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Diseases » Neuropathy » Glossary
 

Glossary for Neuropathy

  • Achalasia -- adrenal -- alacrima syndrome: A familial disorder characterized by adrenal gland-related hormonal problems, swallowing difficulty (achalasia) and a lack of tears (alacrima). Neurological impairment and motor and sensory neuropathy is progressive. The adrenal glands in patients are resistant to the ACTH hormone and hence fails to operate normally.
  • Acrodynia: Symptoms caused by chronic mercury poisoning in infants in children.
  • Acute idiopathic polyneuritis: A rare progressive form of ascending polyneuropathy believed to be an autoimmune response.
  • Acute intermittent porphyria: A rare metabolic disorder characterized by a deficiency in the porphobilinogen deaminase enzyme which results in a build-up of porphyrins or its precursors in the body. Using certain drugs or eating certain foods can trigger the symptoms of the condition.
  • Adrenomyeloneuropathy: A form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy characterized by spinal cord dysfunction and brain involvement may or may not be present. Those with brain involvement suffer serious symptoms that can eventually lead to total disability and even death.
  • Alcoholic Neuropathy: Neurological changes due to nerve damage from long-term alcohol consumption
  • Alcoholic polyneuropathy: A condition where damage to many peripheral nerves throughout the body results from excessive alcohol consumption. The sensory nerves tend to be affected more than the motor nerves and the legs are usually more affected than the arms.
  • Amyloid Neuropathies: A peripheral nerve disorder caused by abnormal amyloid deposits in the nerves. Sensory, autonomic or motor nerves may be affected. The degree of nerve involvement, and hence symptoms, are variable.
  • Auditory neuropathy: A hearing disorder caused by impaired nerve signals from the inner part of the ear to the brain.
  • Autoimmune neuropathies: Nerve diseases from autoimmune damage.
  • Autoimmune peripheral neuropathy: Damage to peripheral nerves that occurs when the body's own immune system attacks it.
  • Autonomic nerve disorders: A disorder of the nervous system concerned with regulation of activity of cardiac muscle, smooth muscle, and glands, usually restricted to the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems
  • Autonomic neuropathy: A disorder of the nervous system concerned with regulation of activity of cardiac muscle, smooth muscle, and glands, usually restricted to the sympathetic and parasympathetic systems
  • Autosomal Dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth with hearing loss: A dominantly inherited form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease which also involves hearing loss. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is a progressive nerve disease that affects the peripheral nerves and hence the muscles primarily in the limbs.
  • Berger paresthesia: A rare disorder characterized by paresthesia and weakness in the lower legs.
  • Borud Syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by numerous features including hearing and vision problems, heart muscle disease, ataxia and peripheral neuropathy.
  • CANOMAD syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by a range of abnormalities caused by immune-mediated nerve demyelination. There is usually no loss of limb function associated with the disorder. The face, throat, mouth and eye symptoms (weakness of the muscles) usually come and go.
  • CCFDN: A rare, recessively inherited syndrome characterized by cataracts during infancy, unusual facial appearance and neuropathy.
  • Carcinomatous polyneuropathy: It is a condition which damages nerves by directly invading or putting pressure on them or by triggering an autoimmune reaction.
  • Cerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive: A group of rare, recessively inherited neurological disorders caused by abnormalities in the cerebellum and spinal cord. In some cases other parts of the body may be affected.
  • Cerebral dysgenesis, neuropathy, ichthyosis, and palmoplantar keratoderma syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by abnormal brain development, neurological problems, scaly skin and thickened skin on the palms and soles.
  • Cervical hypertrichosis neuropathy: A very rare disorder characterized mainly by a hairy throat and abnormal sensations in the hands and feet.
  • Charcot disease: Charcot joint occurs in the presence of sensory or autonomic neuropathy and presents as progressive microtrauma resulting in joint destruction and deformity. It characteristically occurs in weight bearing joints such as the foot, ankle and knee.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disorder: Degeneration of limb muscles.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (generic term): A group of inherited neurological disorders characterized by problems with the peripheral nerves. Muscle weakness, muscle wasting and sensory problems are the most common symptoms. The severity and age of onset of symptoms varies depending on the specific subtype of the disorder.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease -- deafness: Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and deafness involves the usual CMT symptoms as well as deafness.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease deafness recessive type: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4D is inherited recessively and is caused by a defected in a gene in chromosome 8 and is a severe form of the disease that also involves deafness.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with ptosis and parkinsonism: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. This particular type of CMT also involves a drooping upper eyelid and parkinsonism.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with pyramidal features, autosomal dominant: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 5 has an autosomal dominant inheritance, progresses slowly and involves movement disorders.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 1A: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 1A is inherited as an autosomal dominant pattern and involves the duplication of the PMP22 gene on chromosome 17.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 1B: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 1B is inherited as an autosomal dominant pattern and involves a defect in the MPZ gene on chromosome 1. The severity of the condition is variable depending on the age of onset with severe infantile cases resulting in the inability to walk at an early age.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 1C: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 1C is inherited as an autosomal dominant pattern and involves a defect in the LITAF/SIMPLE gene on chromosome 16.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 1D: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 1D is caused by a defect of the ERG2 gene on chromosome 10 and usually results in a severe form of the disease.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 1E: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 1E involves the usual CMT symptoms as well as deafness.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 1F: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 1F is caused by a defect of a gene in chromosome 8 and involves the neurofilament light chain protein.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2A: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2AI: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2A1 has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect in the KIF1B gene on chromosome 1p36.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2AII: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2A2 has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect in the MFN2 gene on chromosome 1p36.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2B: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2B has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect in the gene for the protein RAB 7 located on chromosome 3.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2B1: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2B1 has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect in the LMNA gene located on chromosome 1.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2B2: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2B2 has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect located on chromosome 19.