Hydroquinone is a chemical used mainly in photography developing solution, pharmaceuticals, fur processing, paints, fuel, organic chemicals, plastics, stone coatings and styrene monomers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Hyquincarb: Hyquincarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Imazapyr: Imazapyr is a chemical used mainly in herbicides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Imiprothrin: Imiprothrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Incense: Drinking liquid incense or inhaling incense fumes can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Iodofenphos: Iodofenphos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Isofenphos: Isofenphos is an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Isoprocarb: Isoprocarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Isopropyl Alcohol: Isopropyl Alcohol is a chemical used mainly as a rubbing alcohol and also in perfumes, paint thinners, disinfectants, cleaners and fuels. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Jet Fuel-4: Jet Fuel-4 is an aviation turbine fuel used by the US military. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Jet Fuel-5: Jet Fuel-5 is an aviation turbine fuel used by the US military. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Jet Fuel-8: Jet Fuel-8 is an aviation turbine fuel used by the US military. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Jewelry cleaner: Jewelry cleaner contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested or other types of exposure occurs. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Kerosene: Kerosene is a chemical used mainly in paints, pesticides, lighter fluid, illuminating fuel and heating. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Kratom: Kratom is a plant used to make a tea which produce similar effects to opium . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Lacquer: Lacquer contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested or other types of exposure occurs. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Lewisite: Lewisite is a very poisonous gas which has the potential to be used in chemical warfare due to its deadly effects. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Lighter fluid: Lighter fluid contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested or other types of exposure occurs. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Lindane: Lindane is a chemical used mainly as an agricultural insecticide but also as a treatment of lice and scabies infestations. The insecticide is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Lysergic Acid Diethylamide: Lysergic Acid Diethylamide is a hallucinogenic drug which is often misused. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Malathion: Malathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Mecarbam: Mecarbam is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Metal cleaner: Metal cleaner contains various chemicals which can cause severe symptoms if ingested or other forms of exposure occur. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Metal polish: Metal polish contains various chemicals which can cause severe symptoms if ingested or other forms of exposure occur. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Metaldehyde: Metaldehyde is a chemical used mainly as a molluscicide, in heating fuel and in fire lighters. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Methacrifos: Methacrifos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Methacrylate: Methacrylate is a chemical used mainly in plastics, adhesives and bone cements. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Methamidophos: Methamidophos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Methanol: Methanol is a chemical used mainly in fuel, paint removers, solvent, antifreeze and in the production process of many other products. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Methidathion: Methidathion is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Methiocarb: Methiocarb is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Methomyl: Methomyl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Methoxychlor: Methoxychlor is a chemical used mainly in as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Methyl Bromide: Methyl Bromide is a chemical used mainly in insecticides, fire extinguishers, wool degreasers and oil extraction. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Methyl Ethyl Ketone: Methyl Ethyl Ketone is a chemical used mainly in fiberglass and plastic manufacture. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Methyl Isocyanate: Methyl Isocyanate is a chemical used mainly in herbicides and pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Methyl Mercaptan: Methyl Mercaptan is a chemical used mainly in the production of plastic, pesticides and jet fuel. It is also used in certain toxic gases to give them a detectable odor. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether: Methyl Tert-Butyl Ether is a chemical used mainly in automotive gasoline but is also used as a solvent and chemical reagent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Methyl parathion: Methyl parathion is a chemical used mainly as an insecticide for various crops. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Methylene Chloride: Methylene Chloride is a chemical used mainly in paint removers, nail polish remover, fumigants and fire extinguishers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Methylene Dianiline: Methylene Dianiline is a chemical used mainly in corrosive inhibitors, epoxy resins and polyurethane. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Methylene Diisocyanate: Methylene Diisocyanate is a chemical used mainly in the production of hard plastics and polyurethane foams. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Metiltriazotion: Metiltriazotion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Metobromuron: Metobromuron is a chemical used mainly as a herbicide. The chemical is generally considered toxic only if large amounts are consumed. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Metofluthrin: Metofluthrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Metolcarb: Metolcarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Mevinphos: Mevinphos is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Mexacarbate: Mexacarbate is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Mineral oil: Mineral oil can cause gastrointestinal symptoms if ingested.
  • Chemical poisoning - Mirex: Mirex is a chemical used mainly to control fire ants but also other insecticides such as mealy bugs. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Monocrotophos: Monocrotophos is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Morpholine: Morpholine is a chemical used in a variety of applications: rubber industry, corrosion inhibitor, pharmaceuticals, dyes, crop pesticides and as a solvent in various manufacturing processes. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Mould remover: Mould removers contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if swallowed, inhaled or skin and eye exposure occurs. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Mouth Wash: Mouth wash contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - N,N-Dimethyl-P-Toluidine: N,N-Dimethyl-P-Toluidine is a chemical used mainly in artificial nail solutions. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - N-Butyl Chloride: N-Butyl Chloride is a chemical used mainly in veterinary worming applications. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Naphthalene: Naphthalene is a chemical used mainly as a moth repellant, toilet deodorizer and the manufacture of other chemicals. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Nickel Carbonyl: Nickel Carbonyl is a chemical used mainly in petroleum and rubber production and in electroplating. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Nitrates: Nitrates are chemicals used mainly in explosives and ammunitions but are also an ingredient in cold packs. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Nitric Acid: Nitric Acid is a chemical used mainly as a cleaning agent for food and dairy equipment, in explosives, metal etching, in liquid fuel rockets and as a laboratory reagent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Nitrilacarb: Nitrilacarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Nitrites: Nitrite is a chemical used in many applications: manufacture of dyes, fabric manufacture, corrosive inhibitors, photography and cyanide antidote kits. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Nitrobenzene: Nitrobenzene is a chemical used mainly in floor polish, shoe dyes, soaps and the production of other chemicals such as cellulose ether and acetaminophen. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Nitrofen: Nitrofen is a used as a herbicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Nitrogen Dioxide: Nitrogen Dioxide is a chemical which has industrial applications but is also an air pollutant formed by burning fossil fuels such as gas, oil and coal as well as vehicle exhaust and industrial byproduct. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Nitroglycerin: Nitroglycerin is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of explosives, dynamite, rocket propellant and smokeless powders. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Nitromethane: Nitromethane is a chemical used mainly in racing fuel and as an industrial and cleaning solvent. It is also used in the manufacture of various products: explosives, coatings, pesticides, coatings and pharmaceuticals. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Nitrophenol: Nitrophenol is a chemical used mainly in the production of dyes and pigments and also in fungicides and laboratory chemicals. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Nitrophenol Urea: Nitrophenol Urea is a pesticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Nitrotoluene: Nitrotoluene is a chemical used mainly in industrial applications for the production of things such as agricultural chemicals, explosives, rubber chemicals, sulfur dyes and azo dyes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Nitrous Oxide: Nitrous Oxide is a chemical used mainly as rocket fuel, foaming agent and as an anesthetic. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Oil-based paint: Oil-based paint contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed or if other types of exposure occurs. These paint contain toxic hydrocarbons as well as various other heavy metals depending on the type of paint. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Omethoate: Omethoate is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Oven Cleaners: Oven cleaners contain toxic chemicals which can cause serious symptoms on exposure. Severe gastrointestinal burns can be caused by ingesting oven cleaner. The burns can lead to perforation which involves a high risk of death. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Oxamyl: Oxamyl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide, acaricie and nematicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Oxydeprofos: Oxydeprofos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Oxydisulfoton: Oxydisulfoton is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Para-Dichlorobenzene: Para-Dichlorobenzene is a chemical used mainly as a pesticide, mold and mildew preventer, moth repellent and toilet deodorant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Paraffin wax: Paraffin wax is a chemical used mainly in the production of candles, paraffin papers, varnishes, floor polishes, food packaging, lubricants, cosmetics, wood waterproofing, cork and perfume extraction. The fumes from burning paraffin wax can be quite harmful if excessive inhalation occurs. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Paramethoxyamphetamine: Paramethoxyamphetamine is used as a recreational hallucinogenic drug. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Paraphenylenediamine: Paraphenylenediamine is a chemical used mainly in photographic developing solutions, hair dye, photocopying and printing ink, black rubber, grease, temporary tattoos and car cosmetics. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Parathion: Parathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Parathion Methyl: Parathion Methyl is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Pentaborane: Pentaborane is a chemical used mainly as a fuel additive, reducing agent and rocket propellant. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Pentachlorophenol: Pentachlorophenol is a chemical used mainly in fungicides, herbicides, insecticides, molluscicides, algicides and bactericides. It is commonly used as a wood preservative. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Perming lotion: Perming lotion is a product used to create permanent hair curls. It contains chemicals such as thioglycolate which can cause poisoning symptoms if exposure occurs. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Petroleum Distillates - Naphtha: Petroleum Distillates - Naphtha is a chemical used mainly in . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Phenkapton: Phenkapton is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Phenol: Phenol is a chemical used mainly in the production of fertilizer, explosives, rubber, paint, paint remover, perfumes, asbestos products, wood preservatives, resins, textiles, pharmaceuticals and drugs. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Phorate: Phorate is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide, nematicide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Phosalone: Phosalone is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Phosdrin: Phosdrin is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Phosmet: Phosmet is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Phosphamidon: Phosphamidon is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and nematicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Phosphine: Phosphine is a chemical used mainly in pesticides and rodenticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Phoxim: Phoxim is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Phthalthrin: Phthalthrin is an insecticide - it is used mainly for indoor purposes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Generally, large amounts need to be involved to cause serious symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Pine Oil: Pine Oil is a chemical used mainly as a disinfectant or cleaning agent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Pirimicarb: Pirimicarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Pirimiphos-methyl: Pirimiphos-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Pool Cleaners: Pool Cleaners contain various chemicals (mainly chlorine) which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The chemicals are very damaging to the mucosal linings in the body. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Potassium Permanganate: Potassium Permanganate is a chemical used in various applications: topical antibacterial, photography, laboratory chemical, wood dye, water purification and bleaching processes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Prallethrin: Prallethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Primiphos methyl: Primiphos methyl is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Profenofos: Profenofos is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Profluthrin: Profluthrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Promacyl: Promacyl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Promecarb: Promecarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Propoxur: Propoxur is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Propylene Glycol Dinitrate: Propylene Glycol Dinitrate is a chemical used mainly as a propellant or occasionally in explosives. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Prothidathion: Prothidathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Prothoate: Prothoate is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Protrifenbute: Protrifenbute is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Pyresmethrin: Pyresmethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Pyrethrin: Pyrethrin is used mainly as an indoor insecticide. Pyrethrin is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity with large amounts usually required to produce toxicity symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Pyrethroid: Pyrethroid is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Pyridine: Pyridine is a chemical used mainly in the production of herbicides, pesticides, antihistamine steroids, sulfa antibiotics, water repellents, dyes, paints and rubber. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Pyrimitate: Pyrimitate is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Quinalphos: Quinalphos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Quintiofos: Quintiofos is a chemical pesticide used as an acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - RDX: RDX is a chemical used mainly in explosives, fireworks, detonators and rodenticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Rotenone: Rotenone is a naturally occurring chemical found in certain plants (Derris and Lonchocarpus sp.). It gives the plant insecticidal and pesticidal properties and is hence utilized commercially as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Inhalation tends to cause more severe symptoms than ingestion. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Selenium: Selenium is a chemical element used mainly as an industrial catalyst, in glass and ceramic manufacturing, as an animal feed additive, in photography and in the electronics industry. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Silafluofen: Silafluofen is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Sodium Azide: Sodium Azide is a chemical used mainly in nematocides, herbicides, explosives detonators and in vehicle air bags. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Sodium Monofluoroacetate: Sodium Monofluoroacetate is a chemical used mainly as a rodenticides, often to control mammal pests in crops. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Sodium Oleate: Sodium Oleate is a chemical used mainly in insecticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Solder: Solder contains various chemicals and heavy metals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Sophamide: Sophamide is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Stoddard Solvent: Stoddard Solvent is a solvent used in dry cleaning, ink printing, adhesives, paint thinners, liquid photocopier toners. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Sulfotep: Sulfotep is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Sulfur Trioxide: Sulfur Trioxide is a chemical used mainly in the production of sulfuric acid and explosives. Sulfur trioxide is also a significant air pollutant which can mix with moisture in the air to produce "acid rain". Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Tar remover: Tar remover contains various chemicals (mainly hydrocarbons) which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Tau-Fluvalinate: Tau-Fluvalinate is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Tazimcarb: Tazimcarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Tefluthrin: Tefluthrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Terbufos: Terbufos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and nematicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Tetrachloroethane: Tetrachloroethane is a chemical used mainly as a dry cleaning solvent but is also used as a degreaser and in paint strippers and spot removers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Tetrachloroethylene: Tetrachloroethylene is a chemical used mainly as a fabric dry cleaner, degreaser, worming treatment for animals and in the manufacture of freons. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Tetraethyl Pyrophosphate: Tetraethyl Pyrophosphate is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Tetrahydrofuran: Tetrahydrofuran is a chemical used mainly as a plastic solvent and in the processing of varnish, ink, paint and glue. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Tetramethrin: Tetramethrin is an insecticide - it is used mainly for indoor purposes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Generally, large amounts need to be involved to cause serious symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Tetramethylammonium Hydroxide: Tetramethylammonium Hydroxide is a chemical used mainly in the production of a variety of electronic components. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Tetryl: Tetryl is a chemical used mainly as a military explosive. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Thallium: Thallium is an element used for such things as electronic devices, selenium rectifiers, gamma radiation detection apparatus, transmission equipment and infrared radiation detection. It is also used as a catalyst in various manufacturing processes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Thallium Sulfate: Thallium Sulfate is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of switches and closures in the semiconductor industry. It has historically also been used as a rodenticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Thiocarboxime: Thiocarboxime is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Thiodicarb: Thiodicarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Thiofanox: Thiofanox is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Thiometon: Thiometon is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Thiram: Thiram is a chemical used mainly in the rubber industry, latex manufacture and as a pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Tin: Tin is an element used mainly in steel can coatings, copper wire coating and solder, bronze and pewter. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Tolclofos methyl: Tolclofos methyl is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Toluene Diisocyanate: Toluene Diisocyanate is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of elastomers and polyurethane foams. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Toxaphene: Toxaphene is a chemical used mainly as a livestock insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Tralomethrin: Tralomethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Transfluthrin: Transfluthrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Transpermethrin: Transpermethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Triazophos: Triazophos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide, nematicide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Triazotion: Triazotion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Tributyl Phosphate: Tributyl Phosphate is a chemical used mainly as a plasticizer, antifoaming agent, solvent for uranium extraction and in hydraulic fluid. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Trichlorfon: Trichlorfon is an insecticide used mostly in crops. It is considered motderately toxic to humans. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Trichloroethane: Trichloroethane is a chemical used mainly as an industrial solvent but also in inks and lubricants. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Trichloroethylene: Trichloroethylene is a chemical used mainly as an industrial solvent and in adhesives, lacquer, fire retardants and house cleaning solvents. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Trifenfos: Trifenfos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Trimethacarb: Trimethacarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide, bird repellent, molluscicide and mamal repellent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Tungsten: Tungsten is an element used mainly in light bulb filaments, X-ray tubes, electrodes, superalloys, heating elements and various other high temperature uses. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Turpentine Oil: Turpentine Oil is a chemical used mainly as a solvent, paint thinner and various other applications such as deodorizing fragrances and antiseptics. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Vamidothion: Vamidothion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - White Phosphorus: White Phosphorus is a chemical used mainly in fertilizers, water treatment, rodenticides and insecticides (for cockroaches). Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Window cleaner: Window cleaner contains various chemicals (usually alcohols and ammonia) which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - XMC: XMC is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Xylene: Xylene is a chemical used mainly in pesticides and in the manufacture of glue, paint, paper, rubber, pharmaceuticals and polymers. It is also used as a solvent and clarifier for microscopic tissue examinations in laboratories. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - Xylylcarb: Xylylcarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning - Zinc Phosphide: Zinc Phosphide is a chemical used mainly as a rodenticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - acetic acid: Acetic acid is a chemical used for medicinal purposes such as superficial ear infections, jellyfish stings and bladder irrigation. Acetic acid is a also a component of vinegar which is used as a cooking ingredient. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - alpha-Cypermethrin: alpha-Cypermethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - beta-Cypermethrin: Beta-Cypermethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - gamma-Cyhalothrin: Gamma-Cyhalothrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - gamma-HccH: Gamma-HccH is an insecticide which is considered moderately toxic to humans and acts as a central nervous system stimulant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - lambda-Cyhalothrin: lambda-Cyhalothrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - m-Anisidine: o-Anisidine is a chemical used mainly in the production process of pharmaceuticals and azo-dyes . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - o-Anisidine: o-Anisidine is a chemical used mainly in the production process of pharmaceuticals and azo-dyes . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - p-Anisidine: p-Anisidine is a chemical used mainly in the production process of pharmaceuticals and azo-dyes . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - theta-Cypermethrin: theta -Cypermethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. The chemical is toxic to the nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning - zeta-Cypermethrin: zeta-Cypermethrin is a pyrethroid chemical used as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chenile plant poisoning: The chenille plant is a shrub which bears a long thin stem of red flowers. The plant originated in Australia and New Guinea and is often utilized as a houseplant or ornamental garden plant. The sap from the plant contains diterpene esters which can cause symptoms if eaten or if skin contact occurs. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity if eaten.
  • Cherry laurel seed poisoning: Wild cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Wild cherry plants grow mainly in eastern Europe, Western Asia and Britain.
  • Cherry seed poisoning: Cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually only occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual.
  • Childhood liver cancer, primary: Cancer that develops in the tissue of the liver in children.
  • Chokecherry seed poisoning: Chokecherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Chokecherry plants grow mainly in Northern America.
  • Cholangitis: bile duct inflammation (cholangitis)
  • Cholecystitis: Inflammation of the gallbladder which concentrates and stores bile. The condition may occur suddenly (acute) or persist over a longer period of time (chronic).
  • Cholelithiasis: Is the presence of gallstones in the gallbladder
  • Cholestasis: A condition where the bile flow is impaired or completely halted.
  • Choroid Plexus neoplasms: A rare type of brain tumor that originates in the choroids plexus. The choroids plexus is located inside a space in the brain called the ventricles and produces cerebrospinal fluid. Symptoms are determined by the size, type and exact location of the tumor.
  • Christmas Cherry poisoning: The Christmas Cherry is a small reddish-orange fruit. The plant contains a compound called solanocapsine which can cause symptoms if excessive amounts are consumed. The compound is found in all parts of the plant - especially the leaves and unripe fruit. Very large amounts would need to be consumed to cause symptoms due to the low toxicity of the compound.
  • Chronic Hepatitis C: Chronic form of Hepatitis C viral liver infection.
  • Chronic Kidney Disease: Long-term and generally irreversible disease of the kidneys due to infection, obstruction, congenital diseases or generalised diseases causing failure of the kidneys' normal functions.
  • Chronic Nonulcer dyspepsia: Chronic indigestion not caused by a peptic ulcer.
  • Chronic Pesticide poisoning - xylene: Xylene is an ingredient used in certain insecticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Chronic vitamin A toxicity: Chronic excessive ingestion of vitamin A can cause symptoms.
  • Churee poisoning: The Churee plant is a succulent, cactus-like, spiny plant which also bears relatively large leaves. The sap of the plant contains a chemical (diterpene ester) which can cause skin and eye irritation on exposure or gastrointestinal symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Ciguatera poisoning: Rare toxic food poisoning from eating contaminated fish
  • Cirrhosis of the liver: Scarring of the liver from alcohol or other causes.
  • Cirrhosis, familial: Liver cirrhosis that is inherited in a familial pattern. The liver scarring (cirrhosis) is not caused by any discernable disease process. The liver becomes progressively scarred and its function is impaired.
  • Citalopram toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Classic migraine: Migraine headaches usually preceded by an aura.
  • Claviceps purpurea poisoning: Claviceps purpurea is a type of fungus that can contaminate grains such as rye, wheat, oats and barely. Ingestion of contaminated foods can cause poisoning with the severity of symptoms varying depending on the amount consumed.
  • Climbing Onion poisoning: The Climbing onion is an unusual plant with many small branching, green, leafless stems and small whitish-green flowers. The plant originated in Africa and is often used as an ornamental house or garden plant. The plant contains a chemical (cardiac glycoside) which can cause symptoms if large quantities are consumed. Skin contact with the bulb of the plant can also cause relatively minor skin irritation.
  • Clonorchiasis: Infection with the Chinese liver fluke called Clonchorchis sinensis. Infection usually results from ingesting contaminated fish and crayfish. The infection primarily affects the liver as the flukes tend to occupy the biliary ducts of the liver. Recurring infections can cause more severe symptoms. Infection with this fluke is endemic in Asia but can occur occasionally in countries such as the US though the source of contamination is food from Asia.
  • Closed-angle glaucoma: A severe form of glaucoma needing emergency treatment to avoid blindness.
  • Clostridium sordellii: Clostridium sordellii is a rare bacterium that can cause infections such as pneumonia, arthritis, peritonitis and endocarditis. It is most often associated with childbirth, trauma, medically induced abortions, injection drug use and routine gynecological procedures. Death is not uncommon with this type of infection. In rare cases it can cause toxic shock syndrome.
  • Clupeotoxism: A potentially fatal condition caused by eating fish such as herrings and anchovies from the Clupeidae family of fish. Severe poisoning can result in death within half an hour of ingestion. Outbreaks have been reported in the Caribbean Sea and the Indian-Pacific area.
  • Cluster headache: Intense episodic vascular headaches usually related to blood pressure.
  • Coastal leucothoe poisoning: The coastal leucothoe is an evergreen shrub which bears small clusters of bell-shaped, white flowers in the apex of the leaves. It also bears small capsulated fruit. The leaves and flower nectar contain a chemical called andromedotoxin which is very toxic and can cause death if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Cobra poisoning: The Cobra is a poisonous snake which can be found in Africa, Asia and other parts of the world. Some cobras are able to spit venom into the victims eye and cause serious symptoms.
  • Cocaine overdose: Cocaine is an illegal and highly addictive recreational drug. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Cocaine withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when cocaine use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Coconut crab poisoning: The coconut crab is commonly found and eaten as a delicacy in the Indo-Pacific region. These crabs can contain toxic chemicals which can cause severe poisoning in humans if eaten. The toxicity of these crabs is believed to be derived from the ingestion of certain toxic ocean plants. The best way to avoid poisoning is to not eat these crabs at all.
  • Codeine withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Codeine use is discontinued or reduced. Codeine is a sedative pain-killer. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Colchicine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Colonic Inertia: The nerves and muscles of the bowel do not function normally resulting in chronic constipation.
  • Combat stress reaction: A term used in the military which refers to behaviors that result from the stress of fighting in a war.
  • Common migraine: Migraine headaches usually not preceded by an aura.
  • Common poppy poisoning: The common poppy is most commonly associated with cultivation for it's content of opium which is used as an illegal recreational drug. It is illegal to cultivate the plant. However, the plant is legitimately grown in some areas in order to produce medicinal drugs such as morphine, codeine and noscapine. The plant (especially the fruit) contains chemicals (alkaloids, morphine etc) which are very toxic and can cause death if sufficient quantities are eaten. The seeds from the plant are edible and are often used as toppings on breads and cakes.
