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Symptoms » Abdominal symptoms » Glossary
 

Glossary for Abdominal symptoms

Medical terms related to Abdominal symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • 10q Partial Trisomy: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by the duplication of genetic material from the long arm (q) of chromosome 10 - the genetic material occurs three times in body cells instead of the normal two. The type and severity of symptoms may vary considerably depending on the exact location and size of the duplicated genetic material.
  • 18-Hydroxylase deficiency: A rare genetic, metabolic defect where a deficiency of the enzyme 18-Hydroxylase which results in a reduced amount of aldosterone and salt wasting.
  • 1q deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 1 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • 2-Methylbutyric Aciduria: A very rare genetic disorder where an enzyme deficiency prevents the break down of certain proteins into energy and results in a harmful accumulation of acids in the blood and body tissues. More specifically, there is a deficiency of an enzyme (2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to convert the amino acid isoleucine into energy. 2-methylbutyrylglycine levels build up in the body and may cause damage. Symptoms vary according to the degree of enzyme deficiency - can range from asymptomatic to life-threatening.
  • 2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: A very rare genetic disorder where an enzyme deficiency prevents the break down of certain proteins into energy and results in a harmful accumulation of acids in the blood and body tissues. More specifically, there is a deficiency of an enzyme (2-methylbutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to convert the amino acid isoleucine into energy. 2-methylbutyrylglycine levels build up in the body and may cause damage. Symptoms vary according to the degree of enzyme deficiency - can range from asymptomatic to life-threatening.
  • 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A rare genetic disorder caused by the absence of a small portion of genetic material. A small section of chromosome 22 is missing at a location called q11.2. Chromosome 22 is one of 23 pairs of chromosomes that exist in humans.
  • 3-alpha-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • 3-alpha-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type 4: A rare genetic disorder where the body's cells are unable to make sufficient energy resulting in an accumulation in the body of 3-methylglutaconic acid. Type 4 is characterized by symptoms which overlap type 1 and 3.
  • 4-Alpha-hydroxyphenylpyruvate hydroxylase deficiency: A very rare metabolic disorder where a deficiency of a particular enzyme results in the urinary excretion of a chemical called hawkinsin. Symptoms start once the infant is weaned off breast milk.
  • 46,XX testicular DSD: A sex chromosome disorder in males which affects gonadal development and causes infertility. Males have XX chromosomes instead of the normal XY.
  • 46,XX testicular disorder of sex development: A sex chromosome disorder in males which affects gonadal development and causes infertility. Males have XX chromosomes instead of the normal XY.
  • 7p2 Monosomy Syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is one copy of the end of the short arm (p) of chromosome 7 rather than the normal two. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the location and size of the genetic material deleted.
  • AAA: Anoutpouching at an area of weakness in the abdominal aorta involving all 3 layers of the artery wall.
  • ACAD9 deficiency: A metabolic disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-9). The symptoms are variable and are usually triggered by a viral infection or ingestion of aspirin which can trigger a Reye-like episode which can cause death.
  • ACE Inhibitors -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that the use of ACE Inhibitors during pregnancy may cause a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • ACTH Deficiency: A rare endocrine disorder involving a lack of ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone) and low levels of cortisol and steroid hormones.
  • ACTH deficiency, isolated: An inherited deficiency of adrenocorticotropic hormone. The condition results from a genetic defect.
  • ADANE: A potentially fatal inherited neurological disease involving brain lesions. Symptoms tend to occur during childhood after an illness involving a fever. The disease is similar to Leigh syndrome but the course is acute rather than chronic.
  • AIDS: A term given to HIV patients who have a low CD4 count (below 200) which means that they have low levels of a type of immune cell called T-cells. AIDS patients tend to develop opportunistic infections and cancers. Opportunistic infections are infections that would not normally affect a person with a healthy immune system. The HIV virus is a virus that attacks the body's immune system.
  • AIDS-Associated Nephropathy: Kidney disease associated with AIDS.
  • AIDS-Related Complex: Patients with only mild symptoms of HIV infections.
  • ALL-Down syndrome: The presence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Down syndrome patients. These patients tend to have a poorer prognosis for the leukemia than patients without Down syndrome.
  • APECED Syndrome: APECED is a recessively inherited genetic disease characterized by the presence of two of the following three conditions: impaired parathyroid function, yeast infection (candidiasis) and impaired adrenal gland function (Addison's disease). It is an autoimmune disease resulting from a genetic defect. The body's immune system malfunctions and attacks it's own body tissues.
  • AREDYLD: A rare condition characterized by abnormalities of the extremities, teeth, hair, nail and kidney as well as lipoatrophic diabetes.
  • Aagenaes syndrome: A rare inherited birth abnormality involving underdeveloped lymph vessels which results in swollen legs and liver problems.
  • Abdomen bleeding: Bleeding due to abdominal wall disorders or due to failure in the body clotting mechanisms.
  • Abdomen blister: A raised lesion usually 0.5 mm in diameter present on the abdomen.
  • Abdomen bruise: An abdominal injury to underlying tissues or bone in which the skin is not broken, often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations.
  • Abdomen burning sensation: Burning sensation of the abdomen can be superficial or deep in nature.
  • Abdomen infection: Inflammation of the abdominal wall or inflammation of the abdominal organs
  • Abdomen inflammation: Inflammation of the abdominal wall or inflammation of the abdominal organs
  • Abdomen itch: An irritating abdominal skin sensation due to various etiological factors.
  • Abdomen lump: A swelling or small palpable abdominal mass .
  • Abdomen numbness: Sensation of abdominal numbness.
  • Abdomen obstruction: Abdominal obstruction is usually in the form of intestinal obstruction which can be acute or chronic in nature.
  • Abdomen rash: An abdominal rash is an abnormal condition of the skin of the abdomen.
  • Abdomen redness: Erythema of the abdominal wall usually due to any associated inflammatory pathology.
  • Abdomen sensitivity: Raised abdominal response to stimulus.
  • Abdomen spasm: Sudden involuntary contraction of the abdominal muscles.
  • Abdomen tingling: Prickling or stinging sensation felt in the abdomen.
  • Abdominal Cancer: Growth of abnormal cells (tumour) affecting the organs in the abdominal cavity; may be due to primary growth of a tumour or spread from another tumour (metastases, secondary tumour)
  • Abdominal Cramps in Pregnancy: Abdominal Cramps in Pregnancy are spasms of pain felt in the region between the lowest line of the ribs and the pubic/pelvic bones.
  • Abdominal Discomfort in Pregnancy: Abdominal Discomfort in Pregnancy is an unpleasant sensation felt in the region between the lower border of the ribs and the pelvis.
  • Abdominal Distension in Pregnancy: Abdominal Distension/Abdominal Fullness in Pregnancy is the sensation or appearance of the abdomen being enlarged more than expected.
  • Abdominal Fullness in Pregnancy: Abdominal Fullness in Pregnancy is the sensation or appearance of the abdomen being enlarged more than expected.
  • Abdominal Guarding in Pregnancy: Abdominal Guarding in Pregnancy is voluntary or involuntary muscle contraction of the abdominal wall, preventing the examiner from feeling the deeper contents of the abdomen and protecting the examinee from pain produced by the examination.
  • Abdominal Hernia: A protrusion of the intraabdominal contents through a defect in the abdominal wall
  • Abdominal Injuries: Any injury involving the abdomen. Injuries may penetrating or caused by a fall or blow to the abdomen. Symptoms are variable depending on the nature of the injury.
  • Abdominal Mass in Pregnancy: Abdominal Mass in Pregnancy is a lump felt under the skin, within the abdominal cavity.
  • Abdominal Neoplasms: A tumor that occurs in the abdomen.
  • Abdominal Pain in Pregnancy: Moderate to severe discomfort in the abdomen, occurring during pregnancy, which may or may not be related to pregnancy.
  • Abdominal Tenderness in Pregnancy: Abdominal Tenderness in Pregnancy is a painful sensation felt in the region between the lower border of the ribs and the pelvis.
  • Abdominal aortic aneurysm: A weakness and bulging of a section of an abdominal blood vessel called the abdominal aorta. It is usually associated with severe atherosclerosis in the blood vessel.
  • Abdominal chemodectomas with cutaneous angiolipomas: A rare genetic condition involving the growth of a tumor-like mass of lymphatic tissue in the abdomen.
  • Abdominal conditions: Medical conditions affecting the abdominal region.
  • Abdominal cramps: Painful muscular contractions occurring in the abdomen.
  • Abdominal cramps during pregnancy: Intermittant discomfort in the abdomen, related to abdominal muscles or internal organs, which may or may not be related to pregnancy.
  • Abdominal cystic lymphangioma: A rare form of benign tumor that occurs in infants. It is essentially a malformation of one of the abdominal lymph vessels where a portion is dilated and form a lymph fluid-filled cyst. Symptoms may vary depending on the exact location and size of the cyst.
  • Abdominal discomfort: The sensation of discomfort located in the abdomen
  • Abdominal distension: also known as ascites is pathologic fluid accumulation within the abdominal cavity
  • Abdominal distension in children: Abdominal distension in children is bloating or enlargement of the abdomen in children.
  • Abdominal distention: The sensation and appearance of distention located in the abdomen
  • Abdominal fullness: The sensation of fullness located in the abdomen
  • Abdominal guarding: A spasm of the abdominal wall muscles to protect inflamed abdominal viscera from pressure; it usually results from inflammation.
  • Abdominal hyperresonance: The exaggerated resonance on percussion of the abdomen
  • Abdominal mass: Abdominal swelling with hard mass felt
  • Abdominal mass in adults: An abdominal mass in adults is a lump or growth in an adult's abdomen.
