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Treatments for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Treatment List for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

The list of treatments mentioned in various sources for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma includes the following list. Always seek professional medical advice about any treatment or change in treatment plans.

Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Is the Diagnosis Correct?

The first step in getting correct treatment is to get a correct diagnosis. Differential diagnosis list for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma may include:

Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Marketplace Products, Discounts & Offers

Products, offers and promotion categories available for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma:

Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Research Doctors & Specialists

Research all specialists including ratings, affiliations, and sanctions.

Drugs and Medications used to treat Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma:

Note:You must always seek professional medical advice about any prescription drug, OTC drug, medication, treatment or change in treatment plans.

Some of the different medications used in the treatment of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma include:

Unlabeled Drugs and Medications to treat Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma:

Unlabelled alternative drug treatments for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma include:

Latest treatments for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma:

The following are some of the latest treatments for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma:

Hospital statistics for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma:

These medical statistics relate to hospitals, hospitalization and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma:

  • 0.068% (8,683) of hospital consultant episodes were for follicular non-Hodgkin’s disease in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 96% of hospital consultant episodes for required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 54% of hospital consultant episodes for follicular non-Hodgkin’s disease were for men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 46% of hospital consultant episodes for follicular non-Hodgkin’s disease were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 10% of hospital consultant episodes for required emergency hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • more hospital information...»

Hospitals & Medical Clinics: Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

Research quality ratings and patient incidents/safety measures for hospitals and medical facilities in specialties related to Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma:

Hospital & Clinic quality ratings »

Choosing the Best Treatment Hospital: More general information, not necessarily in relation to Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, on hospital and medical facility performance and surgical care quality:

Medical news summaries about treatments for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma:

The following medical news items are relevant to treatment of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma:

Discussion of treatments for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma:

What You Need To Know About Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: NCI (Excerpt)

Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is usually treated with chemotherapy , radiation therapy , or a combination of these treatments. In some cases, bone marrow transplantation , biological therapies , or surgery may be options. For indolent lymphomas, the doctor may decide to wait until the disease causes symptoms before starting treatment. Often, this approach is called "watchful waiting." (Source: excerpt from What You Need To Know About Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: NCI)

What You Need To Know About Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: NCI (Excerpt)

Chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the most common treatments for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, although bone marrow transplantation, biological therapies, or surgery are sometimes used.

Chemotherapy is the use of drugs to kill cancer cells. Chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma usually consists of a combination of several drugs. Patients may receive chemotherapy alone or in combination with radiation therapy.

Chemotherapy is usually given in cycles: a treatment period followed by a recovery period, then another treatment period, and so on. Most anticancer drugs are given by injection into a blood vessel (IV ); some are given by mouth. Chemotherapy is a systemic treatment because the drugs enter the bloodstream and travel throughout the body.

Usually a patient has chemotherapy as an outpatient (at the hospital, at the doctor's office, or at home). However, depending on which drugs are given and the patient's general health, a short hospital stay may be needed.

These are some questions patients may want to ask the doctor before starting chemotherapy:

  • What is the goal of this treatment?

  • What drugs will I be taking?

  • Will the drugs cause side effects? What can I do about them?

  • What side effects should I report to you?

  • How long will I need to take this treatment?

  • What can I do to take care of myself during treatment?

  • How will we know if the drugs are working?

Radiation therapy (also called radiotherapy) is the use of high-energy rays to kill cancer cells. Treatment with radiation may be given alone or with chemotherapy. Radiation therapy is local treatment ; it affects cancer cells only in the treated area. Radiation therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma comes from a machine that aims the high-energy rays at a specific area of the body. There is no radioactivity in the body when the treatment is over.

These are some questions a patient may want to ask the doctor before having radiation therapy:

  • What is the goal of this treatment?

  • What are its risks and possible side effects?

  • What side effects should I report to you?

  • How will radiation be given?

  • When will the treatments begin? When will they end?

  • What can I do to take care of myself during therapy?

  • How will we know if the radiation therapy is working?

  • How will treatment affect my normal activities?

Sometimes patients are given chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy to kill undetected cancer cells that may be present in the central nervous system (CNS). In this treatment, called central nervous system prophylaxis , the doctor injects anticancer drugs directly into the cerebrospinal fluid .

Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) may also be a treatment option, especially for patients whose non-Hodgkin's lymphoma has recurred (come back). BMT provides the patient with healthy stem cells (very immature cells that produce blood cells) to replace cells damaged or destroyed by treatment with very high doses of chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. The healthy bone marrow may come from a donor, or it may be marrow that was removed from the patient, treated to destroy cancer cells, stored, and then given back to the person following the high-dose treatment. Until the transplanted bone marrow begins to produce enough white blood cells, patients have to be carefully protected from infection. They usually stay in the hospital for several weeks.

These are some questions patients may want to ask the doctor before having a BMT:

  • What are the benefits of this treatment?

  • What are the risks and possible side effects? What can be done about them?

  • What side effects should I report to you?

  • How long will I be in the hospital? What care will I need after I leave the hospital?

  • How will the treatment affect my normal activities?

  • How will I know if the treatment is working?

Biological therapy (also called immunotherapy) is a form of treatment that uses the body's immune system, either directly or indirectly, to fight cancer or to lessen the side effects that can be caused by some cancer treatments. It uses materials made by the body or made in a laboratory to boost, direct, or restore the body's natural defenses against disease. Biological therapy is sometimes also called biological response modifier therapy.

These are some questions patients may want to ask the doctor before starting biological therapy:

  • What is the goal of this treatment?

  • What drugs will I be taking?

  • Will the treatment cause side effects? If so, what can I do about them?

  • What side effects should I report to you?

  • Will I have to be in the hospital to receive treatment?

  • How long will I need to take this treatment?

  • When will I be able to resume my normal activities?

Surgery may be performed to remove a tumor. Tissue around the tumor and nearby lymph nodes may also be removed during the operation. (Source: excerpt from What You Need To Know About Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: NCI)

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