  • Concussion: Brain injury causing loss of consciousness and bruising of the brain
  • Cone shell poisoning: A number of species of cone shells are capable of envenomating humans. The toxin is a neurotoxin and thus primarily affects the nervous system. Cone shells are found mainly in shallow waters of the Indian and Pacific oceans. The toxicity varies amongst species with some delivering a benign stink whereas others are capable of causing death. The cone snails a proboscis on the end of which is a poison-filled barb.
  • Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH): A group of disorder that occur when there is a problem in the process of making adrenal corticosteroids.
  • Congenital aneurysms of the great vessels: A bulge in one of the main blood vessels in the body - pulmonary artery, pulmonary veins, vena cava and aorta. The condition is generally asymptomatic unless the aneurysm becomes very large or bursts which can result in rapid death depending on the location of the aneurysm.
  • Congenital hepatic porphyria: A rare congenital disorder where there is an excess of porphyrin (pigments) in the body. The liver is responsible for making porpyrins.
  • Constipation: Difficult or dry bowel movements
  • Copper toxicity: Excessive accumulation of copper in the body can cause symptoms.
  • Copperhead snake poisoning: The Copperhead snake is a poisonous snake found mainly in parts of North America. The toxicity of the poison varies among species but some species are extremely poisonous and readily result in death if the patient is not treated.
  • Corn Lily poisoning: Corn Lily is a poisonous plant native to the Sierra Nevada mountains. It's appearance is similar to the corn grown as a crop. The plant poison primarily affects the nervous system.
  • Corn cockle poisoning: The corn cockle is a perennial herb which bears thin, pinkish or purplish flowers on a long stalk. It also has capsulated fruit containing many seeds. The seeds contain a chemical called glycoside githagenin which can cause symptoms if sufficient quantities are eaten. The seeds are considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Corsican Hellebore poisoning: The Corsican hellebore is often grown in gardens. It bears cupped, light green flowers. The plant contains a chemical called protoanemonin which can cause symptoms if eaten in large quantities. Skin exposure to the plant can also cause skin irritation but it is usually minor and short-lived.
  • Crack withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when cocaine hydrochloride use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Creeping Spurge poisoning: The creeping surge is a small flowering plant with bluish-gray leaves. The plant originated in Europe and Asia and is often used as an ornamental indoor and outdoor plant. The plant contains diterpene esters which can cause symptoms if excessive quantities are eaten. Skin contact with the plant can also cause minor skin irritation. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity if eaten.
  • Crinum lily poisoning: Crinum lilies are bulbous plants which produce fairly large, distinctive white flowers. The plant bulb contains alkaloids which may be toxic if sufficient quantities are eaten. The plant is considered to have low toxicity if eaten.
  • Cronkhite-Canada disease: A rare condition characterized primarily by polyps in the digestive tract, hair loss and nail problems.
  • Crotalidae snake poisoning: Crotalids are snakes from the Crotalidae family. This group of snakes includes rattlesnakes which are usually found in America. These snakes are easily identified by the "rattle" at the tip of their tails. The toxicity of the venom can vary among species but some can result in death if prompt treatment is not given.
  • Croton poisoning: The croton is a shrub which bears white flowers and leaves with white, red or yellow coloration through them. The plant contains diterpene esters which can cause symptoms if large quantities are eaten. Skin contact with the plant can also cause skin irritation.
  • Crown of Thorns poisoning: The Crown of Thorns is a spiny, spreading shrub which can grow to a couple of metres in height. Some species of the plant are poisonous if ingested, can cause a skin reaction in susceptible people and can also cause severe symptoms if eye exposure occurs. Toxicity varies among species.
  • Cryptococcal Meningitis: Fungal form of meningitis.
  • Cryptococcosis: A fungal infection caused by Cryptococcus neoformans which primarily affects the central nervous system and the lungs. People with weakened immune systems such as AIDS sufferers are generally more susceptible to this type of infection.
  • Cryptosporiosis: Contagious parasitic digestive infection
  • Cuban lily poisoning: The Cuban lily is very toxic bulbous herb. It has long thin leaves with sprays of white, blue or purple bell-shaped flowers. The plant originated in Africa, Europe and Asia. Skin contact can cause skin irritation and eating parts of the plant can result in death. The toxic chemical in the plant is called cardiac glycoside.
  • Cycad poisoning: Cycads are a green plant which has a thick trunk from the top of which sprouts palm-like leaves. Eating the seeds, leaves or unprocessed flour made from the trunk of the plant can cause various symptoms if large quantities are eaten. The harmful compounds in the plant are glycosides and BMAA
  • Cyclic vomiting syndrome: A rare disorder involving repeated cyclic episodes of vomiting which occur for no obvious reason.
  • Cyclospora cayetanenis food poisoning: Cyclospora cayetanenis is a parasite that can cause food poisoning. Contamination through consuming food and water contaminated through contact with infected feces. Diarrhea is usually the main symptom. The severity of symptoms often depends on the age and underlying health of the patient - the very young and old tend to be more severely affected.
  • Cyclosporiasis: A parasitic disease caused by Cyclospora cayetensis which is transmitted by ingestion of food or water contaminated by infected fecal matter. Some cases are asymptomatic while others can be quite severe and untreated cases can suffer relapses.
  • Cyclosporiosis: A parasitic disease caused by Cyclospora cayetensis which is transmitted by ingestion of food or water contaminated by infected fecal matter. Some cases are asymptomatic while others can be quite severe and untreated cases can suffer relapses.
  • Cypress spurge poisoning: Cypress spurge is a herb with narrow leaves and small yellow flowers. The plant contains diterpene esters which can cause symptoms if large quantities are eaten. Skin exposure to the sap can result in minor skin irritation.
  • Cytomegalic Inclusion Body Disease: An infection due to cytomegalovirus and marked by nuclear inclusion bodies in enlarged infected cells
  • D'Acosta: A condition that occurs when an un-acclimatized person climbs to high altitudes.
  • Daffodil poisoning: Daffodils contain a toxic chemical which can cause poisoning symptoms if ingested. The plant also has the potential to cause skin reactions in susceptible people. The daffodil bulb contains the highest concentration of toxins and accidental ingestion has occurred when the bulb has been mistaken for an onion bulb.
  • Daphne poisoning: Daphne is a shrub that contains a toxin called mezerein (skin irritant) in the bark as well as a toxin called daphnin. The bark, sap and berries are the most toxic parts of the plant. The plant is native to Europe and Asia but is also found in other parts of the world such as America. A single berry or leaf can cause symptoms and 2 or 3 can cause death in a child. About 12 berries or leaves can cause quite severe symptoms in adults.
  • Darvocet overdose: Darvocet is a prescription drug mainly used to treat pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Darvocet withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Darcovet use is discontinued or reduced. Darcovet is a pain-killer. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Deadly nightshade (Solanum dulcamara) poisoning: The deadly nightshade is a woody vine and is considered quite toxic. It is found in Europe, Asia, North Africa and North America. There are a number of species of nightshade with variable toxicity. The Solanum dulcamara is considered less toxic with about 200 berries needed to cause death.
  • Death Camas poisoning: The Death Camas is a plant from the lily family. It contains a toxic chemical called zygacine. Young plants tend to be more toxic than older plants. It is most often found in dry areas of Western US. The bulb is often confused with edible wild onions - eating one or two bulbs can cause symptoms and all parts of the plant are poisonous.
  • Dengue fever: An acute viral disease characterized by fever, rash and myalgia and caused by a flavivirus which is transmitted by mosquitoes.
  • Dermatomyositis: A muscle disease characterized by chronic muscle inflammation resulting in progressive muscle weakness and a characteristic rash.
  • Devil's Snuff Box poisoning: Devil's Snuff Box is a type of mushroom which has an extremely ugly appearance. These mushrooms are very poisonous and can cause death if eaten.
  • Dexedrine overdose: Dexedrine is a prescription drug mainly used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and narcolepsy. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Diabetes: Failing or reduced ability of the body to handle sugars.
  • Diabetic Gastroparesis: Slow stomach emptying from diabetic nerve damage
  • Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Life-threatening complication of high blood sugars and diabetes.
  • Dialyzer hypersensitivity syndrome: An anaphylactic reaction that occurs in some patients who are dialyzed on artificial kidneys. A compound (ethylene oxide) used to dry sterilize artificial kidneys is a likely allergen.
  • Diarrhea: Loose or watery stool.
  • Dieffenbachia poisoning: Dieffenbachia is a common houseplant which has large leaves. The plant contains poisonous chemicals (oxalic acid and asparagine) which can cause various symptoms if large amounts of the plant is ingested.
  • Diethylstilbestrol: A synthetic nonsteroidal estrogen
  • Digestive Diseases: Diseases that affect the digestive system
  • Digestive duplication: Duplication of a part of the digestive system. Duplication of the anal canal is the least common where as duplication of the Symptoms vary depending on what part of the digestive system is duplicated.
  • Digestive system cancer: A malignancy that affects the gastrointestinal cancer
  • Dilaudid overdose: Dilaudid is a prescription drug used mainly to treat pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Dilaudid withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Dilaudid use is discontinued or reduced. Dilaudid is a pain-killing drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence. Symptoms are usually peak during the second day and last about a week.
  • Dilutional hyponatremia: Low sodium levels due to excessive fluids.
  • Disequilibrium syndrome: A complication that can occur during or after dialysis and probably caused by abnormal water balance within the brain. Swelling of the brain causes a range of neurological symptoms.
  • Dissociative disorder: A sudden change in the state of consciousness and identity
  • Distomatosis: Infection by parasitic flat worms. Infection can involve liver, lungs or intestines. Symptoms are determined by the location of the infection. Contamination usually occurs through ingesting contaminated food or water.
  • Diverticular Disease: Protrusions of the colon wall (diverticulosis) or their inflammation (diverticulitis)
  • Dock poisoning: Dock is an annual herb that bears clusters of reddish flowers and a reddish brown fruit. The leaves are edible if cooked first but eating uncooked leaves can cause symptoms. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity. Skin exposure can also result in minor skin irritation.
  • Dracunculiasis: An infectious disease caused by the nematode Dracunculus medinensis which is usually transmitted by drinking water contaminated by infected crustaceans.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Clindamycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Clindamycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Quinolone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Quinolone antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Spectinomycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Spectinomycin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Sulfones: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to sulfone antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - 5-Fluorocytosine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called 5-Fluorocytosine. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Allopurinol: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to allopurinol. Allopurinol is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Amphotericin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Amphotericin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Anabolic C-17: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Anabolic C-17 which is an endocrine agent. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Anesthetic agent: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to anesthetic agents. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Antianginal agents: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antianginal agents. Antianginal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Antiarrhythmics: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antiarrhythmics. Antiarrhythmics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Antibiotics: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to certain antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Anticoagulants: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to anticoagulants. Anticoagulants are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Antifungals: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antifungal agents. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Antihyperlipidemic agents: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antihyperlipidemic agents. Antihyperlipidemic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Antihypertensives: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antihypertensives. Antihypertensives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Antineoplastic agents: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antineoplastic agents. Antineoplastic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Antithyroid drugs: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to endocrine agents called antithyroid drugs. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Benzodiazepine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a psychotropic agent called benzodiazepine. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - British anti-Lewisite penicillamine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to British anti-Lewisite penicillamine. British anti-Lewisite penicillamine is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Butyrophenone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a psychotropic agent called butyrophenone. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Cephalosporin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Cephalosporin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Chloramphenicol: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Chloramphenicol. Chloramphenicol is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Chloroform: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called chloroform. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Cimetidine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Cimetidine. Cimetidine is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Colchicine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to colchicine. Colchicine is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Cyclopropane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called cyclopropane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Cycloserine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called cycloserine. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Cytarabine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called cytarabine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Dantrolene: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Dantrolene. Dantrolene is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Diflunisal: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to diflunisal. Diflunisal is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Disulfiram: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Disulfiram. Disulfiram is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Diuretic Agents: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to diuretic agents. Diuretic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Erythromycin estolate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antibiotic called erythromycin estolate. Erythromycin estolate is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Erythromycin ethyl succinate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antibiotic called Erythromycin ethyl succinate. Erythromycin ethyl succinate is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Ethionamide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called ethionamide. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Fenoprofen: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to fenoprofen. Fenoprofen is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Glucocorticoids: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to endocrine agents called glucocorticoids. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Griseofulvin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Griseofulvin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Halothane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called halothane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Ibuprofen: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to ibuprofen. Ibuprofen is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Indomethacin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to indomethacin. Indomethacin is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Iodide ion: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Iodide ion. Iodide ion is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Isoniazid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called isoniazid. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Ketoconazole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Ketoconazole. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Mephenytoin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called mephenytoin. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Methoxyflurane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called methoxyflurane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Naproxen: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to naproxen. Naproxen is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Nitrofuran: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Nitrofuran antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Nitrous Oxide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called nitrous oxide. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Novobiocin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Novobiocin antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Oral hypoglycemics: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to oral hypoglycemics which are endocrine agents. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Penicillin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antibiotic called penicillin. Penicillin is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Phenobarbital: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called phenobarbital. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Phenothiazines: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a psychotropic agent called phenothiazine. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Phenylbutazone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to phenylbutazone. Phenylbutazone is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Phenytoin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called Phenytoin. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Ranitidine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Ranitidine. Ranitidine is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Rifampicin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called rifampicin. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Salicylate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to salicylates. Salicylates are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Saramycetin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antifungal agent called Saramycetin. Antifungal agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Steroids: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to steroids which are endocrine agents. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Sulfonamide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Sulfonamide antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Sulindac: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to sulindac. Sulindac is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Tamoxifen: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Tamoxifen which is an endocrine agent. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Telithromycin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antibiotic called Telithromycin. Telithromycin is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Tetracycline: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Tetracycline antibiotics. Antibiotics are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Thioxanthene: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a psychotropic agent called Thioxanthene. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Thorotrast: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Thorotrast. Thorotrast is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Valproic Acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anticonvulsive called valproic acid. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Vidarabine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called vidarabine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Vitamin A: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Vitamin A. Vitamin A is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - Zoxazolamine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Zoxazolamine. Zoxazolamine is a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - anticonvulsives: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to certain anticonvulsives. Anticonvulsives are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - antituberculous agents: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antituberculous agents. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - antiviral medication: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to antiviral agents. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - endocrine agent: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to endocrine agents. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - idoxuridine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called idoxuridine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - monoamine oxidase inhibitors: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to psychotropic agents called monoamine oxidase inhibitors. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - p-aminosalicylic acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antituberculous agent called p-aminosalicylic acid. Antituberculous agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - psychotropic agents: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to certain psychotropic agents. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - tricyclic antidepressant: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a psychotropic agent called tricyclic antidepressant. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drug-induced liver damage - xenylamine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an antiviral agent called xenylamine. Antiviral agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Drugs-induced liver damage - Ether: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called ether. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Duodenal conditions: Any condition that affects the duodenum
  • Duodenal stenosis: A rare birth defect where a portion of the small intestine is narrowed which prevents the stomach contents from flowing through at a normal rate.
  • Dysentery: A general term for various bacterial digestive disorders.
  • Dysmenorrhea: Pain, cramping, or discomfort due to menstruation
  • EGE: A rare disorder where white blood cells (eosinophils) infiltrate the layers of the lining of the stomach and intestines and cause gastrointestinal symptoms. The degree of infiltration will determine the severity of symptoms.
  • Ear infection: An infection that affects the ear
  • Ear infection (infant): An infection that affects the ear
  • Earthball poisoning: Earthball is a type of mushroom usually found in the US. The mushroom is very poisonous and can result in death if eaten.
  • Eastern equine encephalitis: Is a mosquito born virus that occurs in the eastern united states and causes disease in humans, horses and some birds
  • Ecstasy abuse: Use of the illicit drug called ecstasy
  • Egg Hypersensitivity: An allergic reaction to eggs that is caused by a hypersensitive immune system.
  • Ehrlichiosis: Bacterial tick-borne disease
  • Elapid poisoning: Sea snakes, Kraits and cobras are from the Elapid group of snakes. The toxicity of the venom varies depending on the species. The venom is usually toxic to the nerves or heart. Early symptoms such as drowsiness can occur within 30 minutes with more severe symptoms developing over the next few hours. Severe envenomation can result in death within hours.
  • Elderberry poisoning: The elderberry is a deciduous flowering shrub originating in America. All parts of the plant are poisonous and the tree also produces a fruit which is poisonous if unripe. The toxic chemical in the plant is cyanogenic glycoside and alkaloids. The plant is considered to have a relatively low toxicity.
  • Electrolyte abnormality: An imbalance in the level of any of a number of chemicals (electrolytes) in the blood stream e.g. chloride, sodium, magnesium, potassium, calcium, phosphate and bicarbonate. Symptoms can vary depending on which electrolyte is involved and the severity of the imbalance - severe cases can readily lead to death. An electrolyte abnormality can be caused by such things excessive loss of body fluid through vomiting or diarrhea, kidney conditions, malabsorption and various drugs such as diuretics and chemotherapy drugs.
  • Elephant's-ear poisoning: The Elephant's ear is a common garden plant which has large, heart-shaped leaves on long stalks. The plant contains calcium oxalate and saphotoxin which can cause poisoning if eaten and irritation upon contact with skin or eyes. The toxins are quite poisonous and death can occur if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Encephalitis: Dangerous infection of the brain
  • Encephalitis, California serogroup viral: A mosquito borne viral illness
  • Encephalomyelitis: Inflammation of the brain and spinal cord.
  • End Stage Liver Failure: Late stage of liver failure characterised by the onset of mental and neurological symptoms, due to build up of toxic metabolites.
  • End-stage renal disease: Final stage of total kidney failure.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to endocrine agents. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage - Anabolic C-17: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Anabolic C-17 which is an endocrine agent. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage - Antithyroid drugs: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to endocrine agents called antithyroid drugs. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage - Glucocorticoids: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to endocrine agents called glucocorticoids. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage - Oral contraceptives: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to oral contraceptives which are endocrine agents. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage - Oral hypoglycemics: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to oral hypoglycemics which are endocrine agents. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage - Steroids: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to steroids which are endocrine agents. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endocrine agent-induced liver damage - Tamoxifen: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Tamoxifen which is an endocrine agent. Endocrine agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Endodermal sinus tumor: A form of malignant germ cell tumor that occurs mainly in young children. They can occur in the testis, ovaries, uterus, abdomen, thorax, tailbone region, vagina, liver, retroperitoneum and pineal ventricle of the brain. Symptoms will vary depending on the exact location of the tumor.
  • English Ivy poisoning: English Ivy is a poisonous vine fund in Europe, US and Canada. The leaves and berries are the most toxic part of the plant but all parts of the plant are toxic. Falcarinol and polyacetylene are the toxic chemicals found in the plant.
  • Enterocolitis: Serious type of intestinal infection
  • Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia Coli Infection: An Escherichia Coli infection that occurs in the bowel causing an enterohemorrhagic condition
  • Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli: Bacterial infection of the digestive system
  • Envenomization by the Martinique lancehead viper: Posionous bite by a snake called the Lancehead Viper. It is a very venomous pit viper found in Martinique. Death is not common as the bite usually only causes a localized reaction rather than a systemic one. 10-20% of untreated cases result in death.
  • Eosinophilic enteropathy, pattern I: A rare disorder where white blood cells (eosinophils) infiltrate the deepest layers of the lining of the stomach and sometimes the intestines.
  • Ependymoma: A tumor that occurs in the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). Symptoms vary according to the aggressiveness, size and exact location of the tumor.
  • Epilepsy, familial mesial temporal lobe: A dominantly inherited form of epilepsy.
  • Episodic ataxia, type 3: A rare genetic disorder characterized by episodes of incoordination and unsteadiness as well as tinnitus and vertigo. Stress and exertion may trigger the episodes. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 1q42.
  • Episodic ataxia, type 7: A rare genetic disorder characterized by episodes of incoordination and unsteadiness which lasted from hours to days. Episodes occurred from monthly to yearly and the frequency tends to lessen with age. Stress and exertion may trigger the episodes. Type 7 is caused by a defect on chromosome 19q13.
  • Erythema chronicum migrans: The first stage of Lyme disease which is transmitted by the bite of the Ixodid tick. The first stage involves a skin rash with systemic symptoms also often occurring.
  • Esophagus diseases: Diseases affecting the esophagus
  • Esthesioneuroblastoma: A rare type of tumor that occurs in the upper nasal cavity. The tumor may obstruct one or both nostrils.
  • Eucalyptus Oil poisoning: Eucalyptus oil can be used for medicinal purposes but excessive ingestion can cause problems. Likewise, eating the leaves of the eucalyptus plant (very unlikely) can also cause poisoning symptoms.
  • Eucalyptus poisoning: Eucalyptus trees bear leaves with a distinctive odor when crushed. The tree is found mainly in Australia. The leaves and bark contains eucalyptus oil and cyanogenic glycoside which can cause symptoms if large quantities are eaten. The leaves are the main food source for koala bears but they are immune to its toxic effects. Skin contact with the leaves or bark can result in skin irritation.
  • Eugenol oil poisoning: Eugenol oil is used as a supplement or as a therapeutic ingredient in various medications and foods but excessive doses of undiluted oil can cause symptoms. Smoking undiluted cloves in cigarettes can also cause symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Euphorbium poisoning: Euphorbium is a spiny, cactus-like shrub with green succulent stems and tiny yellow flowers. The plant contains diterpene esters in its sap which can cause symptoms if eaten. Skin exposure can result in skin irritation. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity if eaten.
  • Eustachian tube disorders: Any disorder that affects the Eustachian tubes of the ear
  • Evening Primrose oil - adverse effects: Excessive use of evening primrose oil can in rare cases cause symptoms.
  • Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor: A rare form of cancer that originates in germ cells that are found in areas such as the brain, chest, tailbone or abdomen rather than the ovaries or testicles. Germ cells are the precursors for male sperm and female eggs. The symptoms are determined by the location and size of the tumor.
  • Fabry's Disease: Genetic fat storage disorder
  • Fallopian tube conditions: Conditions that affect the fallopian tubes of a woman
  • False Hellebore poisoning: False Hellebore is a herbaceous plant which bears large clusters of greenish-yellow flowers on the ends of branches. The plant is found mainly growing in the wild in the US. The plant contains steroidal alkaloids which can cause symptoms if large quantities are eaten.
  • False cactus poisoning: False cactus is a spiny, cactus-like plant found mainly in gardens in India. The plant contains diterpene esters which is mildly toxic if eaten. Skin irritation can also occur on skin exposure.
  • False indigo poisoning: The false indigo is a herb which produces long, flower-filled stalks as well as seed pods. The plant is considered to have low toxicity but eating sufficient quantities of any part of the plant may cause gastrointestinal symptoms. The toxic chemicals in the plant are baptisin and cytisine.
  • False jessamine poisoning: False jessamine is a shrubby plant with small white to purple flowers and red, purple or yellow berries. The plant originated in Europe. The leaves contain chemicals (atropine, scopolamine, hyoscyamine) which can cause symptoms if large amounts are eaten.
  • False poinciana poisoning: False poinciana is a small tree with small leaves along divided branches. It has pea-like flowers and pods of fruit. The plant originated in South America. The seeds contain saponic glycosides and eating them can result in severe poisoning and even death if sufficient quantities are eaten. The plant is considered to be very poisonous.