  • Abdominal mass in children: An abdominal mass in children refers to a lump or growth in a child's abdomen.
  • Abdominal mass in newborns: An abdominal mass in newborns refers to a lump or growth in newborns.
  • Abdominal muscle spasm: also known as abdominal rigidity
  • Abdominal pain: Pain in the abdominal area or stomach.
  • Abdominal pain exacerbated by exercise: Any acute or chronic pathological condition of the abdomen can be exacerbated by physical exercise or a sporting activity. Some of the abdominal conditions which can be worsened by exercise or sports include
  • Abdominal pain in adults: Abdominal pain in adults refers to abdominal discomfort that occurs in adults.
  • Abdominal pain in children: Abdominal pain in children refers to discomfort or pain in the abdomens of children.
  • Abdominal pain in mesenteric ischemia: Abdominal pain in mesenteric ischemia is a condition in which a person with mesenteric ischemia is experiencing abdominal discomfort.
  • Abdominal pain in the elderly: Abdominal pain in the elderly refers to an older adult who has abdominal discomfort.
  • Abdominal pain in the second trimester: Abdominal pain in the second trimester refers to pain, cramping, or discomfort that occurs in the abdomen during the second trimester of pregnancy.
  • Abdominal pain similar to Inflammatory bowel disease: it is a lower central abdominal pain
  • Abdominal pain that worsens with menses: also known as dysmenorrhea
  • Abdominal pain worsened by exercise: Abdominal pain in case of exercise is usually due to muscle cramps but previously present abdominal pain can be worsened in the following cases
  • Abdominal paradox: Abdominal paradox is a condition in which the abdomen will contract inward as the chest expands during inspiration.
  • Abdominal rebound tenderness: Where pain is felt on the release of applied pressure upon the abdomen.
  • Abdominal rebound tenderness in Pregnancy: Abdominal rebound tenderness in pregnancy is the feeling of pain that occurs immediately after an examiner removes the hand with which he/she has been palpating the abdomen.
  • Abdominal rigidity: Firmness of the abdomen on palpation.
  • Abdominal rigidity in children: Abdominal rigidity is children refers to the presence of a hard, rigid, or board-like abdomen in a child.
  • Abdominal swelling: Swelling or bloating of the abdomen
  • Abdominal swelling in pregnancy: Abdominal swelling in pregnancy is a lump or enlarged area felt under the skin, within the abdominal cavity.
  • Abdominal tenderness: Abdominal point tenderness refers to the pain you feel when pressure is applied to a specific part of the belly area
  • Abdominal tumor: tumors of the abdomen
  • Abdominal wall bleeding: Bleeding due to abdominal wall disorders or due to failure in the body clotting mechanisms.
  • Abdominal wall blister: A raised lesion usually 0.5 mm in diameter present on the abdomen.
  • Abdominal wall bruise: An abdominal injury to underlying tissues or bone in which the skin is not broken, often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations.
  • Abdominal wall burning sensation: Burning sensation of the abdomen can be superficial or deep in nature.
  • Abdominal wall infection: Inflammation of the abdominal wall or inflammation of the abdominal organs.
  • Abdominal wall inflammation: Inflammation of the abdominal wall or inflammation of the abdominal organs.
  • Abdominal wall itch: An irritating abdominal skin sensation due to various etiological factors.
  • Abdominal wall lump: A swelling or small palpable abdominal mass.
  • Abdominal wall numbness: Sensation of abdominal numbness.
  • Abdominal wall obstruction: Abdominal obstruction is usually in the form of intestinal obstruction which can be acute or chronic in nature.
  • Abdominal wall rash: An abdominal rash which could be in the form of a macule, papule, blister, vesicles etc.
  • Abdominal wall redness: Erythema of the abdominal wall usually due to any associated inflammatory pathology.
  • Abdominal wall sensitivity: Raised abdominal response to stimulus.
  • Abdominal wall spasm: Sudden involuntary contraction of the abdominal muscles.
  • Abdominal wall tingling: Prickling or stinging sensation felt in the abdomen.
  • Abetalipoproteinemia: A rare genetic disorder involving fat metabolism. The disorder is also known as Bassen-Kornzweig syndrome. Signs of the disease include acanthocytosis, little or no serum beta-lipoproteins and hypocholesterolemia. In severe cases, steatorrhea, ataxia, nystagmus, motor incoordination and retinitis pigmentosa may also occur.
  • Abnormal Liver Function Tests in Pregnancy: Abnormal Liver Function Tests in Pregnancy are found when a doctor orders a liver screen in response to abnormal symptoms in a pregnant woman.
  • Abnormal enlargement of bladder: rapid increase in the size of the urinary bladder
  • Abnormal infrequent menstrual bleeding: also known as oligomenorrhea is the infrequent uterine bleeding episodes with intervals of more than 35 days
  • Abnormal liver function tests: Abnormal blood test results indicating that there may be a problem with ones liver
  • Abnormal stool texture: Abnormal stool texture refers to an abnormal consistency of feces.
  • Abnormal stool texture in children: Abnormal stool texture in children is a condition in which a child's bowel movement is too loose, too hard, is greasy, or has any other unusual texture.
  • Abnormal uterine bleeding: The loss of blood from the uterus that varies from that which is considered normal
  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding: refers to vaginal bleeding at any time during the menstrual cycle other than normal menstruation
  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding in children: Abnormal vaginal bleeding in children is any kind of bleeding or hemorrhage from the vagina in a girl who has not yet reached menses or puberty.
  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding in pregnancy: Bleeding from the vagina during pregnancy that occurs after conception but before the onset of labour.
  • Abnormal vaginal discharge: Abnormal vaginal discharge includes any type of discharge from the vagina that is not expected or typical, is heavier than usual, is bloody, is more watery than usual, and/or has an unusual smell.
  • Abnormally decreased urination: known as oliguria
  • Abrupt watery diarrhoea: Multiple episodes of watery diahorrea
  • Abruptio placentae: A condition which is characterized by the premature detachment of the placenta from the uterus
  • Abscess: This is an area of puss collected in a cavity which is constituted by necrotised tissue
  • Absence of bowel movement: absence of peristalsis
  • Absence of septum pellucidum and septo-optic dysplasia: A rare birth defect where a thin membrane in the middle of the brain is missing. This brain abnormality is never present on it's own but is a characteristic of septo-optic dysplasia where the patient also has optic disk abnormalities and pituitary deficiencies.
  • Absence of vaginal bleeding: also called amenorrhea is the absence of menstruation in a women of reproductive age group. It maybe be primary or secondary
  • Absent abdominal reflexes: the abdominal reflex includes contraction of abdominal muscles in the quadrant of the abdomen that is stimulated by scraping the skin tangential to or toward the umbilicus. This contraction can often be seen as a brisk motion of the umbilicus toward the quadrant that is stimulated, it is absent in ceratin conditions
  • Absent alpha 1 band: An absence of alpha-1-antitrypsin the the body
  • Absent bowel sounds: Absent bowel sounds, called ileus, is a condition in which the examiner is unable to hear any bowel sounds after listening to the abdomen. This indicates a lack of intestinal activity.
  • Absent menses: amenorrhea is the absence of menstruation
  • Absent patellae -- scrotal hypoplasia -- renal anomalies -- facial dysmorphism -- mental retardation: A rare syndrome characterized by absent kneecaps, underdeveloped scrotum, kidney anomalies, unusual facial appearance and mental retardation.
  • Absorptive hypercalciuria syndrome: A rare disorder involving the excessive absorption of calcium by the intestines which increases the body's calcium levels and inhibits the functioning of the parathyroid gland.
  • Abuse dwarfism syndrome: Retarded growth, intelligence and social behavior due to child abuse. The child abuse can take the form of mental or physical cruelty or neglect.
  • Acanthamoeba infection: Infection with a microscopic, free-living ameba that is readily found in the environment - soil, air and water. Most people exposed to the ameba will not become infected but when infections do occur, they tend to affect the eyes, central nervous system or can cause widespread infection throughout the body.
  • Acanthamoeba infection of the central nervous system: Infection by an amoebic organism called Acanthamoeba. Infection usually occurs when the amoeba enters through a break in the skin or through the nose. Infection can be localized or systemic where it can involve the central nervous system and cause potentially fatal meningoencephalitis. Infection of the eye can occur by cleaning contact lenses in contaminated water.
  • Acanthocytosis: A rare disorder where most of the red blood cells are abnormal with spiny projections due to lipid abnormalities. The blood abnormality is seen in conditions such as abetalipoproteinemia, severe liver disease and severe malnutrition. Symptoms and prognosis depend on the underlying disorder.
  • Acanthosis nigricans muscle cramps acral enlargement: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle cramps, dark velvety patches of skin and large hands and feet.
  • Accelerated hypertension: Accelerated hypertension is a condition characterized by a rapid increase in blood pressure. The condition is a medical emergency which can cause organ damage if not treated promptly.
  • Accessory navicular bone: An abnormal bone that develops in the arch in the middle of the foot. Often there are no symptoms but if the bone is large it may rub against shoes and cause problems.
  • Acetaminophen poisoning: Excessive ingestion of a drug called acetaminophen.
  • Achalasia: A rare condition where the patients muscles, such as the cardiac sphincter of the stomach, are unable to relax.
  • Achalasia -- adrenal -- alacrima syndrome: A familial disorder characterized by adrenal gland-related hormonal problems, swallowing difficulty (achalasia) and a lack of tears (alacrima). Neurological impairment and motor and sensory neuropathy is progressive. The adrenal glands in patients are resistant to the ACTH hormone and hence fails to operate normally.
  • Achard syndrome: An inherited connective tissue disorder characterized primarily by a short head, long, slender bones, recessed lower jaw and loose hand and foot joints.
