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Glossary for Respiratory conditions

  • ACHOO: A genetic predisposition to start sneezing in response to bright light - especially just after or while in a dark environment.
  • ACHOO syndrome: A common condition involving uncontrollable sneezing upon exposure to bright light. It can occur after stepping out of a building into the bright sunshine. The number of sneezes is variable.
  • AChR deficiency and short channel open time: Extremely rare condition characterized by respiratory insufficiency from birth, facial dysplasia and paralysis of eye muscles.
  • Accelerated silicosis: An occupation lung disease caused by breathing in silica dust over a long period of time. The lung damage becomes symptomatic and affects breathing and often causes weight loss as well.
  • Actinomycetales infection: A bacterial infection from the order of Actinobacteria. The range of symptoms is variable depending on which bacteria from the order is involved.
  • Actinomycosis: An infection that results from the bacteria sp. Actinomyces.
  • Acute Bronchitis: Respiratory inflammation of the bronchi leading to the lungs
  • Acute Interstitial Pneumonia: A relatively uncommon form of pneumonia that has no apparent cause. Symptoms tend to develop over a period of six months to one and a half years.
  • Acute Silicosis: An occupation lung disease caused by breathing in high levels of silica dust.
  • Acute Sinusitis: A condition which is characterized by an acute inflammatory reaction affecting the sinuses
  • Acute Tracheitis: Tracheitis is a bacterial infection of the trachea and is capable of producing airway obstruction
  • Acute elemental mercury inhalation: Inhalation of elemental mercury can lead to breathing and lung symptoms of various degrees of severity depending on the level of exposure.
  • Acute lower respiratory conditions: An acute condition that occurs in the lower respiratory tract
  • Acute mercury inhalation: Inhalation of mercury vapor can lead to serious symptoms and even death if sufficient quantities are inhaled. Mercury inhalation is more likely in confined or poorly ventilated spaces. Mercury from a broken thermometer can lead to symptoms if it occurs in a confined space.
  • Acute pharyngitis: A condition which is characterized by an acute inflammatory reaction of the pharynx
  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome, Infant: A breathing disorder that occurs in infants. The underdeveloped lungs fail to functioning adequately and the body becomes deprived of oxygen. The condition is more likely to affect premature infants and the greater the prematurity, the greater the risk.
  • Acute upper respiratory infection: Upper respiratory tract infections, are the illnesses caused by an acute infection which involves the upper respiratory tract: nose, sinuses, pharynx or larynx
  • Adenocarcinoma of lung: A tumor that develops in the lining of the lung. The tumor is usually slow growing.
  • Adenocarcinoma of the lung: It is one of the main types of lung cancers. Adenocarcinoma of the lung arises from the secretory (glandular) cells located in the epithelium lining the bronchi.
  • Adenocarcinoma, Bronchiolo-Alveolar: A form of lung cancer that develops in the bronchioles or alveoli.
  • Adenovirus-related Cold: An Adenovirus-related cold is a relatively minor contagious infection of the nose and throat caused by the Adenovirus. Although colds can cause discomfort they are not considered a serious condition.
  • Adult Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic fibrosis is an inherited condition characterized by the production of thick sticky mucus by the mucus glands in the lungs, intestines, liver and pancreas. The condition is most often diagnosed in children or young adults but occasionally, relatively mild symptoms may lead to frequent misdiagnosis or no diagnosis at all unless the symptoms become worse. The condition may be misdiagnosed as emphysema, asthma or chronic bronchitis. It is usually females with a mild form of the disease who tend to be diagnosed at a later age.
  • Adult respiratory distress syndrome: Severe respiratory failure
  • Adult-onset asthma: Adult-onset asthma is a type of asthma that occurs during adulthood. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways. The severity of symptoms is variable. Allergies account for about half the cases of adult-onset asthma.
  • Aggressive fibromatosis -- parapharyngeal space: A type of tumor that occur near in the space around the pharynx and is locally invasive but not malignant. They tend to occur mainly in the head and neck region and symptoms depend on the exact location and aggressiveness of the tumor. Tumors often reoccur after surgical removal which then requires further treatment with radiation and chemotherapy.
  • Airborne allergy: An airborne allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to airborne allergens such as pollen, mold spores and house dust mites. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Airway Obstruction: A blockage in the breathing tubes. The blockage can occur for many different reasons such as tumors, severe allergic reaction, bacterial infections, foreign bodies or trauma. The degree of obstruction will determine how seriously breathing is impaired.
  • Allergic asthma: Allergic asthma is one of the most common forms of asthma and is triggered by exposure to an allergen. Upon exposure to the allergen, the airways become constricted and inflamed which affects breathing. The severity of symptoms is variable. This form of asthma is more common in children than adults.
  • Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis: An allergic reaction to a particular fungus called Aspergillus.
  • Allergic rhinitis: Allergic rhinitis involves inflammation of the mucous membranes of the nose, eyes, eustachian tubes, middle ear, sinuses, and pharynx.
  • Allergies: Immune system over-reaction to various substances.
  • Alpha 1-Antitrypsin Deficiency: A rare disorder characterized by the development of lung disease in adults and liver disease in adults and children.
  • Aluminium lung: A respiratory condition caused by breathing in aluminium containing substances such as aluminium ore or a grain preservative called aluminium phosphide.
  • Alveolar capillary dysplasia: The abnormal development of the lung blood vessels. The normal barrier across which air and blood can diffuse fails to develop properly. Death usually results within weeks of birth but rare cases can survive for months.
  • Alveolar cell carcinoma: It is a malignant cancer arising from the alveolar walls
  • Alveolar soft part sarcoma: A rare slow-growing malignant connective tissue tumor. The tumors occur most frequently in the arms and legs. The deep soft tissue of the thigh, tongue, eye orbit, and head and neck regions are also common sites. Metastasis is frequent with lung and brain being most common metastatic sites. Symptoms are determined by the location, size and stage of the tumor.
  • Alveolitis, extrinsic allergic: A lung disease that tends to occur in people with jobs where they are frequently exposed to organic dust inhalation.
  • Analgesic asthma syndrome: Asthma caused by the use of pain-killing and anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin.
  • Anderson's triad: The association of cystic fibrosis, celiac disease and vitamin A deficiency.
  • Ankylosis -- facial anomalies -- pulmonary hypoplasia syndrome: A rare familial syndrome characterized mainly by fused or stiff joints, facial anomalies and underdeveloped lungs.
  • Anophthalmia -- heart and pulmonary anomalies -- intellectual deficit: A rare disorder characterized by absent eyes, heart and lung anomalies and mental retardation.
  • Anophthalmia with pulmonary hypoplasia: A rare disorder characterized by absent or very small eyes and underdeveloped lung tissue.
  • Aorta-pulmonary artery fistula: An abnormal opening or connection between the aorta and the main pulmonary artery. It can occur through a traumatic penetrating injury or may be a complication of surgery. Severe cases can lead to heart failure.
  • Apnea of prematurity: AOP occurs in infants who are born prematurely (before 34 weeks of pregnancy).
  • Apneustic breathing: It is a series of slow, deep inspirations, each one held for 30 to 90 seconds, after which the air is suddenly expelled by elastic recoil of the lung.
  • Arhinia, choanal atresia, and microphthalmia: A very rare syndrome characterized by small eyes, choanal atresia (blocked nasal passages) and arhinia (absence of nose and parts of the olefactory system).
  • Arhinia-choanal atresia-microphthalmia syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by small eyes, choanal atresia (blocked nasal passages) and arhinia (absence of nose and parts of the olefactory system).
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita -- pulmonary hypoplasia: A rare congenital syndrome involving degeneration of the brain and spinal cord and characterized by facial, head, skeletal and muscular abnormalities. Reduced fetal activity causes many of the problems.
  • Asbestos conditions: Medical conditions caused be exposure to asbestos dust
  • Asbestos poisoning: A general term which refers to any adverse health effect caused by exposure to asbestos. Asbestos poisoning can occur when asbestos fibres are inhaled or ingested. The effects of asbestos poisoning (asbestosis, mesothelioma, lung cancer etc) can take as long as forty years to occur.
  • Asbestosis: Lung condition from asbestos exposure
  • Aspergillosis: Infection with a fungus called Aspergillus.
  • Asphyxia neonatorum: A condition where a newborn infant fails to start breathing on its own in the minutes following birth.
  • Asphyxiating Thoracic Dystrophy: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short limbs, underdeveloped iliac wings and a narrow rigid thoracic cage that often results in asphyxiation.