  • Familial hyperchylomicronemia: A rare inherited inborn error of metabolism involving the absence of the enzyme called lipoprotein lipase which results in increased blood triglyeride and chylomicron levels.
  • Familial hypertension: An inherited from of high blood pressure that tends to run in families.
  • Familial hypopituitarism: Impaired pituitary gland hormone-producing activity that tends to run in families. The failure of the pituitary gland in turn affects other hormone-producing glands which rely on the hormones from the pituitary gland for their activity. Symptoms are determined by the degree and type of hormone deficiency involved.
  • Fascioliasis: A rare parastitic infectious disease caused by liver fluke Fasciola hepatica which can cause blockage of the bile ducts in the liver.
  • Fetal alcohol syndrome: A pattern of mental and physical birth defects caused by excessive alcohol use during pregnancy. The range and severity of the symptoms may vary greatly.
  • Fetterbush poisoning: Fetterbush is an evergreen shrub which bears elongated spikes of small, urn-shaped flowers. The plant is found mainly in the US. The leaves and flower nectar contain andromedotoxin which is very poisonous if eaten. Severe poisoning can result in death.
  • Fever: Elevation of the body temperature above the normal 37 degrees celsius
  • Filovirus: A group of viruses that includes Marburg and Ebola
  • Fire Ant bite: The fire ant is found mainly in South America and parts of North America but is also found in other countries such as Australia. The fire ant is red and can deliver a venomous bite. Fire ant venom can elicit and allergic reaction or even anaphylaxis in susceptible people.
  • Fitz syndrome: Symptoms caused by an acute pancreatic inflammation.
  • Fitz-Hugh syndrome: A complication of upper genital tract infections in females where the membrane lining the stomach (peritoneum) and tissues surrounding the liver become inflamed. The infections involved are usually Chlamydia or gonorrhea. In some cases the diaphragm is also involved
  • Flavivirus: A group B arbovirus that causes disease in humans and animals
  • Flavivirus Infections: Infection with a virus from the Flaviviridae family of viruses. Infections by these pathogens include Dengue fever, Rocio encephalitis, West Nile virus and Japanese encephalitis. Transmission usually occurs through the bite of a mosquito.
  • Florida arrowroot poisoning: The Florida arrowroot is an evergreen plant with fern-like leaves. It bears cones of orange to red fleshy seeds. The seeds contain glycosides which can cause poisoning symptoms if eaten in large quantities.
  • Florida leucothoe poisoning: The Florida leucothoe is a shrubby plant often grown in gardens. The leaves contain andromedotoxin which can cause serious symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered very poisonous and can result in death if sufficient quantities of leaves are consumed.
  • Flowering spurge poisoning: The flowering spurge is a slender plant which bears little white flowers. The plant is sometimes used for medicinal purposes by native Americans to treat conditions such as skin infections and gonorrhea but the milky sap of the plant contains diterpene esters which can cause unwanted symptoms. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity if eaten and can also cause skin irritation on exposure.
  • Fluoxetine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Fluvoxamine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Food intolerances: Any inability to tolerate particular foods.
  • Food poisoning: Poisoning from a substance or microbe in food.
  • Four-O'Clock poisoning: The Four-O'Clock plant is a popular flowering ornamental plant which often has different colored flowers on the same plant. The roots and seeds of the plant contains a toxin called trigonelline which can cause skin irritation upon contact with the skin or gastrointestinal symptoms if eaten. The seeds may produce a hallucinogenic effects if smoked or eaten.
  • Foxglove poisoning: The foxglove is a herb which produces fruit in a capsule and colored, tubular flowers. The leaves, flowers and seeds of the plant contain a very toxic chemical called digitalis glycoside which can cause serious symptoms or even death if eaten. Skin irritation can occur if contact with the skin occurs. NOTE: Patients who are taking certain medications (digoxin, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers) are more susceptible to foxglove poisoning.
  • Francisella tularenis infection: Francisella tularenis is a type of bacteria that can cause infection involving the skin, respiratory and gastrointestinal systems. The nature and severity of symptoms varies depending on the location of the infection. The bacteria primarily causes localized tissue necrosis. The pathogen is considered a possible biological weapon.
  • Functioning pancreatic endocrine tumor: Tumors that develop in the pancreas and cause excessive secretion of one or more pancreatic hormones such as insulin, somatostatin, glucagons, gastrin, ACTH (corticosteroids) and vasoactive intestinal peptidase.
  • Gall Bladder Cancer: Cancer of the gall bladder.
  • Gall bladder conditions: Any condition that affects the gallbladder
  • Gallstones: Stone-like deposits in the gall bladder.
  • Ganglioglioma: A type of tumor that develops in the central nervous system. The tumor originates from glial and nerve cells. The tumor may grow rapidly and symptom will vary depending on the exact location and size of the tumor.
  • Gastric Reflux: Condition where relaxation of the sphincter at the bottom of the oesophagus allows acidic stomach contents to enter the oesophagus, causing irritation (See also Gastro-oesophageal Reflex Disease (GORD))
  • Gastric Ulcer: Painful erosion in wall of stomach due to increased acidity or irritation (eg bacterial infection, anti-inflammatory medication use)
  • Gastric lymphoma: A rare type of tumor that occurs in the lining of the stomach. The tumor may be primary or have spread there from other parts of the body. This type of tumor is more common in old people.
  • Gastrinoma: Rare tumors secreting the digestive hormone gastrin.
  • Gastritis: Inflammation of the stomach lining
  • Gastritis, familial giant hypertrophic: A rare inherited chronic disorder characterized by overgrowth of the stomach lining resulting in excessive folds.
  • Gastroenteritis: Acute stomach or intestine inflammation
  • Gastrointestinal Anthrax: Anthrax of the digestive system.
  • Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: Cancer that develops from stroma cells in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract. The primary locations are the small intestine, esophagus and esophagus with symptoms being determined by the location, stage and size of the tumor.
  • Gastroparesis: Slow stomach emptying from stomach nerve damage
  • Gelatinous ascites: A large abdominal cyst filled with gelatinous or mucous fluid. It is often caused by a mucous-producing abdominal cancer.
  • Generalized anxiety disorder: Excessive anxiety and worrying.
  • Giardia: Contagious parasitic digestive infection
  • Gila Lizard poisoning: Gila lizards are one of the few venomous species of lizard. They are found in parts of America such as Arizona, California, Nevada and Mexico. Envenomation by lizards is very uncommon but these venomous lizards can cause life-threatening symptoms. Gila lizards tend to hold on with their jaws while biting and the longer the jaws remain attached to the skin, the more severe the poisoning may be.
  • Gilbert's Syndrome: An inherited enzyme deficiency (UDP glucoronyl transferase) which causes periodic mild jaundice, abdominal pain, weakness and fatigue.
  • Ginseng overuse: Excessive use of ginseng can cause symptoms.
  • Glaucoma: Vision damage from a buildup of fluid pressure in the eye.
  • Glioma: A rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor.
  • Gliomatosis cerebri: A rare, aggressive type of malignant brain tumor. Cancerous glial cells infiltrate various parts of the brain and can result in a variety of symptoms.
  • Gliosarcoma: A type of brain tumor that originates from glial cells. The tumor may grow rapidly and symptom will vary depending on the exact location and size of the tumor.
  • Glomerulonephritis: Kidney disease where the kidney's have problems removing waste material and excessive fluid.
  • Glory lily poisoning: The glory lily is a type of vine which bears unusual yellow and red flowers. It is often used as an indoor and outdoor ornamental plant. The plant contains various chemicals that can cause serious symptoms if eaten. The roots are the most toxic part of the plant. The plant is considered very toxic and serious cases can result in death.
  • Glucosamine - adverse effects: Side effects may be associated with the use of glucosamine supplements.
  • Glucose-galactose malabsorption: An inherited metabolic disorder where the small intestine is unable to absorb and transport glucose and galactose that is consumed in the diet due to a lack of intestinal monosaccharidase.
  • Glénard syndrome: The downward displacement of internal organs.
  • Gnathostoma Infection: Infection with a type of round worm (Gnathostoma spinigerum and Gnathostoma hispidum). Infection typically occurs through eating undercooked fish or poultry containing the roundworm larvae or by drinking contaminated water. The symptoms are determined by which tissues the worms migrate through. The worms tend to migrate mainly through the skin.
  • Gnathostoma hispidum infection: A tapeworm infection with a tapeworm species called Gnathostoma hispidum. The infection is called gnathostomiasis and usually results from eating undercooked contaminated fish or poultry or drinking contaminated water. The nature and severity of symptoms vary depending on which part of the body the tapeworms migrate through (usually the skin).
  • Gnathostoma spinigerum infection: A tapeworm infection with a tapeworm species called Gnathostoma spinigerum. The infection is called gnathostomiasis and usually results from eating undercooked contaminated fish or poultry or drinking contaminated water. The nature and severity of symptoms vary depending on which part of the body the tapeworms migrate through (usually the skin).
  • Golden Chain tree poisoning: The Golden Chain tree is a relatively small tree which produces bright yellow flowers. The plant contains a chemical called cytisine which can cause similar effects to nicotine if ingested and can be serious if patients have underlying health problems. All parts of the plant are poisonous if sufficient quantities are consumed.
  • Golden hurricane lily poisoning: The golden hurricane lily is a bulbous herb with strappy leaves and bright yellow flowers on the end of a long stem. It is often used as an ornamental plant in gardens. The bulb of the plant contains a chemical called lycorine which can cause symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Gonionemus poisoning: Gonionemus is a type of hydrozoan jellyfish which can deliver a venomous sting. The sting can cause various combinations of skin, respiratory and joint and pain symptoms. In mild cases, only the skin is affected. Stings most often occur in the Northern hemisphere - especially Japanese and Russian waters.
  • Gonorrhea: Common sexually transmitted disease often without symptoms.
  • Goodpasture syndrome: A rare disease involving inflammation of membranes in the lung and kidneys.
  • Graft-versus-host disease - acute: A rare condition that occurs in people with a poor immune system who undergo a bone marrow transplant or blood transfusion.
  • Granulomatous amebic encephalitis: Brain/CNS infection from Acanthamoeba bacteria
  • Green gill mushroom poisoning: Green gill is a type of mushroom with a smooth cap and white gills eventually turning greenish. The mushroom is commonly found growing naturally in the US. This mushroom is very poisonous and causes severe gastrointestinal symptoms. Severe poisoning can lead to death due to complications such as dehydration and electrolyte imbalance.
  • HELLP syndrome: A rare potentially fatal condition that occurs in pregnant women and is frequently associated with pre-eclampsia.
  • HIV/AIDS: HIV is a sexually transmitted virus and AIDS is the progressive immune failure that HIV causes.
  • Halm-Munk syndrome: A rare inherited disorder involving red, thickened patches of skin on the palms and soles, skin infections and nail and teeth abnormalities.
  • Hangover: Condition following excessive alcohol consumption.
  • Hantavirosis: Infection by hantavirus which is a virus from the family Bunyaviridae. Infection generally causes severe febrile illness which can involve bleeding, shock and even death in some cases. The disease is transmitted by infected rodents.
  • Hantavirus: A genus of viruses from the family Bunyaviridae
  • Hawaiian Baby Woodrose poisoning: The Hawaiian Baby Woodrose is a woody vine that grows in tropical climates such as in Hawaii, India, Florida and California. The plant bears rose-colored flowers and black seeds. The seeds contain ergoline alkaloids which can produce effects similar to LSD if consumed. As little as three seeds can cause symptoms.
  • Head Cancer: A malignancy that occurs on the head
  • Head Conditions: Conditions that affect the head
  • Head injury: An injury to the head
  • Headache-free migraine: A syndrome with no headache but other migraine-like symptoms
  • Heart attack: Serious and often fatal acute heart condition
  • Helicobacter cinaedi infection: Helicobacter cinaedi is a food borne bacterial infection which may cause mild to severe gastroenteritis.
  • Helicobacter fenneliae infection: Helicobacter fenneliae is a food borne bacterial infection which may cause mild to severe gastroenteritis.
  • Helicobacter pylori bacteria: A bacteria that can infect the gastrointestinal system
  • Heliotrope poisoning: The Heliotrope is a herbaceous plant which bears small white, purple or blue flowers. The plant can be found growing in the wild and is also used indoors and outdoors as an ornamental plant. The leaves contain chemicals which can cause symptoms if eaten or skin irritation upon skin exposure. The plant is considered to have a low level of toxicity and large amounts would have to be eaten to cause symptoms. The leaves are sometimes used to make a tea.
  • Hemangioblastoma: A benign tumor that tends to occur in the central nervous system such as the brain and spinal cord. The tumor arises from the stem cells that develop into blood vessels or blood cells (hemangioblasts). Symptoms vary depending on the exact location and size of the tumor.
  • Hemorragic fever with renal syndrome: A group of infectious diseases that involve bleeding, fever and kidney problems. Examples of viruses that can cause such infectious diseases include Hantan virus, Puumala virus and Seoul virus. Examples of diseases caused by viruses in this group includes epidemic nephritis, Hantaan fever and Songo fever. The virus is usually transmitted to human by rodents or biting insects such as mosquitos. The severity and range of symptoms is determined by the particular virus involved.
  • Hepatic Venoocclusive Disease with immunodeficiency: An inherited disorder characterized by the association of immunodeficiency and liver disease involving the blockage of small veins in the liver due to swelling and fibrosis.
  • Hepatic encephalopathy syndrome: A rare syndrome involving the association of advanced liver disease and neurological problems.
  • Hepatitis: Any type of liver inflammation or infection.
  • Hepatitis A: Contagious viral infection of the liver
  • Hepatitis B: Viral liver infection spread by sex or body fluids.
  • Hepatitis C: Viral liver infection spread by blood.
  • Hepatitis D: Viral liver infection occurring in association with HepB.
  • Hepatitis E: Viral liver infection.
  • Hepatitis X: Hepatitis infection by an unknown virus not classified as HepA/B/C/D/E.
  • Hepatitis X (non-A,-B,-C,-D,-E): Viral liver inflammation that cannot be determined to be one of the existing types of viral hepatitis - A,B,C,D and E.
  • Hepatotoxicity: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a drug, chemical or other agent. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction - Cascara Sagrada: Cascara Sagrada can be used as a herbal agent used as a laxative. The herbal agent contains a chemical called antrhaquinone glycoside and may result in an adverse reaction.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction - Chaparral: Chaparral can be used as a herbal agent to treat abdominal cramps, pain and acne. The herbal agent contains a chemical called NDGA which can cause an adverse reaction in some people. Skin contact can also result in dermatitis. Patients with preexisting liver or kidney conditions are particularly susceptible to an adverse reaction to the herbal agent.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction - Echinacea: Echinacea can be used as a herbal agent to treat arthritis, vaginal yeast infections, cold and flu as well as infections involving the respiratory system, urinary tract and skin. The herbal agent can produce and adverse reaction in some people.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction - Ginkgo biloba: Ginkgo biloba can be used as a herbal agent to treat conditions such as tinnitus, brain trauma, vertigo, blood vessel diseases and any other problems which benefit from the blood vessel dilating action of the herbal agent. Ginkgo biloba can cause adverse reactions in some people.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction - Margosa oil: Margosa oil can be used as a herbal agent to treat parasitic infestations. The herbal agent contains various chemicals which can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction - Passion Flower: Passion Flower can be used as a herbal agent to treat insomnia, nerve painand anxiety. The herbal agent contains various chemicals which can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction - Pennyroyal Oil: Pennyroyal Oil can be used as a herbal agent to treat delayed menstruation and as an insect repellent. The herbal agent can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction - Polygonum multiflorum: The root from the Polygonum multiflorum can be used as a herbal agent to treat constipation, insomnia and vertigo. The herbal agent contains anthraquinones which can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction - Sassafras Oil: Sassafras Oil can be used as a herbal agent to treat skin irritation such as insect bites. The herbal agent contains a chemical called safrole which can cause harmful effects if ingested .
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction - Senna: Senna can be used to treat constipation or to prepare the colon for a rectal examination. The herbal agent can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Herbal Agent overdose - Ajuga Nipponensis Makino: Ajuga Nipponensis Makino can be used as a herbal agent used to control inflammation and coughing, to support liver function and is also used as a diuretic. The herbal agent contains chemicals such as cyasterone and ajugasterone and the ingestion of excessive amounts of these can result in symptoms. The main symptoms are gastrointestinal and urinary-related.
  • Herbal Agent overdose - Arnica Flower: Arnica Flower can be used as a herbal agent used to topically for such things as bruises, hematomas and contusions. The herbal agent contains chemicals such as flavonoid glycoside, coumarin and sesquiterpene lactone. Ingestion of the herbal agent can result in overdose symptoms. The symptoms are mainly gastrointestinal. The herbal agent should not be used on broken skin.
  • Herbal Agent overdose - Autumn Crocus: Autumn crocus can be used as a herbal agent to treat gout and rheumatoid conditions. The herbal agent contains chemicals such as colchicine and the ingestion of excessive amounts of this can result in symptoms. Severe overdose can result in death and chronic ingestion can also cause harmful effects.
  • Herbal Agent overdose - Buckthorn Bark: Buckthorn Bark can be used as a herbal agent used as a laxative. The herbal agent contains a chemical called frangulin and the ingestion of excessive amounts of these can result in unwanted symptoms. Chronic use can affect the electrolyte balance in the body.
  • Herbal Agent overdose - Catnip: Catnip can be used as a herbal agent to treat diarrhea, fever, menstrual cramps and for sedation. The herbal agent contains a chemical called nepetalactone and tannins. The ingestion of excessive amounts of these can result in nervous system symptoms and hallucinations.
  • Herbal Agent overdose - Feverfew: Feverfew can be used as a herbal agent to treat menstrual discomfort, fever and migraines. The herbal agent contains a chemical called parthenolide which can cause an adverse reaction in some people and various gastrointestinal symptoms if excessive quantities are taken. It may also cause bleeding problems in patients on blood thinning drugs.
  • Herbal Agent overdose - Garlic: Garlic can be used as a herbal agent to treat cholesterol problems, high blood pressure and to reduce inflammation and the risk of blood clots. The bulb of the garlic plant contain alliin and ajoene which can cause an adverse reaction in some people or various symptoms if excessive amounts are ingested.
  • Herbal Agent overdose - Germanium: Germanium is used as a health food supplement mainly in Japan but it can cause various problems if too much is taken. Chronic use and the ingestion of a large amount at one time can result in overdose symptoms.
  • Herbal Agent overdose - Golden Seal: Golden seal can be used as a herbal agent to treat a variety of conditions - bleeding after birth, mucosal inflammation, constipation, hemorrhoids. The herbal agent contains chemicals (alkaloid hydrastine, berberine) which can cause various symptoms if excessive quantities are taken.
  • Herbal Agent overdose - Horse Chestnuts: Horse Chestnuts can be used as a herbal agent to treat varicose veins, improve blood circulation through veins and to prevent fluid buildup following operations. The herbal agent contains a chemical called aesculin which can cause various symptoms if excessive quantities are taken. As little as one seed can cause symptoms such as headache and vomiting in some people.
  • Herbal Agent overdose - Kombucha: Kombucha can be used as a herbal agent to treat insomnia, arthritis, aches, high blood pressure and to improve the immune system. The ingestion of excessive amounts of Kombucha can result in overdose symptoms.
  • Herbal Agent overdose - Lobelia: Lobelia can be used as a herbal agent to treat respiratory congestion, muscle spasms and to assist in quitting smoking. The herbal agent contains a certain chemicals which can imitate the effects of nicotine but which can cause various symptoms if excessive quantities are taken.
  • Herbal Agent overdose - Nutmeg: Nutmeg can be used as a herbal agent to treat delayed menstruation. The herbal agent can cause various overdose symptoms if excessive quantities are taken.
  • Herbal Agent overdose - Peppermint Oil: Peppermint Oil can be used as an antispasmodic (to treat nausea, dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome) and as an antibacterial. The herbal agent contains various chemicals (menthol, menthone, methyl acetate) which can cause symptoms if excessive quantities are taken.
  • Herbal Agent overdose - Pygeum africanum: Pygeum africanum can be used as a herbal agent to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia. The herbal agent can cause gastrointestinal symptoms if excessive quantities are taken.
  • Herbal Agent overdose - Rue: Rue can be used to induce abortion, as a topical insect repellant or to treat spasms and delayed menstruation. The herbal agent contains chemicals (alkaloids, arborine, arborinine) which can cause various symptoms if excessive quantities are taken.
  • Herbal Agent overdose - St John's Wort: St John's Wort can be used to treat depression, stress, insomnia, anxiety and as a topical treatment for vitiligo and wounds. The herbal agent contains a chemical called xanthone which can cause symptoms if excessive doses are taken.
  • Herbal Agent overdose - Ting Kung Teng: Ting Kung Teng can be used as a herbal agent to treat arthritis and musculoskeletal problems. The herbal agent contains chemicals which can cause various symptoms if excessive quantities are taken.
  • Herbal Agent overdose - Wormwood: Wormwood can be used to treat worm infestations and as a sedative or hair tonic. The herbal agent contains chemicals which can cause various symptoms if excessive quantities are taken.
  • Hercules' Club poisoning: the Hercules' Club is a small deciduous, prickly tree which bears groups of white flowers and black berries. The bark, roots and unripe berries can cause symptoms if ingested. Skin irritation can occur from skin contact with the bark or roots. The ripe berries are safe to eat.
  • Hereditary angioedema, type 1: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. Symptoms can last for up to five days with usually weeks between episodes. Type I is the most common type and is due to the reduced production of C1 inhibitor proteins. Episodes can be triggered by emotional or physical stress but can occur spontaneously.
  • Hereditary angioedema, type 2: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. Symptoms can last for up to five days with usually weeks between episodes. Type 2 is due to defective C1 inhibitor proteins which are present at normal levels.
  • Hereditary angioedema, type III: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. Symptoms can last for up to five days with usually weeks between episodes. Type 3 is due to a defect in Coagulation factor XII rather than a deficient or dysfunctional C1 (complex blood protein) as in types 1 and 2. This type is exacerbated by increased estrogen levels which can be caused by pregnancy or oral contraception. The severity of the disorder is variable with some patients only suffering episodes during pregnancy or after starting oral contraception. In other cases, adolescence triggered episodes
  • Hereditary pancreatitis: A rare inherited condition involving recurring bouts of pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas) often leading to chronic pancreatitis due to scarring of the pancreas.
  • Heroin dependence: The physical and psychological dependence to the recreational drug heroin
  • Heroin withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when heroin use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Herring poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some herrings contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the herring does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The herrings are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Heterophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear or aversion to heterosexuals.
  • Hexakosioihexekontahexaphobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of the number 666.
  • High altitude cerebral edema: Brain condition related to high altitude.
  • Hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of long words.
  • Hobo spider poisoning: The Hobo spider is a type of funnel web spider which can deliver a painful bite. Their bite can cause localized tissue necrosis which can take a long time to heal. Systemic symptoms may occur in severe cases but this is rare.
  • Hodgkin's Disease: A form of cancer that affects the lymphatic system.
  • Holly poisoning: The Holly is an evergreen tree whose glossy green leaves have spiny edges. They bear a bright red or sometimes yellow berry. The berries are mildly toxic and eating large quantities can cause gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • Hookworm: Worm spread through feces with poor sanitation.