  • Achard-Thiers Syndrome: A rare hormonal disorder that occurs in diabetic postmenopausal women where body hair grows in a masculine manner. Hormonal therapy is used to correct the endocrine imbalance.
  • Achlorhydria: Condition where there is no hydrochloric acid in the gastric juice
  • Achondrogenesis: A type of dwarfism where the main limbs are short and the head and trunk are hydropic (contain an accumulation of clear fluid).
  • Achondrogenesis type 1A: A rare genetic disorder characterized by abnormal cartilage formation and growth of bones. Type 1A differs from other types by the origin of the genetic defect. Type 1A involves abnormal cartilage-forming cells (chondrocytes) whereas type 1B involves an abnormal cartilage matrix. Type 1B is the most severe disorder.
  • Achondroplasia regional -- dysplasia abdominal muscle: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by abnormal bone development of the ilium, ribs and abdominal muscles. The abdominal muscles tend to become more develope with increasing age.
  • Achor-Smith syndrome: A dietary deficiency disorder involving low blood potassium levels which leads to other problems such as diarrhea, anemia, muscle wasting and kidney problems.
  • Achrestic anemia: Achrestic anemia is a form of anemia similar to that caused by Vitamin B12 deficiency but it doesn't respond to treatment with Vitamin B12. The condition tends to progress slowly and can result in death if not treated. There are a variety of possible causes.
  • Acid Reflux in pregnancy: Acid Reflux in pregnancy is the movement of the acid contents of the stomach through the gastro-oesophageal sphincter up into the oesophagus, causing a burning, pain or discomfort in the chest, commonly known as heartburn.
  • Acid reflux: Condition which occurs when the acid reflux into the oesophagus exceeds the normal limit
  • Acid reflux / heartburn:
  • Acid reflux into mouth: acid reflux related disorders
  • Acid regurgitation: The regurgitation of stomach contents
  • Acid-Base Imbalance: A disruption to the normal acid-base equilibrium in the body. There are four main groups of disorder involving an acid-base imbalance: respiratory acidosis or alkalosis and metabolic acidosis or alkalosis. Obviously the severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of imbalance.
  • Acidemia, isovaleric: A rare genetic condition where the body can't process proteins adequately. More specifically, there are insufficient levels of the enzyme needed to break down an amino acid called leucine. This results in a build up of isovaleric acid which can harm the brain and nervous system. Some people suffer severe symptoms from birth and others suffer milder symptoms that come and go and are affected by such things as infections or consumption of high protein food.
  • Acidemia, methylmalonic: An inborn error of metabolism where amino acids in the body aren't metabolized properly resulting in high levels of the acid throughout the body.
  • Acidemia, propionic: An inherited genetic disorder where the body is incapable of processing some proteins and fats resulting in the accumulation of certain substances in the body which causes the symptoms of the condition. The condition can be life threatening.
  • Acidosis: The accumulation of hydrogen ions or the depletion of the alkaline reserve in the body.
  • Acinic cell carcinoma: A usually slow-growing malignant tumor that that can occur in various parts of the body but is most often found in the pancreas, salivary glands, palate and upper lip. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the growth.
  • Ackee Fruit Food poisoning: Unripe ackee fruit contains a chemical called hypoglycin A and B which affect the central nervous system and fatty acid oxidation. Eating the unripe fruit can cause symptoms can occur in as little as two hours but is generally 6 to 48 hours. The ackee fruit is found mainly in Jamaica, West Africa, Central America, Sought Florida, southern California and Hawaii.
  • Acne-like stomach skin symptoms: acne is a disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. The inflammatory process varies from a papule, pustule to a nodule
  • Acorn poisoning: Acorns contain tannic acid which affects the metabolism of proteins and causing serious symptoms if large amounts are consumed. The amount of tannin in the acorn varies amongst species - higher tannin content results in a more bitter tasting acorn.
  • Acquired Cystic Kidney Disease: Kidney disease causing kidney cysts.
  • Acquired angioedema: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative or autoimmune disorders which result in the dysfunction of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Acquired angioedema, type 1: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. The disorder occurs in patients with lymphoproliferative disorders which affects the function of a complex blood protein called C1 inhibitor.
  • Acquired angioedema, type 2: A rare disorder characterized by recurring episodes of swelling of parts of the skin or mucous membranes. Sometimes internal organs may be involved. Type 2 is an autoimmune disorder where patients develop autoantibodies which destroy the function of C1 esterase inhibitor.
  • Acquired hypothyroidism: Acquired hypothyroidism is a condition where the thyroid gland makes too little or no thyroid hormone. Acquired hypothyroidism can be caused by both thyroid disease (primary hypothyroidism) and hypothalamic-pituitary disease (central hypothyroidism)
  • Acquired idiopathic sideroblastic anaemia: A rare disorder where iron is transported into a developing blood cells but because it is unable to be used, it builds up within the cell and tends to stop it from developing into a fully functioning red blood cell. Thus anemia can occur despite adequate or even high iron levels. Acquired cases can occur on exposure to excess alcohol, lead and drugs or can occur to nutritional problems involving a deficiency of folic acid or copper or an excess of zinc. The condition can also be caused by conditions such as kidney problems, endocrine dysfunction, metabolic disorders, rheumatoid arthritis and leukemia.
  • Acquired total lipodystrophy: A rare acquired disorder that involves adipose tissue abnormalities and is characterized by loss of adipose tissue through the body. The disorder is very similar to the congenital form but the liver involvement is more severe.
  • Acral dysostosis -- dyserythropoiesis: A rare disorder characterized by hand and foot defects as well as a congenital form of anemia characterized by the production of abnormal red blood cells.
  • Acro-pectoro-renal field defect: A very rare genetic syndrome characterized by abnormalities of the genital and urinary systems as well as the absence of chest muscles at birth.
  • Acro-reno-ocular syndrome: A disorder characterized by eye abnormalities, kidney defects and abnormalities of the arm and hand bones.
  • Acrocallosal syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by underdeveloped or absent corpus callosum of brain, duplication of thumb or big toe and extra fingers or toes.
  • Acrocephalopolysyndactyly, type 2 (ACPS 2): A rare genetic disorder characterized by premature closing of skull bones, craniofacial abnormalities, heart defects, growth retardation and other disorders.
  • Acrodermatitis Enteropathica: A rare, chronic condition that occurs in infants and involves autosomal zinc malabsorption. Signs include blisters on the skin and mucous membranes, alopecia, diarrhea and failure to thrive. The condition may be fatal if untreated.
  • Acrodynia: A disease occurring in infants or young children. Symptoms include edema, pruritis, skin rash, extremities are pink, cheeks and nose are scarlet, profuse sweating, digestive disturbance, photophobia, polyneuritis, irritability, listlessness, apathy and failure to thrive.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis Rodriguez type: One of a group of disorders characterized by defective limb and facial development. The Rodriguez type is very rare and primarily involves severe limb and organ malformations.
  • Acrofrontofacionasal dysostosis syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by abnormalities of the bones of the skeleton as well as mental retardation. Various facial, eye and urogenital anomalies are also present.
  • Acromegaly: An abnormal enlargement of the limbs due to increased secretion of growth hormone after the cessation of puberty
  • Acropectoral syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by extra fingers and toes, fusion of fingers and toes and anomalies involving the abdominal and chest wall.
  • Acrorenal syndrome: A rare lethal syndrome characterized limb anomalies and kidney malformations.
  • Acrorenal syndrome recessive: A rare, recessively inherited disorder characterized by the association of kidney and hand and foot abnormalities.
  • Actinic prurigo: An inherited tendency to develop an itchy, bumpy rash on exposure to the sun. Generally only the face and lips are affected. Symptoms tend to occur seasonally.
  • Actinomycetales infection: A bacterial infection from the order of Actinobacteria. The range of symptoms is variable depending on which bacteria from the order is involved.
  • Actinomycotic appendicitis: Chronic suppurative appendicitis resulting from infection by Actinomyces israelii. . It is extremely rare, but it is important to diagnose it, since failure to treat it adequately may result in protracted illness with extensive local spread.
  • Acute Bokhoror: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Chemical poisoning -- Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha: Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha is an ingredient used in certain pesticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute Crohn's-like symptoms: the main symptoms of crohn's disease include diarrhoea, loss of weight and abdominal pain
  • Acute Crohns-like abdominal symptoms: the main abdominal symptoms of Crohn's disease include diarrhoea and abdominal pain
  • Acute Crohns-like diarrhea symptoms: conditions which can cause acute severe diarrhoea
  • Acute Crohns-like rectal bleeding: disorders which can cause acute rectal bleeding( hematochezia) similar to that in case of Crohn's disease
  • Acute Crohns-like weight loss symptoms: sudden loss of weight and muscle mass caused by diseases other than Crohn's
  • Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis: A type of encephalitis that usually follows an acute viral infection and involves an immune attack on myelin tissue which is part of the nervous system. Initial symptoms include fever, headache, vomiting and drowsiness followed by seizures, coma and paralysis. Often results in permanent neurological disorders.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- Triforine: Triforine is an ingredient used in certain herbicides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- Ureas: Urea is a class of active ingredients used in certain defoliants, herbicides, insecticides and rodenticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- xylene: Xylene is an ingredient used in certain insecticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute VE: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute abdominal pain: Sudden onset pain occurring within the abdomen.
  • Acute abdominal pain in pregnancy: Acute abdominal pain in pregnancy is the sudden onset of abdominal pain in the pregnant woman.
  • Acute acid reflux into mouth: acid reflux related disorders
  • Acute acid reflux into mouth during pregnancy: Reflux-like vomiting in pregnancy is the movement of the acid contents of the stomach through the gastro-oesophageal sphincter up into the oesophagus, causing a burning, pain or discomfort in the chest, commonly known as heartburn and followed by an episode of vomiting.
