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What is Progressive Supranuclear Palsy?

What is Progressive Supranuclear Palsy?

  • Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: A disorder characterized by reduced motor control, dementia and eye movement problems.
  • Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: A degenerative disease of the central nervous system characterized by balance difficulties; OCULAR MOTILITY DISORDERS (supranuclear ophthalmoplegia); DYSARTHRIA; swallowing difficulties; and axial DYSTONIA. Onset is usually in the fifth decade and disease progression occurs over several years. Pathologic findings include neurofibrillary degeneration and neuronal loss in the dorsal MESENCEPHALON; SUBTHALAMIC NUCLEUS; RED NUCLEUS; pallidum; dentate nucleus; and vestibular nuclei. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1076-7)
    Source - Diseases Database

Progressive Supranuclear Palsy is listed as a "rare disease" by the Office of Rare Diseases (ORD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). This means that Progressive Supranuclear Palsy, or a subtype of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy, affects less than 200,000 people in the US population.
Source - National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Ophanet, a consortium of European partners, currently defines a condition rare when it affects 1 person per 2,000. They list Progressive Supranuclear Palsy as a "rare disease".
Source - Orphanet

Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: Introduction

Types of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy:

Broader types of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy:

How many people get Progressive Supranuclear Palsy?

Prevalance of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: rare

Who gets Progressive Supranuclear Palsy?

Gender Ratio for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: males:females 2:1

How serious is Progressive Supranuclear Palsy?

Prognosis of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: Not fatal. Ongoing disability but lifespan is often normal.
Complications of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: see complications of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy
Prognosis of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: Although PSP gets progressively worse, no one dies from PSP itself. (Source: excerpt from NINDS Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Information Page: NINDS) ... PSP gets progressively worse but is not itself directly life-threatening. It does, however, predispose patients to serious complications such as pneumonia secondary to difficulty in swallowing (dysphagia). (Source: excerpt from NINDS Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Information Page: NINDS)

What causes Progressive Supranuclear Palsy?

Causes of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: see causes of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy
Causes of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: The symptoms of PSP are caused by a gradual deterioration of brain cells in a few tiny but important places at the base of the brain, in the region called the brainstem. (Source: excerpt from NINDS Progressive Supranuclear Palsy Information Page: NINDS)

What are the symptoms of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy?

Symptoms of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: see symptoms of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

Complications of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: see complications of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

Onset of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: 50-70 years

Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: Testing

Diagnostic testing: see tests for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.

Misdiagnosis: see misdiagnosis and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.

How is it treated?

Doctors and Medical Specialists for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: Neurologist ; see also doctors and medical specialists for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.
Treatments for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: see treatments for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy
Research for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: see research for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

Society issues for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy


Hospitalization statistics for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: The following are statistics from various sources about hospitalizations and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy:

  • 0.0005% (63) of hospital consultant episodes were for progressive supranuclear ophthalmoplegia in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 72% of hospital consultant episodes for progressive supranuclear ophthalmoplegia required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 46% of hospital consultant episodes for progressive supranuclear ophthalmoplegia were for men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 54% of hospital consultant episodes for progressive supranuclear ophthalmoplegia were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 53% of hospital consultant episodes for progressive supranuclear ophthalmoplegia required emergency hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 30.55 days was the mean length of stay in hospitals for progressive supranuclear ophthalmoplegia in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • more statistics...»

Organs Affected by Progressive Supranuclear Palsy:

Organs and body systems related to Progressive Supranuclear Palsy include:

Name and Aliases of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

Main name of condition: Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

Other names or spellings for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy:

PSP, Nuchal dystonia dementia syndrome, Steele-Richardson-Olszewski syndrome, Familial progressive supranuclear palsy (type)

Nuchal dystonia-dementia syndrome, Progressive supranuclear ophthalmoplegia, Steele-Richardson-Olszewski syndrome Source - Diseases Database

Familial progressive supranuclear palsy (type), PSP, Steele-Richardson-Olszewski Syndrome, Supranuclear palsy, progressive, Familial progressive supranuclear palsy (type), PSP, Steele-Richardson-Olszewski Syndrome
Source - Office of Rare Diseases (ORD) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: Related Conditions

Research the causes of these diseases that are similar to, or related to, Progressive Supranuclear Palsy:

 

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