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Symptoms of Raynaud's phenomenon

Symptoms of Raynaud's phenomenon: Introduction

Symptoms and complications of Raynaud's phenomenon are due to constricted and narrowed capillaries, which lead to an insufficient supply of oxygen and nutrients to cells and tissues in the fingers and toes. Less commonly, Raynaud's phenomenon can also cause symptoms and complications in the nose, lips, and earlobes.

Symptoms can be triggered by exposure to cold air, stress, or cold water. This leads to spasms and constriction of the small arteries (called capillaries) in the toes and fingers, resulting in decreased blood flow. Symptoms include a change in color of the affected fingers and toes. The fingers and toes may appear pale, grey or bluish (cyanosis). The hands and feet may feel very cold and there may also be pain, throbbing, burning or numbness.

In advanced cases the decreased blood flow can reduce sensation in the fingers and toes and ulcers and lesions can develop. This can lead to the death (necrosis) of affected tissues and gangrene, which may require removal of the dead tissues or amputation in the most severe cases....more about Raynaud's phenomenon »

Symptoms of Raynaud's phenomenon

The list of signs and symptoms mentioned in various sources for Raynaud's phenomenon includes the 51 symptoms listed below:

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Raynaud's phenomenon: Symptom Checkers

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Raynaud's phenomenon: Symptom Assessment Questionnaires

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Raynaud's phenomenon: Complications

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Diagnostic Testing

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Raynaud's phenomenon: Undiagnosed Conditions

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Wrongly Diagnosed with Raynaud's phenomenon?

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Other Possible Causes of these Symptoms

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Article Excerpts About Symptoms of Raynaud's phenomenon:

Questions and Answers about Raynaud's Phenomenon: NIAMS (Excerpt)

Once the attack begins, a person may experience three phases of skin color changes (white, blue, and red) in the fingers or toes. The order of the changes of color is not the same for all people, and not everyone has all three colors. Pallor (whiteness) may occur in response to spasm of the arterioles and the resulting collapse of the digital arteries. Cyanosis (blueness) may appear because the fingers or toes are not getting enough oxygen-rich blood. The fingers or toes may also feel cold and numb. Finally, as the arterioles dilate (relax) and blood returns to the digits, rubor (redness) may occur. As the attack ends, throbbing and tingling may occur in the fingers and toes. An attack can last from less than a minute to several hours. (Source: excerpt from Questions and Answers about Raynaud's Phenomenon: NIAMS)

Questions and Answers about Raynaud's Phenomenon: NIAMS (Excerpt)

When a person is exposed to cold, the body's normal response is to slow the loss of heat and preserve its core temperature. To maintain this temperature, the blood vessels that control blood flow to the skin surface move blood from arteries near the surface to veins deeper in the body. For people who have Raynaud's phenomenon, this normal body response is intensified by the sudden spasmodic contractions of the small blood vessels (arterioles) that supply blood to the fingers and toes. The arteries of the fingers and toes may also collapse. As a result, the blood supply to the extremities is greatly decreased, causing a reaction that includes skin discoloration and other changes.

Changes in Skin Color and Sensation

Once the attack begins, a person may experience three phases of skin color changes (white, blue, and red) in the fingers or toes. The order of the changes of color is not the same for all people, and not everyone has all three colors. Pallor (whiteness) may occur in response to spasm of the arterioles and the resulting collapse of the digital arteries. Cyanosis (blueness) may appear because the fingers or toes are not getting enough oxygen-rich blood. The fingers or toes may also feel cold and numb. Finally, as the arterioles dilate (relax) and blood returns to the digits, rubor (redness) may occur. As the attack ends, throbbing and tingling may occur in the fingers and toes. An attack can last from less than a minute to several hours. (Source: excerpt from Questions and Answers about Raynaud's Phenomenon: NIAMS)

NHLBI, Raynaud's Phenomenon: NHLBI (Excerpt)

Symptoms include changes in skin color (white to blue to red) and skin temperature (the affected area feels cooler). Usually there is no pain, but it is common for the affected area to feel numb or prickly, as if it has fallen asleep. (Source: excerpt from NHLBI, Raynaud's Phenomenon: NHLBI)

Raynauds Phenomenon: NWHIC (Excerpt)

Attacks are often triggered by exposures to cold or by emotional stress. During an attack, there is a severe reduction of blood flow to the extremities which may cause small blood vessels and arteries to collapse. There may be significant changes in skin color and sensation. An attack may last from less than a minute to several hours. (Source: excerpt from Raynauds Phenomenon: NWHIC)

Raynaud's phenomenon as a Cause of Symptoms or Medical Conditions

When considering symptoms of Raynaud's phenomenon, it is also important to consider Raynaud's phenomenon as a possible cause of other medical conditions. The Disease Database lists the following medical conditions that Raynaud's phenomenon may cause:

- (Source - Diseases Database)

Raynaud's phenomenon as a symptom:

For a more detailed analysis of Raynaud's phenomenon as a symptom, including causes, drug side effect causes, and drug interaction causes, please see our Symptom Center information for Raynaud's phenomenon.

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About signs and symptoms of Raynaud's phenomenon:

The symptom information on this page attempts to provide a list of some possible signs and symptoms of Raynaud's phenomenon. This signs and symptoms information for Raynaud's phenomenon has been gathered from various sources, may not be fully accurate, and may not be the full list of Raynaud's phenomenon signs or Raynaud's phenomenon symptoms. Furthermore, signs and symptoms of Raynaud's phenomenon may vary on an individual basis for each patient. Only your doctor can provide adequate diagnosis of any signs or symptoms and whether they are indeed Raynaud's phenomenon symptoms.

 

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