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2C: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2C has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect in chromosome 12 and involves diaphragm and vocal cord weakness as well as hand and foot problems.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2D: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2D has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect in the glycyl RNA synthetase gene on chromosome 7p15. The hands tend to be more severely affected than the feet.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2E: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2C has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect in the neurofilament light gene on chromosome 8p21.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2F: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2F has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect in the HSPB1 gene on chromosome 7.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2G: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2G has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect on chromosome 12.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2H: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2H has an autosomal recessive inheritance and involves a defect in the GDAP1 gene on chromosome 8.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2I: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2J: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2J has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect on chromosome 1q22.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2K: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2K has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect on chromosome 8.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 2L: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 2L has an autosomal dominant inheritance and involves a defect in the HSPB8 gene on chromosome 12.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 4A: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4A has an autosomal recessive inheritance and involves a defect in the GDAP 1 protein gene on chromosome 8. The recessive forms of CMT tend to be more severe than the dominant form and often involve hand and foot problems as well as additional systemic symptoms.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 4B1: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4B1 has an autosomal recessive inheritance and involves a defect in MTMR2 gene on chromosome 11.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 4B2: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4B2 has an autosomal recessive inheritance and involves a defect in the CMT4B2 gene on chromosome 11.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 4B2, with early-onset glaucoma: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. This type is characterized by the involvement of glaucoma which starts during childhood.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 4C: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4B2 has an autosomal recessive inheritance and involves a defect in the KIAA1985 gene on chromosome 5. It involves motor and sensory problems as well as scoliosis.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 4E: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4B2 has an autosomal recessive inheritance and involves a defect in the EGR2 gene on chromosome 10.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 4F: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4F has an autosomal recessive form of inheritance and is a severe form of the disease. It involves a defect in the PRX gene on Chromosome 19q13.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 4G: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4G has an autosomal recessive form of inheritance and is a severe form of the disease. It involves a defect on Chromosome 10.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, Type 4H: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4H has an autosomal recessive form of inheritance and involves a defect on Chromosome 11.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, X-linked: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type X2 is an inherited defect of the X chromosome and affects males to a greater degree than females.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, X-linked recessive, 2: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type X2 is an inherited defect of the X chromosome and affects males to a greater degree than females.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, X-linked recessive, 3: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type X3 is an inherited defect of the X chromosome and affects males to a greater degree than females.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, X-linked recessive, 4: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4X is an inherited defect of the X chromosome and affects males to a greater degree than females and also involves mental retardation and deafness.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, X-linked recessive, 5: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type X5 is an inherited defect of the X chromosome and affects males to a greater degree than females. In addition to normal CMT symptoms it also involves deafness and eye problems.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, X-linked, 1: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type X1 is an inherited defect of the X chromosome (defect in GJB1 gene) and affects males to a greater degree than females. Transient central nervous system symptoms are also sometimes involved.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, demyelinating, autosomal dominant: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, dominant intermediate 1: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. The condition is denoted dominant intermediate because it is inherited dominantly and the nerve conduction speed is at an intermediate level. It involves a defect in chromosome 10.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, dominant intermediate 2: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. The condition is denoted dominant intermediate because it is inherited dominantly and the nerve conduction speed is at an intermediate level. It involves a defect in the dynamin-2 gene on chromosome 19p13.2.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, dominant intermediate 3: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. The condition is denoted dominant intermediate because it is inherited dominantly and the nerve conduction speed is at an intermediate level. It involves a defect in the tyrosyl-tRNA gene on chromosome 1p35.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 1: A slow-progressing muscle disease characterized by muscle weakness and wasting that starts in the hands and feet. Very few patients become wheelchair dependent and life span is not affected. The disorder is inherited in an dominant pattern an involves demyelination of the nerves.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 2: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormalities in the axon of the peripheral nerve cells instead of the myelin sheath coating of the nerves. The condition manifests as muscle weakness and wasting that usually starts in the legs and spreads to the hands and other parts of the body. The severity, age of onset and rate of progression of the condition varies depending on the genetic origin of the defect.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, type 4: A rare group of demyelinating motor and sensory neuropathies consisting of a number of subtypes. The various subtypes are caused by different genetic defects.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 aplasia cutis congenital: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. This form of the condition is inherited recessively and involves only mild muscle symptoms as well as a scalp defect.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth, demyelinating, autosomal recessive: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Type 4 has an autosomal recessive form of inheritance and is a severe form of the disease.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dinitrophenol: Dinitrophenol is a chemical that has various applications: herbicide, pesticide, fungicide, acaricide, manufacture of dyes and wood preservative. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy: A rare disorder involving swelling of nerve roots and destruction of the protective layer around nerves. Severe symptoms can take up to a year or more to develop.
  • Cobalt poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to cobalt.