  • Asphyxiating Thoracic Dystrophy 2: Asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy is rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal development of the ribcage The ribcage is restricted to the point where breathing is impaired and death during infancy is a common occurrence. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 15q13.
  • Asphyxiating Thoracic Dystrophy 3: Asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy is rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal development of the ribcage The ribcage is restricted to the point where breathing is impaired and death during infancy is a common occurrence. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11q13.5.
  • Aspirin-induced asthma: Aspirin-induced asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is triggered by the use of aspirin. A significant number of patients with aspirin-induced asthma also have steroid-dependant asthma where they require regular steroidal asthma medication to maintain normal lung functioning. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Asthma: Repeated attacks of breathing difficulty.
  • Asthma in Adults:
  • Asthma in Children:
  • Asthma in pregnancy: Asthma in pregnancy refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is occurs during pregnancy. Women who are pregnancy may decide to stop taking their asthma medication in order to reduce the perceived risk of side effects to the developing fetus. The reality is that the potential harmful effects on the fetus are very small compared to the problems caused to mother and fetus if a severe asthma attack develops. Furthermore, uncontrolled asthma during pregnancy may also cause problems such as small birth weight or premature birth. Pregnant women should consult their physician in order to determine the optimal management of their condition. During pregnancy, asthma symptoms may become worse, improve or stay the same.
  • Asthma related cough: Cough-variant asthma is a type of asthma in which the main symptom is a dry, non-productive cough. Cough-variant asthma is sometimes called chronic cough to describe a cough that has lasted longer than six to eight weeks.
  • Asthma, Exercise-Induced: Breathing problems caused by exercise. Patients who suffer from asthma and allergic rhinitis are particularly prone to the condition. Factors such as reduced humidity, cold temperatures, high levels of pollen, poor physical fitness, respiratory infections and reduced air quality can all increase the risk of an attack.
  • Asthma-like cough symptoms: Asthma is a chronic disease causing airway constriction along with inflammation and excess collection of mucus in the airways leading to breathing difficulty.
  • Asthma-related traits, susceptibility to, 1: An increased risk of asthma-related traits such as wheezing and atopic dermatitis are linked to a defect on chromosome 14q22.1.
  • Asthma-related traits, susceptibility to, 2: An increased risk of asthma-related traits such as wheezing and atopic dermatitis are linked to a defect on chromosome 7p15-p14.
  • Asthma-related traits, susceptibility to, 3: An increased risk of asthma-related traits such as wheezing and atopic dermatitis are linked to a defect on chromosome 2p16.
  • Asthma-related traits, susceptibility to, 4: An increased risk of asthma-related traits such as wheezing and atopic dermatitis are linked to a defect on chromosome 1p31.
  • Asthma-related traits, susceptibility to, 5: An increased risk of asthma-related traits such as wheezing and atopic dermatitis are linked to a defect on chromosome 12q14.3.
  • Asthma-related traits, susceptibility to, 6: An increased risk of asthma-related traits such as wheezing and atopic dermatitis are linked to a defect on chromosome 17q21.
  • Asthma-related traits, susceptibility to, 7: An increased risk of asthma-related traits such as wheezing and atopic dermatitis are linked to a defect on chromosome 1q32.1.
  • Asthmatic Bronchitis: A variant of asthma where cough, either chronic or during an exacerbation following a viral infection, is the main or only symptom
  • Atelectasis: Collapse of lung tissue affecting part or all of one lung. Atelectasis may be an acute or chronic condition. In acute atelectasis, the lung has recently collapsed and is primarily notable only for airlessness. In chronic atelectasis, the affected area is often characterized by a complex mixture of airlessness, infection, widening of the bronchi, destruction and scarring.
  • Atopic asthma: Atopic asthma is one of the most common forms of asthma and is triggered by exposure to an allergen. Upon exposure to the allergen, the airways become constricted and inflamed which affects breathing. The severity of symptoms is variable. This form of asthma is more common in children than adults.
  • Atrophic rhinitis: Type of rhinitis caused by thinning nasal membranes
  • Ausrian triad: The association of pneumococcal pneumonia, meningitis and endocarditis.
  • Bagassosis: Inhalation of sugarcane dust particles in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the sugarcane dust particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Bagassosis -- Thermoactinomyces sacchari: Inhalation of sugarcane dust particles contaminated with fungus (Thermoactinomyces sacchari) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the contaminated sugarcane dust particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Baritosis: A lung condition caused by breathing in barium dust or barium containing compounds. It is generally a benign condition that doesn't cause symptoms other than irritation.
  • Barley Worker's disease -- Aspergillus spp.: Inhalation of barley particles contaminated with fungus (Aspergillus spp.) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the fungus in the airborne barley particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Bearn-Kunkel syndrome: A type of autoimmune liver disease characterized by liver damage, very high blood gammaglobulin levels and increased plasma cells.
  • Benign lung Tumor: Benign lung tumors are a heterogenous group of neoplastic lesions originating from pulmonary structures.
  • Biphasic Mesothelioma: Biphasic mesothelioma is the second most common type of mesothelioma cancer cell Biphasic mesothelioma, or mixed mesothelioma, contains a mixture of epithelioid and sarcomatoid cells.
  • Bird flu (avian influenza): Bird flu refers to influenza A invection. Influenza A is a viral respiratory infection that can usually occurs in birds (especially poultry) but can be transmitted to humans and cause serious illness. The virus is contagious and can cause severe illness especially in patients who are very young or old or have some other medical condition as well. The severity of symptoms can vary but usually involves respiratory and constitutional (e.g. headache, aching muscles) symptoms. The influenza virus can mutate and produce different strains though the symptoms are the same. This frequent mutation means that people need regular vaccinations to ensure they are protected against new strains as they arise.
  • Blastomycosis: A fungal infection caused by Blastomyces dermatitidis and resulting in lung, skin, bone and genitourinary involvement.
  • Blue and bloated syndrome: Heart and breathing problems that occur in obese patients that can cause reduced blood oxygenation especially while sleeping.
  • Blue baby: Any baby born with blueness
  • Bradypnea: Abnormal slow breathing.
  • Breathing difficulties: Various types of breathing difficulty (dyspnea).
  • Breathing-related sleep disorder: Breathing-related sleep disorder refers to a spectrum of breathing anomalies ranging from chronic or habitual snoring to upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS) to frank obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) or, in some cases, obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS).
  • Bronchial adenomata syndrome: A type of bronchial tumor that causes various respiratory symptoms.
  • Bronchiectasis: Chronic bronchiole dilation from secretions and blockages.
  • Bronchiectasis -- oligospermia: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of bronchiectasis (enlarged bronchial airways) and a defect in the sperm ducts which affects the number of sperm produced. Patients suffer frequent bacterial infections.
  • Bronchietasis:
  • Bronchioalveolar Carcinoma: Bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) is a rare type of lung cancer, it is a sub-type of lung adenocarcinoma
  • Bronchiolitis: Inflammation of the bronchioles.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Ammonia inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Ammonia. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Chlorine inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Chlorine. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Diacetyl inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Diacetyl. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Hydrogen bromide inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Hydrogen bromide. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Hydrogen chloride inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Hydrogen chloride. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Hydrogen fluoride inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Hydrogen fluoride. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Hydrogen sulfide inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Hydrogen sulfide. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Methyl isocyanate inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Methyl isocyanate. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Nitrogen Oxide inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Nitrogen oxides. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Ozone inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of ozone. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Phosgene inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Nitrogen oxides. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Polyamide-amine dyes inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Polyamide-amine dyes. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Sulphur dioxide inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Sulphur dioxide. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis Obliterans -- Thionyl chloride inhalation: A lung disease caused by inhalation of Thionyl chloride. The exposure can cause scarring of the lungs which can lead to obstruction of the small airways and ultimately impaired lung function. Chronic exposure can lead to gradual worsening of symptoms over a period of time. Acute exposure can result in lung damage that may be asymptomatic for a short period of time but can then lead to rapid death due to severe obstructive breathing problems. Severity of symptoms and outcome depend on degree of exposure.
  • Bronchiolitis obliterans: Disease of the lungs in which the bronchioles are plugged with granulation tissue.
  • Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia: Inflammation of lung tissue (bronchioles and surrounding tissue) which may occur on its own or as a result of other conditions such as certain infections.
  • Bronchiolitis obliterans with obstructive pulmonary disease: A rare condition involving the inflammation and thickening of the internal lung structures (bronchioles) which affects breathing. It can be triggered by certain infections, drug reactions or for no obvious reason. The condition often progresses to cause serious respiratory problems or even death though the rate of disease progression is variable.
