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Diseases » Neck Pain » Glossary
 

Glossary for Neck Pain

  • Adenocarcinoma, Follicular: A type of cancer of the thyroid gland.
  • Aneurysm: Dangerous ballooning of a weakened area of an artery
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 1: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 1 is caused by a defect on chromosome 7q11.2.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 2: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 19q13.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 3: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 1p36.13-p34.3.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 4: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 4 is caused by a defect on chromosome 5p15.2-14.3.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 5: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 5 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2p13.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 6: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are now six different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases an individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 9p21.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 7: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 7 is caused by a defect on chromosome 11q24-q25.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 8: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 8 is caused by a defect on chromosome 14q23.
  • Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: Bleeding in the space around the brain that occurs from a leak in a weakened or dilated blood vessel under the arachnoid layer of the brain. Death can occur if treatment is not prompt.
  • Angiostrongyliasis: Infection by a parasitic worm (Angiostrongylus). Infection can occur through eating contaminated raw animals such as snails, slugs, prawns or crabs which act as hosts to these parasites.
  • Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic: Bulging and weakness of the aorta in the area of the chest. The condition is life-threatening as death can occur rapidly if the aneurysm bursts.
  • Arnold-Chiari Malformation (Type 1): A rare malformation where the base of the brain enters into the upper spinal canal.
  • Atlanto-Axial Fusion: A congenital anomaly where the first neck vertebrae is fused to the skull.
  • Autoimmune Myelopathy: A disturbance functionally or pathological change in the spinal cord
  • Back tumour: The presence of tumour growth in the vertebra, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast.
  • Barrett syndrome: A chronic peptic ulcer of the esophagus.
  • Basilar impression primary: A congenital bone abnormality where the skull and vertebrae meet which can compress some of the brain structures and result in neurological abnormalities. The defect is often associated with other vertebral abnormalities. In severe cases, the cerebrospinal fluid flow may be obstructed which can cause fluid to build up inside the skull (hydrocephalus).
  • Carcinoma, squamous cell of head and neck: A type of cancer that occurs in the mucosal lining of parts of the head and neck e.g. esophagus, sinuses, nasal cavity, pharynx, mouth and lips. Symptoms will vary depending on the exact location of the cancer.
  • Cervical Spondylosis: Condition where bony changes within the cervical spine causes spinal cord compression with associated neck pain; usually seen in patients over 40 years of age.
  • Chemical poisoning - Helium: Helium is a chemical used mainly in helium balloons, neon signs and diving gas. The gas is sometimes misused as an inhalant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chordoma: A slow-growing malignant tumor that can occur anywhere along the spine or base of the skull. Symptoms depend on the exact location of the tumor. The cancer can metastasize to other parts of the body such as the lungs, bones, soft tissue, lymph nodes and skin.
  • Degenerative Disc Disease: Chronic or recurrent back and neck pain due to degeneration and occasionally prolapse of spinal discs.
  • Discitis: A subacute infection of the vertebral discs that usually occurs in children.
  • Facet syndrome: An irritation, sprain or strain involving the vertebral joints of the spine. The exact symptoms may vary depending on the part of the spine involved. The condition most often results osteoarthritis, degenerative disc disease or injury.
  • Fibromyalgia: A difficult to diagnose condition affecting the muscles and/or joints
  • Gerlier disease: A disease that occurs usually in farm workers who are exposed to cattle. The condition is usually seen in some parts of Switzerland. Symptoms tend to resolve themselves within a few months.
  • Herniated disc: A misaligned or "slipped" disc in the spine.
  • Hilger syndrome: A type of headache caused by dilation of the carotid arteries and their branches. It may follow a viral illness, be associated with arteriosclerosis or occur for no obvious reason. Treatment and prognosis is determined by the cause.
  • Hip cancer: The presence of tumour growth in the bone of the hip, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast; cancer affecting bone of hip likely to affect other bones e.g. vertebra, ribs
  • Inheritable disorders of connective tissue: Disorders that affect the connective tissue of the body that are handed down from generation to generation
  • Intervertebral disc disease: Degenerative changes in the discs located between vertebrae. The severity of the disorder is variable.
  • Madelung's disease: A rare disorder involving defective fat metabolism which leads to a buildup of fat deposits in neck and shoulder area. Mainly occurs in male alcoholics.
  • Meningitis: Dangerous infection of the membranes surrounding the brain.