  • Horse nettle poisoning: Horse nettle is a herbaceous plant which has prickles and bears yellow berries. The berries contain solanin alkaloids which can cause symptoms if eaten in large quantities. It is often found growing in the wild in many parts of the world. Death is considered possible if large amounts are eaten, especially in children.
  • Horseradish poisoning: Horseradish is a herb which has a long thick root. It is often found in gardens. The roots contain a chemical called glucosinolate which can cause symptoms if large quantities are eaten. Eating small quantities of the root is considered harmless. The safest way to eat the root is to eat small amounts of young roots. Cooking the roots destroys the toxicity of the chemical.
  • Horseshoe Crab poisoning: The Asiatic horseshoe crab is eaten mainly in parts of Asia. Various parts of the crab become toxic during the reproductive season - flesh, unlaid green eggs and viscera. Poisoning most often occurs in Thailand. Eating the crabs should be avoided during reproductive season as poisoning can readily result in death.
  • Hot pepper poisoning: Hot pepper is a plant which bears small, elongated fruit which can be red, green or yellow. The fruit and leaves contain chemicals such as capsaicin and can cause severe skin, eye and mouth irritation. Eating large amounts can also cause gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • Human granulocytic ehrlichiosis: A rare infectious condition caused by infection with a type of bacteria called Ehrlichia (Anaplasma phagocytophilia) which attack granulocytes (a type of white blood cell). The infection is transmitted by the deer and American dog tick.
  • Human monocytic ehrlichiosis: A rare infectious condition caused by infection with a type of bacteria called Ehrlichia (Ehrlichia chaffeensis) which attack monocytes(a type of white blood cell). The infection is transmitted by the Lone Star and American dog tick.
  • Hyacinth poisoning: The Hyacinth is a bulb plant which bears stalks of colored, funnel-shaped flowers. The plant contains alkaloids such as lycorine which can cause symptoms if ingested. Large amounts need to be eaten to cause toxicity and skin exposure can cause irritation.
  • Hydrangea poisoning: The hydrangea is a beautiful flowering plant. The buds, flowers and leaves contains a chemical called amygdalin which can cause symptoms if ingested. Skin irritation can also occur upon skin exposure.
  • Hydrocephalus: A rare condition where the normal flow of cerebrospinal fluid is impaired by dilated brain ventricles which causes the fluid to accumulate in the skull and hence result in increased brain pressure.
  • Hydrocodone withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Hydrocodone use is discontinued or reduced. Hydrocodone is pain-killing drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence. Symptoms are usually peak during the second day and last about a week.
  • Hyperadrenalism: Excessive levels of adrenal hormones in the body. Symptoms depend on which hormone is involved and the degree of involvement. Adrenal hormones are aldosterone, corticosteroids, androgenic steroids, epinephrine and norepinephrine.
  • Hypercalcemia: Raised level of calcium in the blood
  • Hyperglycemia: High levels of glucose in the blood
  • Hyperoxia: A high level of oxygen in body tissues. It can be caused by exposure to high atmospheric pressure or long term inhalation of high oxygen concentrations. The high levels of oxygen may affect the lungs, nervous system or the eyes and thus can result in varying symptoms.
  • Hyperparathyroidism: Increased secretion of parathyroid hormone from the parathyroid glands.
  • Hyperparathyroidism, primary: A rare genetic disorder where excessive activity of the parathyroid gland causes increased blood calcium levels which can cause various problems.
  • Hypertensive heart disease: Heart disease that is caused by hypertension
  • Hypnophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of sleep or being hypnotized.
  • Hypokalemia: Low levels of potassium in the body.
  • Hypokalemic periodic paralysis: A rare inherited muscle condition characterized by periods of severe muscle weakness or paralysis which can last from hours to days. Episodes can occur as often as daily or only rarely.
  • Hypomagnesemia primary: Low blood magnesium levels which is caused by the abnormal absorption and excretion of the mineral and can be caused by such things as kidney problems and intestinal malabsorption.
  • Hyponatremia: An electrolyte disturbance involving low sodium levels in the blood. Symptoms are determined by the degree of imbalance. Very low sodium levels can cause water intoxication which can be very dangerous.
  • Ichthyocrinotoxication: Poisoning that occurs through ingestion of toxic glandular skin secretions of certain fish (moray eel, toadfish, lamprey, hagfish, pufferfish, trunkfish and porcupine fish).
  • Ichthyohepatotoxication: Ichthyohepatotoxication is a condition caused by eating the liver of certain fish. It is believed that the high vitamin A content of the liver leads to vitamin A overdose and the resulting symptoms. Tropical shark livers are associated with this condition.
  • Idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome: A rare blood disorder where the bone marrow produces too many eosinophils over a long period of time which can cause organ or tissue damage. The disorder can affect and part of the body but most often affects the skin, heart and nervous system. The increased eosinophil production continues for a long period of time (at least 6 months) and there is no apparent cause.
  • Increased intracranial pressure: Increased pressure inside the skull due to brain swelling or fluid accumulation
  • Indian Tobacco poisoning: The Indian Tobacco plant contains alkaloids such as lobeline which can result in similar effects to nicotine. The plant is sometimes used in herbal preparations which is usually how poisoning occurs.
  • Indigestion: Various eating symptoms of indigestion (dyspepsia)
  • Inflammatory bowel disease: Any type of digestive condition caused by bowel inflammation.
  • Insect sting allergies: When a person has an allergic reaction at the site of an insect sting
  • Intestinal Conditions: Conditions that affect the intestines
  • Intestinal Flu: Sudden onset, generally short-lived infection of the gastrointestinal tract; may be caused by viruses, bacteria or protozoa
  • Intestinal pseudo-obstruction: A digestive disorder where the intestines are unable to contract normally and push food through the digestive system. This results in symptoms similar to an obstruction and hence the name pseudo-obstruction. The walls of the affected gastrointestinal tract becomes thin and the muscles that control its motion start to degenerate.
  • Intracranial Hemorrhages: Bleeding inside the skull. The condition is a medical emergency and the greater the bleeding, the more severe the condition.
  • Intracranial arachnoid cysts: A rare disorder involving a fluid-filled cysts on the arachnoid membrane which is one of the thin layers of tissue that form a membrane which covers the brain. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the size and location of the cyst.
  • Intracranial germ cell tumour: A brain tumor that arises from germ (sex) cells. This type of tumor tends to occur in patients under the age of 30, usually in the second decade. Symptoms depend on the size, exact location and rate of growth of the tumor.
  • Invasive group A Streptococcal disease: Infection with Group A Streptococcal bacteria
  • Iris poisoning: The iris is a common flowering plant that grows from rhizomes or bulbs. The rhizomes or bulbs contain a toxic chemical called irisin which can cause various symptoms if ingested. Irises are considered to have low toxicity and skin irritation upon skin exposure is usually mild.
  • Irish potato poisoning: The common potato is an edible root. However, the potato sprouts and green skin in old potatoes contain chemicals such as solanine which can cause symptoms if eaten. Severe cases can result in death but this is relatively rare.
  • Iron poisoning: Excessive ingestion of iron - often occurs when children ingest adult iron tablets.
  • Iron supplements - adverse effects: The use of iron supplements can cause various adverse effects.
  • Irritable bowel syndrome: Spasms in the colon wall
  • Japanese Boxwood poisoning: The Japanese boxwood is an evergreen, woody, flowering shrub often used as a hedge. The leaves contain steroidal alkaloids which can cause skin irritation upon skin contact with the sap or various other symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Japanese andromeda poisoning: An evergreen flowering shrub originating from Asia. The leaves and flower nectar contain a chemical called andromedotoxin which is highly toxic. Ingesting the leaves or nectar can result in death as the plant is considered highly toxic.
  • Japanese aucuba poisoning: Japanese aucuba is shrub which bears green and yellow mottled leaves, small flowers and a bright red or sometimes yellow berries. The fruit and leaves of the plant contain a chemical called aucubin which can cause symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Japanese encephalitis: A form of encephalitis caused by a flavivirus (Japanese B encephalitis virus - JBEV) and transmitted by mosquito bites. Most cases are mild and asymptomatic but severe cases can lead to death.
  • Japanese pagoda tree poisoning: A deciduous tree which bears clusters of fragrant, pea-like flowers. The plant originated in China and is often used as an ornamental tree. The seeds contain a chemical which can cause symptoms if eaten. The seeds are considered to have a low level of toxicity.
  • Japanese poinsettia poisoning: The Japanese poinsettia is a shrubby plant with thick, succulent, green stems. The flowers form on the ends of the branches and are red. The plant is often used indoors and outdoors as an ornamental plant. The sap from the plant contains diterpene esters which can cause symptoms if eaten. Skin contact with the sap can also cause skin irritation. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Jaundice: Bile or liver problem causing yellowness.
  • Jessamine poisoning: Jessamine is an evergreen shrub which bears aromatic flowers and small white or purplish berries. It is often utilized as a houseplant or grown in gardens. The unripe berries contain various alkaloids which can be toxic if large quantities of the berries are eaten.
  • Jimsonweed poisoning: The Jimsonweed is a herb that bears single large white or lavender flowers and seeds surrounded by a spiny shell. The plant contains tropane alkaloids (mainly the seeds and leaves) which can cause symptoms if eaten in large quantities.
  • Jonquil poisoning: The Jonquil is a pretty flowering bulb plant. The bulb contains phenanthridine alkaloids and calcium oxalate crystals which can cause symptoms if ingested. Generally, toxicity only occurs if large quantities are eaten. Severe skin irritation can occur upon skin contact.
  • Judeophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of Jews.
  • Juniper tar poisoning: Tar from the Juniper plant is sometimes used to treat skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis. Ingestion of the substance can cause poisoning symptoms.
  • Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma: A type of brain tumor that occurs in children and young adults. The tumor is derived from a type of cell called an astrocyte and it can occur in various parts of the brain as well as the optic pathways and the spinal cord. Malignancy is rare. Symptoms may vary depending on the size and location of the tumor.
  • Kaposi sarcoma, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated form: A form of cancer caused by a type of herpesvirus that occurs mainly in the skin but may also occur in lymph nodes, internal organs and mucosal areas. The AIDS-associated form is aggressive and tends to occur mainly on the face, genitals and lower extremities with internal organs often being involved as well. Symptoms depend on the extent of internal organ involvement.
  • Kentucky coffee tea poisoning: Kentucky coffee tea is a large, deciduous tree which bear small flowers and a flattened seed pod. The sticky, sweet substance surrounding the seeds in the seedpods contains a chemical called alkaloid cytosine which can cause symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Kidney failure: Total failure of the kidneys to filter waste
  • Kidney stones: Stone-like calcium deposits in the kidney.
  • King Cobra poisoning: The King Cobra is a large venomous snake usually found in southeast Asia and India. Most bites from this snake results in envenomation due to the ferocity of their bite. The poison primarily affects the neuromuscular system but can also affect blood clotting.
  • Labrynthitis: Inner ear condition affecting various ear structures
  • Labyrinthitis syndrome: A temporary condition which affects the inner ear workings and impairs hearing. It is often caused by an upper respiratory infection.
  • Lachanophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of vegetables.
  • Lactic Acidosis: Acidic blood (acidosis) due to buildup of lactate
  • Lactose Intolerance: Inability to properly digest lactose (milk sugar) and related dairy products
  • Latex allergies: When a person has an allergic reaction to latex
  • Laxative abuse syndrome: Chronic overuse of laxatives resulting in various gastrointestinal symptoms. The condition is considered a variant of Munchausen syndrome.
  • Lead poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to lead.
  • Leatherwood poisoning: Leatherwood is a shrubby plant which bears elongated clusters of flowers. The plant is usually found growing in the wild. The plant contains resin which can cause symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity. Skin irritation can also result from skin exposure.
  • Legionella adelaidensis infection: Legionella adelaidensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella anisa infection: Legionella anisa is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella beliardensis infection: Legionella beliardensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella birminghamensis infection: Legionella birminghamensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella bozemanii infection: Legionella bozemanii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella bruneiensis infection: Legionella bruneiensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella brunensis infection: Legionella brunensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella busanensis infection: Legionella busanensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella cherrii infection: Legionella cherrii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella cincinnatiensis infection: Legionella cincinnatiensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella donaldsonii infection: Legionella donaldsonii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella donaldsonil infection: Legionella donaldsonil is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella drancourtii infection: Legionella drancourtii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella drozanskii infection: Legionella drozanskii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella dumofii infection: Legionella dumofii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella erythra infection: Legionella erythra is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella fairfieldensis infection: Legionella fairfieldensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella fallonii infection: Legionella falloni is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella feelei infection: Legionella feelei is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella feeleii infection: Legionella feeleii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella gesstiana infection: Legionella gesstiana is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella gormanii infection: Legionella micdadei is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella gratiana infection: Legionella gratiana is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella gresilensis infection: Legionella gresilensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella hackeliae infection: Legionella hackeliae is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella impletisoli infection: Legionella impletisoli is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella isrealensis infection: Legionella isrealensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella jamestowniensis infection: Legionella jamestowniensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella jordanis infection: Legionella jordanis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella lansingensis infection: Legionella lansingensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella londinensis infection: Legionella londinensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella longbeachae infection: Legionella longbeachae is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment, especially potting mixes and compost. Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella lytica infection: Legionella lytica is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella maceachemii infection: Legionella maceachemii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella maceachernii infection: Legionella maceachernii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella micdadei infection: Legionella micdadei is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella monrovica infection: Legionella monrovica is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella moravica infection: Legionella moravica is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella nautarum infection: Legionella nautarum is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella oakridgensis infection: Legionella oakridgensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella parisiensis infection: Legionella parisiensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella quateirensis infection: Legionella quateirensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella quinlivanii infection: Legionella quinlivanii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella rowbothamii infection: Legionella rowbothamii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella rubrilucens infection: Legionella rubrilucens is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella sainthelensi infection: Legionella sainthelensi is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella santicrucis infection: Legionella santicrucis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella shakespearei infection: Legionella shakespearei is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella spiritensis infection: Legionella spiritensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella steigerwaltii infection: Legionella steigerwaltii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella tauriensis infection: Legionella tauriensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella tusconensis infection: Legionella tucsonensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella wadsorthii infection: Legionella wadsorthii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella wadsworthii infection: Legionella wadsworthii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella waltersii infection: Legionella moravica is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella worsliensis infection: Legionella worsliensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella yabuuchiae infection: Legionella yabuuchiae is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionnaires' disease: A severe respiratory disease which is caused by the Legionella pneumophila bacteria. The condition can result in pneumonia and can be life-threatening.
  • Lemierre's syndrome: A very rare condition where a throat infection leads to secondary infection and blood clot formation in the internal jugular vein. The infected blood clot can then travel to other parts of the body and cause problems. The usual bacterial culprit is Fusobacterium necrophorum.
  • Lenten rose poisoning: Lenten rose is a herbaceous plant which has light-colored flowers which become purple as they age. The plant is often found in gardens. The plant contains a chemical called protoanemonin which can cause various symptoms if large quantities are eaten. Skin irritation can also result from skin exposure.
  • Lepidopterism: A systemic illness caused by contact with certain poisonous caterpillar spines or urticating hairs.
  • Lidocaine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Lily-of-the-Valley poisoning: Lily-of-the-Valley is a plant often grown in gardens. The plant contains cardiac glycosides (convallamatian, convallarin) and saponins which can cause poisoning symptoms if eaten. Large amounts would need to be eaten to cause poisoning symptoms. Cardiovascular symptoms usually occur a few hours after gastrointestinal symptoms. The biggest danger of eating this plant is the effects on the heart which can cause serious problems in patients with underlying heart conditions.
  • Lionfish poisoning: The Lionfish is a venomous bottom-dwelling fish which is found in the Pacific and Indian Oceans. Symptoms tend to abate after 8 to 12 hours.
  • Lipoproteine lipase deficiency: A rare inherited inborn error of metabolism involving the absence of the enzyme called lipoprotein lipase which results in increased blood triglyeride and chylomicron levels.
  • Liposarcoma: A form of malignant mesenchymal tumour usually occurring in the thigh
  • Listeriosis: Bacterial food poisoning
  • Liver abscess: Pus in the liver
  • Liver cancer: Cancer of the liver.
  • Lizard poisoning: A few lizard species are venomous e.g. Gila monster and Mexican beaded lizard. Envenomation by lizards is very uncommon but these venomous lizards can cause life-threatening symptoms. Gila lizards tend to hold on with their jaws while biting and the longer the jaws remain attached to the skin, the more severe the poisoning may be.
  • Lobelia poisoning: Lobelia is a herbaceous plant which bears elongated shafts of small blue, white or red flowers. The plant contains alkaloids such as lobeline which can result in similar effects to nicotine. The plant is sometimes used in herbal preparations which is usually how poisoning occurs.
  • Lortab overdose: Lortab is a prescription drug used to treat. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Lortab withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Lortab use is discontinued or reduced. Lortab is a pain-killer and cough reliever. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence. Symptoms are usually peak during the second day and last about a week.
  • Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis: Rodent-borne viral disease often causing meningitis or encephalitis
  • Lymphoma, Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue: Malignancies that occur in the lymphoid tissue found in mucosal linings (MALT) e.g. gastrointestinal tract, skin and lungs. Symptoms may vary considerably depending on which organs are involved but usually the stomach is involved. A significant portion of patients suffering from MALTomas also have autoimmune diseases.
  • Lysteria monocytoigeneses meningitis: A very rare form of meningitis (bacterial infection of the brain membrane or meninges) caused by Listeria monocytogenes. The condition is more common in the elderly and those with poor immune system and death is common.
  • Magic lily poisoning: The Magic lily is a bulbous plant which has long, narrow leaves and large scented flowers on long stems. The flowers are often grown in gardens. The bulb of the plant contains an alkaloid chemical called lycorine which can cause symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity if eaten.
  • Maidenhair tree poisoning: Maidenhair tree is a deciduous tree which bear fan-shaped leaves and green to yellow-brown fruit. The ripe fruit has a revolting smell. The fruit and the raw seed kernels contain chemicals which can cause symptoms if large quantities are eaten. Skin irritation can result form skin exposure in sensitive people. The seeds are edible if properly prepared - washed and boiled or roasted.
  • Mal de debarquement: Imbalance that occurs after being exposed to motion such as on a boat. It differs to normal motion sickness in that symptoms can last months or even years and may be quite debilitating.
  • Malaria: A parasitic disease transmitted through mosquito bites.
  • Malignant Jaundice: Jaundice due to an obstruction or blockage in one of the bile ducts by a tumor. Bile ducts are vessels which carry bile from the liver to the digestive system or gallbladder.
  • Malignant germ cell tumor: Malignant tumors that are made up of germ cells which are immature cells that eventually become reproductive system tissues in males and females. The symptoms depend on the location of the tumor which may occur in the ovaries, testes or anywhere along the body's midline such as the chest, head, abdomen, pelvis and lower back.
  • Malignant obstructive biliary disease: Obstruction or blockage in one of the bile ducts by a tumor. Bile ducts are vessels which carry bile from the liver to the digestive system or gallbladder. Jaundice is usually one of the main symptoms.
  • Mango poisoning: The Mango tree grows in tropical areas and produces an edible fruit. However, the plant contains chemicals called anacardic acid, cardol and anacardol which can cause and allergic contact dermatitis. The fruit skin, sap and shell contain the chemicals.
  • Marburg virus: Serious virus related to Ebola.
  • Marijuana abuse: Illicit depressant/hallucinogenic drug
  • Marine turtle poisoning: Marine turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning - Green Sea Turtle: Green Sea turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning - Hawksbill Turtle: Hawksbill turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning - Leatherback Turtle: Leatherback turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning - Loggerhead Turtle: Loggerhead turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marine turtle poisoning - Soft-shelled Turtle: Soft-shelled turtles are found and eaten in the rivers and coastal waters of Southeast Asia. It is believed that sometimes these turtles become poisonous when the eat toxic algae which occur at certain times of the year. Symptoms vary in nature and severity amongst patients - obviously the more that is eaten, the more severe the symptoms are.
  • Marsh marigold poisoning: Marsh marigold is a low growing plant with rounded leaves and small yellow flowers. The plant can be found growing in the wild or in gardens. The leaves from the plant contain a chemical called protoanemonin which can cause symptoms if large quantities are eaten. The young leaves are actually edible if they are boiled with frequent changes of water.
  • Mastitis: Infected breast common in nursing mothers
  • Mastocytosis: A disorder where excessive amounts of mast cells proliferate in organs such as the skin, liver, bone, spleen and gastrointestinal tract. Mast cells occur in connective tissue and defend the body against disease by releasing histamine to stimulate the immune system.
  • Mayapple poisoning: The Mayapple is a small flowering plant which is often found growing naturally. It bears small single flowers and apple-like fruit which turns yellow when ripe. The unripe fruit and leaves contain a chemical called podophyllin which can cause poisoning if eaten. The plant is considered highly toxic and death can occur if sufficient quantities are eaten. The leaves, roots and unripe fruit are toxic but the ripe fruit is edible. The plant has been used to treat venereal warts.
  • Mayaro fever: Infection with a type of virus (Mayaro virus) transmitted by mosquito bites. The disease is most common in South America. The incubation period is one to two weeks.
  • Meadows syndrome: A rare condition that affects pregnant women during the last trimester or within two months after birth. It is characterized by breathing difficult, chest pain, congestive heart failure, heart rhythm abnormalities, high blood pressure, gastrointestinal symptoms and embolisms.
  • Mechanical obstruction: occurs whenever movement through the intestine is blocked temporarily
  • Meconium plug syndrome: A condition that can occur in newborns where a mass of thickened meconium obstructs the large intestines. The condition may occur as a result of other disorders such as cystic fibrosis, colon atresia, narrowed colon, impaired intestinal motility (Hirschsprung disease) or for no apparent reason. Often, bowel function returns to normal once the meconium plug is passed from the body.
  • Medulloblastoma: A type of brain tumor.
  • Meningitis: Dangerous infection of the membranes surrounding the brain.
  • Meningococcal disease: Dangerous bacterial infection causing meningitis or bacteremia.
  • Mercury poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to mercury.
  • Mesenteric Adenitis: Swollen abdominal lymph nodes
  • Mesothelioma, adult malignant: A rare type of malignant cancer that occurs in the pleura (chest lining) or peritoneum (abdominal lining). The cancer develops in people who have inhaled asbestos fibres. Symptoms tend to occur many years or even decades after the exposure.
  • Mesothelioma, adult malignant - peritoneal: A rare type of malignant cancer that occurs in the peritoneum (abdominal lining). The cancer develops in people who have inhaled asbestos fibers. Symptoms tend to occur many years or even decades after the exposure.
  • Metal Fume Fever - Aluminium: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of aluminium oxide fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever - Antimony: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of antimony fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever - Cadmium: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of cadmium fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever - Chromium: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of chromium fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever - Copper: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of copper fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever - Iron: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of iron fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever - Magnesium: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of magnesium fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever - Manganese: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of manganese fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever - Nickel: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of nickel fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever - Selenium: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of selenium fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever - Silver: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of silver fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever - Tin: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of tin fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever - Zinc: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of zinc fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal fume fever: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of iron oxide fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to a metal (usually ingestion). Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure.