  • Bronchitis: Bronchitis is an inflammation of the air passages within the lungs. It occurs when the trachea and the large and small bronchi within the lungs become inflamed
  • Bronchogenic carcinoma: When cells of the lung start growing rapidly in an uncontrolled manner, the condition is called lung cancer .
  • Bronchopulmonary amyloidosis: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage. In the bronchopulmonary form, the amyloid deposits occur mainly in the lungs.
  • Bronchopulmonary dysplasia: A rare form of infant lung disease that usually occurs as a complication of ventilator use in premature babies.
  • Burn-McKeown syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by choanal atresia (narrowing or blockage of nasal airway), deafness, heart defects and eye, ear and facial anomalies.
  • Byssinosis: Usually an occupational disease where excessive inhalation of dust from cotton, hemp or flax causes lung problems.
  • CHARGE Syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by choanal atresia, coloboma, ear and genital abnormalities and congenital heart defects.
  • COPD: Severe obstruction of bronchial air flow typically from bronchitis and/or emphysema.
  • COPD-like dyspnea: Dyspnea is a classical symptom in case of COPD and is associated with cough.
  • Cardiomegaly -- bronchitis -- emphysema syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of bronchitis, emphysema and an enlarged heart. The condition is often associated with long-term chronic alcoholism.
  • Catamenial pneumothorax: A collapsed lung that occurs at the same time as menstruation. The condition is believed to be caused by the presence of endometrial tissue in the chest cavity. The endometrial tissue produces blood (just as in the uterus) and can result in the lung collapsing. The lung tends to collapse within 3 days of the start of menstruation.
  • Catarrh: Nasal/sinus membrane inflammation
  • Central sleep apnea: Central sleep apnea is when the person repeatedly stops breathing during sleep because the brain temporarily stops sending signals to the muscles that control breathing.
  • Centriacinar Emphysema: The abnormal permanent enlargement of air spaces distal to the terminal bronchioles, accompanied by the destruction of the walls and without obvious fibrosis. It begins in the respiratory bronchioles and spreads peripherally
  • Cheese Washer's lung: Inhalation of cheese particles contaminated with bacteria in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the bacteria in the airborne cheese particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Cheese Washer's lung -- Penicillium spp.: Inhalation of cheese particles contaminated with bacteria (Penicillium spp.) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the bacteria in the airborne cheese particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical burn -- inhalation: Burns to the airways caused by a chemical through inhalation. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures. Immediate medical attention should be sought if chemical burns to the airways are suspected.
  • Chemical pneumonia: Lung inflammation from inhaled chemicals
  • Chemical worker's lung (Ammonia): Inhalation of a chemical called Ammonia in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical worker's lung (Chlorine): Inhalation of a chemical called Chlorine in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical worker's lung (Formalin vapours): Inhalation of a chemical called Formalin vapours in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical worker's lung (Hydrogen Sulfide): Inhalation of a chemical called Hydrogen Sulfide in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical worker's lung (Methylene Diisocyanate): Inhalation of a chemical called Methylene Diisocyanate in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical worker's lung (Nitrogen dioxide): Inhalation of a chemical called Nitrogen dioxide in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical worker's lung (Ozone): Inhalation of a chemical called Ozone in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical worker's lung (Phosgene): Inhalation of a chemical called Phosgene in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical worker's lung (Sulfur dioxide): Inhalation of a chemical called Sulfur dioxide in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical worker's lung (Trimellitic anhydride): Inhalation of a chemical called trimellitic anhydride)in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical worker's lung -- Lacquer: Inhalation of a lacquer (which contains isocyanates) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical worker's lung -- Varnish: Inhalation of a varnish (which contains isocyanates) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chest Cold: Acute lower respiratory infection caused by virus
  • Chest pain: Pain in the chest area.
  • Cheyne-Stokes respirations: Breathing with regularly occurring apnoeic episodes and change in rate of breathing.
  • Childhood asthma: Childhood asthma is a type of asthma that occurs during childhood. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways. The severity of symptoms is variable. The asthma may be triggered by allergens, pollution, viral infections and many other factors.
  • Chlamydia pneumoniae: Specific bacterial type of pneumonia
  • Choanal atresia -- deafness -- cardiac defects -- dysmorphism: A rare genetic disorder characterized by choanal atresia (narrowing or blockage of nasal airway), deafness, heart defects and eye, ear and facial anomalies.
  • Cholesterol pneumonia: Lung inflammation caused by cholesterol.
  • Chronic Airway Obstruction: Chronic airway obstruction is a type of pulmonary disorder, such as emphysema or chronic bronchitis, in which the upper or lower airway is chronically obstructed.
  • Chronic Bronchitis: Chronic bronchitis is a chronic inflammation of the bronchi (medium-size airways) in the lungs.
  • Chronic Sinusitis: Chronic form of sinusitis, inflammation of the sinus cavities.
  • Chronic bronchitis-like cough: Chronic bronchitis is bronchitis that lasts longer than 3 months and is usually associated with whitish sputum.
  • Chronic cough: The chronic noisy sudden expulsion of air from the respiratory tract
  • Chronic hiccup: Persistent hiccupping that occurs for 48 hours or more. It can be caused by conditions such as gastroesophageal reflux, liver disease, kidney disease and esophageal inflammation. Sometimes there is no discernable cause.
  • Chronic laryngotracheitis: It is inflammation of the mucous membrane lining the larynx, which is located in the upper part of the respiratory tract and the trachea which may cause respiratory obstruction.
  • Chronic lower respiratory diseases: General term for various chronic respiratory diseases including COPD, emphysema and chronic bronchitis
  • Chronic pharyngitis: Chronic inflammation of the pharynx.
  • Chronic pneumonitis of infancy: A rare form of interstitial lung disease that occurs in infants. Death is common even if treatment is delivered.
  • Chronic silicosis: An occupation lung disease caused by breathing in silica dust. Chronic exposure involves inhalation of low levels of the silica.
  • Ciliary discoordination, due to random ciliary orientation: A rare disorder where abnormal function of cilia in the breathing passages causes frequent lung problems such as respiratory tract infections.
  • Ciliary dyskinesia, due to transposition of ciliary microtubules: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move adequately due to abnormal cilia structure. The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Ciliary dyskinesia-bronchiectasis: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move. The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. The lack of ciliary movement can cause a lung disease called bronchiectasis where a build up of mucus causes infections and airway damage. The airways then become enlarged. The condition can become progressively worse with time and can result in serious breathing problems.
  • Cleft palate, bilateral choanal atresia, curly hair and congenital hypothyroidism: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of curly, choanal atresia, cleft palate and congenital hypothyroidism.
  • Coal worker's pneumoconiosis: A lung disease caused by breathing in coal dust. The condition is generally associated with employees in the coal industry. Symptoms usually resolve when exposure to coal dust stops.
  • Cobalt poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to cobalt.
  • Coffee Worker's lung: Inhalation of coffee bean dust in occupational settings can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to small air-borne particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Cold & Flu:
  • Collapsed lung: Deflation of all or part of one lung
  • Colobomata unilobar lung heart defect: A very rare condition characterized by the association of a single lobed lung, heart defect and colobomata.
  • Common cold: A cold is a relatively minor contagious infection of the nose and throat that can be caused by a number of different viruses (e.g. rhinoviruses, coronaviruses). There are over 200 different viruses that have the potential to cause the common cold. Although colds can cause discomfort they are not considered a serious condition.
  • Congenital bronchobiliary fistula: A rare malformation where there is an abnormal opening between a bile duct and the bronchial (respiratory) system.
  • Congenital bronchogenic cyst: A rare birth condition characterized by the formation of a cyst in the middle of the chest, usually near the area where the trachea branches off. The condition may be asymptomatic but if the cyst is large enough it may cause problems by compressing nearby structures such as the trachea.
  • Congenital tracheal stenosis: A rare birth defect where a portion of the trachea is narrowed due to the cartilage rings that make up the trachea forming a complete or almost complete ring.
  • Congenital unilateral pulmonary hypoplasia: A rare disorder where one of the two lung structures fail to develop normally.
  • Cooperman-Miura syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by various oral anomalies such as malocclusion, recessed jaw, narrowed breathing airways and irritation of the back of the tongue and uvula. The recessed jaw causes the tongue and uvula to be too close together which leads to irritation.
  • Cor pulmonale: Enlarged heart due to respiratory difficulty.
