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Risk Factors for Rocky Mountain spotted fever

List of Risk Factors for Rocky Mountain spotted fever

The list of risk factors mentioned for Rocky Mountain spotted fever in various sources includes:

Risk factors discussion:

Rocky Mountain spotted fever: Signs and Symptoms: DVRD (Excerpt)

Host factors associated with severe or fatal Rocky Mountain spotted fever include advanced age, male sex, African-American race, chronic alcohol abuse, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency.  Deficiency of G6PD is a sex-linked genetic condition affecting approximately 12% of the U.S. African-American male population; deficiency of this enzyme is associated with a high proportion of severe cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever.  This is a rare clinical course that is often fatal within 5 days of onset of illness.  (Source: excerpt from Rocky Mountain spotted fever: Signs and Symptoms: DVRD)

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: Epidemiology: DVRD (Excerpt)

The frequency of reported cases of Rocky Mountain spotted fever is highest among males, Caucasians, and children. Two-thirds of the Rocky Mountain spotted fever cases occur in children under the age of 15 years, with the peak age being 5 to 9 years old (see Figure 12).  Individuals with frequent exposure to dogs and who reside near wooded areas or areas with high grass may also be at increased risk of infection. (Source: excerpt from Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: Epidemiology: DVRD)

Risks factors for Rocky Mountain spotted fever: medical news summaries:

The following medical news items are relevant to risk factors for Rocky Mountain spotted fever:

About risk factors:

Risk factors for Rocky Mountain spotted fever are factors that do not seem to be a direct cause of the disease, but seem to be associated in some way. Having a risk factor for Rocky Mountain spotted fever makes the chances of getting a condition higher but does not always lead to Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Also, the absence of any risk factors or having a protective factor does not necessarily guard you against getting Rocky Mountain spotted fever. For general information and a list of risk factors, see the risk center.

 

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