  • Acute acne-like stomach skin symptoms: acne is a disorder of the pilosebaceous unit. The inflammatory process varies from a papule, pustule to a nodule
  • Acute adult T-Cell leukemia: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis. The acute subtype tends to progress rapidly and is the most prevalent form of the condition.
  • Acute appendicitis: Infection of the appendix
  • Acute basophilic leukaemia: A rare type of acute myeloid leukemia characterized by the presence of abnormal basophils.
  • Acute biphenotypic leukemia: A rare form of leukemia that has myeloid and lymphoid features.
  • Acute cholecystitis: Acute inflammation of the gall bladder, usually due to obstruction by a gall stone
  • Acute cholinergic dysautonomia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal red blood cells in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute chronic kidney pain: renal related etiologies
  • Acute colitis-like abdominal pain: conditions which cause pain abdomen similar to that in case of colitis
  • Acute crohns-like rectal symptoms: disorders which can cause acute rectal bleeding( hematochezia) similar to that in case of Crohn's disease
  • Acute diarrhea in children: Acute diarrhea in children is a condition in which there is a sudden onset of loose, runny, or watery stools or bowel movements in children.
  • Acute diarrhoea: A sudden onset of diarrhoea
  • Acute digestive ulcer like symptoms: diseases which can cause acute symptoms leading to gastric ulcers
  • Acute erythroleukemia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of abnormal blood cells (erythroblastic precursors) in the bone marrow and blood. The condition is characterized by anemia and generally leads to the development of acute myelogenous leukemia. The acute form has more severe symptoms than the chronic form.
  • Acute fatty liver of pregnancy: A rare complication of pregnancy that can occur in the second half of the pregnancy. It is characterized by excessive fatty deposits in the liver which can be fatal without prompt diagnosis and treatment which involves delivering the baby as soon as possible.
  • Acute flank pain: acute flank pain refers to sudden onset pain in one side of the body between the upper abdomen and the back
  • Acute flank pain in pregnancy: Acute flank pain in pregnancy is a feeling of discomfort to the sides of the abdomen. This may occur on one side or both, which may give a clue as to its cause.
  • Acute gastritis: Acute gastritis is the sudden onset of irritation or inflammation of the stomach.
  • Acute heartburn with acid reflux: acid reflux related disorders
  • Acute heartburn without reflux: acute heartburn not related to reflux diseases
  • Acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis: A rare degenerative brain disease where the patient suffers edema, many small hemorrhages, necrosis of blood vessel walls, demyelination of nerve fibers. Histiocytes, lymphocytes and neutrophils also enter the meninges. Symptoms include severe headache, fever, vomiting and sometimes convulsions and unconsciousness. Also called acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis.
  • Acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis: Acute inflammation of the pancreas accompanied by the formation of necrotic areas on the surface of the pancreas and in the omentum and, frequently, also accompanied by hemorrhages into the substance of the gland.
  • Acute hepatitis in children:
  • Acute ibd-like abdominal pain: conditions which causes abdominal pain similar to that in case of inflammatory bowel disease
  • Acute ibd-like diarrhea: conditions which can cause acute altered bowel habits
  • Acute ibd-like symptoms: symptoms of IBD include altered bowel habits, weight loss and pain abdomen
  • Acute ibs-like abdominal pain: conditions which cause acute abdominal pain similar to that in case of inflammatory bowel disease
  • Acute ibs-like diarrhea: conditions which can cause acute diarrhoea like in case of IBS
  • Acute ibs-like symptoms: symptoms of IBD include altered bowel habits, weight loss and pain abdomen
  • Acute ichthyosis-like stomach skin symptoms: rough skin on the abdominal wall
  • Acute infections: An infection that occurs acutely
  • Acute intermittent porphyria: A rare inherited metabolic disorder caused by a disturbed porphyrin metabolism resulting in increased production of porphyrin or its precursors. Symptoms include abdominal pain, photosensitivity and neurological disturbances such as seizures, coma, hallucinations and respiratory paralysis.
  • Acute kidney failure: The sudden and acute loss of kidney function
  • Acute leukaemia of ambiguous lineage: A term used to describe a type of leukemia (a blood cancer) where the leukemic cells cannot be determined as myeloid or lymphoid or where both types of cells are present.
  • Acute leukemia: An acute condition which affects a cell line of the blood which shows little or no differentiation
  • Acute liver pain: pain due to pathology in the liver
  • Acute liver pain in pregnancy: Acute liver pain in pregnancy is pain under the ribs on the right side of the upper abdomen. This pain may or may not actually arise from the liver, so other potential causes are also listed.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A malignant disease that starts suddenly and progresses quickly. It is characterized by a high number of immature cells in the organs, bone marrow and blood. Symptoms include fever, pallor, anorexia, fatigue, anemia, hemorrhage, bone pain, splenomegaly and frequent infections. Also called acute lymphocytic leukemia.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21 and type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 1: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 2: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, adult: Cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute megacaryoblastic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. More specifically, it involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes).
  • Acute meningitis: Acute meningitis is an inflammation of the brain that presents in an acute fashion. The inflammation may be the result of infective agents such as bacteria, viruses and fungi as well as non-infective agents such as certain drugs. Acute forms of meningitis can develop in within hours or days whereas chronic meningitis develops over weeks or months.
  • Acute mercury inhalation: Inhalation of mercury vapor can lead to serious symptoms and even death if sufficient quantities are inhaled. Mercury inhalation is more likely in confined or poorly ventilated spaces. Mercury from a broken thermometer can lead to symptoms if it occurs in a confined space.
  • Acute mountain sickness: A condition that occurs when an un-acclimatized person climbs to high altitudes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 1: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of immature blood cells (blast cells).
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 2: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 3: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 3 involves the proliferation of promyelocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 4: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 4 involves the rapid proliferation of myelocytes and monocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 5: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 5 involves the rapid proliferation of monoblasts (immature precursors of monocytes) in particular.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 6: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 6 involves the proliferation of the immature precursors of red blood cells called erythroblasts.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 7: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 7 involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes) in particular.
  • Acute myelocytic leukemia: A malignant cancer of blood-forming tissues resulting in a high number of immature leukocytes. Symptoms include soft bleeding gums, anemia, fatigue, fever, dyspnea, moderate splenomegaly, joint and bone pains and frequent infections. Also called acute granulocytic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, myeloid leukemia, splenomedullary leukemia, splenomyelogenous leukemia.
  • Acute myelofibrosis: A rare condition where progressive scarring or fibrosis of the bone marrow impairs it's ability to make blood cells causing symptoms such as anemia and liver and spleen enlargement.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to alkylating agent: The use of alkylating agents to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to topoisomerase type II inhibitor: The use of topoisomerase type II inhibitors to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, therapy related: Certain cancer therapies can result in the development of leukemia in some patients. These therapies includes topoisomerase type II inhibitors and alkylating agents.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia, adult: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute myelosclerosis: A rare disorder where the bone marrow makes too many blood cells. The disease progresses rapidly with death usually occurring within 6 months of onset.
  • Acute nausea: The sudden and acute onset of the symptom of nausea
  • Acute nausea and vomiting: Sudden onset unpleasant sensation in the abdomen causing a forcible regurgitation of stomach contents through the mouth
  • Acute nausea and vomiting in pregnancy: Acute nausea and vomiting in pregnancy is the sudden onset of a feeling of sickness in the stomach, associated with vomiting.
  • Acute nausea in pregnancy: Acute nausea in pregnancy is the sudden onset of a feeling of sickness in the stomach, often associated with vomiting.
  • Acute non lymphoblastic leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets. It is one of the most common forms of leukemia in adults but can occur in children.
  • Acute oophoritis:
  • Acute pancreatitis: sudden inflammation of the pancreas
  • Acute panmyelosis: A rare condition where progressive scarring or fibrosis of the bone marrow impairs it's ability to make blood cells causing symptoms such as anemia and liver and spleen enlargement. The disease often progresses rapidly and results in death.
  • Acute pimples on abdomen: acne eruptions on the abdominal wall
  • Acute pimples on stomach area: acne eruptions on the abdominal wall
  • Acute prostate-related urinary dribbling: weak urinary stream
  • Acute prostate-related urinary symptoms: Symptoms include urinary frequency, urgency, urgency incontinence, voiding at night (nocturia), weak urinary stream, hesitency (needing to wait for the stream to begin), intermittency (when the stream starts and stops intermittently), straining to void, dysuria (burning sensation in the urethra), and dribbling
  • Acute prostate-related weak urinary stream: weak urinary stream
  • Acute prostatitis: An acute condition which affects the prostate which is the result of infammation
  • Acute psoriasis-like stomach rash: Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin disorder that most commonly appears as inflamed, edematous skin lesions covered with a silvery white scale. The most common type of psoriasis is plaque psoriasis . Psoriasis like plaques on the abdominal wall may be seen in a few cases such as
  • Acute radiation sickness: Tissue injury can result from exposure to radiation. The radiation dose, rate of dosing and tissues irradiated will determine the severity and type of symptoms. The effects may be chronic, delayed or acute. Acute irradiation sickness usually occurs after abdominal irradiation and lasts for hours or days.
  • Acute reflux-like regurgitation: acid reflux related disorders
  • Acute reflux-like regurgitation in pregnancy: Acute reflux-like regurgitation in pregnancy is the movement of the acid contents of the stomach through the gastro-oesophageal sphincter up into the oesophagus, causing a burning, pain or discomfort in the chest, commonly known as heartburn. The contents sometimes reach the mouth and may be swallowed or expelled.
