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Glossary for Abnormal eye movements

Medical terms related to Abnormal eye movements or mentioned in this section include:

  • Abnormal pain: The abnormal presence of pain that one may feel
  • Achromatopsia: Patients who have achromatopsia (sometimes called achromatopia) do not have normal "cone vision.". Although the term may refer to acquired disorders such as color agnosia and cerebral achromatopsia, it typically refers to an autosomal recessive congenital color vision disorder, the inability to perceive color AND to achieve satisfactory visual acuity at high light levels (typically exterior daylight).
  • Amaurosis congenita of Leber: A rare genetic eye disorder characterized by blindness at birth or within years as well as other eye abnormalities.
  • Aniridia: A genetic disorder where part or all of the iris of one or both eyes is missing. The iris is the colored part of the eye. There are four forms of the disease: AN-1, AN-II, AN-III and AN-IV.
  • Arizona Bark Scorpion poisoning: A bite from the Arizona Bark scorpion contains chemicals toxic to the nerve system and can cause serious, life-threatening symptoms.
  • Aromatic amino acid decarboxylase deficiency: A rare inborn error of metabolism involving the deficiency of an enzyme (aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase) needed to process aromatic amino acids. This results in a deficiency of neurotransmitters such as dopamine and serotonin. The condition manifests as movement and neurological problems.
  • Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: A condition where certain head movements cause extreme dizziness.
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • CDG syndrome type I: A rare genetic disorder where the body is unable to synthesize glycoproteins which results in multisystem problems.
  • Carotid artery stenosis:
  • Cerebral Palsy, Ataxic, Autosomal Recessive: Ataxic cerebral palsy refers to an injury to the brain that results primarily in low muscle tone and poor coordination of movements. The ataxic autosomal recessive form is an inherited abnormality in the development of the brain which is linked to chromosome 9p12-q12
  • Coloboma chorioretinal cerebellar vermis aplasia: A very rare syndrome characterized by an eye anomaly (gap in eye structures such as choroids and retina) and abnormal development of the midline structure of the brain (cerebellar vermis aplasia).
  • Developmental delay -- hypotonia extremities hypertrophy: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by poor muscle tone, developmental delay.
  • Encephalopathy: Any degenerative condition which affects ones brain
  • Eye conditions: Any condition that affects the eyes
  • Eye movement symptoms: Symptoms affecting the movement of the eye
  • Eye pain: Pain in the eye.
  • Eye symptoms: Symptoms affecting the eye
  • Face symptoms: Symptoms affecting the face
  • Fibrosis of extraocular muscles, congenital with synergistic divergence: A rare congenital eye movement disorder involving droopy eyelids and limited eye movement. The condition is caused by the dysfunction of the muscles that control eye movement or by the innervation of these muscles by the third cranial nerve (oculomotor nerve). The condition is not progressive.
  • Ganglioglioma: A type of tumor that develops in the central nervous system. The tumor originates from glial and nerve cells. The tumor may grow rapidly and symptom will vary depending on the exact location and size of the tumor.
  • Glioma Susceptibility: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. There have been at least 8 genetic defects linked to an increased glioma susceptibility.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 1: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 1 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 3p25.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 2: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 2 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 10q23.31.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 3: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 3 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 13q12.3.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 4: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 4 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 15q23-q26.3.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 5: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 5 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 9p21.3.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 6: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 6 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 20q13.33.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 7: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 7 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 8q24.21.
  • Glioma Susceptibility 8: A glioma is a rare type of tumor that occurs from glial cells that make up the central nervous system. These tumors usually occur in the brain but can also occur in the spinal cord and other nerves such as the optic nerve. Symptoms depend on the size and location of the tumor. Some people have particular genetic anomalies which makes them more susceptible to developing a glioma. Type 8 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 5p15.33.
  • Gliosarcoma: A type of brain tumor that originates from glial cells. The tumor may grow rapidly and symptom will vary depending on the exact location and size of the tumor.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Head trauma: injury to the haed