  • Methahemoglobinemia: Excess methahemoglobin in the blood
  • Methamphetamine overdose: Methamphetamine is a prescription drug mainly used to treat ADHD . Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Mexican Beaded Lizard poisoning: Gila lizards are one of the few venomous species of lizard. They are found in parts of America such as Arizona, California, Nevada and Mexico. Envenomation by lizards is very uncommon but these venomous lizards can cause life-threatening symptoms. Gila lizards tend to hold on with their jaws while biting and the longer the jaws remain attached to the skin, the more severe the poisoning may be.
  • Mexican tea poisoning: Mexican tea is plant that bears elongated clusters of small green flowers and small greenish fruit which contain seeds which are green when fresh and black when dry. The plant has a strong odor. The oil in the seeds contain chemicals (including terpene peroxide ascaride) which are very poisonous and cause death if sufficient quantities are eaten. The oil from the seeds is often used to control worm infestations in livestock.
  • Migraine: Chronic recurring headaches with or without a preceding aura.
  • Migraine with aura, susceptibility to, 9: A form of migraine caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 5q21. Physical activity can exacerbate symptoms. The headaches can last between 4 hours and 3 days.
  • Migraine with or without aura, susceptibility to, 1: A form of migraine caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 4q24. Physical activity can exacerbate symptoms. The headaches usually last between 4 hours and 3 days.
  • Migraine with or without aura, susceptibility to, 10: A form of migraine caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 17p13. Physical activity can exacerbate symptoms. The headaches can last between 4 hours and 3 days.
  • Migraine with or without aura, susceptibility to, 11: A form of migraine caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 18q12. Physical activity can exacerbate symptoms.
  • Migraine with or without aura, susceptibility to, 2: A form of migraine caused by a genetic defect on chromosome Xq. Physical activity can exacerbate symptoms. The headaches can last between 4 hours and 3 days.
  • Migraine with or without aura, susceptibility to, 3: A form of migraine caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.2-p12.2. Physical activity can exacerbate symptoms. The headaches tend to last for more than twelve hours and can occur as often as weekly and as rarely as yearly.
  • Migraine with or without aura, susceptibility to, 4: A form of migraine caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 14q21.2-q22.3. Physical activity can exacerbate symptoms. The headaches can last between 4 hours and 3 days.
  • Migraine with or without aura, susceptibility to, 5: A form of migraine caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 19p13. Physical activity can exacerbate symptoms. The headaches can last between 4 hours and 3 days.
  • Migraine with or without aura, susceptibility to, 6: A form of migraine caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 1q31. Physical activity can exacerbate symptoms.
  • Migraine with or without aura, susceptibility to, 7: A form of migraine caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 15q11.2-q12. Physical activity can exacerbate symptoms. The headaches can last between 4 hours and 3 days.
  • Migraine with or without aura, susceptibility to, 8: A form of migraine caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 5q21. Physical activity can exacerbate symptoms.
  • Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Mild brain injury caused by trauma, accident or injury
  • Milkbush poisoning: The milkbush is an unusual succulent bush which has green branches with groups of leaves at the top of the branches. It originates from Africa and India. The sap contains diterpene which can cause symptoms if eaten or skin irritation if skin exposure occurs. The plant is considered to have a low level of toxicity if eaten.
  • Milkweed poisoning: The milkweed is a flowering herb which bears clusters of red, orange or yellow flowers. The plant contains chemicals (resinoids, cardiac glycosides) which are toxic if large quantities are ingested.
  • Misogynism: An exaggerated or irrational fear or dislike of females.
  • Misogyny: An exaggerated or irrational fear or dislike of women.
  • Misophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of dirt or being contaminated by dirt or germs.
  • Misosophy: An exaggerated or irrational fear of wisdom.
  • Mistletoe poisoning: The mistletoe is an evergreen shrub that tends to grow on tree branches. It produces white berries which contain amines. The berries can cause poisoning if eaten in large quantities. Eating more than 20 berries or 5 leaves is likely to cause symptoms and patients should seek medical attention. Reported poisoning usually occur from drinking teas or extracts made from the plant.
  • Mitochondrial diseases: Any of a group of mitochondrial disorders affecting cell metabolism and especially muscles.
  • Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy syndrome: A rare genetic disorder which affects a number of body systems and manifests results in symptoms such as droopy eyelids, progressive eye muscle weakness, gastrointestinal dysmotility, brain disease, thin body, peripheral neuropathy and muscle disease.
  • Mixed connective tissue disease: A rare disorder of the connective tissue which affects a range of body tissues and organs.
  • Moccasin snake poisoning: The Moccasin snake is a poisonous snake found mainly in America and Asia. Moccasin snakes include the copperhead, cottonmouth and the Siberian, Central Asian and Malayan pit vipers. They are considered less venomous than rattlesnakes The snake venom contains toxins which affect the blood and tissues rather than the nervous system. Children tend to suffer more severe symptoms due to their smaller body size. Rapid swelling of the skin around the site of the bite is a sign of a more severe poisoning.
  • Mohave Rattle snake poisoning: The Mohave rattle snake is a poisonous snake found mainly in Mexico and south-western areas of the US. The type of venom in Mohave snakes varies amongst species. Those with Type A venom tend to affect the nervous system whereas those with Type B venom primarily affect the blood and tissues. Type A tends to be more toxic than type B. Children tend to suffer more severe symptoms due to their smaller body size.
  • Molysomophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of infection.
  • Monopathophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of sickness.
  • Monophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of being alone. Sufferers may also fear being away from a particular place or person who makes them feel safe. An underlying anxiety disorder is generally involved.
  • Morning Glory poisoning: The morning glory is a flowering vine with heart-shaped leaves that originates from tropical areas of America. The seeds contain chemicals (indole alkaloids, LSD) which can cause symptoms if eaten. The seeds are considered to have a low level of toxicity.
  • Morning sickness: Pregnancy-related nausea or vomiting, usually in mornings.
  • Morphine overdose: Morphine is a highly addictive drug used to treat pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Morphine withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Morphine use is discontinued or reduced. Morphine is a pain-killing drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence. Symptoms are usually the most severe between 36 and 72 hours after withdrawal and symptoms tend to abate within a week. Craving may persist for months.
  • Mosquito-borne diseases: Diseases that are carried by the mosquito
  • Motion sickness: Nausea from any type of motion or travel
  • Mountain Laurel poisoning: The mountain laurel is a large evergreen shrub which bears clusters of small flowers. The plant contains chemicals (andromedotoxin, arbutin) which can cause poisoning symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered highly toxic if ingested. The level of toxicity varies amongst species but it is unlikely that eating less than three leaves or flowers would cause symptoms.
  • Mountain andromeda poisoning: The Mountain Andromeda is an evergreen flowering shrub bearing elongated clusters of white flowers. The leaves and flower nectar contain a chemical called andromedotoxin which is highly toxic. Ingesting the leaves or nectar can result in death as the plant is considered highly toxic.
  • Mountain sickness: Illness from poor adjustment to low oxygen at altitude.
  • Mucormycosis: An infectious disease caused by fungus from the order Mucorales which is normally found in the soil and in decaying plant matter. Transmission is usually through the inhalation of spores. It is generally harmless to healthy individuals but can cause infection in patients who are immunocompromised or who have a serious chronic illness such as uncontrolled diabetes. Symptoms and severity can vary considerable depending on the part of the body the infection occurs in - gastrointestinal tract, skin, lungs, central nervous system, eye orbit and the paranasal sinuses.
  • Multiple Myeloma: A rare malignant cancer that occurs in the bone marrow. More common in skull, spine, rib cage, pelvis and legs.
  • Multiple endocrine neoplasia: A group of conditions that is characterised by the hyperplasia and hyperfunction of two or more glands of the endocrine system
  • Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1: Rare inherited disease causing tumors in multiple glands
  • Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2: Rare inherited disease causing tumors in multiple glands
  • Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 3: Rare inherited disease causing tumors in multiple glands
  • Muscle contraction headache: Headache from tension or muscle contraction.
  • Musicophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear or dislike of music.
  • Musophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of mice and rats.
  • Mustard tree poisoning: The mustard tree is found in various parts of America and contains nicotine. Ingestion of the plant can cause various symptoms. The leaves of the plant is sometimes smoked for its effects but it can result in death.
  • Mycotoxin-induced liver damage - Aflatoxin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a mycotoxin called Aflatoxin which is a toxin produced by some Aspergillus fungus. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. The toxin is also know to increase the risk of developing liver cancer.
  • Mycotoxin-induced liver damage - Cyclochlorotine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a Mycotoxin called Cyclochlorotine which is a toxin produced by a particular fungus (Penicillium islandicum). Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. The toxin is also know to increase the risk of developing liver cancer.
  • Mycotoxin-induced liver damage - Luteoskyrins: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a Mycotoxin called Luteoskyrin which is a toxin produced by a particular fungus (Penicillium islandicum). Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. The toxin is also know to increase the risk of developing liver cancer.
  • Mycotoxin-induced liver damage - Ochratoxin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a Mycotoxin called Ochratoxin. Ochratoxin is a toxin produced by a particular fungus (Aspergillus ochraceus and Penicillium verrucosum). It is a relatively common food contaminant and can be found in mouldy grain, pork, coffee and dried grapes. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. The toxin is also know to increase the risk of developing liver cancer.
  • Mycotoxin-induced liver damage - Rubratoxin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a Mycotoxin called Rubratoxin. Rubratoxin is a toxin produced by a particular fungus (Penicillium rubrum and purpurogenum) which is most commonly found on cereal grains. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. The toxin is also know to increase the risk of developing liver cancer.
  • Mycotoxin-induced liver damage - Sterigmatocystin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a Mycotoxin called Sterigmatocystin. It is a toxin produced by a particular fungus (Aspergillus). Sterigmatocystin may also increase the risk of developing liver cancer. Most likely sources of exposure are foods such as wheat, maize, hard cheese and green coffee beans contaminated with mould. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. The toxin is also know to increase the risk of developing liver cancer.
  • Mythophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of making false or incorrect statements.
  • Myxophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear or dislike of slime.
  • Ménétrier's disease: Rare chronic disease with excessive growth of skin folds in the stomach.
  • Naegleria: Rare bacterial infection from contaminated water
  • Naked brimcap poisoning: Naked brimcap is a brown mushroom which becomes slimy when wet and is covered in thin hairs. The mushroom is often found growing in the wild in the US. This mushroom is poisonous and can lead to death if sufficient quantities are eaten. They are considered less toxic if cooked. This mushroom is unusual in that some people are able to eat them if they are cooked for a long time without any ill effect and can then develop a condition called immune hemolysis (where the body's immune system attacks it's own red blood cells).
  • Nasopharyngeal carcinoma: A malignant cancer that occurs in the nasopharynx area which is the upper part of the throat. Often there are no symptoms until the cancer has metastasized to other parts of the body such as the neck.
  • Necrophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of death or corpses.
  • Nefazodone toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Negrophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of African Americans.
  • Neophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of new things.
  • Nephophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of clouds.
  • Neuroectodermal tumors primitive: A type of brain tumor that consists of small round cells and is believed to originate from primitive nerve cells in the brain. Symptoms are determined by the exact location of the tumor.
  • Neurofibromatosis, familial intestinal: A rare type of familial tumor that arises from intestinal nerves.
  • Niacin toxicity: Excessive consumption of niacin can cause symptoms of toxicity.
  • Noctiphobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of the night.
  • Non functioning pancreatic endocrine tumor: A tumor of the pancreas that does not result in an increased hormone production but can cause symptoms when the tumor becomes big enough to push against other structures. The tumor may be malignant or benign.
  • Nonulcer dyspepsia: Persistent indigestion not caused by a peptic ulcer.
  • Norwalk gastroenteritis: A viral (Norwalk virus) infection that is transmitted through fecal-oral contact which can happen through eating contaminated food or drinking contaminated water. Symptoms are usually relatively mild. The incubation period is 18-72 hours.
  • Norwalk-like viruses: Several shellfish or oyster-associated gastro-causing viruses related to Norwalk or caliciviruses.
  • Nosophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of contracting a disease.
  • Nudophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of nudity.
  • Nychtophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of darkness or the night.
  • OHSS: Excessive stimulation of the ovaries that usually occurs as a complication of in vitro fertilization but may also occur spontaneously. The degree of excessive ovarian stimulation may vary from mild to severe.
  • Oak poisoning: The oak is a large tree which has distinctive leaves and bears acorns. The acorns and young leaves contain chemicals (gallotannins, quercitrin and quercitin) which can cause symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a low level of toxicity. The nuts are edible if the tannins have been leached out.
  • Obstructive biliary disease: A disease process that causes obstruction or blockage in one of the bile ducts which are vessels that carry bile from the liver to the digestive system or gallbladder. Diseases that can cause such obstructions includes tumors, gallstones, parasites, bile duct inflammation, trauma to the bile duct and biliary strictures.
  • Occupational liver damage - 1,1,1-Tetrachloroethane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to 1,1,1-Tetrachloroethane in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - 1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to 1,1,2-Tetrachloroethane in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - 1,2-Dibromoethane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to 1,2-Dibromoethane in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - 1,2-Dichloroethane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to 1,2-Dichloroethane@ in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - 2-Nitropropane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to 2-Nitropropane in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - 2-acetylamino-fluorene: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to 2-acetylamino-fluorene in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - 3,3-Dichlorobenzidine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to 3,3-Dichlorobenzidine and all its salts in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - 4-Dimethylaminoazobenzene: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to 4-Dimethylaminoazobenzene in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Acetates: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to various Acetates in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Acetonitrile: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Acetonitrile in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Acrylonitrile: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Acrylonitrile in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Alcohol: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to alcohol in an occupational (industrial) setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Alicyclic Hydrocarbons: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to alicyclic hydrocarbons in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Aliphatic Amines: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Aliphatic Amines in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Aliphatic Hydrocarbons: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to certain aliphatic hydrocarbons in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Aliphatic hydrogenated hydrocarbons: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to aliphatic hydrogenated hydrocarbons in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Allyl alcohol: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to allyl alcohol in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Amyl acetate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Amyl acetate in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to certain Aromatic Hydrocarbons in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Aromatic amines: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to certain aromatic amines (e.g. 2-acetylamino-fluorene) in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Aromatic halogenated hydrocarbons: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to certain aromatic halogenated hydrocarbons in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Arsenic: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to arsenic in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Arsine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Arsine in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Benzene: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Benzene in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Benzyl chloride: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Benzyl chloride in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Beryllium: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to beryllium in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Beta-Propiolactone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Beta-Propiolactone in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Bipyridyl pesticides: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Bipyridyl pesticides in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Bismuth: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to bismuth and bismuth compounds in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Boron: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to boron and boron compounds in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Boron hydrides: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Boron hydride in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Bromide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Bromide in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Cadmium: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Cadmium and Cadmium compounds in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Carbolic Acids and Anhydrides: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to carbolic acids and anhydrides in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Carbon Disulfide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Carbon Disulfide in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Carbon tetrachloride: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Carbon tetrachloride in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Carbonyls (metal): Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Carbonyls (metal) in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Chlorinated benzenes: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Chlorinated benzenes in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Chlorinated naphthalenes: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Chlorinated naphthalenes in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Chlorodiphenyls and derivatives: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Chlorodiphenyls and derivatives in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Chloroform: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to chloroform in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Chloroprene: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to chloroprene in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Chromium: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to chromium and chromium compounds in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Copper: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to copper in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Cresol: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Cresol in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Cyclopropane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to cyclopropane in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Dibromochloropropane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Dibromochloropropane in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Dimethyl sulfate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Dimethyl sulfate in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Dimethylnitrosamine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Dimethylnitrosamine in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Dinitrobenzene: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Dinitrobenzene in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Dinitrophenol: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Dinitrophenol in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Dinitrotoluene: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Dinitrotoluene in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Diphenyl: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Diphenyl in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Ethanolamines: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Ethanolamines in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Ethyl Acetate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Ethyl Acetate in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Ethyl Ether: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to ethyl ether in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Ethyl Salicylate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Ethyl Salicylate in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Ethyl alcohol: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to ethyl alcohol in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Ethylene Dibromide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Ethylene Dibromide in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Ethylene chlorohydrin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to ethylene chlorohydrin in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Ethylene dichloride: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Ethylene dichloride in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Ethylene oxide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Ethylene oxide in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Ethylenediamine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Ethylenediamine in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Germanium: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Germanium in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Hydrazine and derivatives: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Hydrazine and its derivatives in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Hydrogen Cyanide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Hydrogen Cyanide in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Hydrogen bromides: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Hydrogen bromides in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Ionizing radiation: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Ionizing radiation in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Iron: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Iron in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Isopropyl acetate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Isopropyl acetate in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Kepone pesticides: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Kepone pesticides in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Mercaptans: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Mercaptans in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Methyl Bromide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Methyl Bromide in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Methyl Chloride: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Methyl Chloride in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Methyl acetate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Methyl acetate in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Methylene chloride: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Methylene chloride in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Methylene dianiline: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Methylene dianiline in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - N,N-Dimethylformamide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to N,N-Dimethylformamide in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - N-N-Dimethylacetamide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to N-N-Dimethylacetamide in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - N-Nitrosodimethylamine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to N-Nitrosodimethylamine in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - N-butyl acetate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to N-butyl acetate in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - N-propyl acetate: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to N-propyl acetate in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Naphthalene: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Naphthalene in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Naphthol: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Naphthol in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Nickel: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to nickel and nickel compounds in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Nitriles: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to certain nitriles in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Nitrobenzene: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Nitrobenzene in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Nitromethane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Nitromethane in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Nitroparaffins: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Nitroparaffins in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Nitrophenol: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Nitrophenol in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Phenol: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Phenol in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Phosphine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Phosphine in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Phosphorus: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Phosphorus in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Phthalic Anhydride: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to phthalic anhydride in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Picric Acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Picric Acid in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Polybrominated biphenyls: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Polybrominated biphenyls in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Polychlorinated biphenyls: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Polychlorinated biphenyls in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Propylene dichloride: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Propylene dichloride in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Pyridine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Pyridine in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Pyrogallol: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Pyrogallol in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Selenium: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to selenium and selenium compounds in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Stibine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Stibine in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Styrene/ethyl benzene: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Styrene/ethyl benzene in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Tetrachloroethane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Tetrachloroethane@ in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Tetrachloroethylene: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Tetrachloroethylene in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Tetramethylthiuram disulfide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Tetramethylthiuram disulfide in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Tetryl: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Tetryl in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Thallium: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Thallium and Thallium compounds in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Thallium sulfate pesticides: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Thallium sulfate pesticides in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Thorium dioxide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Thorium dioxide (Thorotrast) in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Tin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to tin and tin compounds in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Toluene: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Toluene in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Trichloroethylene: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Trichloroethylene in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Trinitrotoluene: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Trinitrotoluene in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Turpentine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Turpentine in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Uranium: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Uranium@ in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Vinyl Chloride: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Vinyl Chloride in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Whole body vibration: Damage or injury to the liver caused by whole body vibration in an occupational setting. This often occurs when operating equipment which cause constant physical vibration such as occurs when driving off-road vehicles or forklifts. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - Xylene: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Xylene in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational liver damage - n-Heptane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to n-Heptane in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms. Occupational liver damage is considered relatively uncommon due to current safe industrial practices.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Antimony: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to antimony in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Arsenic: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to arsenic in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Barium: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to barium in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Beryllium: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to beryllium in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Bismuth: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to bismuth in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Boranes: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to boranes in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Boron: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to boron in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Cadmium: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Cadmium in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Chromium: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to chromium in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Cobalt: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to Cobalt in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Copper: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to copper in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Germanium: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to germanium in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Gold: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to gold in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Hafnium: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to hafnium in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Halides: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to halides in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Hydrazines: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to hydrazines in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Iron: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to iron in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Lanthanides: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to Lanthanides in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Lead: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to lead in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Manganese: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to manganese in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Mercury: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to mercury in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Molybdenum: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to molybdenum in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Nickel: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to nickel in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Niobium: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to niobium in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Phosphorus: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to phosphorus in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Selenium: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to selenium in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Tellurium: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to tellurium in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Thallium: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to thallium in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure.
  • Occupational metal-induced liver damage - Tin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to tin in an occupational setting. Often other organs and tissues are also affected but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure.
  • Ochlophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of crowds.
  • Ochophophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of vehicles.
  • Odontophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of teeth. The fear is usually associated with animal's teeth.
  • Odynophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of pain.
  • Oecophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear or dislike of home surroundings.
  • Oenophobia: An exaggerated or irrational dislike or hatred of wine.
  • Oesophagostomiasis: A parasitic intestinal infection caused by a nematode called Oesophagostomum bifurcum. The parasite commonly infects monkeys, goats, cattle, sheep and pigs. The infection is relatively rare in humans but is most commonly found in northern Togo and Ghana. Transmission usually occurs through oral contact with contaminated soil.
  • Ogilvie's syndrome: A rare gastrointestinal disorder where the peristaltic action of the colon is absent which prevents fecal matter from passing through.
  • Oikophobia: An exaggerated or irrational dislike or fear of home surroundings.
  • Oinophobia: An exaggerated or irrational dislike or hatred of wine.
  • Oleander poisoning: The oleander is a flowering shrub or small tree which bears clusters of flowers. The plant originated from Eurasia and is often used as an ornamental plant. The plant contains chemicals (cardiac glycosides: nerioside, oleandroside; saponins) which are very toxic if ingested. The plant is considered highly toxic and can result in death if sufficient quantities are eaten. The toxicity within a species can vary depending on the season. As little as seven leaves have been reported to cause poisoning symptoms. Poisoning can occur from inhaling smoke from burning oleander leaves.
  • Olfactophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear or dislike of smells.
  • Ombrophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of rain or being rained on.
  • Ommetaphobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of eyes.
  • Onomatophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of a certain name or words due to their supposed importance.
  • Ophibiophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of snakes.
  • Ophidophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of snakes.
  • Opioid withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when opioid use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence. Opioids includes heroin, methadone and codeine.
  • Opium withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Opium use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Opoid withdrawal:
  • Optic pathway glioma: A type of tumor that arises in the optic nerve which sends messages from the eye to the brain. These tumors tend to occur mainly in children under the age of 10. The tumor may affect the hormone center of the brain and hence can affect such things as growth and weight.
  • Orbit Tumour: Tumour growing in the eye socket (space behind or surrounding the eyeball); may be benign or malignant or due to secondary growth from another malignancy
  • Ornithophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of birds.
  • Orthostatic intolerance: A condition where various symptoms occur when a person moves to an upright position such as standing after sitting down or sitting up after lying down. It is due to problems with blood flow, blood pressure and heart rate.
  • Osmophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of odors.
  • Osphresiophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of odors.
  • Ostrich Fern poisoning: The Ostrich fern may cause gastrointestinal symptoms if eaten. The symptoms usually last a day.
  • Ovarian Cancer: Cancer of the ovaries.
  • Ovarian carcinosarcoma: A type of ovarian cancer.
  • Ovarian cysts: Cysts occurring in the ovaries.
  • Oxalosis: A rare inherited metabolic disorder where excess oxalic acid forms crystals which make up urinary stones. In type I primary hyperoxaluria there is a deficiency of peroxisomal alanine-glyoxalate aminotransferase and type II involves a deficiency of the enzyme glyoxylate reductase/hydroxypyruvate reductase.