  • Coronavirus-related Cold: A Coronavirus-related cold is a relatively minor contagious infection of the nose and throat caused by the Coronavirus. Although colds can cause discomfort they are not considered a serious condition. Coronaviruses are a significant cause of common colds in adults.
  • Cough: The noise produced from the sudden expulsion of air from the lungs
  • Coxsackievirus-related Cold: A Coxsackievirus-related cold is a relatively minor contagious infection of the nose and throat caused by the Coxsackievirus. Although colds can cause discomfort they are not considered a serious condition.
  • Croup: Respiratory infection with a characteristic cough
  • Cutis laxa, recessive type 1: A severe, recessively inherited form of cutis laxa which is characterized by loose, inelastic skin and emphysema early in life.
  • Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic fibrosis is a hereditary disease affecting the exocrine (mucus) glands of the lungs, liver, pancreas, and intestines, causing progressive disability due to multisystem failure.
  • Cystic adenomatoid malformation of lung: A rare birth condition where the lungs fail to develop normally during the fetal stage and cysts form in parts of the lung instead of normal alveolar tissue.
  • Cystic fibrosis -- gastritis -- megaloblastic anaemia: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by cystic fibrosis, metaloblastic anemia, mental retardation and gastritis due to helicobacter pylori.
  • Cystic fibrosis -- gastritis -- megaloblastic anemia: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by cystic fibrosis, anemia and gastritis.
  • Cystic hamartoma of lung and kidney: A very rare condition characterized mainly by benign cysts in the lungs and kidneys.
  • Decreased chest wall movement: decreased movement of the chest wall
  • Decreased diaphragmatic excursion: decreased diaphragmatic movement
  • Decreased respiratory excursions: known as bradyapnea is the decreased rate of breathing
  • Decreased tactile fremitus: Medical term for the reduced vibration felt in the chest when a hand is placed on the chest while the patient speaks. It can be caused by conditions such as COPD, bronchial obstruction, pleural effusion, pneumothorax and other conditions that can interfere with the transmission of vibrations through the chest.
  • Decreased transfer factor on lung function: A decrease in the transfer factor evident on lung function tests
  • Decreased vocal fremitus: A medical term for reduced palpable variations during speech. It can be a sign of fluid on the lungs or a collapsed lung.
  • Desquamative Interstitial Pneumonia: A relatively uncommon form of lung inflammation that has no apparent cause though the majority of patients have a history of smoking. Symptoms tend to develop over a period of six months to one and a half years.
  • Detergent worker's disease: Inhalation of detergent in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Deviated Septum: A septum in the nose that is deviated from the normal position
  • Dextrocardia-bronchiectasis-sinusitis: A genetic disorder characterized by sinusitis, bronchiectasis and situs inversus.
  • Diaphragm. congenital absence: A rare condition where an infant is born with part or all of the diaphragm missing. The diaphragm facilitates the breathing process and separates the abdominal organs from the chest organs.
  • Diaphragmatic paralysis: Diaphragmatic paralysis occurs when the muscles associated with breathing become do weak to function properly. Breathing becomes difficulty and severe cases can result in death if breathing assistance is not delivered. The condition can result from such things as motor neuron disease, trauma and myopathy.
  • Diffuse panbronchiolitis: A pulmonary disease involving chronic inflammation of the airways which causes obstruction and can lead to respiratory failure and even death if untreated.
  • Diffuse systemic sclerosi: A rare condition that characterized by skin tightness affecting the trunk and extremities as well as organ involvement. It involves an early period of internal inflammation which distinguishes it from other forms of scleroderma and the organ involvement can be severe and even life-threatening.
  • Dirofilaria immitis infection: Infection with the dog heartworm (Dirofilaria immitis) which is transmitted from dogs to humans through mosquito bites.
  • Double outlet -- left ventricle: A very rare birth defect where the aorta and the pulmonary artery both exit from the left ventricle and thus blood is unable to be pumped to the lungs. However, a hole connects the two ventricles and ultimately allows some blood flow to the lungs.
  • Double outlet -- right ventricle I: A very rare birth defect where the aorta and the pulmonary artery both exit from the right ventricle and thus blood is unable to be pumped to the lungs. However, a hole connects the two ventricles and ultimately allows some blood flow to the lungs. In the type I the hole is located just below the aorta and there is no narrowing of the pulmonary valve.
  • Double outlet -- right ventricle II: A very rare birth defect where the aorta and the pulmonary artery both exit from the right ventricle and thus blood is unable to be pumped to the lungs. However, a hole connects the two ventricles and ultimately allows some blood flow to the lungs. In the type II the hole is located in the infracristal area and there is no narrowing of the pulmonary valve.
  • Double outlet -- right ventricle IV: A very rare birth defect where the aorta and the pulmonary artery both exit from the right ventricle and thus blood is unable to be pumped to the lungs. However, a hole connects the two ventricles and ultimately allows some blood flow to the lungs. In the type VI the hole is located just below the aorta and there is a narrowing of the pulmonary valve.
  • Double outlet right ventricle: A very rare birth defect where the aorta and the pulmonary artery both exit from the right ventricle and thus blood is unable to be pumped to the lungs. However, a hole connects the two ventricles and ultimately allows some blood flow to the lungs. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the location of the connecting hole in the heart and the exact location of the two arteries with respect to the heart.
  • Drowning: Accidental loss of life due to water.
  • Drug-induced asthma: Drug-induced associated asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is caused by taking a particular drug. There is a large range of drugs that have the potential to produce asthmatic symptoms in susceptible people. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Drug-resistant Streptococcus Pneumoniae Disease: Streptococcal respiratory infection resistant to antibiotics
  • Drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae: A form of streptococcus pneumoniae which is resistant to antibacterials that are usually used to destroy it
  • Ductus arteriosus, patent reversed flow: A rare birth defect. During the fetal stage, a connecting tube (ductus arteriosus) joins the pulmonary artery and aorta and hence prevents blood from flowing past the fluid filled lungs. After birth, the tube normally closes off so that the blood can be sent to the lungs to be oxygenated. Patent ductus arteriosus is where the connecting tube fails to close and hence the blood can't be oxygenated properly. In the patent reversed flow form of the condition, blood flow is reversed between the pulmonary and aorta opening and results in a reduced pulmonary flow.
  • EAF: A very rare type of tumor that occurs in the sinus and nasal tracts and upper respiratory system.
  • Echovirus-related Cold: An Echovirus-related cold is a relatively minor contagious infection of the nose and throat caused by the Echovirus. Although colds can cause discomfort they are not considered a serious condition.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia -- hypohidrotic -- hypothyroidism -- ciliary dyskinesia: A rare syndrome characterized by alopecia (A), nail problems (N), eye problems (O - ophthalmic), thyroid dysfunction (T), reduced sweating (H - hypohidrosis), freckles (E-ephelides), intestinal disease (E - enteropathy) and respiratory tract infections (R).
  • Eisenmenger Syndrome: Increased lung blood pressure that can result from conditions such as a hole in the wall between the two heart chambers.
  • Emotional stress related asthma: Emotional stress related asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is caused by emotional stress.
  • Emphysema: Emphysema is a type of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It is defined as an abnormal, permanent enlargement of the air spaces distal to the terminal bronchioles accompanied by destruction of their walls and without obvious fibrosis.
  • Emphysema, congenital lobar: A rare respiratory disorder where air can readily enter the lungs but has difficulty escaping. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Enslin syndrome: A rare disorder characterized mainly by the presence of a tower skull, adenoid hypertrophy and bulging eyes.
  • Enterovirus-related Cold: Enterovirus-related cold is a relatively minor contagious infection of the nose and throat caused by the Enterovirus. Although colds can cause discomfort they are not considered a serious condition.
  • Eosinophilic asthma: Eosinophilic asthma is a type of asthma that is characterized by increased levels of eosinophils (a type of white blood cell) in the airways. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways which makes breathing difficult. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Epidermoid carcinoma: A non-small-cell type of lung cancer. The cancer develops from cells that line the inside of the lungs.
  • Epiglotitis: Inflamation of the epiglottis in the throat
  • Epiglottiditis: A condition characterized by inflammation of the epiglottis of the throat
  • Epiglottis diseases: Diseases that affect the epiglottis
  • Erucism: Erucism is a skin reaction to envenomation from certain poisonous caterpillar spines. The reaction can be cause by contact with the spines or hairs of the caterpillar. Even airborne caterpillar hair can cause symptoms as can spines or hair on dead caterpillars.