  • Colchicine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Complex 5 mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency: A rare genetic defect where an enzyme deficiency (ATP synthetase) disrupts cellular processes. Any of a variety of the components of the enzyme may be missing or defective and hence the clinical presentation and severity may vary. The deficiency may result in a variety of symptoms and conditions of variable severity such as Leber's myopathy, Leigh syndrome, cardiomyopathy and NARP (neuropathy, ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa).
  • Congenital hypomyelination neuropathy: A rare neurological disorder that is apparent at birth and is characterized by breathing difficulty and muscle problems.
  • Corpus callosum agenesis-neuropathy: A rare genetic disorder involving mental retardation, progressive neuropathy and absence of the fibers that connect the two halves of the brain together.
  • Cruse Syndrome: A condition observed in four generations of one family. It is characterized by hearing impairment, trigeminal neuralgia and peripheral nervous system problems. The nature and severity of the symptoms vary amongst patients. Hearing loss usually starts between the fourth and sixth decade of life.
  • Deafness mesenteric diverticula of small bowel neuropathy: A rare genetic condition characterized by deafness, gastrointestinal abnormalities and neuropathy.
  • Deafness peripheral -- neuropathy -- arterial disease: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by artery disease, deafness and peripheral neuropathy.
  • Dejerine-Sottas Syndrome: A condition characterized by a progressive hyperplasia of the interstitial connective tissue causing thickening of the peripheral nerve
  • Dejerine-Sottas disease: An inherited, progressive, hypertrophic nervous system disorder which affects limb function.
  • Diabetes: Failing or reduced ability of the body to handle sugars.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 1: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p21.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 10: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 10 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10p15.1.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 11: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 11 is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q24.3-q31.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 12: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 12 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q33.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 13: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 13 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q34.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 15: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 15 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q21.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 17: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 17 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q25.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 18: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 18 is linked to a defect on chromosome 5q31.1-q33.1.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 19: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 19 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q24.3.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 2: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11p15.5.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 20: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 20 is linked to a defect on chromosome 12q24.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 21: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 21 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q25.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 22: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 22 is linked to a defect on chromosome 3p21.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 23: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 23 is linked to a defect on chromosome 4q27.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 24: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 24 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q23.31.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 3: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 15q26.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 4: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11q13.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 5: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q25.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 6: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 6 is linked to a defect on chromosome 18q21.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 7: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 7 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q31.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 8: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 81 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q25-q27.
  • Diabetes-like neuropathy symptoms: Also known as peripheral neuropathy. It is a typical presentation of diabetes but can be a presentation of other diseases too.
  • Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: Diabetic nerve damage affecting toes, feet, and sometimes hands.
  • Diabetic neuropathy: Nerve damage from diabetes affecting any body part; most commonly feet.
  • Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V: An inherited condition characterized by progressive muscle weakness in the hands and feet due to nerve cell damage in the spinal cord.
  • Dysautonomia like disorder: A very rare condition observed in two sibling and characterized mainly by mental retardation and autonomic neuropathy. The sense of taste is normal.
  • Eye neuropathy: Neuropathy of the eye nerves
  • Familial amyloid polyneuropathy: A rare inherited condition where impaired nerve function is caused by amyloid deposits in peripheral nerves.
  • Fibromyalgia: A difficult to diagnose condition affecting the muscles and/or joints
  • Giant axonal neuropathy: A rare genetic disorder characterized by incoordination, vision problems and dementia caused by abnormalities of a nerve cell component.
  • Groll-Hirschowitz syndrome: A rare genetic condition characterized by deafness, gastrointestinal abnormalities and neuropathy.
  • Guillain-Barre Syndrome: A rare progressive form of ascending polyneuropathy believed to be an autoimmune response.
  • Hagemoser Weinstein Bresnick syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by deafness, neuropathy and vision problems.
  • Hand neuropathy: Neuropathy (nerve damage) affecting the hands
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Germanium: Germanium is used as a health food supplement mainly in Japan but it can cause various problems if too much is taken. Chronic use and the ingestion of a large amount at one time can result in overdose symptoms.
  • Hereditary Motor and Sensory Neuropathy with Deafness, Mental Retardation and Absence of Large Myelinated Fibers: An inherited condition reported in three brothers involving mental retardation, deafness and nerve and muscle problems. The hearing loss is severe and occurs in the first year of life.
  • Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies: A rare disorder where the peripheral nerves are more sensitive to pressure than normal which results in recurring periods of numbness, tingling and sometimes loss of muscle function. The condition can affect one or more nerves such as the carpal tunnel nerve. Permanent damage to peripheral nerves can result from recurring episodes. The severity of symptoms are greatly variable from virtually asymptomatic to disability.
  • Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy 3: A very rare inherited disorder affecting the peripheral and autonomic nervous system and characterized by reduced tear production, excessive sweating, poor body temperature control, blood pressure problems, impaired sensation and poor muscle control.
  • Hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1: A rare genetic disorder where abnormalities in the nerves that control automatic responses causes loss of sensation in limbs.
  • Hereditary sensory neuropathy type 2: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a loss of sensation in arms and legs as well as inflammation of fingers and toes.
  • Hypertrophic neuropathy of Dejerine-Sottas: An inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Hypoactive deep tendon reflexes: delayed tendon reflexes
  • Hypomyelination neuropathy -- arthrogryposis: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by insufficient myelination of peripheral nerves and contractures at birth. The myelin sheath is a protective coating around nerves.