  • Oxalosis, Type II: A rare inherited metabolic disorder where excess oxalic acid forms crystals which make up urinary stones. In type I primary hyperoxaluria there is a deficiency of the enzyme glyoxylate reductase/hydroxypyruvate reductase.
  • Oxalosis, type I: A rare inherited metabolic disorder where excess oxalic acid forms crystals which make up urinary stones. In type I primary hyperoxaluria there is a deficiency of alanine-glyoxalate aminotransferase.
  • OxyContin withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when OxyContin use is discontinued or reduced. OxyContin is a pain reliever but is also used as a recreation drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Oxycontin overdose: Oxycontin is a prescription drug mainly used to treat pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Pain: A feeling of suffering, agony, distress caused by the stimulation of pain fibres in the nervous system
  • Pancreatic abscess: A localized pus-filled cavity (abscess) in the pancreas which usually occurs after pancreatitis. Death can occur if the abscess is not drained.
  • Pancreatic adenoma: A pancreatic tumor which may be benign or malignant. Symptoms may vary depending on the location and size of the tumor as well as whether the tumor secretes hormones or not. For example, the tumor may block the biliary duct.
  • Pancreatic cancer: Cancer of the pancreas (usually digestive area).
  • Pancreatitis: Inflammation of the pancreas causing digestive complaints.
  • Panic attack: Sudden attack of unreasonable panic or fear without any real danger
  • Panic disorder: It is a severe medical condition characterized by extremely elevated mood.
  • Panphobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of everything or a generalized state of anxiety or fear not related to any one particular thing.
  • Papaphobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of the pope or papacy.
  • Papillary renal cell carcinoma: A type of kidney tumor characterized by the development of finger-like projections in at least some of the tumor. It can be inherited in a familial pattern or occur sporadically.
  • Papilledema: Swelling of the head of the optic nerve (optic disk) due to increased intracranial pressure.
  • Para-amino benzoic acid overuse: High doses of para-amino benzoic acid (member of the vitamin B family) cause symptoms.
  • Paralipophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of neglecting some duty or responsibility.
  • Paralytic shellfish poisoning: Rare food poisoning from eating contaminated shellfish
  • Paraphobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of sexual perversion.
  • Parasitophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of parasites.
  • Paraskavedekatriaphobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of Friday the 13th.
  • Parathyroid Cancer: A condition that is characterised by malignancy that affects the parathyroid
  • Parathyroid cancer, adult: A rare cancer that can occur in the parathyroid gland in adults. The parathyroid glands regulate body calcium levels so cancer of the gland upsets the body's calcium balance causing muscle, bone and other symptoms.
  • Paroxetine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Parthenophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of or aversion to young girls.
  • Pathophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of disease.
  • Peace lily poisoning: Peace lily is a herbaceous plant which has large tapering leaves and bears small flowers on a long stalk surrounded by a white spathe. The plant is often used indoors or outdoors as an ornamental plant. The plant contains calcium oxalate crystals which can be poisonous if large quantities are eaten.
  • Peach seed poisoning: Peach seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Most parts of the peach plant contain the toxic chemical with the highest concentration in young leaves.
  • Peanut allergies: A hypersensitive state that is due to exposure to an allergen contained in peanuts
  • Peccatiphobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of sinning.
  • Pediculophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of lice.
  • Pediophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear or dislike of children.
  • Peladophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of baldness.
  • Pelvic Cancer: Any malignancy that is located in the anatomical location of the pelvis
  • Pelvic Inflammatory Disease: Infection of the womb and fallopian tubes.
  • Pelvis conditions: Any condition that affects the pelvis
  • Peniaphobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of poverty.
  • Penicillin allergy: A hypersensitive state that is due to exposure to an allergen contained in penicillin
  • Pentheraphobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of mother-in-law.
  • Peptic Ulcer: Ulcer on the lining of the stomach or duodenum
  • Percocet overdose: Percocet is a prescription drug used to treat pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Percocet withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Percocet use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Perilymphatic fistula: An abnormal opening between the fluid-filled inner ear and air-filled middle ear. It generally causes sudden or fluctuating hearing loss.
  • Peritoneum cancer: A condition that is characterised by the location of a malignant lesion in the perineum
  • Peritoneum disorders: Any condition that affects the peritoneum
  • Pernettya poisoning: Pernettya is a shrubby plant found mainly in the southern parts of the world. It is often utilized as an ornamental shrub. The leaves, berries and flower nectar contain a chemical called andromedotoxin which can cause symptoms if eaten. Serious cases of poisoning can result in death.
  • Persian violet poisoning: The persian violet is a small flowering herb which bears red, pink or white scented flowers. It is often used as an ornamental indoor or outdoor plant or in floral arrangements. If large quantities of the root (rhizome) of the plant are eaten, poisoning symptoms can result. Skin contact with the roots can result in minor skin irritation. Poisoning is unlikely due to the bitter taste of the root.
  • Pesticide poisoning - Triazine: Triazine is a class of active ingredients used in certain algicides, fungicides and herbicides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Pfiesteria piscicida infection: Pfiesteria piscicida is a tiny marine organism called a dinoflagellate that is found in waters where fresh and salt water mix e.g. at river mouths. It is believed to be responsible for killing fish as well as health problems in humans.
  • Pfiesteria piscicida poisoning: Pfiesteria piscicida is an estuarine microorganism (dinoflagellate) that can cause illness in humans as well as fish. The particular toxin involved has not yet been identified. The microorganism may release toxins into the water or it may be aerosolized which can result in skin, eye and respiratory exposure. The condition is not contagious and they symptoms may vary considerably amongst patients.
  • Pfiesteria poisoning: Pfiesteria is an estuarine microorganism (dinoflagellate) that can cause illness in humans as well as fish. The particular toxin involved has not yet been identified. The microorganism may release toxins into the water or it may be aerosolized which can result in skin, eye and respiratory exposure. The condition is not contagious and they symptoms may vary considerably amongst patients.
  • Pfiesteria shumwayae poisoning: Pfiesteria shumwayae is an estuarine microorganism (dinoflagellate) that can cause illness in humans as well as fish. The particular toxin involved has not yet been identified. The microorganism may release toxins into the water or it may be aerosolized which can result in skin, eye and respiratory exposure. The condition is not contagious and they symptoms may vary considerably amongst patients.
  • Phagophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of eating.
  • Phalacrophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of becoming bald.
  • Phanmophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of specters or phantoms.
  • Pharmacophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of drugs.
  • Phasmophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of ghosts.
  • Pheasant's eye poisoning: Pheasant's eye is a flowering plant which has serrated leaves and beautiful flowers. The plant contains cardiac glycosides which can result in symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Phenogophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of daylight.
  • Phenophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of noise.
  • Phenylketonuria: A metabolic disorder where there is a deficiency of the enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase which leads to a harmful buildup of the phenylalanine in the body. Normally the phenylalanine is converted into tyrosine. The severity of the symptoms can range from severe enough to cause mental retardation to mild enough not to require treatment. Severity is determined by the level of impairment of enzyme activity of phenylalanine hydroxylase.
  • Pheochromocytoma: A rare tumor of the sympathetic nervous system which controls automatic body activities such as regulating breathing rate and heartbeat.
  • Pheochromocytoma as part of Neurofibromatosis: A tumor that develops in the part of the adrenal gland called the medulla which produces adrenalin and noradrenaline. This tumor is often associated with a condition called neurofibromatosis. The tumor affects automatic body activities such as regulating breathing rate and heartbeat.
  • Philosophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear or dislike of philosophers or philosophy.
  • Phobophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of fear.
  • Phonemophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of thinking.
  • Phonophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of noise.
  • Phosphoglycerate kinase 1 deficiency: An inherited genetic muscle disease where an enzyme deficiency (phosphoglycerate kinase) affects the normal processes that convert carbohydrates from food into energy.
  • Photalgiophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of eye pain caused by light.
  • Photophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of light.
  • Pinkroot poisoning: Pinkroot is a herbaceous plant which bears elongated flowers which are red on the outside and yellow on the inside. The plant can be found growing in the wild or in gardens. The plant contains a chemical called spigiline which can cause symptoms if eaten in large quantities.
  • Pituitary Cancer: Cancer of the pituitary gland.
  • Pituitary apoplexy: A rare disorder usually caused by bleeding or blood vessel blockage of a pituitary tumor. It causes symptoms such as headache, nausea, vision problems and altered consciousness.
  • Plant poisoning - Acetylandromedol: Acetylandromedol is a chemical found naturally in plants from the Ericaceae family which includes rhodendrons. Human poisoning can occur through eating honey made from pollen and nectar from these flowers or from eating other parts of the plant. The severity of symptoms may vary from mild to life-threatening depending on the amount consumed.
  • Plant poisoning - Aconitum: Aconitum is a toxin found in certain plants from the Aconitum genus e.g. Monkshood. It is a highly poisonous neurotoxin that affects the heart and other parts of the body. It can cause serious symptoms and even death in severe cases. The toxin can be absorbed through the skin to some degree.
  • Plant poisoning - Aesculin: Aesculin is a toxin found in horse chestnuts, California buckeye and in the resin from Daphne mezereum. The toxin causes gastrointestinal symptoms and neurological symptoms.
  • Plant poisoning - Amygdalin: Amygdalin is a chemical found naturally in various plants e.g. stone fruit kernels and raw almonds. Eating these parts of the plant that contain the chemical can cause symptoms of cyanide poisoning as the amygdalin is converted to cyanide by the digestive process. Obviously, the concentration of the chemical varies amongst species of plant and often, significant quantities are needed to produce symptoms. Nevertheless, severe poisoning can result in death. Amygdalin is believed by some to inhibit cancers but there has been no conclusive proof of this.
  • Plant poisoning - Andromedotoxin: Andromedotoxin is a toxin found naturally in plants such as aloe vera, senna, rhubarb and Cascara buckthorn. The main symptoms are gastrointestinal which can range in severity depending on the amount consumed. Severe cases can result in kidney damage and gastrointestinal bleeding.
  • Plant poisoning - Angel's trumpet (D. suaveolans): Ingestion of Angel's trumpet can cause various symptoms which can be severe in some cases.
  • Plant poisoning - Anthraquinone: Anthraquinone is a toxin found naturally in plants such as aloe vera, senna, rhubarb and Cascara buckthorn. The main symptoms are gastrointestinal which can range in severity depending on the amount consumed. Severe cases can result in kidney damage and gastrointestinal bleeding.
  • Plant poisoning - Castor bean (Ricinus communis): Ingestion of parts of the castor bean plant may cause severe symptoms.
  • Plant poisoning - Conline: Conline is a toxin found naturally in plants such as aloe vera, senna, rhubarb and Cascara buckthorn. The main symptoms are gastrointestinal which can range in severity depending on the amount consumed. Severe cases can result in kidney damage and gastrointestinal bleeding.
  • Plant poisoning - Cyanogenic glycoside: Cyanogenic glycoside is a toxin found naturally in various plants e.g. cherries, plums, almonds, peaches, apricots, apples and cassava. The chemical is usually concentrated in the seeds, kernels or wilted leaves. Eating these parts of the plant that contain the chemical can cause symptoms of cyanide poisoning as the cyanogenic glycoside is converted to cyanide by the digestive process. Even chewing the leaves can result in conversion to cyanide due to the presence of digestive enzymes in the mouth. Obviously, the concentration of the chemical varies amongst species of plant and often, significant quantities are needed to produce symptoms. Nevertheless, severe poisoning can result in death.
  • Plant poisoning - Cytisine: Cytisine is a chemical found naturally in plants from the Faboideae family e.g. Laburnum, Cytisus, Genista and Sophora. It tends to have an effect similar to nicotine.
  • Plant poisoning - Digitalis glycoside: Digitalis glycoside is a toxin found naturally in plants such as the foxglove. The main symptoms of relatively mild poisoning are gastrointestinal and the effect on the heart usually results in changes in heart rate. Serious cases can result in symptoms such as convulsions and hallucinations.
  • Plant poisoning - Euphorbiaceae: Euphorbiaceae is a family of flowering plants called spurges. They contain various chemicals (alkaloids, glycosides and diterpene ester) which can cause symptoms if ingested.
  • Plant poisoning - Grayanotoxin: Grayanotoxin is a chemical found naturally in plants from the Ericaceae family which includes rhodendrons. Human poisoning can occur through eating honey made from pollen and nectar from these flowers or from eating other parts of the plant. The severity of symptoms may vary from mild to life-threatening depending on the amount consumed.
  • Plant poisoning - Hydroquinone: Hydroquinone is a chemical metabolized by the human digestive system from a naturally occurring chemical called arbutin found in the leaves of plants such as blueberries, cranberries, bearberries and red whortleberries. The main symptoms are irritation of the gastrointestinal mucosa but severe poisoning can cause systemic symptoms.
  • Plant poisoning - Indole alkaloids: Indole alkaloids are a group of chemicals found naturally in plants such as snakeroot and Madagascar periwinkle. Specific indole alkaloids from this group are vinblastine, reserpine and vincristine.
  • Plant poisoning - Jimsonweed (Datura stramonium): Ingestion of Jimsonweed can cause various symptoms which can be severe in some cases.
  • Plant poisoning - Lantadene: Lantadene is a toxin found naturally in a plant called lantana camara. The chemical is toxic to the liver and can cause various symptoms if ingested. The green fruit and leaves are the most toxic parts of the plant.
  • Plant poisoning - Lobeline: Lobeline is a chemical found naturally in plants called lobelias. Ingesting plants containing the chemical produces symptoms similar to the effects of nicotine.
  • Plant poisoning - Nicotine alkaloids: Nicotine alkaloids is a chemical found naturally in plants such as the mustard tree. It produces symptoms similar to the effects of nicotine.
  • Plant poisoning - Protoanemonin: Protoanemonin is derived from a chemical called ranunculin found naturally in plants such as the buttercup. The main symptoms are gastrointestinal which can range in severity depending on the amount consumed. It leaves a bitter taste in the mouth so poisoning is very rare.
  • Plant poisoning - Pyrrolizidine alkaloids: Pyrrolizidine alkaloids is a toxin found naturally in plants such as comfrey. The main symptoms are gastrointestinal which can range in severity depending on the amount consumed.
  • Plant poisoning - Quinolizidine alkaloids: Quinolizidine alkaloids are chemicals found naturally in plants such as the scotch broom. The ingestion of plants containing these chemicals results mainly in nervous system symptoms. Examples of alkaloids from this group are: sparteine, lupanine, ;upinine, hydroxylupanine, spathulatine and thermopsine.
  • Plant poisoning - Rhodotoxin: Rhodotoxin is a chemical found naturally in rhodendrons. Human poisoning can occur through eating honey made from pollen and nectar from these flowers or from eating other parts of the plant. The severity of symptoms may vary from mild to life-threatening depending on the amount consumed.
  • Plant poisoning - Rosary pea (Abrus precatorious): Ingestion of parts of the Rosary pea plant may cause severe symptoms.
  • Plant poisoning - Saponin: Saponin is a toxin found naturally in plants such as the Christmas rose and carnations. It gives plants a bitter taste which makes poisoning relatively uncommon.
  • Plant poisoning - Solanine: Solanine is a toxin found naturally in plants from the nightshade family - potatoes, tomatoes, eggplant and capsicum. However, the content is usually quite low except for potatoes which have turned green on light exposure.
  • Plant poisoning - Tetranortriterpene: Tetranortriterpene is a toxin that occurs naturally in some plants (e.g. Chinaberry tree). It functions as a natural insect repellant but is toxic to the human nervous system. Ingesting plant parts with this chemical can cause poisoning symptoms.
  • Plant poisoning - Toxalbumin: Toxalbumin is a toxin found naturally in plants such as the castor bean. The severity of symptoms depends on the particular species of plant involved and the amount consumed. For example the toxalbumin called ricin found in castor beans is extremely toxic.
  • Plant poisoning - Veratum alkaloid: Veratum alkaloid is a chemical found in plants from the Veratum genus of plants (lilies). The chemical has blood pressure-reducing properties and the ingestion of high doses can cause problems.
  • Plant poisoning - Water hemlock (Cicuta sp.): Ingestion of parts of the water pea plant may cause severe symptoms.
  • Plant poisoning - daffodil (Narcissus pseudonarcissus): Accidental ingestion of daffodils can result in gastrointestinal irritation which is usually mild but can be severe.
  • Plant poisoning - holly (Ilex sp.): Accidental ingestion of holly can result in gastrointestinal irritation which is usually mild but can be severe.
  • Plant poisoning - mistletoe (Phoradendron serotinum): Accidental ingestion of mistletoe can result in gastrointestinal irritation which is usually mild but can be severe.
  • Plant poisoning - pokeweed (Phytolacca Americana): Accidental ingestion of pokeweed can result in gastrointestinal irritation which is usually mild but can be severe.
  • Plant poisoning - potato (Solanum tuberosum): Ingestion of green potatoes or potato sprouts can cause various symptoms which can be severe in some cases.
  • Plant toxin-induced liver damage - Albitocin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a toxin called albitocin found in certain plants. Often other organs and tissues are also affected by this toxin but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Plant toxin-induced liver damage - Cycasin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a toxin called cycasin found in certain plants. Often other organs and tissues are also affected by this toxin but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Plant toxin-induced liver damage - Icterogenin: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a toxin called Icterogenin found in certain plants. Often other organs and tissues are also affected by this toxin but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Plant toxin-induced liver damage - Indospicine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a toxin called Indospicine found in certain plants. Often other organs and tissues are also affected by this toxin but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Plant toxin-induced liver damage - Lanthana: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a toxin called Lanthana found in certain plants. Often other organs and tissues are also affected by this toxin but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Plant toxin-induced liver damage - Ngaione: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a toxin called Ngaione found in certain plants. Often other organs and tissues are also affected by this toxin but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Plant toxin-induced liver damage - Nutmeg: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a toxin called Nutmeg found in certain plants. Often other organs and tissues are also affected by this toxin but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Plant toxin-induced liver damage - Pyrrolidizine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a toxin called Pyrrolidizine found in certain plants. Often other organs and tissues are also affected by this toxin but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Plant toxin-induced liver damage - Safrole: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a toxin called Safrole found in certain plants. Often other organs and tissues are also affected by this toxin but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Plant toxin-induced liver damage - Tannic Acid: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a toxin called Tannic Acid found in certain plants. Often other organs and tissues are also affected by this toxin but only the liver toxicity symptoms are listed below. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Pneumatophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of spirits.
  • Pneumococcal meningitis: Meningitis that is caused by an infection from pneumococcal
  • Pneumococcal pneumonia: Lung pneumnoia from streptococcus bacteria.
  • Pnigophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of choking or smothering.
  • Pogonophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear or dislike of beards.
  • Poinephobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of punishment.
  • Poinsettia poisoning: The poinsettia is shrubby plant which bears large leaves with small flowers nestled in bright red large leaves. The plant contains diterpene esters in the sap which can cause symptoms if eaten or skin irritation if skin contact occurs. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Poison hemlock poisoning: Poison hemlock is a herbaceous plant which has a relatively large taproot and clusters of small white flowers. The plant if often found growing in the wild as a weed. The plant contains various alkaloid chemicals which can cause symptoms if eaten. Severe cases of poisoning can result in death.
  • Poisoning: The condition produced by poison
  • Polar bear poisoning: Polar bears are often used as a food source by the arctic inhabitants. Eating the liver and kidneys of the polar bear is believed to result in a Vitamin A overdose which can cause serious symptoms and even death in extreme cases. Eating more than 200 grams of Polar bear liver can result in human death however death is considered rare.
  • Politicophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear or dislike of politicians.
  • Pollen allergy: An allergic reaction that occurs due to exposure to pollen
  • Polyarteritis nodosa: A serious blood vessel disease where small and medium-sized arteries become swollen and damaged and are unable to adequately supply oxygenated blood to various tissues in the body. The disease can occur in a mild form or a serious, rapidly fatal form.
  • Polymer Fume Fever: Polymer fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of fumes which can occur when Polytetrafluoroethylene (commercially known as Fluon, Teflon and Halon) is heated to high temperatures. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the polymer industry.
  • Polyphobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of lots of things.
  • Ponophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of fatigue or exhaustion. It primarily relates to fear of fatigue associated with working too hard.
  • Popcorn tree poisoning: Popcorn tree is a deciduous tree which bears elongated clusters of yellowish fruit and seed capsules containing large whitish seeds. The plant can be found growing in the wild or in gardens. The sap from the plant and the unripe fruit contain chemicals which can cause gastrointestinal symptom if eaten or skin irritation upon skin exposure. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Porphyria: A group of disorders characterized by excess production of porphyrin or its precursors which affects the skin and/or nervous system.
  • Porphyria, Ala-D: A very rare inherited disorder where involving a lack of the enzyme delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase.
  • Porphyria, hereditary coproporphyria: An inherited disorder that affects the nervous system and sometimes the skin. It occurs when a metabolic disorder results in excessive production of coproporphyrins which accumulate in body tissues and is excreted in large amounts.
  • Portal thrombosis: Clotting or obstruction of blood flow along the veins from the intestines and spleen and into the liver. This causes blood to back up and results various problems such as enlarged spleen and abdominal pain. The obstruction can occur acutely (over a short space of time) or chronically (over a longer period of time).
  • Portal vein thrombosis: Clotting or obstruction of blood flow along the portal vein and into the liver. This causes blood to back up and results various problems such as enlarged spleen and abdominal pain. The obstruction can occur acutely (over a short space of time) or chronically (over a longer period of time). The portal vein collects blood from the intestines and spleen and carries it to the liver.
  • Posteriophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of falling behind.
  • Postoperative haemorrhage: The excessive loss of blood from an individual after an operation
  • Potamophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of rivers.
  • Potophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of drinks.
  • Pregnancy: The condition of supporting a fetus from conception till birth.
  • Primary sclerosing cholangitis: A rare progressive disorder involving inflammation and fibrosis of the bile ducts which carry bile from the liver.
  • Primary tubular proximal acidosis: A rare disorder where abnormal function of the proximal kidney tubules causes a buildup of acid in the body. The kidney abnormality is not due to any other disease, condition or injury.
  • Privet poisoning: Privet is a shrubby plant which bears elongated clusters of small white flowers and black berries. The plant can be found growing in the wild or in gardens. The berries contain chemicals (ligustrin, syringin and other glycosides) which can cause symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to be very toxic and death can result if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Protozoan Conditions: Any condition caused by the infection of the human being by a protozoan organism
  • Proximal Renal Tubular Acidosis: This is a condition that is characterised by a metabolic acidosis state caused by impairment of a persons renal function
  • Pseudomonas stutzeri infections: A bacterial infection found in soil and water environments.
  • Pseudotumor Cerebri: A condition involving increased intracranial pressure which can produce symptoms similar to a brain tumor.
  • Psittacosis: An infectious disease caused by Chlamydia psittaci and transmitted mainly by infected birds but also by some mammals.
  • Psychophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of the mind.