  • Acute reflux-like vomiting: acid reflux like disorders asociated with vomiting
  • Acute reflux-like vomiting in pregnancy: Acute reflux-like vomiting in pregnancy is the movement of the acid contents of the stomach through the gastro-oesophageal sphincter up into the oesophagus, causing a burning, pain or discomfort in the chest, commonly known as heartburn. The contents sometimes reach the mouth and may be swallowed or expelled.
  • Acute rheumatic fever: Bacterial joint infection with risk of heart complications.
  • Acute stomach ulcer-like symptoms in pregnancy: Acute stomach ulcer-like symptoms in pregnancy is the feeling of a burning, discomfort or nausea in the epigastric area. Pain may radiate from the epigastrium through to the back.
  • Acute stomach-ulcer like symptoms: diseases which can cause acute symptoms leading to gastric ulcers
  • Acute tin poisoning: Acute ingestion of tin can cause various adverse symptoms.
  • Acute tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis syndrome: The association of a sudden kidney disorder with eye inflammation. Autoimmune processes are believed to be involved.
  • Acute ulcerative colitis-like abdominal symptoms: Acute ulcerative colitis-like abdominal symptoms are abdominal symptoms that resemble symptoms of acute ulcerative colitis, such as abdominal cramping and bloody diarrhea.
  • Acute uterine pain: pathologies of the uterus which cause pain for a short duration
  • Acute uterine pain in pregnancy: Acute uterine pain in pregnancy refers to sudden onset of pain in the lower abdomen originating from the uterus in a woman who is pregnant
  • Acute vitamin A toxicity: Acute ingestion of vitamin A can cause symptoms. Symptoms usually only last for a day or two.
  • Acute zinc toxicity: Acute ingestion of zinc can cause symptoms.
  • Acyclovir -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Acyclovir during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, very long chain, deficiency of: A rare inherited genetic condition where the body is unable to convert certain fats to energy i.e. there is not enough of a certain enzyme which is needed to metabolize a type of fat called long-chain fatty acids. The build-up of these fatty acids in the body causes damage. There are three subtypes of the disorder each with varying severity: severe early-onset form, an intermediate form and an adult-onset form.
  • Adam and Eve poisoning: The Adam and Eve plant is a herb with heart-shaped leaves found in Europe. The plant contains a poisonous chemical called calcium oxalate crystals which can cause a variety of symptoms if ingested. Eye exposure can also cause symptoms due to the abrasive nature of the toxic chemical. Ingestion of the plant generally causes severe mouth pain. Skin exposure usually only causes minor, short-lived skin irritation.
  • Adams Nance syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by rapid heartbeat, high blood pressure, small eyes and the presence of excess glycine in the urine.
  • Addison-Gull syndrome: A condition where scarring of the liver and bile ducts which results in chronic jaundice, enlarged spleen and liver and yellow skin plaques due to abnormal lipid metabolism.
  • Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency: A rare genetic disorder where an enzyme (2, 8-dihydroxyadenine) deficiency results in urinary tract stone formation.
  • Adenocarcinoid tumor: A rare type of tumor that occurs in the gastrointestinal tract and tends to metastasize. The symptoms are determined by the location of the tumors.
  • Adenoma, Islet Cell: A pancreatic tumor which may be benign or malignant. Symptoms may vary depending on the location and size of the tumor as well as whether the tumor secretes hormones or not. For example, the tumor may block the biliary duct.
  • Adenomatous Polyposis of the Colon, autosomal dominant: A genetic condition characterized by the development of adenomatous polyps mainly in the colon and rectum. There may be hundreds or thousands of polyps and these polyps have a predisposition for becoming cancerous. The condition is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner and occurs in a familial pattern. Most patients have at least one parent with the condition.
  • Adenomyosis: presence of ectopic endometrial tissue in the myometrium
  • Adenophorea Infections: A parasitic roundworm infection. Roundworms can be found in water and soil environments as well as on plants and in animals.
  • Adenosine triphosphatase deficiency, anaemia due to: Deficiency of a chemical (adenosine triphosphate) resulting in anemia.
  • Adenoviridae Infections: Infection with a virus from the Adenoviridae family. The most common sites for infection are membrane linings such as the intestines, respiratory and urinary tract and the eyes. The infection may result in a range of symptoms depending on the particular virus involved. Transmission usually occurs through breathing in the germs or through fecal-oral contact. The infection is contagious.
  • Adenovirus infection in immunocompromised patients: Infection with a virus from the Adenoviridae family that occurs in a patient with a weakened immune system. The infection in these people is serious and can be fatal. The infection may result in a range of symptoms depending on the particular virus involved. Transmission usually occurs through breathing in the germs or through fecal-oral contact.
  • Adenoviruses: Common viruses causing common cold and various other ailments.
  • Adhesions: A fibrous band or structure by which parts abnormally adhere
  • Adhesive abuse: Adhesive abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Adhesives include household glues, rubber cement and model aeroplane glue. These adhesives can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Adhesive addiction: Adhesive addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse adhesives (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Adhesives includes household glue, rubber cement and model airplane glue.
  • Adnexal and Skin Appendage Neoplasms: A type of tumour that develops on particular organs - eyes, skin and uterus. The tumors are usually benign but some may become malignant. The symptoms will vary depending on the location of the tumor and whether it is benign or malignant. These type of tumors tend to be most common in middle-aged women.
  • Adnexal tenderness: Tenderness of the appendages or secondary structures of the uterus.
  • Adrenal Cancer: A malignant cancer that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids. Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal Cortex Diseases: Diseases of the adrenal cortex. Examples includes Addison's disease, Cushing's syndrome and adrenal fatigue.
  • Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms: A tumor that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids.
  • Adrenal adenoma, familial: A benign tumor that develops in the adrenal gland and tends to run in families. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids . Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal crisis: A potentially fatal condition where the adrenal cortex slows or stops functioning resulting in reduced glucocorticoids, decreased extracellular fluid volume and hyperkalemia. Symptoms include shock, coma, low blood pressure, weakness and loss of vasomotor tone. Also called addisonian crisis.
  • Adrenal disorders: Disorders affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adrenal gland hyperfunction: Excessive activity of the adrenal gland which causes excessive production of one or more adrenal hormones (aldosterone, corticosteroids, androgenic steroids, epinephrine and norepinephrine). The increased adrenal gland activity may be caused by an adrenal gland tumor or by excessive stimulation of the gland. Pituitary hormones stimulate adrenal gland activity.
  • Adrenal gland hypofunction: Reduced adrenal gland activity due to damage to the adrenal gland or lack of stimulation of the gland. Pituitary hormones stimulate adrenal gland activity.
  • Adrenal gland symptoms: Symptoms affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adrenal hemorrhage, neonatal: Hemorrhage of the adrenal gland after birth. The severity of the disorder is varies from a small hemorrhage to damage to the whole adrenal gland. Sometimes the condition is discovered incidentally during ultrasounds for other reasons. The hemorrhage may occur as the result of a variety of causes including adrenal tumor, neonatal stress, and blood coagulation disorder or for no apparent reason.
  • Adrenal hyperplasia: A group of disorder that occur when there is a problem in the process of making adrenal corticosteroids.
  • Adrenal hyperplasia, congenital type 3: A group of disorders that occur when a deficiency of 21-hydroxylase impairs the normal process of making adrenal corticosteroids. The severity of the condition is variable depending on the degree of deficiency.
  • Adrenal hypertension: Adrenal hypertension is high blood pressure caused by adrenal gland problems. For example, an adrenal tumor can cause excessive production of aldosterone which in turn causes salt-retention and high blood pressure. Severity of symptoms varies depending on the underlying cause.
  • Adrenal hypofunction: A condition which is characterized by a lack of production of hormones from the adrenal gland.
  • Adrenal hypoplasia congenital, X-linked: A genetic disorder which affects the body tissues that produce hormones. It is characterized by underdeveloped adrenal glands which results adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism.
  • Adrenal incidentaloma: A tumor of the adrenal gland that is discovered incidentally while performing an imaging examination for reasons other than an adrenal tumor. The tumor may be asymptomatic or can causes excessive secretion of adrenal hormones and resulting symptoms. The tumor may also be malignant or benign.
  • Adrenal medulla neoplasm: A tumor that develops in the part of the adrenal gland called the medulla which produces adrenalin and noradrenaline. The tumor is usually benign but can be malignant.
  • Adrenocortical carcinoma: A condition which is characterized by malignancy which affects the adrenocortex.
  • Adrenoleukodystrophy: A rare hereditary metabolic disease that only occurs in male children and is characterized by adrenal atrophy and extensive cerebral demyelination causing progressive loss of mental functioning, aphasia, apraxia and sometimes blindness. The patient usually dies within 5 years.
  • Adrenoleukodystrophy, autosomal, neonatal form: A rare inherited disorder involving the adrenal glands, testes and certain parts of the brain (white matter). It is a less severe form of leukodystrophy where an abnormality within the body cells prevents the metabolism of certain fats (long chain fatty acids).
  • Adrenomyeloneuropathy: A form of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy characterized by spinal cord dysfunction and brain involvement may or may not be present. Those with brain involvement suffer serious symptoms that can eventually lead to total disability and even death.
  • Adrenomyodystrophy: A rare genetic disorder characterized by primary adrenal insufficiency, dystrophic myopathy, severe psychomotor retardation and an overly-distended bladder which can cause death.
  • Adult Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic fibrosis is an inherited condition characterized by the production of thick sticky mucus by the mucus glands in the lungs, intestines, liver and pancreas. The condition is most often diagnosed in children or young adults but occasionally, relatively mild symptoms may lead to frequent misdiagnosis or no diagnosis at all unless the symptoms become worse. The condition may be misdiagnosed as emphysema, asthma or chronic bronchitis. It is usually females with a mild form of the disease who tend to be diagnosed at a later age.