  • Esophageal Atresia and/or Tracheoesophageal Fistula: A rare condition characterized by an underdeveloped esophagus where the esophagus is not connected to the stomach. An abnormal opening between the trachea and esophagus may or may not also be present. The two abnormalities usually occur together.
  • Esthesioneuroblastoma: A rare type of tumor that occurs in the upper nasal cavity. The tumor may obstruct one or both nostrils.
  • Exercise-induced asthma: Exercise-induced asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is triggered by exercise. The severity of symptoms is variable. Exercise involving long periods of activity or is done in a cold environment is more likely to trigger asthmatic symptoms. Exercise can also exacerbate existing asthma symptoms.
  • Exogenous lipoid pneumonia: A rare disorder where lung inflammation results from inhalation or aspiration of fatty or oily material. Examples of fatty sources includes oil-based nasal inhalation drops, cosmetic oil. The severity of the condition can vary greatly depending on the amount of lipids involved.
  • Extrinsic asthma: Extrinsic asthma is a type of asthma that is triggered by an exposure to an allergen. Extrinsic asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways in response to exposure to the allergen. Examples of possible allergens include dust mites, pollen and mould. The severity of symptoms and allergen involved is variable.
  • Familial emphysema: A rare genetic form of emphysema caused by a deficiency of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) which results in destruction of the elastin component of the lung structure. The disorder tends to run in families (familial).
  • Familial hypersensitivity pneumonitis: An immune-mediated lung disease that occurs in a familial pattern.
  • Familial interstitial fibrosis: A rare familial disorder involving fibrosis and scarring of the lung tissue which causes the lung to become stiff and unable to function normally.
  • Familial nasal acilia: A rare birth defect where the cilia (hairs) in the nose are absent which leads to a build up of mucus and debris inside the nose. This accumulation of waste provides an ideal environment for bacterial infections.
  • Farmer's lung: A condition that affects farmers who are exposed to mouldy hay or crops. The lungs become inflamed due to a hypersensitivity reaction to the exposure.
  • Farmer's lung -- Micropolyspora faeni: Inhalation of moldy contaminated with bacteria (Micropolyspora faeni) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the bacteria in the moldy hay particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Farmer's lung -- Thermoactinomyces vulgaris: Inhalation of moldy contaminated with bacteria (Thermoactinomyces vulgaris) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the bacteria in the moldy hay particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Feather Plucker's lung: Inhalation of particles from chicken feathers in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the proteins in the chicken feathers. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Female sex reversal with dysgenesis of kidneys, adrenals and lungs: A very rare disorder involving female sex reversal and abnormal development of the lungs, kidneys and adrenals. Most of the reported cases were terminated during the fetal stage when the abnormalities were detected.
  • Fetor hepaticus: Faecal breath due to mercaptans which pass directly into the lung.
  • Fibrosing alveolitis: A condition characterized by abnormalities in the fibrous tissues between lung alveoli which results in inflammation.
  • Fish meal worker's lung: Inhalation of a fish meal particles in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the fish meal particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Flail Chest: The separation of a portion of the rib cage from the rest of the chest wall - usually due to trauma. The severity of the condition varies depending on the extent of the damage.
  • Flu: Very common viral respiratory infection.
  • Follicular hamartoma -- alopecia -- cystic fibrosis: A rare syndrome characterized by small benign growths that develop in hair follicles, alopecia and cystic fibrosis.
  • Food allergy related asthma: Food allergy related asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is caused by an allergic reaction to a particular food. This is a very uncommon cause of asthma.
  • Franke triad: A term used to describe the association of palate abnormalities, deviated nasal septum and enlarged adenoids.
  • Fraser-Jequier-Chen syndrome: A very rare disorder characterized by a cleft epiglottis and larynx, extra fingers and toes and kidney, pancreatic and bone abnormalities. The internal organs are also located on the opposite side of the body to normal (situs inversus totalis).
  • Furrier's lung: Inhalation of a dust from animal fur in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the animal fur. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Game-Friedman-Paradice syndrome: A rare condition characterized by retarded growth, hydrocephaly, underdeveloped lungs and various other anomalies. The condition was observed in four offspring from one family.
  • Gastresophageal reflux-related chronic cough: Gastroesophageal reflux (GER)-related chronic cough is the second most common cause of chronic cough and is defined as a cough that improves or is eliminated with GER-specific therapy.
  • Glossopharyngeal neuralgia: A condition which is characterized by sever pain that originates on the side of the throat and extends to the ear
  • Goldblatt-Viljoen syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by a fully or partially blocked nasal passage and abnormalities of the forearm bone (radius) and thumbs.
  • Gollop syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by eye, ear, facial and nasal abnormalities.
  • H1N1 Flu:
  • Habit cough: Habit or nervous cough is a throat-clearing noise made by a person who is nervous and self-conscious. There are patients with a chronic dry cough (longer than 4 months) that seems to defy all explanation and resist all the usual standard treatments (cough and cold remedies for children). A habit cough is a cough that occasionally develops in children after a cold or other airway irritants
  • Hamman-Rich syndrome: A rare acute lung disease where the lung sufferers progressive inflammation and fibrosis which often leads to death.
  • Hay Worker's disease -- Aspergillus spp.: Inhalation of hay particles contaminated with fungus (Aspergillus spp.) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the fungus in the airborne hay particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Hay fever: An allergy which causes sneezing, runny nose or blocked nose for part of the year.
  • Hay fever-like sneezing symptoms: Allergy causes runny nose, sneezing and headache.
  • Hedblom syndrome: Acute inflammation of the diaphragm muscles. As the inflammation abates, symptoms resolve but the shape of the diaphragm remains flattened rather than dome-shaped.
  • Heller-Dohle disease: Inflammation of the aorta which occurs in the later stages of a syphilis infection.
  • Hemophilus influenzae B: Bacterial respiratory infection with dangerous complications.
  • Hemoptysis: A condition which is characterized by the coughing up of blood or blood stained sputum
  • Hendra Virus: A paramyxoviridae virus that is transmitted from animals to humans from body fluids and excretions
  • Hiccups, intractable: Persistent, difficult to treat hiccups that can continue for days or weeks.
  • High altitude pulmonary edema: Lung condition related to high altitude.
  • Homozygotic Alpha 1 antitrypsin Defeciency: Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is an inherited disorder that can cause lung disease in adults and liver disease in adults and children
  • Humidifier lung: Inhalation of humidifier vapors contaminated with pathogens such as amoeba and certain bacteria can cause various lung symptoms in occupational settings. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the pathogens. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Humidifier lung -- Acanthamoeba spp.: Inhalation of humidifier vapors contaminated with a pathogen called (Acanthamoeba spp.) can cause various lung symptoms in occupational settings. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the pathogens. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Humidifier lung -- Bacillus spp.: Inhalation of humidifier vapors contaminated with a pathogen called (Bacillus spp.) can cause various lung symptoms in occupational settings. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the pathogens. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Humidifier lung -- Naegleria gruberi: Inhalation of humidifier vapors contaminated with a pathogen called (Naegleria gruberi) can cause various lung symptoms in occupational settings. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the pathogens. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Humidifier lung -- Penicillum spp.: Inhalation of humidifier vapors contaminated with a pathogen called (Penicillum spp.) can cause various lung symptoms in occupational settings. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the pathogens. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Hyperphalangism -- dysmorphy -- bronchomalacia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by finger and toe abnormalities, unusual facial features and narrowed airways.
  • Hyperpnea: A condition characterized by an abnormal increase in the depth and rate of ones respiration
  • Hyperresonant lung fields: excessive air in the lungs
  • Hyperresonant lung fields as in case of COPD: excessive air in the lungs
  • Hyperresonant sounds: excessive air in the lungs
  • Hypersensitivity pneumonitis:
  • Hyperventilation: Excessively rapid breathing causing blood gas imbalances
  • Hypopharyngeal cancer: Cancer of the bottom part of the throat (hypopharynx).
  • Hypopnea syndrome: Hypopnea Syndrome is a condition in which an individual experiences severe shallow breathing or a slow rate of airflow during sleep.
  • Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Lung fibrosis from unknown causes.
  • Idiopathic acute eosinophilic pneumonia: An acute lung disorder involving the infiltration of eosinophils into the lung tissue with no apparent cause.
  • Idiopathic alveolar hypoventilation syndrome: A rare condition characterized by a reduced breathing rate despite no respiratory system abnormalities. The cause of the condition is unknown.