  • Metastatic cancer: Any cancer that has spread to other parts of the body.
  • Metastatic squamous neck cancer with occult primary: A type of cancer that occurs in the neck and has spread (metastasized) to the lymph nodes from a primary source that has not been able to be determined. Squamous cells are cells that line hollow organs as well as the skin and throat.
  • Migraine: Chronic recurring headaches with or without a preceding aura.
  • Nasopharyngeal carcinoma: A malignant cancer that occurs in the nasopharynx area which is the upper part of the throat. Often there are no symptoms until the cancer has metastasized to other parts of the body such as the neck.
  • Neck Arthritis: Degenerative arthritic changes in the neck causing pain and loss of function; may be due to age-related degenerative change (osteoarthritis) or due to autoimmune disease (rheumatoid arthritis)
  • Neck Cancer: Any cancer that occurs in the neck
  • Neck conditions: Any condition that affects the neck
  • Neck injury: Any injury that occurs to the neck
  • Neck muscle strain: Damage to the neck muscle due to over-stretching of the muscle tissue. The damage involves tearing the muscle tissue. Small blood vessels may also be damaged which can cause bruising. The symptoms may vary from mild to severe depending on the severity of the damage. Neck strain is most often caused by whiplash in vehicle accidents.
  • Neck symptoms: Symptoms affecting the neck
  • Optic neuropathy, anterior ischemic: Impaired vision due to optic nerve damage caused by problems with the blood supply to the nerve. The non-arteritic form is caused by and interrupted blood supply to the optic disk. Usually one eye is affected first and maybe eventually be followed by the other. Often only part of the visual field is affected.
  • Osteomyelitis: A bone inflammation caused by bacteria. The inflammation usually originates in another part of the body and is transported to the bone via the blood.
  • Polymyalgia rheumatica: A condition characterized by muscle pain and stiffness, fatigue and fever. It is often associated with giant-cell arteritis which is a related but more serious condition.
  • Retropharyngeal abscess: An abscess (pus-filled cavity) in the back of the throat. Prompt treatment is needed to avoid obstruction of airways and other complications including death.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis: Autoimmune form of arthritis usually in teens or young adults.
  • Rib Tumor: The presence of tumour growth in the ribs, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary bony metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast.
  • SAPHO syndrome: A rare disorder involving skin (acne, pustulosis), bone (hyperostosis, osteitis) and joint problems.
  • Shoulder conditions: Any condition that affects the shoulder
  • Sinusitis: Infection of any of the sinus cavities.
  • Spinal Arthritis: Inflammation of the spine joints. The inflammation can be the result of such things as degenerative joint disease, gout, infection, trauma and autoimmune conditions.
  • Spinal stenosis: Narrowing of the spinal cavity around the spinal cord.
  • Spondylolisthesis: A condition in which 2 or more vertebra may slide backwards or forwards on each other.
  • Spondylosis: Spinal degeneration of the discs or spinal joints
  • Syringomyelia, cervical lesion: A slowly-progressing neurological disorder characterized by a fulid-filled cavity in the spinal cord in the neck region.
  • Temporal arteritis: Inflamed head artery causing headache.
  • Temporo-mandibular ankylosis: A disorder involving stiffness or fusion of the jaw joint which affects the ability of the jaw to open and close normally. The condition may occur congenitally or may be acquired through such things as trauma.
  • Thoracic aortic aneurysm:
  • Thoracic outlet syndrome TOS: A rare disorder involving compression or damage to the nerves and blood vessels that go from the neck to the arms or armpit. It may occur as a birth defect or through some sort of traumato the shoulder area. It can causes symptoms such as arm pain and weakness and can occur on one or both sides depending on the nature of the cause.
  • Thymus Cancer: Cancer that occurs in the thymus
  • Thymus disorders: Any disorder that affects the thymus
  • Thyroglossal tract cyst: A rare condition where a soft, slow-growing growth develops at the front of the neck. It occurs as an abnormal growth that develops from thyroid tissue that is left over from fetal development.
  • Thyroid cancer: Cancer of the thyroid gland.
  • Thyroid cancer, Hurthle cell: A rare form of cancer that originates in the thyroid gland. This cancer is characterized by the abnormal presence of Hurthle cells which may signify benign or malignant thyroid cancer. The cancer usually responds well to treatment if detected in the earlier stages.
  • Thyroid cancer, anaplastic: A thyroid gland cancer that is quite aggressive and metastasizes to other parts of the body.
  • Thyroiditis: Thyroid gland inflammation
  • Vertebral Artery Dissection: A tear that develops in the verebral artery and tends to result in a stroke. It is the most common cause of stroke in young people. Vertebral artery dissections can be caused by trauma to the neck, manipulation of the spine (chiropractics), high blood pressure or even blowing the nose in some cases.
  • West Nile fever: Mosquito-borne infectious virus.
  • West nile encephalitis: A virus that is of the Flavivirus genus that causes the condition West Nile encephalitis
  • Whiplash: Neck injury often from a car accident.
  • Whiplash Injuries: An injury to the neck when the neck is rapidly forced backward and then forwards or vice versa. It most commonly occurs in vehicle accidents when the vehicle is stopped abruptly or pushed forwards suddenly.

 

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