  • Adult Panic-Anxiety Syndrome: A psychiatric disorder involving anxiety and panic attacks that occur for no obvious reason.
  • Adult T-Cell leukemia: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis.
  • Adult T-Cell lymphoma: A form of blood cancer affecting the T-cells which make up the body's immune system. The disease is caused by the HTLV-1 virus (human T-cell leukemia virus) which causes the proliferation of abnormal T-cells. The virus can be transmitted sexually and may lay dormant for decades. There are four subtypes: acute, chronic, lymphoma and smoldering. The acute and lymphoma subtypes have the poorest prognosis. The lymphoma subtype is aggressive and tends to affect the lymph nodes more than the blood.
  • Adult onset Still's disease: A form of Still's disease that has a later onset and involves arthralgia or arthritis and a characteristic rash that often appears during periods of temperature increase.
  • Adult-onset Renal Failure: A progressive kidney disease characterized by the presence of high blood pressure.
  • Adverse reaction: Term to describe unwanted, negative consequences sometimes associated with using medications, diagnostic tests or therapeutic interventions.
  • Adverse reaction to chemical -- 1,2-Dibromo-3-Chloropropane: 1,2-Dibromo-3-Chloropropane is a chemical used in soil fumigants and as a nematocide for various field crops. Commercial examples include Fumagon, Nemagon, Fumazone, Nemapax, Nemafume. Some people can suffer an adverse reaction to the chemical. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the route of exposure.
  • Adverse reaction to chemical -- 1,2-Dibromoethane: 1,2-Dibromoethane is a chemical used in gasoline, soil fumigants, fire extinguishers, flue gases and mechanical gauge fluid. Excessive exposure to this chemical can cause serious symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies amongst patients.
  • Adverse reaction to chemical -- 1-Propanol: 1-Propanol is a chemical used in various antiseptics, polishes, cleaners, cosmetics and lacquer. Some people can suffer an adverse reaction to the chemical which mainly involves irritation to the part of the body exposed to the chemical - eyes, skin and gastrointestinal. The severity of symptoms varies amongst patients.
  • Aerosol abuse: Aerosol abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Aerosols include air fresheners, hair spray, spray pain and deodorants. These aerosols can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Aerosol addiction: Aerosol addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse aerosol (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Aerosols includes spray pain, air freshener, deodorants and hair sprays.
  • Aflatoxicosis: Poisoning from ingestion of aflatoxins.
  • Aflatoxin B1 exposure: Aflatoxin B1 is a toxin produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • Aflatoxin B1- Teratogenic Agent: Reports indicate that the use of Aflatoxin B1 during pregnancy may cause various harmful effects on the fetus. The likelihood and severity of symptoms may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at. The effect on human fetuses has not been conclusively determined.
  • Aflatoxin B2 exposure: Aflatoxin B2 is a toxin produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • Aflatoxin G1 exposure: Aflatoxin G1 is a toxin produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • Aflatoxin G2 exposure: Aflatoxin G2 is a toxin produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • Aflatoxin exposure: Aflatoxins are toxins produced by fungus from the Aspergillus genus. The toxin is carcinogenic in humans and can also cause other health effect, particularly liver problems. The fungus are found frequently in nature and can readily contaminate crops before harvest or during storage. It is common in moist soils and decaying vegetation. There are more than 13 different subtypes of aflatoxin with B1 being the most toxic. The condition is most common in poorly developed countries where there are insufficient controls on the presence of aflatoxin in food.
  • African Sleeping sickness: A disease caused by parasites (Trypanosome brucei gamiense or T. brucei rodesiense) and transmitted to humans by the tsetse fly which is found only in Africa. Causes symptoms such as fever, chills, headache, anemia, edema of hands and feet, enlarged lymph glands, lethargy, sleepiness, convulsions and coma. Also called African trypanosomiasis and sleeping sickness.
  • Agammaglobulinemia, alymphocytotic type: A rare inherited immunodeficiency disorder involving a lack of T and B lymphocytes which makes the patient susceptible to bacterial and viral infections.
  • Agammaglobulinemias, Primary: A group of inherited conditions characterized by a defective immune system.
  • Aganglionosis, total intestinal: A developmental defect of the intestinal tract where the muscles of the intestines are unable to function and move food along the digestive tract. This form of Hirschsprung disease is differentiated from the other types by the location of the genetic defect.
  • Aggressive NK-cell leukaemia: An aggressive form of blood cancer involving the rapid proliferation of natural killer (NK) cells.
  • Aggressive systemic mastocytosis: The excessive proliferation of mast cells. Mast cells control the skin's response to minor injury and release a chemical called histamine which causes the skin to redden. In the aggressive form, mast cells accumulate in the liver, spleen and lymphatic system.
  • Ahumada-Del Castillo Syndrome: A form of secondary amenorrhea often resulting from a pituitary gland tumor. The condition causes galactorrhea and amenorrhea even when the patient is not pregnant.
  • Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 1: A rare inherited progressive disease that affects the brain and immune system. Type 1 is caused by a defect on chromosome 3p21.3-p21.2.
  • Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 2: A rare inherited progressive disease that affects the brain and immune system. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 13q14-q21.
  • Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 3: A rare inherited progressive disease that affects the brain and immune system. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 11q13.2.
  • Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 4: A rare inherited progressive disease that affects the brain and immune system. Type 4 is caused by a defect on chromosome 19p13.13.
  • Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome 5: A rare inherited progressive disease that affects the brain and immune system. Type 5 is caused by a defect on chromosome 3p21.3-p21.2.
  • Air sickness: disturbance between the central nervous system and the inner ear which affects the balance and equilibrium
  • Al Gazali Hirschsprung syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by Hirschsprung disease (an intestinal disorder), nail abnormalities and facial anomalies.
  • Al Murrah-induced lead poisoning: Al Murrah is a folk remedy used mainly by Saudi Arabian people to treat problems such as stomach pain, diarrhea and colic. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Alagille syndrome: A genetic disorder affecting the liver and characterized by the absence of some or all of the liver bile ducts that transport bile within the liver.
  • Alarcon-induced lead poisoning: Alarcon is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican people to treat digestive or stomach problems including indigestion and diarrhea. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albatross syndrome: Symptoms that occur after partial or total surgical removal of the stomach in patients with personality disorders. The symptoms experienced may be due to a peptic ulcer, salicylate addiction or for no detectable reason.
  • Albayaidle-induced lead poisoning: Albayaidle is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican and Central American people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albayalde-induced lead poisoning: Albayalde is a folk remedy used mainly by Mexican and Central American people to treat digestive or stomach problems such as vomiting and colic. It is also used to treat apathy and lethargy. This folk remedy has the potential to cause lead poisoning due to its relatively high content of lead. Children are more susceptible to the effects of lead. The use of folk remedies is still prevalent in some cultures. Lead poisoning can result in serious illness and even death in severe cases.
  • Albers-Schonberg disease -- malignant recessive form: A rare disorder characterized primarily by increased bone density as old bone is not resorbed and replaced with new bone - is also known as marble bone disease. The malignant infantile form is the most severe form of this disorder and death usually occurs in the first decade of life.
  • Albuminuria: The presence of albumin (a blood protein) in the urine.
  • Alcohol Withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when alcohol consumption is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Alcohol abuse: Excessive alcohol as a symptom of other conditions
  • Alcohol-Induced Disorders: Disorders caused by excessive alcohol consumption. The symptoms are variable depending on the disorder involved. Some of the disorders are: alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence, alcohol intoxication, alcohol withdrawal, alcohol intoxication delirium, alcohol withdrawal delirium, alcohol-induced persisting dementia, alcohol-induced persisting amnestic disorder, alcohol-induced psychotic disorder, alcohol-induced mood disorder, alcohol-induced anxiety disorder, alcohol-induced sexual dysfunction, alcohol-induced sleep disorder, liver damage, liver cancer and esophageal cancer.
  • Alcohol-induced hypertension: Alcohol-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by excessive drinking of alcohol.
  • Alcohol-induced pseudo-Cushing syndrome: The excessive consumption of alcohol can result in symptoms similar to a condition called Cushing's syndrome. When alcohol consumption is stopped, symptoms regress.
  • Alcoholic intoxication: The excessive consumption of alcohol can have toxic effects on the body and can ultimately result in death in severe cases.
  • Alcoholic liver disease: Alcoholic liver disease is the major cause of liver disease in Western countries, (in Asian countries, viral hepatitis is the major cause). It arises from the excessive ingestion of alcohol.
  • Aldehyde syndrome: A metabolic anomaly where consumption of alcohol results in high levels of blood acetaldehyde which causes a variety of symptoms.
  • Aldolase A deficiency: A rare condition where a deficiency of the enzyme called aldolase A causes muscle problems and anemia.
  • Allergenic cross-reactivity: Studies have indicated that a significant number of people with certain allergies will also have allergic responses to other allergens which have a similar protein. For example patients allergic to birch pollen will often have allergies to plant foods such as apples and peaches. Symptoms can range from mild response to severe allergic reactions. Cross-reactivity tends to have mainly oral allergy symptoms with breathing problems and anaphylactic reactions being extremely rare. Food allergies related to cross-reactivity tend to be less severe than those not related to cross-reactivity.
  • Allergic Disorders: A group of disorders that a caused by an allergic response to allergens
  • Allergic colitis:
  • Allergic reaction: A hypersensitivity reaction produced by the body, which results in an exaggerated or inappropriate immune reaction to a particular substance.
  • Allergies: Immune system over-reaction to various substances.
  • Allergy-like conditions: Medical conditions with similar effects to those of allergies.