  • Idiopathic diffuse interstitial fibrosis: A rare lung disease involving progressive inflammation and scarring (fibrosis) of deep lung tissue which can cause shortness of breath. In idiopathic forms of the condition, there is no apparent cause.
  • Idiopathic eosinophilic chronic pneumopathy: A rare disorder where eosinophils (a type of white blood cell) accumulate in the lungs and cause problems. The symptoms occur gradually over a period of weeks or even months.
  • Idiopathic pulmonary hypertension: A rare condition where sclerosis of the pulmonary arteries cause cyanosis, polycythemia and heart failure.
  • Idiopathic subglottic tracheal stenosis: Narrowing of the portion of the trachea below the glottis (voice box) that occurs for no apparent reason.
  • Immotile cilia syndrome, due to defective radial spokes: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move adequately due to abnormal cilia structure. The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility.
  • Immotile cilia syndrome, due to excessively long cilia: A very rare disorder where the cilia fail to move adequately due to abnormally long cilia. The cilia are tiny, hair-like structures found in the respiratory and ear passages and help to clear debris and mucus. This results in increases risk of respiratory infections, sinusitis, ear infections and male infertility. The infertility results as the tails of sperm is basically cilia.
  • Immunodeficiency, gonadal dysgenesis and pulmonary fibrosis: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by immunodeficiency, gonadal dysgenesis and pulmonary fibrosis that results in death.
  • Infant asthma: Infant asthma is a type of asthma that occurs during childhood. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways. The severity of symptoms is variable. The asthma may be triggered by allergens, pollution, viral infections and many other factors.
  • Infantile sleep apnea: Apnea of infancy occurs in children who are younger than 1 year old and who were born after a full-term pregnancy.
  • Influenza A: A type of virus affecting the respiratory tract
  • Influenza B: A type of virus affecting the respiratory tract
  • Interstitial lung disease: Any condition which affects the interstitium of the lungs
  • Intrinsic asthma: Intrinsic asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is not caused by exposure to an allergen. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Jeune syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by short limbs, underdeveloped iliac wings and a narrow rigid thoracic cage that often results in asphyxiation.
  • Job syndrome: An immunodeficiency disorder characterized by excessive production of IgE and frequent bacterial infections mainly involving the skin.
  • Juvenile angiofibroma: A condition characterized by a benign tumour of the nasopharynx
  • LEOPARD Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by multiple lentigines, pulmonic stenosis, widely spaced eyes and deafness.
  • Labrador lung: A lung disease caused by breathing in dust containing silica and other inorganic compounds such as iron. The dusts deposit in the lungs where it can cause problems which may not become evident for many years. It is often seen in long-term miners.
  • Large cell carcinoma: Large cell carcinoma is the uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells in the lungs. This non-small cell lung cancer that represents 10% to 20% of all tumors that start in the bronchi, which are the main branches of the trachea that lead to the lungs.
  • Larsen-like syndrome, lethal form: A very rare lethal syndrome characterized mainly by joint dislocations and breathing problems due to respiratory system abnormalities. The condition is a manifestation of abnormal collagen formation.
  • Larsen-like syndrome, lethal type: A very rare lethal syndrome characterized mainly by joint dislocations and breathing problems due to respiratory system abnormalities.
  • Laryngeal carcinoma: Cancer of the laryngeal area. Smoking and alcohol increase the risk of this cancer.
  • Laryngeal cleft: A rare birth defect where there is an abnormal opening between the larynx and esophagus which allows food to get into the airways and even the lungs. The severity of the condition is determined by the size of the opening.
  • Laryngeal papillomatosis: A rare disease characterized by the development of tumors in the larynx, vocal cords or respiratory tract. The disease is caused by the human papilloma virus. Symptoms will vary according to the size, location and aggressiveness of the tumor.
  • Laryngeal web congenital heart disease short stature: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by short stature, congenital heart disease and an abnormal membrane of tissue across the larynx.
  • Laryngeal webbing: Tissue that develops over the glottis and between the vocal folds. May result from vocal fold injury (trauma or infection) or may be present at birth. The severity of symptoms depends on the size of the webbing.
  • Laryngitis: Laryngitis is an inflammation of the mucous membrane lining the larynx which is located in the upper part of the respiratory tract.
  • Laryngocele: A rare condition where an air-filled sac associated with the larynx becomes dilated.
  • Laryngomalacia: A defect where the larynx is abnormally soft which affects voice quality and can cause breathing problems. The larynx is so soft that when inhalation occurs, the larynx collapses and obstructs the breathing passage.
  • Laryngomalacia, dominant congenital: A dominantly inherited birth defect where the larynx is abnormally soft which affects voice quality and can cause breathing problems. The larynx is so soft that when inhalation occurs, the larynx collapses and obstructs the breathing passage.
  • Laryngopharyngeal reflux: A gastrointestinal disorder where acid reflux affects the throat and causes irritation.
  • Larynx Cancer: Cancer of the voice box or nearby areas.
  • Larynx atresia: A very rare birth disorder where a thin membrane obstructs the laryngeal opening.
  • Larynx conditions: Any condition that affects that larynx
  • Larynx, congenital partial atresia of: A birth defect where the larynx is obstructed. Usually a tracheostomy is required to permit normal breathing and prevent death.
  • Legionella adelaidensis infection: Legionella adelaidensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella anisa infection: Legionella anisa is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella beliardensis infection: Legionella beliardensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella birminghamensis infection: Legionella birminghamensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella bozemanii infection: Legionella bozemanii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella bruneiensis infection: Legionella bruneiensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella brunensis infection: Legionella brunensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella busanensis infection: Legionella busanensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella cherrii infection: Legionella cherrii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella cincinnatiensis infection: Legionella cincinnatiensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella donaldsonii infection: Legionella donaldsonii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella donaldsonil infection: Legionella donaldsonil is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella drancourtii infection: Legionella drancourtii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella drozanskii infection: Legionella drozanskii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella dumofii infection: Legionella dumofii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella erythra infection: Legionella erythra is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella fairfieldensis infection: Legionella fairfieldensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella fallonii infection: Legionella falloni is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella feelei infection: Legionella feelei is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella feeleii infection: Legionella feeleii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella gesstiana infection: Legionella gesstiana is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella gormanii infection: Legionella micdadei is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella gratiana infection: Legionella gratiana is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella gresilensis infection: Legionella gresilensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella hackeliae infection: Legionella hackeliae is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella impletisoli infection: Legionella impletisoli is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella isrealensis infection: Legionella isrealensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella jamestowniensis infection: Legionella jamestowniensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella jordanis infection: Legionella jordanis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella lansingensis infection: Legionella lansingensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella londinensis infection: Legionella londinensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella lytica infection: Legionella lytica is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella maceachemii infection: Legionella maceachemii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella maceachernii infection: Legionella maceachernii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella micdadei infection: Legionella micdadei is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella monrovica infection: Legionella monrovica is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella moravica infection: Legionella moravica is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella nautarum infection: Legionella nautarum is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella oakridgensis infection: Legionella oakridgensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella parisiensis infection: Legionella parisiensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella quateirensis infection: Legionella quateirensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella quinlivanii infection: Legionella quinlivanii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella rowbothamii infection: Legionella rowbothamii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella rubrilucens infection: Legionella rubrilucens is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella sainthelensi infection: Legionella sainthelensi is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella santicrucis infection: Legionella santicrucis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella shakespearei infection: Legionella shakespearei is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella spiritensis infection: Legionella spiritensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella steigerwaltii infection: Legionella steigerwaltii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella tauriensis infection: Legionella tauriensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella tusconensis infection: Legionella tucsonensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella wadsorthii infection: Legionella wadsorthii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella wadsworthii infection: Legionella wadsworthii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella waltersii infection: Legionella moravica is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella worsliensis infection: Legionella worsliensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella yabuuchiae infection: Legionella yabuuchiae is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionnaires' disease: A severe respiratory disease which is caused by the Legionella pneumophila bacteria. The condition can result in pneumonia and can be life-threatening.
  • Lepidopterism: A systemic illness caused by contact with certain poisonous caterpillar spines or urticating hairs.
  • Limb-body wall complex: A rare condition where disruption of the amniotic band system can result in head, heart, lung, diaphragm, kidney or gonad abnormalities .