  • Infantile axonal neuropathy: A very rare form of progressive nerve damage that starts early in life. The central nervous system is also usually involved.
  • Leber hereditary optic neuropathy:
  • Limbic encephalitis -- neuromyotonia -- hyperhidrosis -- polyneuropathy: A rare autoimmune disorder involving excessive sweating, dysfunction central nervous system and neuromyotonia. The condition occurs when the body develops antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channels.
  • Liver disease -- retinitis pigmentosa -- polyneuropathy -- epilepsy: An inherited disorder characterized by an enzyme (Alpha-methyl-acyl-CoA racemase) deficiency, liver disease, epilepsy, polyneuropathy and eye problems. The neuropathy tends to start during adulthood.
  • MADSAM: A rare sensory and motor nerve disease which causes progressive numbness and weakness that usually starts in the hands. The condition may progress for a while and then remit.
  • Metabolic disorders: Disorders that affect the metabolic system in human
  • Miller Fisher Syndrome: Autoimmune nerve condition.
  • Moebius axonal neuropathy -- hypogonadism: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by facial paralysis due to problems with 6th and 7th nerve development (Moebius sequence) and hypogonadism.
  • Motor and Sensory Neuropathy with Sensorineural Hearing Loss, Bouldin type: A rare condition observed in two sibling and characterized by hearing loss during adulthood and motor and sensory neuropathy.
  • Motor and Sensory Neuropathy, Optic Atrophy and Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A very rare inherited condition characterized by vision and hearing impairment and muscle and sensory problems. Hearing impairment is progressive and usually starts in early childhood.
  • Motor and Sensory Neuropathy, Pigmentary Retinopathy and Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A condition described in three generations of one family. The condition is characterized by vision and hearing impairment and muscle and sensory problems. Hearing impairment is progressive and usually starts in early childhood.
  • Motor neuropathy: A rare disorder involving progressive muscle weakness. The rate of progression, severity and age of onset is variable.
  • Motor neuropathy, peripheral with dysautonomia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by slowly progressive muscle weakness and wasting and abnormal function of the bodies automatically regulated processes resulting in excess sweating and other problems.
  • Mucolipidosis type 1: An inherited metabolic disorder where a defect in the enzyme alpha-neuraminidase prevents glycoproteins being metabolized - a milder form of the condition than sialidosis type II.
  • Multifocal motor neuropathy: Disorder of progressive muscle weakness.
  • Multifocal motor neuropathy with conduction block: A very rare disorder involving progressive destruction of the protective sheath around nerves. Usually arms are affected first and occasionally the legs are involved. It is believed to be an immune mediated disorder.
  • Muscle atrophy: Decrease in size and bulk of muscle.
  • Muscle weakness: A condition which is characterized by an inability of the muscles to function at their full strenght
  • Myelomatous polyneuropathy: Polyneuropathy may be associated with multiple myeloma which is a tumour of the plasma cells.
  • Nervous system conditions: Diseases affecting the nerves and the nervous system.
  • Neuritis: Inflammation of a nerve.
  • Neurological disorders related to AIDS: It usually occurs due to decreased immunity.
  • Neuropathic pain: Pain that is caused by the nerves
  • Neuropathy -- ataxia -- retinitis pigmentosa: A rare inherited disorder where defects in the energy producing part of cells affects the nervous system and causes symptoms such as muscle and vision problems. Severity and rang of symptoms are variable.
  • Neuropathy ataxia and retinis pigmentosa: A rare inherited disorder where defects in the energy producing part of cells affects the nervous system and causes symptoms such as muscle and vision problems. Severity and rang of symptoms are variable.
  • Neuropathy congenital sensory neurotrophic keratitis: A recessively inherited nerve disease which affects sensation and the eyes. Neurotrophic keratitis is a degenerative eye disease caused by damage to the trigeminal nerve. The lack of sensation in the limbs results in frequent damage to the tissues as the patient is unaware of pain or temperature.
  • Neuropathy hereditary sensory and autonomic type 1: A neurological condition which can start in late childhood or adulthood and progresses slowly. It involves mainly sensory loss in the hands and feet as well as autonomic symptoms.
  • Neuropathy hereditary with liability to pressure palsies:
  • Neuropathy motor sensory type 2 deafness mental retardation: An inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. Deafness and mental retardation are also involved.
  • Neuropathy sensory spastic paraplegia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by sensory nerve degeneration and spastic paraplegia. The extremities of the hands and feet have reduced pain sensation and disfiguring ulcers tend to develop.
  • Neuropathy, Hereditary Sensory and Autonomic Type I: Type I hereditary sensory neuropathy is an inherited condition characterized by progressive degeneration of the nervous system which manifests primarily as loss of sensation in the hands and feet. The sensory loss is worse in the feet and legs than the hands and arms. Muscle wasting and weakness of variable severity tends to occur after sensory loss.
  • Neuropathy, Hereditary Sensory, Type I: Type I hereditary sensory neuropathy is an inherited condition characterized by progressive degeneration of the nervous system which manifests primarily as loss of sensation in the hands and feet. The sensory loss is worse in the feet and legs than the hands and arms. Muscle wasting and weakness of variable severity tends to occur after sensory loss.