  • Allopurinol hypersensitivity syndrome: An immune reaction to the ingestion of a drug called allopurinol. It is a potentially fatal disorder.
  • Aloe poisoning: Aleo vera is often used on the skin to treat such things as burns and dermatitis. The sap from the leaves contain a chemical called anthraquinone glycoside which can cause skin irritation in susceptible people but can also cause poisoning symptoms.
  • Alpers Syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by liver disease, seizures and progressive, episodic psychomotor retardation.
  • Alpha thalassemia: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Alpha thalassemia involves defects in one or more of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The main symptom is anemia, the severity of which can vary amongst patients depending on how many defective genes are involved.
  • Alpha thalassemia -- Hemoglobin H disease: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Hemoglobin H disease involves defects in three of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The main symptom is moderate to severe anemia.
  • Alpha thalassemia major: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Alpha thalassemia major is very rare involves defects in all of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The condition leads to infant death before or soon after birth.
  • Alpha-Mannosidosis: A rare condition which is characterized by a lysosomal storage defect.
  • Alpha-mannosidosis type II: A rare inherited metabolic disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (alpha-mannosidosase) which results in the accumulation of certain chemicals in the body which leads to progressive damage. This form of the condition is less severe than type I (infantile form).
  • Alpha-mannosidosis, adult-onset form:
  • Alpine syndrome: A condition that occurs in some people who go to low altitude winter resorts (1500 metres). It tends to mostly affect people who have been fasting when they arrive.
  • Alport Syndrome: A rare hereditary disorder involving the progressive deterioration of parts of the kidney resulting in chronic kidney disease.
  • Alport syndrome -- mental retardation -- midface hypoplasia -- elliptocytosis: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of Alport syndrome, mental retardation, underdeveloped midface and a blood abnormality (elliptocytosis). Alport syndrome is an inherited condition involving progressive kidney damage and hearing loss.
  • Alport syndrome with leukocyte inclusions and macrothrombocytopenia: A rare condition characterized by the presence of large blood platelets, kidney inflammation, deafness and abnormal leukocytes. End-stage kidney disease occurs in about a third of patients and tends to occur during the 3rd and 4th decades of life.
  • Alport syndrome with macrothrombocytopenia: A rare inherited syndrome characterized by progressive kidney damage and hearing loss as well as macrothrombocytopenia.
  • Alport syndrome, dominant type: A rare syndrome characterized by kidney problems and hearing loss. The condition is inherited as a dominant trait.
  • Alport syndrome, recessive type: A rare syndrome characterized by kidney problems and hearing loss. The condition is inherited as a recessive trait.
  • Alsing syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by kidney problems, skeletal abnormalities and a hole in the coloboma of the eye.
  • Alstrom disease: A rage genetic disorder involving a group of abnormalities affecting vision, hearing, kidney function and also characterized by obesity and diabetes mellitus.
  • Alstrom syndrome: A rare, hereditary genetic disorder which is progressive. Initial symptoms in infants are usually extreme light sensitivity, wobbling of the eyes and sometimes dilated dilated cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure. Young children quickly gain weight and become obese and as they get older, multiple organ systems may be affected causing blindness, hearing loss, type 2 diabetes, heart failure, liver disease, urological dysfunction, pulmonary fibrosis and renal failure.
  • Alström Syndrome: A progressive condition which is characterized by deafness, obesity and visual problems in childhood that may lead to diabetes and kidney failure in adulthood
  • Altered bladder habits: causes of retention
  • Altered bladder habits in pregnancy: Altered bladder habits in pregnancy are normal and consist of nocturia and frequency of micturition.
  • Altered bowel habit: An altered bowel habit is any abnormal unusual bowel movement or change in the normal pattern of bowel movements in an individual.
  • Altered bowel habit in pregnancy: Altered bowel habit in pregnancy refers to a change in the normal pattern of bowel movements in a woman who is pregnant.
  • Altered stool texture: Altered stool texture is a change in the consistency of feces.
  • Alternating Bowel Habit IBS: It is a functional bowel disorder characterized by chronic abdominal pain, discomfort, bloating, and alteration of bowel habits in the absence of any organic cause. IBS may be associated with pain disorders.
  • Alternating constipation and diarrhea as in case of ulcerative colitis: alternate bouts of constipation and diarrhoea
  • Alternating constipation and diarrhoea: altenate bouts of constipation and diarrhoea
  • Alveolar Hydatid Disease: Rare multi-organ tapeworm infection caught from animals.
  • Alveolar echinococcosis: A rare parasitic infection caused by the larva of a miniscule tapeworm called Echinococcus multilocularis. Transmission occurs through contact with foxes, coyotes, dogs and cats. The condition results in the development of parasitic tumors in the liver (sometimes other organs such as brain and lungs) but it generally causes no symptom for 5 to 15 years after infection.
  • Amanita polypyramis poisoning: Amanita polypyramis is a type of large-capped mushroom often found growing in the wild in the US. The mushroom tends to give off a chlorine-like odor. It is poisonous and death can result if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Amaryllis poisoning: The Amaryllis plant is a bulbous, flowering herb which originated from South America. The bulb contains alkaloids such as lycorine which are toxic but a large quantity would need to be eaten to cause poisoning.
  • Amastia, bilateral, with ureteral triplication and dysmorphism: A very rare disorder characterized mainly by the absence of both breasts, triplicated ureters (normally they are duplicated), facial anomalies and various other defects.
  • Amebiasis: Intestinal inflammation caused by Entamoeba histolytica and often marked by symptoms such as frequent, loose bowel movements that contain blood and mucus. Also called intestinal amebic dysentery.
  • Amebic dysentery: Intestinal inflammation caused by Entamoeba histolytica and often marked by symptoms such as frequent, loose bowel movements that contain blood and mucus. Also called intestinal amebiasis.
  • Amelogenesis Imperfeca, Hypoplastic, and Nephrocalcinosis: A rare disorder involving abnormal tooth development and kidney problems.
  • Amenorrhea: Absence of menstrual periods.
  • American mountain fever: A viral disease transmitted through the bite of ticks (Rocky Mountain wood tick and American dog tick) who are infected with the virus. Because the virus infects blood cells including erythrocytes, transmission can also occur through transfusion with infected blood but this is uncommon. Infection is most common in Canada and parts of western US. The incubation period usually lasts between 3 and 6 days but can be as long as a few weeks. The virus tends to cause to periods of fever each lasting for a few days.
  • Ammonia-smelling urine: Ammonia-smelling urine refers to urine with an odor of ammonia.
  • Ammonia-smelling urine in children: Ammonia-smelling urine in children is urine with an abnormal smell of ammonia, often indicating a urinary tract infection in children.
  • Amnesic shellfish poisoning: Rare shellfish poisoning sometimes causing amnesia.
  • Amniotic Bands: A rare condition where abnormal fetal development occurs when bands of tissue encircle parts of the fetus and affect the growth of that portion. The band of tissue develops from the internal womb lining. The location of the band on the fetus determines the symptoms and the seriousness of the condition.
  • Amoebiasis: An infectious disease caused by a free-living amoebic parasite called Entamoeba histolytica. The organism infects the bowel and causes gastroenteritis. Infection occurs through ingesting contaminated food or water. It is more common in countries with poor sanitation. The incubation period may last from days to weeks before symptoms appear.
  • Amphetamine abuse: Use of the stimulant drugs known as amphetamines or "speed"
  • Amphetamine-induced hypertension: Amphetamine-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by use of amphetamines. Patients with an existing history of hypertension may suffer further blood pressure increases while taking amphetamines and this can be serious. Severity of symptoms varies amongst patients depending on their susceptibility, underlying health and duration of amphetamine use.
  • Ampola syndrome: A rare genetic disease characterized primarily by mental retardation, facial anomalies, short stature, seizures and finger and toe abnormalities.
  • Amyloid Neuropathies: A peripheral nerve disorder caused by abnormal amyloid deposits in the nerves. Sensory, autonomic or motor nerves may be affected. The degree of nerve involvement, and hence symptoms, are variable.
  • Amyloid angiopathy: A blood vessel disorder caused by abnormal amyloid deposits in the blood vessel walls of the brain. The deposits can cause the blood vessel to become weak and rupture resulting in intracranial bleeding. Despite the potentially serious consequences the disorder is often asymptomatic until old age.
  • Amyloidosis: A disease characterized by the accumulation of insoluble amyloid protein in tissues and organs which in turn affects the functioning of these tissues and organs.
  • Amyloidosis AL: A disease involving the abnormal deposit of amyloid fibrils in virtually any part of the body - the heart, liver, kidney and peripheral and autonomic nerves are most commonly affected. The abnormal amyloid fibrils are produced abnormal plasma cells in the bone marrow. In some cases, the excess growth of abnormal plasma cells can result in a cancerous condition called myeloma resulting in bone pain and infections. A patient with myeloma may develop amyloidosis but it is rare for a patient with AL amyloidosis to go on to develop myeloma.
  • Amyloidosis beta2-microglobulinic: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage. The type of amyloid protein involved in this type of amyloidosis is beta-2-microglobulin. The abnormal protein tends to be deposited in parts of the body such as joints, bones and carpal tunnel but can also be found in the gastrointestinal tract and other organs.
  • Amyloidosis, Familial: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage. In the familial form, the type of amyloid involved is usually a plasma protein called transthyretin. The main parts of the body affected are the nerves, heart and kidneys.
  • Amyloidosis, Inherited: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage. In the inherited form, the type of amyloid involved is usually a plasma protein called transthyretin. The main parts of the body affected are the nerves, heart and kidneys.