  • Lung Cancer Susceptibility 1: Researchers have linked a number of genes to an increased risk of developing lung cancer. The genetic predisposition plus environmental factors and lifestyle factors such as smoking translate to an increased risk of cancer. The genetic predisposition is believed to be insufficient on its own and appears to require the presence of environmental and lifestyle factors such as smoking in order to result in the development of lung cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q23-q25.
  • Lung Cancer Susceptibility 2: Researchers have linked a number of genes to an increased risk of developing lung cancer. The genetic predisposition plus environmental factors and lifestyle factors such as smoking translate to an increased risk of cancer. The genetic predisposition is believed to be insufficient on its own and appears to require the presence of environmental and lifestyle factors such as smoking in order to result in the development of lung cancer. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 15q25.1.
  • Lung Cancer Susceptibility 3: Researchers have linked a number of genes to an increased risk of developing lung cancer. The genetic predisposition plus environmental factors and lifestyle factors such as smoking translate to an increased risk of cancer. The genetic predisposition is believed to be insufficient on its own and appears to require the presence of environmental and lifestyle factors such as smoking in order to result in the development of lung cancer. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 15p15.33.
  • Lung Cancer Susceptibility 4: Researchers have linked a number of genes to an increased risk of developing lung cancer. The genetic predisposition plus environmental factors and lifestyle factors such as smoking translate to an increased risk of cancer. The genetic predisposition is believed to be insufficient on its own and appears to require the presence of environmental and lifestyle factors such as smoking in order to result in the development of lung cancer. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p21.33.
  • Lung abscess: Pus (abscess) in the lung
  • Lung cancer: Lung cancer is a disease of uncontrolled cell growth in tissues of the lung. This growth may lead to metastasis, which is the invasion of adjacent tissue and infiltration beyond the lungs. Most lung tumors are malignant.
  • Lung conditions: Various conditions affecting the lungs or related airways.
  • Lung damage: COPD is defined as the destruction of the air spaces distal to the terminal bronchioles and their walls and without obvious fibrosis.
  • Lung granuloma: A nodular aggregation of mononuclear inflammatory cells which is located in the lungs
  • Lung herniation -- congenital defect of sternum: A rare congenital disorder where a some of the lung tissues pushes through and opening in the breast bone. The mid-chest mass may change in size with inhalation and exhalation.
  • Lung scarring: Damage to the lung tissue from and cause can cause scarring of the lung tissue. Small scars generally cause no problems but large or widespread scarring can affect breathing. Causes of lung scarring include pneumonia, lung infections, cystic fibrosis, asbestosis, silicosis and sarcoidosis and tuberculosis. Excessive lung scarring can lead to thickening and stiffening of the lung tissue which can make breathing more difficult. Scar tissue can also be a result of damage due to cancer.
  • Lymphangioleiomyomatosis: A very rare progressive disease where an unusual type of muscle cell (smooth muscle) infiltrates the lungs which eventually obstructs the flow of air through the lungs. The cause is unknown and generally occurs in women of child bearing age.
  • Lymphoid interstitial pneumonia: A relatively rare form of lung disease characterized by the buildup of lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell) in the air spaces or alveoli of the lungs. The condition can affect children or adults and is frequently associated with conditions such as HIV and autoimmune conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Symptoms may develop gradually over a period of months or even years in some cases.
  • Macrosomia with lethal microphthalmia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by very small eyes and a large body size at birth.
  • Magrassi-Leonardi syndrome: A type of eosinophilic lung disease possibly caused by a virus. The condition may have variable presentations. Some patients have a severe pneumonia-like illness whereas other suffer fever, weakness and muscle pain for a few days.
  • Malignant Lung Cancer: Lung cancer is a disease of uncontrolled cell growth in tissues of the lung. This growth may lead to metastasis, which is the invasion of adjacent tissue and infiltration beyond the lungs. Most lung tumors are malignant. This means that they invade and destroy the healthy tissues around them and can spread throughout the body
  • Malignant Teratocarcinosarcoma: A rare type of cancer that involves connective (bone, cartilage, fat) and epithelial (skin and lining of internal organs) tissue and tends to be of a large size. It often tends to occur in the nose, pharynx and sinus areas. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the tumor.
  • Malt Worker's disease: Inhalation of malt particles contaminated with fungus in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the fungus in the airborne malt particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Malt Worker's disease -- Aspergillus spp.: Inhalation of malt particles contaminated with fungus (Aspergillus spp.) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the fungus in the airborne malt particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Manouvrier syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by the failure of the lungs to develop fully, heart defects and thumb abnormalities.
  • Marijuana abuse: Illicit depressant/hallucinogenic drug
  • Marshall-Smith Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by accelerated growth and maturation, shallow orbits and broad middle bones of fingers.
  • Meadows syndrome: A rare condition that affects pregnant women during the last trimester or within two months after birth. It is characterized by breathing difficult, chest pain, congestive heart failure, heart rhythm abnormalities, high blood pressure, gastrointestinal symptoms and embolisms.
  • Meconium aspiration syndrome: A condition that occurs when an infant suffers respiratory distress following birth due to the presence of meconium in the amniotic fluid.
  • Mendelson syndrome: Symptoms caused by breathing in gastric juices stomach contents during general anesthesia. Severe cases can lead to shock and death but this is rare. The condition is believed to be caused by the absence of laryngeal reflexes. It is most often seen in pregnant women.
  • Metal Fume Fever -- Aluminium: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of aluminium oxide fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever -- Antimony: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of antimony fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever -- Cadmium: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of cadmium fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever -- Chromium: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of chromium fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever -- Copper: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of copper fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever -- Iron: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of iron fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever -- Magnesium: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of magnesium fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever -- Manganese: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of manganese fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever -- Nickel: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of nickel fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever -- Selenium: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of selenium fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever -- Silver: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of silver fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever -- Tin: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of tin fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal Fume Fever -- Zinc: Metal fume fever is a flu-like illness which can result from inhalation of zinc fumes. The condition is most likely to occur in poorly ventilated areas in the metal-working industry.
  • Metal-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by a exposure to a metal (usually ingestion). Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure.
  • Metapneumovirus: A type of viral respiratory infection which was first discovered early in the 21st century. The infection tends to occur mainly in children and infants or the elderly. The incubation period is probably less than a week and the virus is transmitted through large droplets or contact with contaminated surface or objects e.g. used tissue. Symptoms are usually mild but may be severe in some cases.
  • Microcephaly -- mesobrachyphalangy -- tracheoesophageal fistula syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by an abnormally small head, short fingers and an abnormal opening between the trachea and esophagus.
  • Microcephaly, mental retardation and tracheoesophageal fistula (MMT): A rare syndrome characterized by the association of an abnormally small head, mental retardation and a tracheoesophageal fistula. Other variable symptoms may also be present.
  • Microcephaly, mental retardation and tracheoesophageal fistula associated with features of Rett Syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of an abnormally small head, mental retardation and a tracheoesophageal fistula.
  • Microcornea -- glaucoma -- absent frontal sinuses: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by small corneas, glaucoma and missing sinuses.
  • Mixed apnea: Mixed apnea is a combination of central and obstructive apnea and is seen particularly in infants or young children who have abnormal control of breathing.
  • Mixed asthma: Mixed asthma is a type of asthma that can be caused by an exposure to an allergen as well as other intrinsic triggers such as exposure to cold air or cigarette smoke. Mixed asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways that may or may not involve an allergic reaction.
  • Mixed granulocytic asthma: Mixed granulocytic asthma is a type of asthma that is characterized by increased levels of eosinophils and neutrophils (types of white blood cell) in the airways. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways which makes breathing difficult. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Mixed type non small cell carcinoma: It is the presence of mixed histological of small cell and non small cell cancer variety
  • Mollusk-shell hypersensitivity -- inhalation: Inhalation of sea snail shell dust in occupational settings can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to small air-borne particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Moraxella catarrhalis infection: An infectious disease caused by Moraxella catarrhalis. Moraxella catarrhalis can be found in the upper respiratory tract and is often harmless and asymptomatic. However, it can also cause ear infections and sinusitis, bronchopulmonary infection as well as other infections.
  • Morse-Rawnsley-Sargent syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal brain development and reduced fetal movement.
  • Mouldy shower curtain hypersensitivity pneumonitis: Inhalation of mold from mouldy shower curtains can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the wood dust. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Mountain sickness: Illness from poor adjustment to low oxygen at altitude.
  • Mucopolysaccharidosis IV: Disorder of mucopolysaccharide metabolism in infants.