  • Neuropathy, Hereditary Sensory, Type II: A very rare inherited condition characterized mainly by the loss of all sensations such as pain, temperature and touch. The sensation impairment starts in the toes and fingers and spreads up the limbs with the trunk occasionally being affected. Injuries to the hands and feet are common as there is no pain associated with injury and the patient may be unaware that they even have an injury.
  • Neuropathy, Hereditary Sensory, Type IV: A rare disorder characterized mainly by insensitivity to pain and inability to sweat.
  • Neuropathy, congenital, with arthrogryposis multiplex: A very rare condition characterized by peripheral neuropathy from birth and multiple contractures. The condition is generally not progressive.
  • Neuropathy, distal hereditary motor: An inherited group of neuromuscular disorders that affects the nerve cells in the spinal cord and causes weakness and wasting of the muscles in the hands and feet. The condition is generally progressive but the rate is variable. The muscles only are affected and there is no sensory impairment.
  • Neuropathy, distal hereditary motor, Jerash type: An inherited neuromuscular disease that causes progressive muscle wasting and weakness in the limbs without any sensory impairment.
  • Neuropathy, distal hereditary motor, type III: An inherited neuromuscular disease that causes progressive muscle wasting and weakness in the limbs without any sensory impairment. HMN III and HMN IV are forms of autosomal recessive distal neuronopathy type 3 - the only difference is that HMN III is a slightly milder version.
  • Neuropathy, distal hereditary motor, type VIIA: An inherited neuromuscular disease that causes progressive muscle wasting and weakness in the limbs and vocal cord paralysis. There is no sensory impairment.
  • Neuropathy, hereditary motor and sensory, LOM type: A severe form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease which involves the loss of the protective covering around nerves resulting in various nerve problems. Muscle weakness and wasting and sensory loss is more severe in the ends of the arms and legs.
  • Neuropathy, hereditary motor and sensory, Okinawa type: A dominantly inherited, slow-progressing motor and sensory nerve disease which primarily involves the proximal muscles (i.e. the muscles closest to the trunk of the body).
  • Neuropathy, hereditary, sensory, radicular: A rare inherited degenerative disorder of the nervous system characterized by sensory loss in limbs, pain and foot ulcers.
  • Numbness: Loss of feeling or sensation
  • Optic Atrophy -- Hearing Loss -- Peripheral Neuropathy, Autosomal Dominant: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by deafness, neuropathy and vision problems.
  • Optic atrophy deafness neuropathy: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by deafness, neuropathy and vision problems.
  • Optic atrophy, deafness and peripheral neuropathy: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by degeneration of the optic nerve, hearing impairment and peripheral neuropathy. Not all patients will develop peripheral neuropathy.
  • Optic atrophy, hearing loss and peripheral neuropathy: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by degeneration of the optic nerve, hearing impairment and peripheral neuropathy. Not all patients will develop peripheral neuropathy.
  • Optic atrophy, hearing loss and peripheral neuropathy, autosomal recessive: A very rare, recessively inherited syndrome characterized mainly by degeneration of the optic nerve, hearing impairment and peripheral neuropathy. The severity of the symptoms is variable.
  • Optic neuropathy, anterior ischemic: Impaired vision due to optic nerve damage caused by problems with the blood supply to the nerve. The non-arteritic form is caused by and interrupted blood supply to the optic disk. Usually one eye is affected first and maybe eventually be followed by the other. Often only part of the visual field is affected.
  • POEMS: A very rare disorder that has widespread effects on the body: P -- polyneuropathy, O -- organopathy, E -- endocrinopathy, M -- monoclonal gammopathy and S -- skin changes.
  • POEMS syndrome: A very rare disorder that has widespread effects on the body: P - polyneuropathy, O - organopathy, E - endocrinopathy, M - monoclonal gammopathy, S - skin changes.
  • Paresthesias: Tingling, prickling, numbness or burning sensations
  • Peripheral Neuropathy -- Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction -- Deafness: A reported case involving chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, deafness from birth and peripheral neuropathy.
  • Peripheral neuropathy: Peripheral neuropathy is the term for damage to nerves of the peripheral nervous system, which may be caused either by diseases of the nerve or from the side-effects of systemic illness.
  • Plant poisoning -- Amygdalin: Amygdalin is a chemical found naturally in various plants e.g. stone fruit kernels and raw almonds. Eating these parts of the plant that contain the chemical can cause symptoms of cyanide poisoning as the amygdalin is converted to cyanide by the digestive process. Obviously, the concentration of the chemical varies amongst species of plant and often, significant quantities are needed to produce symptoms. Nevertheless, severe poisoning can result in death. Amygdalin is believed by some to inhibit cancers but there has been no conclusive proof of this.
  • Plant poisoning -- Cyanogenic glycoside: Cyanogenic glycoside is a toxin found naturally in various plants e.g. cherries, plums, almonds, peaches, apricots, apples and cassava. The chemical is usually concentrated in the seeds, kernels or wilted leaves. Eating these parts of the plant that contain the chemical can cause symptoms of cyanide poisoning as the cyanogenic glycoside is converted to cyanide by the digestive process. Even chewing the leaves can result in conversion to cyanide due to the presence of digestive enzymes in the mouth. Obviously, the concentration of the chemical varies amongst species of plant and often, significant quantities are needed to produce symptoms. Nevertheless, severe poisoning can result in death.