  • Amyloidosis, familial cutaneous: Amyloidosis involves the abnormal deposit of a substance called amyloid in various parts of the body. The familial cutaneous form is characterized by brown skin pigmentation as well as systemic symptoms such as failure to thrive, developmental delay, gastrointestinal problems and pneumonia.
  • Amyloidosis, familial visceral: A rare genetic disorder involving widespread amyloidosis (abnormal buildup of amyloid protein in tissues) which tends the affect the kidneys severely.
  • Amyloidosis, inflammatory: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage and is potentially fatal. Symptoms depend on the organs involved. Secondary amyloidosis is caused by a chronic infection of inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple myeloma, tuberculosis and osteomyelitis. The main organs affected in secondary amyloidosis are usually the kidneys, liver, spleen and lymph nodes. The peripheral and autonomic nerves and the heart are rarely affected.
  • Anaesthesia complications: Complications that occur due to anaesthesia
  • Anal bleeding: The loss of blood per rectum
  • Anal cancer: A cancerous malignancy that is located anatomically in the anus
  • Anal conditions: Conditions that affect the anus
  • Anal fissure: A painful ulcer linear to the margin of the anus
  • Anal lump: Lump in the anal area as a symptom
  • Anal sphincter dysplasia: A malformation of the anal canal.
  • Anal sphincter myopathy, internal: A rare disorder where abnormalities of the anal muscles results in severe intermittent anal pain. The pain occurs at intervals during the day and every hour during the night.
  • Analgesic nephropathy syndrome: Kidney damage caused by excessive use of pain-killing drugs. Aspirin and phenacetin mixtures are the most common causes.
  • Analgesic syndrome: The use of large quantities of pain-killer drugs can sometimes cause serious kidney damage as well as various other problems.
  • Anaphylaxis: An immediate hypersensitivity reaction due to the exposure of a specific antigen to a sensitized individual
  • Anatomic obstruction: occurs whenever movement through the intestine is blocked temporarily by an anatomic growth
  • Anchovy poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some anchovies contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the anchovy does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The anchovies are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Ancylostoma duodenale: An infestation with Ancylostoma duodenale which is a parasitic hookwork whichcan cause serious disease in humans - usually occurs in people who work barefoot in damp soil. The hookworms suck blood from the intestines of the host which can result in anemia if there is a large number of worms.
  • Andersen disease: An rare inborn error of metabolism involving glycogen storage and characterized by cirrhosis and sometimes liver failure. Lack of the amyl-transglucosidase enzyme and abnormal glycogen causes the condition.
  • Andrade's syndrome: An inherited condition characterized by deposits of an abnormal protein called amyloid in various parts of the body including organs. The condition mainly involves neurological symptoms.
  • Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome: Females with male XY genetics but inability to respond to testosterone.
  • Anemia: Reduced red blood cells in the blood
  • Anemia, Blackfan Diamond: Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a rare genetic condition where the bone marrow is unable to make sufficient red blood cells which leads low levels of red blood cells. There are eight subtypes of the condition which differ in the location of the genetic defect and the incidence of additional symptoms such as malformations. The severity of symptoms is variable but most cases are serious.
  • Anemia, Hemolytic, Warm Antibody: A rare autoimmune condition where the body's defense system attacks and destroys red blood cells. The onset of the condition is triggered by temperatures 37ºC or higher. The severity of the disorder is variable.
  • Anemia, Neonatal: Insufficient red blood cells that can carry oxygen around the body. It is common in premature births or can occur as a result of blood loss before, during or just after the birth.
  • Anemia, Sideroblastic: A rare blood disorder where abnormal utilization of iron results in the production of defective red blood cells which have excessive deposits of iron in them.
  • Anemia, hypochromic microcytic: A blood disorder where red blood cells are too small and lack sufficient iron. It can be inherited or caused by insufficient iron in the diet or from a genetic disorder.
  • Anemias, Sideroblastic: Sideroblastic anemias are a group of rare blood disorders where the bone marrow is unable to produce normal red blood cells. The body has enough iron but the red blood cells are unable to utilize it in a normal manner and anemia results. The red blood cells become overloaded with iron and are unable to carry out their normal functions. Some forms of sideroblastic anemia are inherited but most tend to be acquired due to such things as exposure to toxins and certain drugs, leukemia, inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and nutritional deficiencies (e.g. copper and pyridoxine deficiency). Inherited forms usually appear in childhood whereas acquired forms usually occur in adulthood.
  • Anemic -- hematuria syndrome: An epidemic disease in Argentina which has a prolonged recovery time but usually there are no complications. Symptoms vary between seasons so that affected patients suffer anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea and dehydration in summer but suffer reduced urination, excess blood, albumin and renal casts in the urine. Other symptoms occur irrespective of the season.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to anesthetic agents. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Chloroform: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called chloroform. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Cyclopropane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called cyclopropane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Ether: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called ether. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Halothane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called halothane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Methoxyflurane: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called methoxyflurane. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Anesthetic agent-induced liver damage -- Nitrous Oxide: Damage or injury to the liver caused by exposure to an anesthetic agent called nitrous oxide. Anesthetic agents are a relatively uncommon cause of liver damage. Symptoms vary depending on the degree of exposure and hence extent of the liver damage or injury. Mild liver damage may cause few if any symptoms whereas severe damage can ultimately result in liver failure. Symptoms may be acute, subacute or chronic depending on the severity of the exposure. Factors such as age, race, gender, overall health and underlying liver problems may also influence a person's risk of developing liver problems and the severity of the symptoms.
  • Aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage: Bleeding in the space around the brain that occurs from a leak in a weakened or dilated blood vessel under the arachnoid layer of the brain. Death can occur if treatment is not prompt.
  • Angiodysplasia: Abnormality of small blood vessels - especially in the intestinal tract - which can result in bleeding. The size of the lesion involved determines the severity of the condition. Small amounts of bleeding from one lesion often goes unnoticed but multiple large lesions may cause heavy bleeding and result in black tarry stool and anemia.
  • Angiofollicular ganglionic hyperplasia: A rare disorder characterized by a localized overgrowth of lymph node tissue which can form a benign tumor-like growth. The symptoms are determined by the location and number of growths. There are two types of the disease: hyaline-vascular type or the plasma cell type which tends to have more severe symptoms.
  • Angiofollicular ganglionic hyperplasia -- hyaline-vascular type: A rare disorder characterized by a localized overgrowth of lymph node tissue which can form a benign tumor-like growth. There are two types of the disease: hyaline-vascular type or the plasma cell type which tends to have more severe symptoms. The hyaline-vascular type is usually asymptomatic but symptoms can be determined by the location and number of growths and the effect it can have on nearby tissue by pushing against it - e.g. squashing blood vessels.
  • Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma: A form of cancer which tends to be systemic in nature and thus cancer cells can be found in various parts of the body such as the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, skin and bone marrow.
  • Angioimmunoblastic with dysproteinemia lymphadenopathy: A rare immune system disorder which is similar to lymphoma. The condition is progressive but the course varies with some patients surviving a long time without treatment and others surviving only a short period of time.
  • Angiomyolipoma: A rare, benign growth that usually occurs in the kidney. It is usually asymptomatic unless it becomes large or starts bleeding. It is usually associated with tuberous sclerosis.
  • Angioneurotic Edema: Involves swelling of deep skin layers and fatty tissues under the skin as well as the mucous membrane. The condition involves recurrent swelling of tissues, abdominal pain and swelling of the voice box. It is often caused by an allergic reaction to drugs or food. It is also called Quincke's disease, giant urticaria, Quincke's edema or angioedema.
  • Angiopathy, hereditary, with nephropathy, aneurysms and muscle cramps: An inherited disorder characterized by kidney disease, aneurysms, blood vessel disease and muscle cramps which can last from seconds to minutes.
  • Angiosarcoma: A rare, aggressive malignant tumor of the blood vessel cells. Also called hemangiosarcoma, malignant hemangioendothelioma.
  • Angiosarcoma of the liver: A rare type of cancer that starts in the lining of blood vessels in the liver. It is generally an aggressive tumor which often metastasizes.
  • Angiostrongyliasis: Infection by a parasitic worm (Angiostrongylus). Infection can occur through eating contaminated raw animals such as snails, slugs, prawns or crabs which act as hosts to these parasites.
  • Anguillulosis: A infectious disease caused by an intestinal parasite called Strongyloides stercoralis (round worm). Infestation can occur directly through broken skin or through ingestion. Symptoms can take decades to develop in some cases. In rare cases, reinfection occurs and the parasites travel to other parts of the body such as the liver and lungs which can cause serious symptoms. The condition is highly deadly in immunocompromised patients.
  • Animal allergy: An animal allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to animals such as cats. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, saliva or urine of the animal. Animals frequently lick themselves which results in saliva sticking to the fur. Thus a person allergic to animals will often react to the fur even if it is not attached to the animal. Frequent washing of the animal may reduce symptoms. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • Aniridia -- renal agenesis -- psychomotor retardation: A rare genetic disorder characterized by missing irises of the eye, kidney developmental problems and mental retardation.
  • Aniridia ataxia renal agenesis psychomotor retardation: A rare genetic disorder characterized by missing irises of the eye, ataxia, psychomotor retardation and abnormally kidneys.
  • Anisakiasis: Intestinal infection by a parasitic worm (Anisakidae). Infection usually occurs by eating seafood infected with the larvae.
  • Ankylostomiasis: A parasitic intestinal infection caused by a hookworm called Ancylostoma duodenale or Necator americanus. Infection usually occurs when larva enter a break in the skin and then travel throughout the body until the reach the intestines.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Abdominal symptoms:

The following list of conditions have 'Abdominal symptoms' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions which include a symptom of Abdominal symptoms or choose View All.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Abdominal symptoms:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Abdominal symptoms' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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