  • Psychotropic agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to psychotropic agents. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Psychotropic agent-induced liver damage - Benzodiazepine: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a psychotropic agent called benzodiazepine. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Psychotropic agent-induced liver damage - Butyrophenone: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a psychotropic agent called butyrophenone. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Psychotropic agent-induced liver damage - Phenothiazines: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a psychotropic agent called phenothiazine. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Psychotropic agent-induced liver damage - Thioxanthene: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a psychotropic agent called Thioxanthene. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Psychotropic agent-induced liver damage - monoamine oxidase inhibitors: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to psychotropic agents called monoamine oxidase inhibitors. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Psychotropic agent-induced liver damage - tricyclic antidepressant: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to a psychotropic agent called tricyclic antidepressant. Psychotropic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Psyllium - adverse effects: The use of psyllium as a diet supplement can cause adverse symptoms.
  • Pteronophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of feathers.
  • Ptomaine food poisoning: Food poisoning caused by toxic products from bacterial metabolism
  • Puss caterpillar poisoning: The puss caterpillar has hollow, poison-filled spines amongst the hairs along its body. It is found mainly in the southern states of the United states. It is often found feeding on trees such as elm, oak and sycamore. Contact with the poisonous spines can result in various symptoms. The puss caterpillar is one of the more poisonous stinging caterpillars. Children tend to be more severely affected than adults.
  • Pyelonephritis: Kidney and ureter infection usually bacterial from the bladder.
  • Pylephlebitis: A pus-producing inflammation of the wall of the portal vein that drains blood from the abdominal part of the gastrointestinal tract. The infection is often fatal. It usually occurs as a complication of abdominal or pelvic infections such as diverticulitis and appendicitis.
  • Pyrexiophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of fever.
  • Pyrophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of fire.
  • Q fever: A disease caused by Coxiella burnetti which causes fever, headache and muscle pain.
  • Rabies: An infectious disease that can affect any mammal including humans and is transmitted through the saliva of an infected animal. The infectious agent is the Neurotropic lyssavirus which affects the salivary gland and also causes neurological symptoms.
  • Radiation sickness: Illness from radiation exposure or cancer radiotherapy.
  • Rapid gastric emptying: Dumping of undigested food from the stomach into intestine.
  • Rattle snake poisoning: The Rattle snake is a poisonous snake found mainly in America. They are distinguished by a characteristic rattle at the tip of their tail.
  • Rectal conditions: Any condition that affects the rectum
  • Rectophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of the rectum.
  • Rectractile mesenteritis: A disorder involving the tissue that connects the small intestine to the back of the back of the abdominal wall (mesentery) and is characterized by infection and inflammation followed by fibrosis.
  • Red Whelk poisoning: Red Whelk are colorful, carnivorous snail found mainly in Britain and Japan. The salivary gland of some whelks contains tetramine which can cause symptoms in humans if eaten. Raw, cooked or canned whelk can cause poisoning. Red whelk have the highest concentration of toxins in the summer. Whelk is often used as fish bait.
  • Red buckeye poisoning: The red buckeye is a shrubby plant which bears a cluster of small red flowers and brown seeds with distinctive pale markings. The plant originated in the US. The seeds and leaves contain various chemicals (glycoside aesculin, saponin aescin and alkaloids) which can cause poisoning symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered very toxic and death can result in cases of severe poisoning.
  • Red spider lily poisoning: Red spider lily is a bulbous herb which has long, narrow leaves and long stems of yellow or red flowers. It is often used in gardens as an ornamental plant. The bulb contains a chemical called lycorine which can cause various symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity if eaten.
  • Red-berried elder poisoning: Red-berried elder is a deciduous shrub which bears tapered leaves, round clusters of small white flowers and small red berries. The plant contains cyanogenic glycoside which can cause various symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity. The stems of the plant are hollow and cases of poisoning has occurred in children who used these stems as whistles or peashooters.
  • Renal colic: Severe urinary system pain usually from a urinary stone
  • Renal infarction: The death of an area of tissue in the kidney due to a localized lack of oxygen. Usually results from an interruption in the blood supply. The severity of the symptoms depends on how large the affected part of the kidney is. Small infarcts can produce virtually no symptoms. The condition is relatively uncommon and frequently misdiagnosed.
  • Restrictive cardiomyopathy: A condition which is characterized by restriction to the function of the walls of the heart
  • Reye's Syndrome: A syndrome in children recovering from infection and associated with aspirin.
  • Rhabditida Infections: Infection with a parasitic worm from the order rhabditida. The symptoms are determined by the species involved.
  • Rhabdomyolysis: Skeletal muscle injury or death, which releases muscle fibres into the blood.
  • Rhabdophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of being punished severely. The term can also be used to describe a fear of being beaten with a rod of a fear of magic and the paranormal.
  • Rhinocerebral mucormycosis: A rare opportunistic infection that tends to occur mainly in the brain and sinuses. The condition is usually fatal and generally only affects immunocompromised people such as patients with leukemia, lymphoma or those that have had organ transplants or chemotherapy. The infectious agent is saprophytic fungi.
  • Rhinocerebral zygomycosis: An infectious disease caused by fungus from the orders Mucorales and Entomophthorales which are normally found in the soil and in decaying plant matter. The infection differs from mucormycosis which only involves the order Mucorales. Transmission is usually through the inhalation of spores. It is generally harmless to healthy individuals but can cause infection in patients who are immunocompromised or who have a serious chronic illness such as uncontrolled diabetes. Symptoms and severity can vary considerable depending on the part of the body the infection occurs in - gastrointestinal tract, skin, lungs, central nervous system, eye orbit and the paranasal sinuses. Rhinocerebral zygomycosis involves infection of the paranasal sinuses and the central nervous system.
  • Rhypophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of filth.
  • Right heart failure: Heart failure of the right side of the heart
  • Ringed seal poisoning: The Ringed seal is often used as a food source by the arctic inhabitants. Eating the liver of the ringed seal can result in a Vitamin A overdose which can cause serious symptoms and even death in extreme cases.
  • Ritalin overdose: Ritalin is a prescription drug used to treat ADHD. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Ritalin withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Ritalin use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Rocky Mountain spotted fever: A bacterial disease caused by Rickettsia rickettsii and transmitted by ticks. The condition causes fever and a characteristic rash and may be fatal in severe or untreated cases.
  • Rotavirus: Diarrhea-causing virus in infants.
  • Roux-en-Y syndrome: A complication that can occur following a gastric bypass surgery. Symptoms are usually worse after eating.
  • Russophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of Russians.
  • SIADH: Inappropriate release of Antidiuretic hormone, resulting in fluid retention.
  • Salmonella anatum infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which mainly causes gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella choleraesuis infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which mainly causes gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella enteritidis infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which mainly causes gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella heidelberg infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which mainly causes gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella hirschfeldii infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which mainly causes gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella newport infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which mainly causes gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella paratyphi A infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which mainly causes gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella schottmuelleri infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which mainly causes gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella typhi infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which mainly causes gastroenteritis. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Salmonella typhimurium infection: An infection caused by bacteria from the Salmonella genus which can result in gastroenteritis, fever or may be asymptomatic. Infection is caused by consuming contaminated food or drinks.
  • Sardine poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some sardines contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the sardines does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The sardines are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Scarlet pheasant's eye poisoning: Scarlet pheasant's eye is a flowering plant which has serrated leaves and beautiful flowers. The plant contains cardiac glycosides which can result in symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Scarletina (Scarlet Fever): Infection with a Group A streptococcus bacteria, which causes a characteristic sore throat and rash.
  • Sciophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of shadows.
  • Sclerosing Cholangitis: Chronic hereditary disease causing inflammation and destruction of the bile ducts in and around the liver with subsequent blockage to bile flow
  • Scoleciphobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of worms.
  • Scombroid fish poisoning syndrome: Poisoning caused by eating spoiled fish from the scromboid family which includes tuna, mackerel, skipjack, bonito and wahoo.
  • Scopophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of being looked at, stared at or being seen.
  • Scotch broom poisoning: Scotch broom is a shrubby plant with tall straight stems giving it a broom-like appearance. The plant has bright yellow, pea-like flowers and a flat seed pod. The plant can be found growing in the wild and in the gardens. The seeds, stems and leaves of the plant contain a chemical called quinolixidine which can cause symptoms if eaten. Serious cases of poisoning can result in death.
  • Scotophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of the dark.
  • Sea Hare poisoning: Certain species of sea hares can result in poisoning if eaten. Sea hares are marine mollusks. Two species with a potential for poisoning are found in Oceans near Fiji and Japan. Eating the eggs of these sea hares can also cause liver damage. Poisoning by sea hares is considered quite rare. The substance underlying the condition is organic bromine compounds.
  • Sea onion poisoning: Sea onion is a bulbous herb which has long narrow leaves and tall stems of small, usually white, flowers. The plant is often used indoors or outdoors as an ornamental plant. The plant contains cardiac glycoside which causes gastrointestinal symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity. Skin irritation can also result from skin exposure to the juice from the bulb.
  • Sea snake poisoning: The Sea snake is a poisonous snake found in the warmer western parts of the Pacific and Indian Ocean. Sea snakes have scales but not gills or fins so they still need to go to the surface of the water to breathe. Sea snake venom is particularly poisonous but their bite fails to achieve any significant envenomation. The venom is toxic to the nervous system and muscles.
  • Sea urchin poisoning: The gonads of sea urchins are eaten in some European and Indo-Pacific areas. These gonads are believed to produce a toxic chemical during their reproductive season. Ingestion of the toxic gonads can result in various symptom. Some people develop allergy symptoms following ingestion of the gonads.
  • Sea wasp poisoning: The sea wasp can deliver a serious sting and can be found in the waters of Northern Australia and the Philippines. Death can occur in as little as a few minutes if a person is severely stung.
  • Sea wasp poisoning (Chiropsalmus quadrigatus): The Chiropsalmus quadrigatus jellyfish can deliver a serious sting and can be found in the waters of Northern Australia and the Philippines. Death can occur in as little as a few minutes if a person is severely stung.
  • Sea wasp poisoning - Chironex fleckeri: The Chironex fleckeri jellyfish is one of the deadliest jellyfish in the world. It can deliver a serious sting and can be found mainly in the waters of Northern Australia and the Philippines. Death can occur in as little as a few minutes if a person is severely stung.
  • Secernentea Infections: Infection with a type of parasitic nematode (worm). The symptoms are highly variable depending on where the worm migrates to through out the body and which particular species is involved. Some examples of nematodes are Wuchereria, Spirurina, Mansonella, Drucunculus, Loa and Ascaris.
  • Secondary Bone Cancer: Tumour development in bone as a result of spread from a primary malignant tumour from another body site (usually lung bronchus, breast and prostate)
  • Sedative dependence: The psychological or physical dependence on sedative medication
  • Sei whale poisoning: The Sei whale is eaten in certain parts of Asia. Eating the liver of the Sei whale can cause poisoning symptoms in humans if sufficient quantities are consumed. It is believed that the poisoning results from the very high levels of vitamin A in the liver.
  • Selachophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of sharks.
  • Selaphobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear or dislike of flashes of light.
  • Selenium - overuse: Excessive use of selenium can case various adverse symptoms.
  • Selenium poisoning: Excessive exposure to selenium. Selenium is essential to the diet in small amounts but is toxic in large amounts. Poisoning can occur through inhalation or ingestion.
  • Senecio poisoning: Senicio is a herbaceous plant which bears groups of small, usually yellow flowers. The plant can be found growing in the wild and is also used indoors and outdoors as an ornamental plant. The leaves contain chemicals which can cause symptoms if eaten or skin irritation upon skin exposure. The plant is considered to have a low level of toxicity.
  • Sennetsu Fever: A rare infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Ehrlichia sennetsu.
  • Separated Rectus Abdominal Muscles: When there is separation of the rectus abdominal muscles
  • Serious digitalis intoxication: An adverse reaction to a drug called digitalis. The main symptoms involve heart and/or vision problems and death can occur in some cases.
  • Sheep laurel poisoning: Sheep laurel is a small shrub which bears clusters of small white or pink flowers and encapsulated fruit. The plant contains chemicals (andromedotoxin and arbutin) which can cause various symptoms if ingested. The plant is considered to be very toxic and death can result if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Shigella boydii infection: Shigella boydii is a species of bacteria from the Shigella genus. Infection with this bacteria causes diarrhea. The severity of the disease is variable depending on the underlying health of the individual - the young and old tend to be more severely affected. Infection usually occurs through the fecal-oral route. Infection can be transmitted between people unless appropriate hygiene measures are undertaken. Some infected patients are asymptomatic and are those more likely to transmit infection to other people.
  • Shigella dysenteriae infection: Shigella dysenteriae is a species of bacteria from the Shigella genus. Dysenteriae is the most common cause of epidemic dysentery in condensed populations such as refugee camps. Infection with this bacteria causes diarrhea. The severity of the disease is variable depending on the underlying health of the individual - the young and old tend to be more severely affected. Infection usually occurs through the fecal-oral route. Infection can be transmitted between people unless appropriate hygiene measures are undertaken. Some infected patients are asymptomatic and are those more likely to transmit infection to other people.
  • Shigella flexneri infection: Shigella flexneri is a species of bacteria from the Shigella genus. Flexneri is the most common cause of Shigellosis in the world. Infection with this bacteria causes diarrhea. The severity of the disease is variable depending on the underlying health of the individual - the young and old tend to be more severely affected. Infection usually occurs through the fecal-oral route. Infection can be transmitted between people unless appropriate hygiene measures are undertaken. Some infected patients are asymptomatic and are those more likely to transmit infection to other people.
  • Shigella sonnei infection: Shigella sonnei is a species of bacteria from the Shigella genus. Sonnei is the most common cause of Shigellosis in the developed world. Infection with this bacteria causes diarrhea. The severity of the disease is variable depending on the underlying health of the individual - the young and old tend to be more severely affected. Infection usually occurs through the fecal-oral route. Infection can be transmitted between people unless appropriate hygiene measures are undertaken. Some infected patients are asymptomatic and are those more likely to transmit infection to other people.
  • Shigellosis: An infectious disease which affects the intestinal tract and is caused by the Shigella bacteria. The condition may be severe, especially in children, but may be asymptomatic in some cases. The disease can be transmitted through fecal-oral contact.
  • Shrubby yew podocarpus poisoning: Shrubby yew podocarpus is a shrubby plant with long narrow leaves. It bears a red fruit and pale blue seed. It is often used indoors and outdoors as an ornamental plant. The seeds can cause symptoms if eaten though they are considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Sickle cell crisis: A condition which is characterized by either a hemolytic crisis or vaso-occlusive crisis
  • Sicklepod poisoning: Sicklepod is a herbaceous plant which bears small yellow flowers and elongated fruit. The plant is usually found growing in the wild. The seeds contain various chemicals (emodin glycoside, toxalbumin, anthraquinone, alkaloid) which can cause symptoms if eaten. The seeds are considered to be poisonous if large amounts are eaten.
  • Siderodromophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of trains.
  • Siderophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of the stars.
  • Silo unloader syndrome: An occupational lung disease that occurs in farm workers who go into a silo and breath in the nitrogen dioxide which are toxic to the body. Death can occur in some cases. Symptoms usually occur within a week of entering the silo.
  • Simian B virus infection: A type of herpesvirus which occurs in monkeys but can be transmitted to humans through bites or through contact with infected monkey tissue as in a laboratory situation. The virus infects the brain (encephalitis) and the surrounding membrane (meningitis).
  • Sinophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of China.
  • Sitophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of food.
  • Skunk cabbage poisoning: Skunk cabbage is a herbaceous plant with large leaves and flowers which have a bad smell. It is most often found growing in the wild. The plant contains calcium oxalate crystal which can cause symptoms if large quantities are eaten.
  • Slickhead poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some slickhead contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the slickhead does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The slickhead are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Small bowel bacterial overgrowth syndrome: The small bowel is a part of the digestive system. A healthy small bowel contains some bacteria but in bacterial overgrowth syndrome, there are an excessive number of bacteria. Abnormal small bowel muscle function is often associated with conditions such as intestinal motility problems due to neurological diseases and muscular diseases, diabetes mellitus, small intestine obstruction and diverticulitis. It may also be caused by certain medications and abdominal surgeries.
  • Snake bite: When a person is bitten by a snake
  • Sneezeweed poisoning: Sneezeweed is a herbaceous plant which bears yellow flowers. It can be found growing in the wild or in gardens as an ornamental plant. The leaves, seeds and flowers of the plant contain a chemical called sesquiterpene lactone which can cause various symptoms if large quantities are eaten.
  • Snow-on-the-mountain poisoning: Snow-on-the-mountain is a herbaceous plant which grows in the wild in North America but can also be used in gardens as an ornamental plant. The milky sap from the plant contains diterpene esters which can cause gastrointestinal symptoms if eaten and skin irritation upon skin exposure.
  • Snowberry poisoning: The snowberry is a small-leaved, shrubby plant which bears bell-shaped flowers at the base of the leaves and berries. The berries contain chemicals (calcium oxalates and perhaps saponic glycosides) which can cause symptoms if eaten in sufficient quantities. The berries are considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Snowdrop poisoning: Snowdrop is a bulbous plant with narrow strappy leaves and single white flowers on a long stem. It is often used indoors and outdoors as an ornamental plant. The bulb of the plant contains a chemical called phenanthridine alkaloid which can cause gastrointestinal symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity if eaten.
  • Soapberry poisoning: Soapberry is a small-leafed tree which bears yellowish flowers and drupes. The fruit (drupe) contain saponic glycoside which can cause gastrointestinal symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity if eaten.
  • Soapwort poisoning: The soapwort is a herbaceous plant whose roots and seeds are slightly toxic if eaten. The toxic chemical in the plant is saponic glycoside.
  • Social phobia: Excessive anxiety in social situations.
  • Solomon's seal poisoning: Solomon's seal is aherbaceous plant which bears long, unbranched stemsm white floers and hanging blue-black berries. The plant can be found growing in the wild or in gardens as an ornamental plant. The berries contain a chemical called which can cause gastrointestinal symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Solophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of sunlight or abnormal sensitivity to sunlight.
  • Specrophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of specters or phantoms.
  • Spectrophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of mirrors.
  • Spencer disease: A possibly viral epidemic disease which is occurs during winter and involves a range of gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • Spermatophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of germs.
  • Spermophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of germs.
  • Sphingolipidosis: A group of diseases involving the abnormal metabolism and storage of a substance called sphingolipid. Symptoms will vary depending on the disease. Examples of diseases from this group include gangliosidosis, Gaucher's disease and Niemann-Pick disease.
  • Spider Bites: A puncture wound caused by a spider that may involve the release of noxious substances or bacteria.
  • Spider lily poisoning: Spider lilies are bulbous plants which produce fairly large, distinctive white flowers. The plant bulb contains lycorine and alkaloids which may be toxic if sufficient quantities are eaten. The plant is considered to have low toxicity if eaten.
  • Spira syndrome: Chronic fluoride intoxication that can occur from flouridated water as well as exposure to vapors or dusts from various industries, agricultures or mines. The main symptoms are teeth anomalies and gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • Spirochetes disease: Infection with a type of bacteria which is often found in mud, sewage and polluted water. Symptoms are determined by the species involved. Diseases caused by this bacteria include Treponema infection and borreliosis.
  • Spirurida Infections: Infection with a nematode (worm) from the spirurida order. Nematodes from this order include Loa eyeworm, wuchereria and mansonella. The symptoms are determined by which species is involved. Some cases can result in severe complication if the nematode invades and organ or compresses vital nerves or blood vessels.
  • Splenic infarct: A relatively uncommon condition where a portion of spleen tissue dies due to a lack of sufficient blood supply to the affected tissue for any reason. An interruption in the blood supply can result from such things as emboli, thrombi, twisted blood vessels or blood pressure changes, trauma and blood disorders such as leukemia and abnormal blood coagulation. The severity of symptoms depends on the amount of spleen tissue involved.
  • Split-leaf philodendron poisoning: Split-leaf philodendron is a climbing vine with a distinctive leaf which has lobes and holes. The plant bears a relatively large fruit which is edible after it has ripened for a year. The green fruit contains oxalic acid which can cause symptoms if eaten. However, some people are allergic even to the ripe fruit.
  • Spotted fevers: An acute condition caused by the bacteria Rickettsia rickettsii
  • Spurge poisoning: Spurge is a plant which has purplish discoloration along the stem and in a spot near the base of the leaves. It bears small flowers where the leaf joins the stem. The plant contains dieterpene esters in its sap and can cause skin irritation on exposure to the skin or symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • St. Anthony's fire: Very painful burning sensation in the arms and legs caused by excessive exposure to ergotamines. Ergotamines are produced by particular fungi. It is also a drug used for such things as migraine controls and to induce abortions. Ergotamines result in the constriction of blood vessels which can result in tissue death (gangrene) and is also toxic to nerves.
  • Stachybotrys chartarum: A toxic black slimy mold that can be found in damp indoor environments. Exposure can occur through the skin, ingestion or inhalation. It can causes conditions such as "sick building syndrome".
  • Staggerbush poisoning: Staggerbush is a shrubby plant with small pink or white droopy flowers. The plant originated in the US. The leaves and flower nectar contain andromedotoxin which is very poisonous if eaten. Severe poisoning can result in death.
  • Staphylococcal food poisoning: A gastrointestinal disease caused by consuming food or drink contaminated by toxins made by a bacteria called Staphylococcus aureus.
  • Staphylococcal infection: Any infection caused by the bacteria staphylococcal
  • Stasiphobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of standing or walking. Sufferers believe that they are unable to stand or walk.
  • Still's Disease, Adult-Onset: A form of arthritic inflammation characterized by fever, rash and joint pain that occurs in adults. The cause is unknown.
  • Stomach Conditions: Any condition that affects a persons stomach
  • Stomach cancer: Cancer of the stomach.
  • Stomach cancer, familial: Cancer of the stomach that tends to run in families.
  • Strep throat: Streptococcal bacterial throat infection.
  • Streptococcal Infections: Various "strep" bacterial infections.
  • Striped Blister Beetle poisoning: The striped blister beetle is native to many parts of America and Canada. Animals that accidentally eat the beetles can become quite ill and they can also cause symptoms in humans if accidentally ingested. The beetles contain toxic substances called cantharidin and pederin which can cause symptoms through skin or eye exposure as well as through ingestion.
  • Stroke: Serious brain event from bleeding or blood clots.
  • Strongyloidiasis: A parasitic infectious disease involving the intestines and caused by the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis. Infection usually occurs in crowded, unsanitized populations.
  • Stygiophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of hell.
  • Subacute Thyroiditis: A self-limiting, virally induced inflammation of the thyroid characterised by a febrile illness and swelling of the thyroid, with subsequent damage to the thyroid tissue causing leakage of thyroid hormones into the circulation
  • Subarachnoid hemorrhage: Brain bleeding in the subarachnoid area
  • Substance Withdrawal Syndrome: Symptoms that occur when drug use is discontinued or reduced in dosage. The term covers withdrawal from smoking and alcohol as well as therapeutic and recreational drugs. Symptoms may vary depending on the drug involved and the level of dependence.
  • Sudden Digestive Conditions: Various forms of sudden acute digestive upset.