  • Polyarteritis nodosa: A serious blood vessel disease where small and medium-sized arteries become swollen and damaged and are unable to adequately supply oxygenated blood to various tissues in the body. The disease can occur in a mild form or a serious, rapidly fatal form.
  • Polyneuropathy: Dysfunction and/or damage to neurons, causing a loss of sensory or motor function.
  • Polyneuropathy -- Ophthalmoplegia -- Leukoencehalopathy -- Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction: A rare genetic disorder which affects a number of body systems and manifests results in symptoms such as droopy eyelids, progressive eye muscle weakness, gastrointestinal dysmotility, brain disease, thin body, peripheral neuropathy and muscle disease.
  • Polyneuropathy -- hand defect: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by flexion deformity of the thumb and some fingers as well as sensory disturbance in the arms.
  • Polyneuropathy -- mental retardation -- acromicria -- premature menopause: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by premature menopause, sensory impairment, mental retardation and small, delicate facial bones.
  • Polyneuropathy, Hearing Loss, Ataxia, Retinitis Pigmentosa and Cataract: A very rare, recessively inherited condition characterized by the association of vision, hearing and neurological problems. The condition generally starts during the second decade of life and progresses slowly.
  • Polyradiculoneuropathy: An inflammatory disorder that affects the peripheral nerves and the spinal nerve roots. The onset and progression of the disease is variable with severe cases resulting in premature death. The condition is chronic and progressive but periodic relapses can occur.
  • Porphyria: A group of disorders characterized by excess production of porphyrin or its precursors which affects the skin and/or nervous system.
  • Porphyria, Ala-D: A very rare inherited disorder where involving a lack of the enzyme delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase.
  • Probable human carcinogen -- Azacitidine: Azacitidine is a drug deemed to be a probable carcinogen to humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Radiculopathy: A condition characterized by disease of the nerve roots
  • Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome: A condition characterized by pain and reduced range of motion in the shoulder and hand of the affected arm.
  • Refsum Disease: A metabolic disorder where a deficiency of phytanic acid alpha-hydroxylase results in a buildup of phytanic acid in the body which causes neurological disorders.
  • Refsum disease with increased pipecolic acidemia: A rare disorder involving all the clinical features of Refsum disease as well as high blood levels of L-pipecolic acid. Refsum disease is a metabolic disorder where a deficiency of phytanic acid alpha-hydroxylase results in a buildup of phytanic acid in the body which causes neurological disorders.
  • Rosenberg-Chutorian Syndrome: A very rare disorder involving eye, ear and nerve disorders.
  • Sensory ataxic neuropathy, dysarthria, and ophthalmoparesis: A very rare syndrome characterized by progressive ataxia, eye muscle problems and a speech disorder (dysarthria).
  • Sensory neuropathy type 1: Type I sensory neuropathy is an inherited condition characterized by progressive degeneration of the nervous system which manifests primarily as loss of sensation in the hands and feet. The sensory loss is worse in the feet and legs than the hands and arms. Muscle wasting and weakness of variable severity tends to occur after sensory loss.
  • Severe infantile axonal neuropathy: A rare disorder involving the early onset of severe neuropathy.
  • Sexual neuropathy: Nerve damage resulting in reduced sexual function in men or women
  • Sialidosis type 1 and 3: A rare inherited biochemical disorder involving the deficiency of an enzyme (alpha-N-acetylneuraminidase) which results in the harmful accumulation of certain chemicals (sialyloligosaccharides and sialylglycopeptides) in various body tissues.
  • Sialidosis type I: An inherited metabolic disorder where a defect in the enzyme alpha-neuraminidase prevents glycoproteins being metabolized - a milder form of the condition than sialidosis type II.
  • Spastic paraplegia -- neuropathy -- poikiloderma: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by progressive stiffness and weakness of the legs, peripheral nerve degeneration and a skin disorder called poikiloderma. The eyelashes and eyebrows are usually gone by the age of three.
  • Spastic paraplegia type 5A, recessive: A rare disorder characterized mainly by progressive stiffness and weakness of lower leg muscles. Bladder and speech problems are also usually present.
  • Spinal bulbar motor neuropathy: A rare inherited disease that affects the nerves in the spine and in the bulbous (bulbar) part of the brain stem. The main signs are muscle weakness and wasting.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy, type 2: A neurological disorder characterized by progressive ataxia, tremor and muscle weakness and wasting. The rate of progression and severity is variable with some needing wheelchairs in their second decade and others still capable of some walking in their 4th decade.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive, with axonal neuropathy: A rare neurological disorder caused by a genetic defect (chromosome 114q31-q32, recessive) and resulting in ataxia and dysarthria.
  • Subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord: Gradual spinal cord degeneration
  • Synovitis granulomatous with uveitis and cranial neuropathies: A rare chronic inflammatory condition characterized by arthritis, dermatitis and uveitis. The condition may have a similar presentation to a condition called early-onset sarcoidosis and genetic testing may be needed to distinguish the conditions.
  • Synovitis granulomatous with uveitis and cranial neuropathies, familial: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by joint inflammation, inflammation of the uvea (layer between sclera and retina) and cranial neuropathy (damage to cranial nerves).