  • Horner's syndrome: Horner's syndrome is characterised by ptosis, meiosis, anhidrosis and loss of ciliospinal reflex.
  • Hypopigmented lesions in children: Hypopigmented lesions in children refers are sores or ulcers that are colorless or have lost color in a child.
  • Joubert Syndrome: A rare neurological disorder where there is a defect in the part of the brain that controls coordination and balance.
  • Joubert Syndrome 9: Joubert syndrome is a rare congenital neurological disorder characterized mainly by a brain anomaly where the cerebellar vermis is underdeveloped. This part of the brain is responsible to for balance and coordination. Most of the symptoms are of a neurological type. There are ten subtypes of the disorder, each with a different origin for the genetic anomaly. Type 9 is linked to a defect on chromosome 4p15.3.
  • Malignant germ cell tumor: Malignant tumors that are made up of germ cells which are immature cells that eventually become reproductive system tissues in males and females. The symptoms depend on the location of the tumor which may occur in the ovaries, testes or anywhere along the body's midline such as the chest, head, abdomen, pelvis and lower back.
  • Movement symptoms: Changes to movement or motor abilities
  • Multiple Sclerosis: Autoimmune attack on spinal nerves causing diverse and varying neural problems.
  • Muscle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the muscles of the body
  • Musculoskeletal symptoms: Symptoms affecting muscles or bones of the skeleton.
  • Ménière's disease: Ear fluid disorder causing balance problems.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neurological symptoms: Any symptoms that are caused by neurological conditions
  • Noonan Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a webbed neck, chest deformity, undescended testes and pulmonic stenosis.
  • Nystagmus: unintentional jittery movement of the eyes
  • Nystagmus, Benign Paroxysmal Positional: A condition where certain head positions cause dizziness and abnormal eye movements due to abnormalities within the inner ear. Symptoms such as abnormal eye movements occur suddenly.
  • Ocular myokymia: Ocular myokymia is a mild type of eyelid twitching that is often linked to fatigue.
  • Oral facial digital syndrome, type 4: A rare inherited disorder characterized by facial, digital and oral abnormalities. Type IV is differentiated from the other types by the presence of severe shinbone deformity.
  • PHACE association: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a brain malformation (involving the posterior fossa), large facial hemangioma and eye, heart and artery anomalies.
  • Parkinson's disease dementia, familial: A condition characterized by the association of parkinsonism with dementia. Eye muscle weakness and pyramidal signs also develop in the early stage of the disease.
  • Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease: Rare brain myelin disorder.
  • Progressive supranuclear palsy, atypical: A rare progressive neurodegenerative disorder which starts involves features of parkinsonism and dementia.
  • Septooptic dysplasia -- digital anomalies: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by finger and toe abnormalities as well as abnormal development of the optic nerve and pituitary gland. Antenatal exposure to sedatives may be a factor in the cause of the disorder.
  • Severe infantile axonal neuropathy: A rare disorder involving the early onset of severe neuropathy.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 2: A disorder involving degeneration of the brain and spinal cord and causing progressive coordination difficulty and other symptoms. Symptom generally become more severe earlier than in spinocerebellar ataxia 1.
  • Strabismus: Strabismus is a misalignment of the eyes, also known as crossed eyes.
  • Striatonigral degeneration infantile: A genetic neurological disorder caused by progressive damage to a part of the brain called the striatum.
  • Stroke symptoms: Brain-related symptoms of bleeding or blockage.
  • Thompson-Baraitser syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by liver fibrosis, kidney cysts and mental retardation.
  • Tome-Brune-Fardeau syndrome: A rare syndrome involving neurological impairment which manifests as movement disorders and dementia.
  • Verloes-Deprez syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of scoliosis, muscle disease and eye condition called Duane anomaly.
  • Wallenberg's Syndrome: A rare neurological condition caused by a stroke (involving the cerebellar artery) and resulting in symptoms such as facial paralysis or weakness on one side of body.
  • Wernicke's encephalopathy: Brain condition with various effects
  • Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome: A rare degenerative brain disorder caused by thiamine (Vitamin B1) deficiency. Chronic alcoholics are prone to this condition.
  • Westphal disease: A condition that is closely associated with Huntington's disease and is a clinical variant of it
  • Wilson's disease: Wilson disease, or hepatolenticular degeneration, is a neurodegenerative disease of copper metabolism.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Abnormal eye movements:

The following list of conditions have 'Abnormal eye movements' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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