  • Mushroom Worker's lung -- Micropolyspora faeni: Inhalation of mushroom particles and compost contaminated with bacteria (Micropolyspora faeni) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the bacteria in the airborne mushroom particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Mushroom Worker's lung -- Thermoactinomyces vulgaris: Inhalation of mushroom particles and compost contaminated with bacteria (Thermoactinomyces vulgaris) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the bacteria in the airborne mushroom particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Mycoplasma pneumoniae: Bacterial respiratory infection
  • Mycoplasmal pneumonia: An infectious disease affecting the lungs and caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae.
  • Nasal Obstruction: An obstruction in the nasal cavity. The obstruction may be caused by such things as an inserted object, tumor, swollen nasal passages due to allergy, hypertension or structural abnormalities of the nose.
  • Nasopharyngeal carcinoma: A malignant cancer that occurs in the nasopharynx area which is the upper part of the throat. Often there are no symptoms until the cancer has metastasized to other parts of the body such as the neck.
  • Nasopharyngeal teratoma with Dandy-Walker -- diaphragmatic hernia: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a nasopharyngeal tumor, diaphragmatic hernia and the Dandy-Walker anomaly (brain cyst).
  • Nasopharyngitis: Nasopharyngitis is a contagious, viral infectious disease of the upper respiratory system, primarily.It is the most common infectious disease in humans
  • Nasopharynx cancer: A condition which is characterized a malignancy located in the nasopharynx
  • Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Lung disease mostly in premature newborns; see also adult RDS.
  • Neutrophilic asthma: Neutrophilic asthma is a type of asthma that is characterized by increased levels of neutrophils (a type of white blood cell) in the airways. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways which makes breathing difficult. The severity of symptoms is variable. This type of asthma is usually driven by such things as pollution and viral infections rather than exposure to an allergen.
  • Nipah virus encephalitis: Inflammation of the brain caused by the Nipah virus which can infect pigs and humans so transmission usually occurs through contact with pigs.
  • Nocturnal asthma: Nocturnal asthma is a type of asthma that tends to only produce symptoms at night. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways which makes breathing difficult. The severity of symptoms is variable. Factors such as airconditioning, gastroesophageal reflux and sleeping in a reclining positing may increase the incidence of this form of asthma in susceptible patients.
  • Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: It is any type of lung cancer other than small cell carcinoma (SCLC). As a class, NSCLCs are relatively insensitive to chemotherapy, compared to small cell carcinoma
  • Non-allergic asthma: Non-allergic asthma is a type of asthma that is not triggered by exposure to an allergen. Non-allergic asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways that can be caused by such things as exercise, cold air, cigarette smoke and inhalation of chemicals.
  • Non-atopic asthma: Non-atopic asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is not caused by exposure to an allergen. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia: A relatively uncommon form of pneumonia that has no apparent cause. Symptoms tend to develop over a period of six months to one and a half years.
  • Nose foreign body: Having a foreign body inserted in a nostril or otherwise in the nose.
  • Nosocomial pneumonia: A form of pneumonia which is contracted in a hospital
  • Novak syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly underdeveloped lungs and by an abnormal opening in the area of the larynx, trachea and esophagus.
  • Obesity associated asthma: Obesity associated asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is associated with obesity. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Obesity hypoventilation syndrome: Obesity hypoventilation syndrome is defined as the combination of obesity (body mass index above 30kg/m2), hypoxia (falling oxygen levels in blood) during sleep, and hypercapnia (increased blood carbon dioxide levels) during the day, resulting from hypoventilation (excessively slow or shallow breathing)
  • Obstructive sleep apnea: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome is characterized by episodic upper airway obstruction that occurs during sleep.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Beauticians: People employed as beauticians may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to henna extract, ammonium thioglycolate, monoethanolamine, hexamethyhlenamine and persulfate salts. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Boiler Cleaners: People employed as boiler cleaners may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to vanadium and vanadium pentoxide. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Brewery Workers: People employed as brewery workers may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to Choloramine T and sulfone chloramides. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Cement Industry: People employed in the cement industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to chromates and dichromates. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Chemical Industry: People employed in the chemical industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to trimellitic anhydride, nickel and nickel compounds. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Chemists: People employed as chemists may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to naphthalene diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Cosmetics Industry: People employed in the cosmetics industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to carmine. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Detergent Industry: People employed in the detergent industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to amylases and proteases. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Dye Industry: People employed in the dye industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to carmine. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Dye Manufacturers: People employed as dye manufactures may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to Hexafix Yellow, Drimaren blue and Cibachrome brilliant scarlet. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Electroplating Industry: People employed in the electroplating industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to chromium and nickel and chromium and nickel compounds. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Epoxy Resin Industry: People employed in the epoxy resin industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to phthalic anhydride, hexahydrophthalic anhydrides, trimellitic anhydride, phthalic anhydride and tetrachlorophthalic anhydride. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Fabric Dying Industry: People employed in the fabric dying industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to anthroquinone. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Fire Retardant Industry: People employed in the fire retardant industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to himic anhydride. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Foundry Workers: People employed as foundry workers may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to diphenylmethane diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Fur Dying: People employed in the fur dying industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to paraphenyl diamine. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Galvanising Industry: People employed in the galvanising industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to Zinc. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Hairdressers: People employed as hairdressers may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to ammonium thioglycolate, monoethanolamine, hexamethyhlenamine and persulfate salts. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Hard Metal Industry: People employed in the hard metal industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to cobalt. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Hospital staff: People employed as hospital staff may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to enfluorane anaesthetic. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Jewellery Industry: People employed in the jewellery industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to platinum, nickel and nickel compounds. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Laminating Industry: People employed in the laminating industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to toluene diisocyanate and diphenylmethane diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Laxative Manufacturing: People employed in the laxative manufacturing industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to psyllium. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Manufacturing Industry: People employed in the manufacturing industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to amylases and proteases. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Nurses: People employed as nurses may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to cephalosporins. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Paint Manufacturing Industry: People employed in the paint manufacturing industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to hexamethylene diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Photocopying workers: People employed as photocopying workers may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to diazonium salt. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Polyurethane Foam Industry: People employed in the polyurethane foam industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to diphenylmethane diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Polyurethane Industry: People employed in the polyurethane industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to toluene diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Refining Industry: People employed in the refining industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to platinum. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Rubber Workers: People employed as rubber workers may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to azodicarboamide and ethylene oxide. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Spray Paining Industry: People employed in the spray painting industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to hexamethylene diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Tanning Industry: People employed in the tanning industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to chromium and chromium compounds. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Turbine Cleaners: People employed as turbine cleaners may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to vanadium and vanadium pentoxide. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Varnish Manufacture Industry: People employed in the varnish manufacture industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to toluene diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Cancer -- Respiratory tract cancer: People employed in occupations which involves chronic exposure to arsenic, asbestos, cadmium, beryllium, chromium, diesel exhaust, silica and nickel can lead to an increased risk of developed respiratory tract cancers such as bronchial cancer, lung cancer and tracheal cancer.
  • Occupational asthma: Occupational asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that occurs in a workplace setting. There is a wide range of chemicals and other airway irritants that are used in a workplace settings and can result in inhalation exposure that can produce asthma symptoms. The severity of symptoms is variable. Occupational exposures can also exacerbate existing asthma symptoms.
  • Occupational asthma -- Anhydride exposure: A respiratory condition caused by exposure to Anhydride in a workplace environment. The severity of symptoms varies between people. Some patients may suffer no symptoms until several exposures or a prolonged period of exposures occurs. Obviously the best way to treat symptoms is to avoid further exposures. People with underlying lung conditions or who smoke face a greater risk of developing occupational asthma.
  • Occupational asthma -- Animal laboratory workers: A respiratory condition that occurs in people who work with animal laboratories and is caused by exposure to animal antigens in the workplace environment. The severity of symptoms varies between people. Some patients may suffer no symptoms until several exposures or a prolonged period of exposures occurs. Obviously the best way to treat symptoms is to avoid further exposures. People with underlying lung conditions or who smoke face a greater risk of developing occupational asthma.
  • Occupational asthma -- Bakers: People employed as Bakers may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to amylases and proteases. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational asthma -- Bookkeepers: A respiratory condition that occurs in bookkeepers and is caused by exposure to paper dust in the workplace environment. The severity of symptoms varies between people. Some patients may suffer no symptoms until several exposures or a prolonged period of exposures occurs. Obviously the best way to treat symptoms is to avoid further exposures. People with underlying lung conditions or who smoke face a greater risk of developing occupational asthma.

 

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