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Diseases » Smoking » Stats
 

Statistics about Smoking

Complication statistics for Smoking:

The following are statistics from various sources about the complications of Smoking:

Prevalence and incidence statistics for Smoking:

See also prevalence and incidence page for Smoking

Prevalance of Smoking: 22.3% of Americans smoke (CDC); 23 million American women smoke (NHLBI)

Prevalance Rate: approx 1 in 4 or 22.30% or 60.7 million people in USA [about data]

Lifetime risk for Smoking: 1 in 2 chance of dying from a smoking-related disease (NIA)

Worldwide prevalence of Smoking: 1.3 billion people smoking worldwide (WHO World Health Report, 2003)

Prevalance of Smoking: An estimated 47 million (24.7 percent) adults were smokers in the United States in 1995 --24.5 million men (27 percent) and 22.4 million women (22.6 percent). (Source: excerpt from Facts About Smoking Among U_S_ Adults: CDC-OC) ... Current estimates indicate that about one-third of all adults smoke. And, while adult men seem to be smoking less, women and teenagers of both sexes seem to be smoking more. (Source: excerpt from Smoking and Your Digestive System: NIDDK)

Prevelance statistics about Smoking:

The following statistics relate to the prevalence of Smoking:

  • 26% of men in the US (Mayo Clinic)
  • 21% of women in the US (Mayo Clinic)
  • 29% of population over 15 with smoking "habit" in Canada 1996-97 (Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, 2000)
  • 29% of Canadian men over 16 with smoking "habit" in 2000 (British Heart Foundation - Coronary Heart Disease Statistics, 2003)
  • 21% of population over 18 smoked regularly in Australia 1995 (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2002)
  • World smoking prevalence expected to rise to 1.7 billion people worldwide (WHO World Health Report, 2003)
  • 32.1% of African American men in America 1997 (CBCF Health Organisation, 2004)
  • 27.4% of white men in America 1997 (CBCF Health Organisation, 2004)
  • 22.4% of African American women in America 1997 (CBCF Health Organisation, 2004)
  • 23.3% of white women in America 1997 (CBCF Health Organisation, 2004)
  • 22.1% of adult women in the US 1997 (The National Women’s Health Information Center, American Heart)
  • 22 million women in the US (The National Women’s Health Information Center, American Heart)
  • 24% of non-Hispanic white women in the US (The National Women’s Health Information Center, American Heart)
  • 22% of non-Hispanic black women in the US (The National Women’s Health Information Center, American Heart)
  • 14% of Hispanic women in the US (The National Women’s Health Information Center, American Heart)
  • 12% of Asian/Pacific Islander women in the US (The National Women’s Health Information Center, American Heart)
  • 30% of American Indian/Alaska Native women in the US (The National Women’s Health Information Center, American Heart)
  • 17.5% of female population smoke in Australia 1999-2001 (Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • 21.1% of male population smoke in Australia 1999-2001 (Australia’s Health 2004, AIHW)
  • more about prevalence...»

Incidence statistics about Smoking:

The following statistics relate to the incidence of Smoking:

  • 329,000 took up the habit in Canada 1996-97 (Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, 2000)
  • Women smoking nearly as much as men in Europe (The European Heart Network, 2000)
  • more about incidence...»

Death and mortality statistics for Smoking:

Deaths from Smoking: 440,000 annual deaths each year are smoking-associated (CDC)

Death rate extrapolations for USA for Smoking: 440,000 per year, 36,666 per month, 8,461 per week, 1,205 per day, 50 per hour, 0 per minute, 0 per second. Note: this extrapolation calculation uses the deaths statistic: 440,000 annual deaths each year are smoking-associated (CDC)

Death statistics for Smoking:

The following are statistics from various sources about deaths and Smoking:

  • Death rate is 2-3 times higher than non-smokers
  • Estimated to cause 10 million deaths per year worldwide by 2020 (WHO Web Site)
  • 1.2 million deaths in Europe (The European Heart Network)
  • 45,000 African American deaths each year in America (CBCF Health Organisation, 2004)
  • 1.2 million deaths from smoking in Europe (The European Heart Network, 2000)
  • 400,000 deaths annually in the US (Mayo Clinic)
  • more about deaths...»

Deaths from Smoking

An estimated 400,000 deaths each year are caused directly by cigarette smoking. (Source: excerpt from Smoking and Your Digestive System: NIDDK)

Life Expectancy & Years of Life Lost for Smoking

Average life years lost for Smoking: 12 years (NIA)

Average life years lost for Smoking: Smoking doesn't just cut a few months off the end of your life. It reduces the life of the average smoker by 12 years. (Source: excerpt from Smoking It's Never Too Late to Stop -- Age Page -- Health Information: NIA)

Society statistics for Smoking

Cost statistics for Smoking:

The following are statistics from various sources about costs and Smoking:

  • Expenditure on smoking related disease is estimated to be 200 billion U.S. dollars per year worldwide (WHO Web Site)

Hospitalization statistics for Smoking:

The following are statistics from various sources about hospitalizations and Smoking:

  • 0.0002% (21) of hospital consultant episodes were for mental and behavioural disorders due to use of tobacco in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 95% of hospital consultant episodes for behavioural disorders due to use of tobacco required hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 76% of hospital consultant episodes for mental and behavioural disorders due to use of tobacco were for men in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 24% of hospital consultant episodes for mental and behavioural disorders due to use of tobacco were for women in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 55% of hospital consultant episodes for mental and behavioural disorders due to use of tobacco required emergency hospital admission in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 16.4 days was the mean length of stay in hospitals for mental and behavioural disorders due to use of tobacco in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 6 days was the median length of stay in hospitals for mental and behavioural disorders due to use of tobacco in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 49 was the mean age of patients hospitalised for mental and behavioural disorders due to use of tobacco in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 62% of hospital consultant episodes for mental and behavioural disorders due to use of tobacco occurred in 15-59 year olds in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 0% of hospital consultant episodes for mental and behavioural disorders due to use of tobacco occurred in people over 75 in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 5% of hospital consultant episodes for mental and behavioural disorders due to use of tobacco were single day episodes in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)
  • 0.0006% (311) of hospital bed days were for mental and behavioural disorders due to use of tobacco in England 2002-03 (Hospital Episode Statistics, Department of Health, England, 2002-03)

About statistics:

This page presents a variety of statistics about Smoking. The term 'prevalence' of Smoking usually refers to the estimated population of people who are managing Smoking at any given time. The term 'incidence' of Smoking refers to the annual diagnosis rate, or the number of new cases of Smoking diagnosed each year. Hence, these two statistics types can differ: a short-lived disease like flu can have high annual incidence but low prevalence, but a life-long disease like diabetes has a low annual incidence but high prevalence. For more information see about prevalence and incidence statistics.

 

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