  • Sulfur tuft poisoning: Sulfur tuft is a type of small mushroom which can have yellow to orange to green caps. The mushroom has a very bitter taste and is poisonous - death can result if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Summer pheasant's eye poisoning: Summer pheasant's eye is a flowering plant which has serrated leaves and beautiful flowers. The plant contains cardiac glycosides which can result in symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Sump Syndrome: A complication that can sometimes occur after an operation done to treat recurring stone disease. The surgery involves forming a connection between the common bile duct and the intestines. Sometimes a pit-like (sump) portion develops along the bile duct and this allows debris such as food to build up in a pit-like (sump) portion of the bile duct. The buildup of debris can lead to infection.
  • Superior mesenteric artery syndrome: A rare condition where the third portion of the duodenum is compressed between two large blood vessels - the aorta and superior mesenteric artery.
  • Supraventricular Tachycardia: A rapid heart rate, the cause of which originates above the ventricles.
  • Sychrophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of ice or frost.
  • Symmetrophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear or dislike of symmetry.
  • Syncope: Temporary loss of conciousness or fainting.
  • Syncope, familial neurocardiogenic: A familial condition where a person suffers an increased tendency to faint due to a sudden drop in blood pressure.
  • Systemic mastocytosis: A condition which is characterized by an accumulation of mast cells in the tissues of the body
  • TRAPS (TNF-receptor-associated periodic syndrome): A rare syndrome involving periods of fever and chills along with gastrointestinal symptoms and muscle pain. Symptoms last for two or three weeks.
  • Tabophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of a wasting sickness.
  • Tachophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of speed.
  • Taeniasis: An infection with a type of tapeworm
  • Taphephobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of being buried alive or of cemeteries.
  • Tapinophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of small things.
  • Tapioca poisoning: Tapioca is a shrubby plant which bears inconspicuous flowers. The tubers contain chemicals (cyanogenic glycosides) which are turned into cyanide by the digestive process. Ingestion of the raw roots of this plant can result in death if sufficient quantities are eaten. The tubers are edible if they are boiled first. Toxicity varies within the species depending on growing conditions and other factors.
  • Tarpon poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some tarpon contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the tarpon does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The tarpon are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Taurophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of bulls.
  • Technophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear or dislike of modern technology.
  • Telephonophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of the telephone.
  • Teratophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of monsters and deformed people or of giving birth to a malformed infant.
  • Testicular torsion: Twisting of a testicle's spermatic cord
  • Texas Mescalbean poisoning: Texas Mescalbean is a shrub which bears blueish-purple, scented flowers and a seed pod containing vibrant red seeds. The brightly colored seeds are often used to make necklaces. The seeds contain alkaloids which can cause symptoms if they are eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Thaasophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear or dislike of boredom or being idle.
  • Thalassophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of the sea.
  • Thanatophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of death.
  • Theatrophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of theatres.
  • Theophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of God.
  • Thermophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear or dislike of heat.
  • Thimbleweed poisoning: Thimbleweed is a herbaceous plant which has a variety of flower colors depending on the species. It is most often used as an ornamental garden plant. The plant contains a chemical called protoanemonin which can cause various symptoms if eaten in large quantities. Skin irritation can also occur upon skin exposure.
  • Thixophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of touch.
  • Thornapple poisoning: Thornapple is a herbaceous plant that bears spiny, waxy leaves and white to yellow flowers. The plant is often grown in gardens but can also be found growing in the wild. The plant contains isoquinolone alkaloids which can cause symptoms if large quantities are eaten.
  • Thromboembolism: Lodgement of a blood clot causing blockage
  • Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, acquired: A rare blood condition where small blood clots form in blood vessels which reduces the number of blood platelets and results in kidney failure, neurological symptoms and anemia. The condition may be familial or acquired - symptoms tend to recur regularly in the familial form.
  • Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, congenital: A rare blood condition where small blood clots form in blood vessels which reduces the number of blood platelets and results in kidney failure, neurological symptoms and anemia.
  • Tick-borne encephalitis: A viral infection (flavivirdae) of the central nervous system which is transmitted by ticks. Ticks usually feed on small rodents who are the main carriers of the virus. Transmission may also occur through the consumption of untreated milk. The incubation period is usually 1 to 2 weeks. The symptoms occur in two phases: the first involves symptoms of a general viral illness (fever, headache, nausea, aching muscles) followed by a period of remission and then central nervous system inflammation such as meningitis. However, many patients only suffer the first phase of the disease.
  • Tocophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of childbirth.
  • Togaviridae disease: Infection with any of a number of togaviridae viruses which can caused conditions such as Equine encephalitis, Ross River virus and Rubella virus. Symptoms are determined by the type of virus involved. Togaviridae are arboviruses and are transmitted by arthropods.
  • Tomato leaf poisoning: Tomatoes are an edible fruit but the leaves and stems contain chemicals (solanine and demissine) which can cause symptoms if eaten in large quantities.
  • Tomophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of surgical operations.
  • Topophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of certain places.
  • Toxic mushrooms - Cholinergic: Some mushrooms contain a toxic chemical called muscarine which causes cholinergic symptoms. Mushroom species from this group include certain species of Clitocype, Inocybe and Mycena. Symptoms usually occur within a few hours and tend to disappear within 24 hours. Fatalities have been reported but not in recent times.
  • Toxic mushrooms - Gastrointestinal irritant: Some mushrooms contain a chemical which cause gastrointestinal irritation. Mushroom species from this group include certain species of Agaricus, Amanita, Boletus, Entoloma, Gomphus, Lactarius, Omphalotus, Tricholoma, Tylopilus and Verpa.
  • Toxic mushrooms - Monomethylhydrazine: Some mushrooms contain a toxic chemical called gyromitrin which is converted to monomethylhydrazine after digestion. Mushroom species from this group include certain species of Gyromitra, Helvella, Sarcosphaera and Peziza. Poisoning may occur from inhaling fumes from cooking mushrooms. The amount of toxin varies amongst and within species but some are toxic enough to cause death. Urgent medical attention should be sought if mushroom poisoning is suspected.
  • Toxic mushrooms - Psychedelic: Some mushrooms contain chemicals called psilocybin and psilocin which produce effects similar to LSD. Mushroom species from this group include certain species of Conocybe syanopus, Conocybe spectabilis, Gymnopilus, Panaeolus, Pluteus, Psilocybe and Stropharia. About five dried mushroom caps can result in hallucinations.
  • Toxic mushrooms - Renal toxic (orelline): Some mushrooms (Amanita smithiana) contain chemicals (allenic norleucine, chlorocrotyglycine) which can cause kidney damage.
  • Toxic mushrooms - cyclopeptides: Some mushrooms contain a toxic chemical called cyclopeptide which can cause primarily gastrointestinal symptoms if ingested. Most cases of mushroom poisoning in North America involve cyclopeptide-containing mushrooms. Mushroom species from this group include certain species of Amanita (bisporigera, ocreata, phalloides, suballiacea, tenufolia, verna, virosa), Galerina and Lepiota. One Amanita mushroom cap may result in death in an adult. Poisoning occurs in three phases: gastrointestinal symptoms (within 24 hours of ingestion); remission (up to 72 hours after ingestion); and liver and kidney symptoms (3 to 6 days after ingestion). Poisoning symptoms are more severe in children due to their smaller body size.
  • Toxicophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of being poisoned.
  • Transthyretin amyloidosis: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage. In the transthyretin form, the amyloid protein consists of transthretin. The condition is characterized by slo-progressing peripheral sensorimotor and autonomic neuropathy, kidney disease and heart disease. Abnormal amyloid deposits may also occur in the eyes and central nervous system. There are a number of subtypes of the disorder: familial oculoleptomeningeal amyloidosis, familial amyloid polyneuropathy and familial amyloid cardiomypathy as well as others. Neuropathic symptoms tend to start in the legs. Symptoms may vary depending on which parts of the body are affected.
  • Traumatic Brain Injury: Brain injury from trauma or accident.
  • Traumatic spreading depression syndrome: Transient neurological problems that can occur after minor head injury in infants and children.
  • Traumatophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of war or physical injury.
  • Traveler's diarrhea: Various diarrheal conditions often caught on international travel.
  • Tremophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of trembling.
  • Trichinosis: Worm infection usually caught from pigs
  • Trichophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of hair.
  • Trifoliate orange poisoning: Trifoliate orange is a shrubby plant with spiny stems, small aromatic flowers and small, slightly furry, orange-like fruit. The plant originated in China and is often used as an ornamental plant in gardens or as a hedge. The fruit contains saponic glycoside and ponciridin which is a bitter-tasting oil. These chemicals can cause gastrointestinal symptoms if eaten. The plant can also cause skin irritation upon skin exposure. The fruit is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity if eaten.
  • Triskaidekaphobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of the number 13.
  • Trophoblastic Cancer: A neoplastic disorder that originates in the placenta
  • Tropical Reef Crab poisoning: The tropical reef crab is commonly found and eaten in the Indo-Pacific region. These crabs can contain toxic chemicals which can cause severe poisoning in humans if eaten. The best way to avoid poisoning is to not eat these crabs at all.
  • Tropical sprue: A rare digestive disease where the small intestine can't absorb nutrients properly.
  • Trumpet Creeper poisoning: The Trumpet creeper is a woody vine which bears trumpet shaped orange to red flowers. Skin contact with the plant can cause skin irritation but it is usually minor and short-lived. Eating the flowers or leaves can cause mild gastrointestinal symptoms if sufficient quantities are eaten but the plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Trumpet flower poisoning: The trumpet flower is a flowering vine-like plant that bears fairly large, colorful, trumpet-shaped flowers. It is often grown in gardens as an ornamental plant. The leaves and flowers of the plant contain chemicals (solanine, solanidine) which are highly toxic. Ingestion of sufficient flowers and leaves can result in death.
  • Trypanophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of injections .
  • Tubatoxin poisoning: Tubatoxin is a naturally occurring chemical found in certain plants (Derris and Lonchocarpus sp.). It gives the plant insecticidal and pesticidal properties and is hence utilized commercially as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Inhalation tends to cause more severe symptoms than ingestion. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Tuberculous meningitis: A bacterial infection where inflammation of the membranes that surround the brain or spinal cord results affects the nervous system. The inflammation is caused by the Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
  • Tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis: A rare disorder characterized by neurological degeneration and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Tulip poisoning: Tulips are an ornamental bulbous plant which contain a toxin called tulipalin. The chemical can cause symptoms if eaten but the plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity. The plant may also cause skin irritation.
  • Tung oil tree poisoning: Tung oil tree is a deciduous tree with dark green leaves and pink to white flowers with a darker centre. The plant originated in China and is often used in gardens as an ornamental plant. The plant (especially the seeds) contain chemicals (glycoside and others) which can cause serious symptoms and even death if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Turban shell mollusk poisoning: The turban shell mollusk may become toxic due to a diet of toxic algae. The toxins occur in the gut of the mollusk and can cause poisoning symptoms in humans if the whole mollusk is eaten. Removing the internal organs of the mollusk prior to eating can reduce the risk of poisoning. Outbreaks of turban shell mollusk poisoning has occurred in Western Pacific regions and Marianas and Marcus Islands.
  • Type 1 diabetes: Severe insulin-treated diabetes typically occurring in young people.
  • Type 2 diabetes: Most common diabetes in adults, usually progressing slowly, mostly treated without insulin at diagnosis.
  • Tyrannophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear or hatred of tyrants.
  • Ulcerative colitis: Inflammation and ulcers in the large intestine
  • Uremia: Excessive urea and waste products in the blood
  • Urinary tract infections: Infection of the urinary system; usually bacterial.
  • Urinary tract infections (child): Infection of the urinary system in children.
  • Urophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of urine.
  • Vaccinophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of vaccines or vaccination.
  • Vancomycin resistant enterococcal bacteremia: A condition which is characterised by bacteremia caused by an enterococci that is resistant to vancomycin.
  • Variegate porphyria: A rare metabolic disorder characterized by a deficiency of a certain enzyme which results in a build-up in the body of porphyrins or their precursors. This form of hepatic porphyria causes the sufferer to have acute attacks as well as skin sensitivity.
  • Vasculitis hypersensitivity: A condition which is characterised by a reaction that results in the inflammation of the blood vessels
  • Vasovagal attack: Cranial nerve disorder with various effects.
  • Venereophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of venereal disease.
  • Venerupin shellfish poisoning: The venerupin shellfish can be eaten by humans. The shellfish can become toxic if they consume toxic algae. The shellfish is most commonly found and eaten in Japan but has been introduced into parts of the US. Interestingly, all cases of poisoning have occurred in very localized areas of Japan where they are harvested from lakes. This type of poisoning tends to have a high death rate - up to a third of patients die.
  • Venezuelan equine encephalitis: A mosquito-borne virus that usually affects horses and related animals but may also infect humans. Young, weak and old people may become very sick and in some cases death can occur. It occurs in Central and South America. The incubation period is 2-5 days. The period of illness is usually 3-8 days but relapses are possible.
  • Ventricular familial preexcitation syndrome: A condition which is inheritable and causes any syndrome that is characterised by ECG signs of preexcitation
  • Vermiphobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of earthworms.
  • Vertebral Artery Dissection: A tear that develops in the verebral artery and tends to result in a stroke. It is the most common cause of stroke in young people. Vertebral artery dissections can be caused by trauma to the neck, manipulation of the spine (chiropractics), high blood pressure or even blowing the nose in some cases.
  • Vertigo: The odd balance sensation of inappropriate spinning or movement of the environment
  • Vertigo, benign paroxysmal, in childhood: A rare harmless disorder in children which causes short periods of dizziness, nausea and involuntary eye movements.
  • Vestibular neuritis: A temporary condition which affects the inner ear workings but doesn't impair hearing. It is often caused by an upper respiratory infection.
  • Vestibulocochlear Nerve Diseases: Diseases that affect the vestibular and/or cochlear nerves of the hearing system. Such diseases include cochlear neuritis, acoustic neuroma, and vestibular neuritis. Symptoms depend on which of the nerves are involved.
  • Vestibulocochlear dysfunction progressive familial: A condition which is characterised by vestibulocochlear dysfunction that occurs in a familial pattern
  • Vibrio: An organism of the genus Vibrio or other spiral motile organism
  • Vibrio infection - Vibrio alginolyticus: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio alginolyticus. This bacterium tends to cause ear and wound infections.
  • Vibrio infection - Vibrio damsela: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio damsela. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Wound infection is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia and gastroenteritis is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio infection - Vibrio fluvialis: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio fluvialis. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Gastroenteritis is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio infection - Vibrio furnissii: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio furnissii. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Gastroenteritis is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia and wound infection is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio infection - Vibrio holisae: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio holisae. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Gastroenteritis is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio infection - Vibrio metschnikovii: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio metschnikovii. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Gastroenteritis is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio infection - Vibrio mimicus: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio mimicus. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Gastroenteritis is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia and wound infection is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio infection - Vibrio parahaemolyticus: An infectious disease caused by a bacteria called Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The nature and severity of symptoms can vary considerably depending on the type of infection caused - gastroenteritis, wound infection or septicemia. Gastroenteritis is the most common disease associated with this bacteria and septicemia is relatively rare. Infection usually occurs through consumption of contaminated seafood or exposure of a wound to contaminated water. The elderly and very young tend to suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vibrio parahaemolyticus: Bacteria commonly infecting oysters and seafood.
  • Vibrio vulnificus infection: The infection by the vibrio vulnificus bacteria
  • Vicodin overdose: Vicodin is a prescription drug used to pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Vicodin withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Vicodin use is discontinued or reduced. Vicodin is a pain-killing drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Viral Hepatitis: Any type of virus infecting the liver.
  • Viral digestive infections: Any virus that infects the gastrointestinal tract causing a medical condition
  • Viral meningitis: Brain membrane infection due to viruses.
  • Viremia: The presence of a virus in the bloodstream. The symptoms will depend on the type of virus involved. Some viruses cause no symptoms.
  • Visceral neuropathy, familial, autosomal dominant: A dominantly inherited gastrointestinal disorder where the intestinal walls are unable to contract normally to move digested material through the system which produces symptoms similar to an obstruction in the intestinal tract.
  • Vitamin A overdose: Overdose of Vitamin A usually due to Vitamin A supplement overuse or poisoning.
  • Vitamin B6 - adverse effects: Regular use of large doses of vitamin B6 supplements can cause adverse effects.
  • Vitamin C Overdose: Symptoms occurring due to the ingestion of an amount of ascorbic acid (vitamin C) in excess of recommended doses or prolonged chewing of vitamin C supplement tablets; overdose is rare except in people with predisposing conditions as ascorbic acid is non-toxic.
  • Vitamin C toxicity: Excessive consumption of vitamin C (ascorbic acid) can cause symptoms of toxicity.
  • Vitamin D - adverse effects: Excessive use of vitamin D supplements can cause symptoms.
  • Vitamin D toxicity: Excessive consumption of vitamin D can cause symptoms of toxicity.
  • Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Syndrome: A rare condition characterized by poliosis and hair, skin, eye and ear abnormalities as well as retinal detachment and neurological involvement.
  • Waldmann disease: A rare digestive disorder where the lymph glands that feed the small intestine lining are enlarged. The enlargement may be due to causes or a result of other conditions.
  • Wallenberg's Syndrome: A rare neurological condition caused by a stroke (involving the cerebellar artery) and resulting in symptoms such as facial paralysis or weakness on one side of body.
  • Walrus poisoning: The walrus is used as a food source in some parts of the world. Eating the liver of the walrus can result in a Vitamin A overdose which can cause serious symptoms and even death in extreme cases.
  • Wandering spleen: A very rare birth defect where the structures (ligaments) that hold the spleen in position are absent or not developed properly which allows the spleen to move around in the abdominal cavity.
  • Water Intoxication: Excessive water intake can lead to water intoxication and ultimately death.
  • Waterhouse-Friederichsen syndrome: A rare syndrome that occurs as complication of septicemia (often due to meningococcal or pneumococcal infection) and involves blood coagulation in blood vessels, adrenal gland hemorrhages and ultimately kidney failure.
  • Wax begonia poisoning: Wax begonia is a plant that bears many small white, pink or red flowers. The roots and rhizomes (thickened roots) contain a chemical called oxalates which can cause various symptoms if eaten. They are considered to have a low level of toxicity though.
  • Weber-Christian disease: A rare skin disorder characterized by recurring inflammation of the fatty layer of the skin and the development of nodules.
  • Weil syndrome: A rare infectious disorder which affects liver and kidney function and also causes hemorrhaging. It is a severe form of the second phase of leptospirosis which is an infection caused by the spiral shaped bacteria Leptospira interrogans which is transmitted from animals to humans.
  • Weil's syndrome: Severe form of Leptospirosis
  • Western equine encephalitis: An infectious disease caused by an arbovirus (Alphavirus - Togaviraidae) and transmitted by infected mosquitoes. The infection primarily attacks that central nervous system and severity can range from asymptomatic to severe complications and even death in rare cases.
  • Wheat intolerance: A condition that is characterised by an intolerance to wheat
  • Whiplash Injuries: An injury to the neck when the neck is rapidly forced backward and then forwards or vice versa. It most commonly occurs in vehicle accidents when the vehicle is stopped abruptly or pushed forwards suddenly.
  • White Chameleon poisoning: The white chameleon is a type of thistle found mainly in dry areas of the Mediterranean. The rhizomes contains chemicals which can cause poisoning symptoms if eaten. The plant is often mistaken for a wild artichoke. The root extract is sometimes used in alternative medicine and excessive doses can also result in poisoning.
  • White snakeroot poisoning: White snakeroot is a herbaceous plant which is found mainly growing in the wild in the US and has round clusters of small white flowers. The plant contains a chemical called tremetol which can cause gastrointestinal symptoms in people who drink the raw milk or eat the meat from cows who have fed on the plant. The plant itself is considered very poisonous to humans and eating the plant can result in death.
  • Whole-body acute irradiation - cerebral syndrome: Tissue injury can result from exposure to radiation. The radiation dose, rate of dosing and tissues irradiated will determine the severity and type of symptoms. The effects may be chronic, delayed or acute. Cerebral radiation syndrome involves exposure of the whole body to very high exposure to radiation (3,000 rads or more).
  • Whole-body acute irradiation - gastrointestinal syndrome: Tissue injury can result from exposure to radiation. The radiation dose, rate of dosing and tissues irradiated will determine the severity and type of symptoms. The effects may be chronic, delayed or acute. Gastrointestinal syndrome involves exposure of the whole body to radiation of 400 rads or more.
  • Whole-body acute irradiation - hematopoietic syndrome: Tissue injury can result from exposure to radiation. The radiation dose, rate of dosing and tissues irradiated will determine the severity and type of symptoms. The effects may be chronic, delayed or acute. Hematopoietic syndrome involves exposure of the whole body to radiation of 200-1,000 rads.
  • Wild cherry seed poisoning: Wild cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually only occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual.
  • Wilms' tumor: A malignant kidney tumor that occurs in children.
  • Winkelman Bethfe Pfeiffer syndrome: A syndrome that is characterised by sensorineural deafness and pituitary dwarfism
  • Wolf-Parkinson-White syndrome: Heart arrhythmia causing increased heart rate
  • Worm conditions: Any condition that is caused by infestation of worms
  • Xanthic urolithiasis: The formation of xanthine crystals in the urine
  • Xanthine oxydase deficiency: The deficiency of an enzyme that is involved in the degradation of purine
  • Xanthinuria: A hereditary condition that is characterised by a disorder of purine metabolism
  • Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis: A lipid laden foam cell tumour of the gallbladder resulting in inflammation
  • Xanthophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of the color yellow or the word yellow.
  • Xenophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear or hatred of foreigners and strange things.
  • Xerophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of dryness and dry places such as deserts.
  • Yellow fever: A viral infection transmitted by mosquito bites which can damage various organs such as the liver, heart, kidney and digestive tract.
  • Yellow jessamine poisoning: The Yellow Jessamine is a woody vine which bears aromatic, funnel-shaped yellow flowers and flat fruit capsules. The plant contains alkaloids which are very toxic and potentially fatal if eaten in sufficient quantities.
  • Yellow pleated parasol poisoning: Yellow pleated parasol is a bright yellow, bell-shaped mushroom with a yellow powdery substance over the cap. The mushroom is very poisonous and death can result if sufficient quantities are eaten. However, most cases result in gastrointestinal symptoms only.
  • Yellow sac spider poisoning: The yellow sac spider is a small spider found in Hawaii, eastern US, Utah and New England. The spider tends to hold on very tightly when it bites and often has to be physically removed. The venom contains a toxin which kills cells. Skin and sometimes systemic symptoms result - symptoms experience can vary amongst patients.
  • Zelophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of jealousy.
  • Zemmiphobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of the great mole rat.
  • Zollinger-Ellison syndrome: A rare disorder where excessive levels of the hormone gastrin are released into the stomach which increases stomach acidity which results in peptic ulcer development. A hormone secreting pancreatic or duodenal tumor is usually the cause.
  • Zoophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of animals.
  • Zygomycosis: An infectious disease caused by fungus from the orders Mucorales and Entomophthorales which are normally found in the soil and in decaying plant matter. The infection differs from mucormycosis which only involves the order Mucorales. Transmission is usually through the inhalation of spores. It is generally harmless to healthy individuals but can cause infection in patients who are immunocompromised or who have a serious chronic illness such as uncontrolled diabetes. Symptoms and severity can vary considerable depending on the part of the body the infection occurs in - gastrointestinal tract, skin, lungs, central nervous system, eye orbit and the paranasal sinuses.

 

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