  • Tangier disease: A rare disorder characterized by a very low level of HDL (high-density lipoprotein or "good cholesterol") in the blood. The condition occurs because the body lacks the gene to make a certain protein (Apolipoprotein A1) which normally transports fats from tissues to where it is needed.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Agenerase: Use of an HIV drug called Agenerase may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Amiodarone: Use of a cardiovascular drug called Amiodarone may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Amiodarone tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Amitriptyline: Use of drug called Amitriptyline may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Amitriptyline tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Amphotericin: Use of drug called Amphotericin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Amphotericin tends to primarily affect muscle movement (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Amprenavir: Use of an HIV drug called Amprenavir may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Arsenic: Exposure to Arsenic can cause neuropathy as Arsenic is toxic to the peripheral nervous system. This toxin causes mostly sensory or sensorimotor polyneuropathy (which affects sensation) with little or no weakness involved. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Due to the fact that any of a large number of toxins or conditions can cause neuropathies, it is very difficult to diagnose the exact cause.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Calcium Carbimide: Use of a drug called Calcium Carbimide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Calcium Carbimide tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Carbon disulfide: Exposure to Carbon disulfide can cause neuropathy as Carbon disulfide is toxic to the peripheral nervous system. This toxin causes mostly sensory or sensorimotor polyneuropathy (which affects sensation) with little or no weakness involved. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Due to the fact that any of a large number of toxins or conditions can cause neuropathies, it is very difficult to diagnose the exact cause.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Carbutamide: Use of drug called Carbutamide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Carbutamide tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Chlorambucil: Use of a cancer drug called Chlorambucil may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Chlorambucil tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Chloramphenicol: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Chloramphenicol may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Chloramphenicol tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Chloroquine: Use of an antirheumatic drug called Chloroquine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Chloroquine tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Chlorpropamide: Use of drug called Chlorpropamide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Chlorpropamide tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Cisplatin: Use of a cancer drug called Cisplatin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Clioquinol: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Clioquinol may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Clioquinol tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Clofibrate: Use of a cardiovascular drug called Clofibrate may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Clofibrate tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Colchicine: Use of an antirheumatic drug called Colchicine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Colchicine tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Colistin: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Colistin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Colistin tends to cause mainly paresthesia.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Cytarabine: Use of a cancer drug called Cytarabine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Cytarabine tends to cause mainly paresthesia.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Dapsone: Use of Dapsone, a drug used to tread skin conditions, may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Diamines: Use of a type of antimicrobial drug called Diamines may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Thiamphenicol tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Didanosine: Use of an HIV drug called Didanosine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Disopyramide: Use of a cardiovascular drug called Disopyramide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Disopyramide tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Disulfiram: Use of drug called Disulfiram may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Disulfiram tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Ergotamine: Use of a drug called Ergotamine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Ergotamine tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Ethambutol: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Ethambutol may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Ethambutol tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Ethionamide: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Ethionamide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Ethionamide tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Ethoglucid: Use of a drug called Ethoglucid may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Ethoglucid tends to cause mainly localized neuropathy.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Ethylene oxide: Exposure to ethylene oxide can cause neuropathy as ethylene oxide is toxic to the peripheral nervous system. This toxin causes mostly sensory or sensorimotor polyneuropathy (which affects sensation) with little or no weakness involved. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Due to the fact that any of a large number of toxins or conditions can cause neuropathies, it is very difficult to diagnose the exact cause.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Gemfibrozil: Use of a cholesterol-lowering drug called Gemfibrozil may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Glutethimide: Use of drug called Glutethimide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Glutethimide tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Gold: Therapeutic use of gold to treat rheumatism may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). The nerve toxicity of the substance may vary amongst people - tolerance level to the drug varies amongst people. Gold tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Hydralazine: Use of a blood pressure drug called Hydralazine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Indapamid: Use of a diuretic and antihypertensive agent called Indapamid may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Indomethacin: Use of an antirheumatic drug called Indomethacin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Indomethacin tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Isoniazid: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Isoniazid may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Isoniazid tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy). B6 supplements may help prevent the neuropathy.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Lead: Exposure to lead can cause neuropathy as lead is toxic to the peripheral nervous system. This toxin causes mostly sensory or sensorimotor polyneuropathy (which affects sensation) with little or no weakness involved. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Due to the fact that any of a large number of toxins or conditions can cause neuropathies, it is very difficult to diagnose the exact cause.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Lopid: Use of a cholesterol-lowering drug called Lopid may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Lovastatin: Use of a cholesterol-lowering drug called Lovastatin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Lozol: Use of a cholesterol-lowering drug called Lozol may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Mercury: Exposure to Mercury can cause neuropathy as Mercury is toxic to the peripheral nervous system. This toxin causes mostly sensory or sensorimotor polyneuropathy (which affects sensation) with little or no weakness involved. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Due to the fact that any of a large number of toxins or conditions can cause neuropathies, it is very difficult to diagnose the exact cause.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Methaqualone: Use of drug called Methaqualone may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Methaqualone tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Methimazole: Use of drug called Methimazole may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Methimazole tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Methyl Bromide: Exposure to Methyl Bromide can cause neuropathy as Methyl Bromide is toxic to the peripheral nervous system. This toxin causes mostly sensory or sensorimotor polyneuropathy (which affects sensation) with little or no weakness involved. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Due to the fact that any of a large number of toxins or conditions can cause neuropathies, it is very difficult to diagnose the exact cause.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Methysergide: Use of a drug called Methysergide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Methysergide tends to cause mainly paresthesia.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Metronidazole: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Metronidazole may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Metronidazole tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Mevacor: Use of a cholesterol-lowering drug called Mevacor may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Mustine: Use of a drug called mustine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Mustine tends to mainly cause localized neuropathy.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Nalidixic Acid: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Nalidixic Acid may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Nalidixic Acid tends to cause mainly paresthesia.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Nitrofurantoin: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Nitrofurantoin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Nitrofurantoin tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Nitrofurazone: Use of a cancer drug called Nitrofurazone may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Nitrofurazone tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Norvir: Use of an HIV drug called Norvir may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Perhexiline: Use of a cardiovascular drug called Perhexiline may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Perhexiline tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Phenelzine: Use of a drug called Phenelzine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Phenelzine tends to cause mainly paresthesia.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Phenylbutazone: Use of an antirheumatic drug called Phenylbutazone may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Phenylbutazone tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Phenytoin: Use of drug called Phenytoin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Phenytoin tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Podophyllum: Use of a cancer drug called Podophyllum may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Podophyllum tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs): Exposure to Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) can cause neuropathy as Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is toxic to the peripheral nervous system. This toxin causes mostly sensory or sensorimotor polyneuropathy (which affects sensation) with little or no weakness involved. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Due to the fact that any of a large number of toxins or conditions can cause neuropathies, it is very difficult to diagnose the exact cause.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Procarbazine: Use of a cancer drug called Procarbazine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Procarbazine tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Propranolol: Use of a cardiovascular drug called Propranolol may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Propranolol tends to cause mainly paresthesia.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Propylthiouracil: Use of a drug called Propylthiouracil may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Propylthiouracil tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Ritonavir: Use of an HIV drug called Ritonavir may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Stavudine: Use of an HIV drug called Stavudine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Streptomycin: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Streptomycin may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Streptomycin tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Sulfoxone: Use of a drug called Sulfoxone may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sulfoxone tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Sulphonamide: Use of Sulphonamide drugs may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sulphonamide tends to primarily affect muscle movement (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Sulthiame: Use of a drug called Sulthiame may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sulthiame tends to cause mainly paresthesia.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Thalidomide: Use of drug called Thalidomide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Thalidomide tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Thallium: Exposure to Thalliumcan cause neuropathy as Thallium is toxic to the peripheral nervous system. This toxin causes mostly sensory or sensorimotor polyneuropathy (which affects sensation) with little or no weakness involved. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Due to the fact that any of a large number of toxins or conditions can cause neuropathies, it is very difficult to diagnose the exact cause.
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Thiamphenicol: Use of an antimicrobial drug called Thiamphenicol may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Thiamphenicol tends to cause mainly sensory symptoms rather than motor neuropathy (movement problems).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Tolbutamide: Use of drug called Tolbutamide may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Tolbutamide tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Videx: Use of an HIV drug called Videx may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Vincristine: Use of a cancer drug called Vincristine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Vincristine tends to primarily affect sensation and muscle movement (sensorimotor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Zalcitabine: Use of an HIV drug called Zalcitabine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Zerit: Use of an HIV drug called Zerit may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- Zidovudine: Use of an HIV drug called Zidovudine may cause damage to the peripheral nervous system (neuropathy) as it can have a toxic effect on the nerves. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Usually more than one nerve is affected (polyneuropathy). Tolerance to the drug may vary amongst people with the elderly and other susceptible people having lower thresholds before nerve problems occur. Sensations (sensory neuropathy) are predominantly affected but sometimes movement may also be impaired (motor neuropathy).
  • Toxic polyneuropathy -- acrylamide: Exposure to acrylamide can cause neuropathy as acrylamide is toxic to the peripheral nervous system. This toxin causes mostly sensory or sensorimotor polyneuropathy (which affects sensation) with little or no weakness involved. Symptoms usually start in the outermost parts of the body such as the fingers and toes and moves towards the centre of the body. Due to the fact that any of a large number of toxins or conditions can cause neuropathies, it is very difficult to diagnose the exact cause.
  • Type 1 diabetes: Severe insulin-treated diabetes typically occurring in young people.
  • Type 2 diabetes: Most common diabetes in adults, usually progressing slowly, mostly treated without insulin at diagnosis.
  • Ulnar Neuropathy: Condition of entrapment of the ulnar nerve at the elbow, causing neurological symptoms in the corresponding parts of the forearm, hand and fingers
  • Variegate porphyria: A rare metabolic disorder characterized by a deficiency of a certain enzyme which results in a build-up in the body of porphyrins or their precursors. This form of hepatic porphyria causes the sufferer to have acute attacks as well as skin sensitivity.
  • Vascular neuropathy: Neuropathy affecting the nerves controlling blood vessels
  • Vasculitis: Inflammation of a blood or lymph vessel
  • Vitamin B12 Deficiency: A deficiency of Vitamin B12 primarily causes anemias the body is unable to make sufficient quantities of normal red blood cells. Severe cases can lead to permanent nervous system problems. The vitamin B12 deficiency can result from absorption problems, insufficient dietary intake, certain medications (e.g. metformin), inherited conditions (e.g. transcobalamin deficiency) and certain chronic parasitic intestinal infestations.
  • Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome: An inherited immune system disorder that affects only males and is characterized by recurring infections, eczema and reduced level of blood platelets (thrombocytopenia).
  • Wright Dyck syndrome: A condition characterised by a sensory neuropathy associated with deafness and dementia

 

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