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Glossary for Acute fever in children

Medical terms related to Acute fever in children or mentioned in this section include:

  • Abscess: This is an area of puss collected in a cavity which is constituted by necrotised tissue
  • Actinomycosis: A chronic infection usually caused by an organism normally found in human bowels and mouths. The disease usually affects the face and neck and results in deep, lumpy abscesses that emit a grainy pus through multiple sinuses.
  • Acute Appendicitis: Infection of the appendix
  • Acute Tracheitis: Tracheitis is a bacterial infection of the trachea and is capable of producing airway obstruction
  • Acute rheumatic fever: Bacterial joint infection with risk of heart complications.
  • Amebiasis: Intestinal inflammation caused by Entamoeba histolytica and often marked by symptoms such as frequent, loose bowel movements that contain blood and mucus. Also called intestinal amebic dysentery.
  • Amphetamine poisoning: Excessive ingestion of amphetamine drugs.
  • Ascariasis: Large intestinal roundworm from 6 to 13 inches.
  • Aspergillosis: Infection with a fungus called Aspergillus.
  • Bacteremia: A condition where bacteria is present in the blood.
  • Body symptoms: Symptoms affecting the entire body features.
  • Brain abscess: abscess in the brain may involve any of the lobes of the brain
  • Bronchiolitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the bronchioles
  • Bronchitis: Inflammation of the bronchi as a symptom
  • Brucellosis: An infectious disease caused by the Brucella genus which is transmitted from animals to humans.
  • Burns: Injury from burns and scalds.
  • Cat scratch disease: An infectious disease transmitted through a cat's bite, scratch or lick and resulting primarily in lymph node pain and swelling. The condition can be mild or severe.
  • Cellulitis: inflammation of the subcutaneous fat
  • Chemical poisoning -- Lysergic Acid Diethylamide: Lysergic Acid Diethylamide is a hallucinogenic drug which is often misused. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chickenpox: Common viral infection.
  • Child health symptoms: Symptoms related to pediatric (child) health.
  • Chills: Excessive feeling of coldness.
  • Cholangitis: bile duct inflammation (cholangitis)
  • Cholecystitis: inflammation of the gall bladder.
  • Cocaine poisoning: Excessive ingestion of cocaine.
  • Crohn's disease: Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. The disease can affect any area from the mouth to the anus. It often affects the lower part of the small intestine called the ileum.
  • Croup: A condition characterized by an acute partial obstruction of the upper airway on young children
  • Dental abscess: Abscess of tooth, gum, or jawbone
  • Dermatomyositis: A muscle disease characterized by chronic muscle inflammation resulting in progressive muscle weakness and a characteristic rash.
  • Diabetes insipidus: A condition which is characterized by polyuria causing dehydration and resulting in great thirst
  • Ear infection: Infection of the ear - may involve the middle and inner ear.
  • Ectodermal dysplasia, hypohidrotic, autosomal dominant: A very rare inherited disorder that affects the development of skin, hair, nails, teeth and sweat glands during the fetal stage.
  • Ehrlichiosis: Bacterial tick-borne disease
  • Encephalitis: Infection of the brain (as a symptom)
  • Endocarditis: Inflammatory alterations of the endocardium of ones heart
  • Epidemic typhus: An infectious disease caused by Rickettsia prowazekii and transmitted by body lice. The severity of the illness may range from moderate to fatal.
  • Epididymitis: Infection of the epididymis (testicle tube)
  • Factitious fever: Factitious fever is an elevation in body temperature that is deliberately feigned or faked.
  • Familial Mediterranean fever: A rare inherited condition characterized by recurrent fever and inflammation. The inflammation usually involves the stomach, lungs or joints.
  • Familial dysautonomia: An inherited biochemical disorder that primarily affects the autonomic and sensory nervous system.
  • Fever: Raised body temperature usually with other symptoms.
  • Fever in children: Fever in children is the presence of a high body temperature in a child.
  • Gastroenteritis: An infection of the bowel
  • HIV/AIDS: HIV is a sexually transmitted virus and AIDS is the progressive immune failure that HIV causes.
  • Hand-Foot-Mouth Syndrome: An infectious viral disease caused by the coxsackievirus A. The disease is characterized by the development of blisters in the mouth and on hands and feet. The disease is spread by contact with body fluids from an infected person and the incubation period is 3 - 7 days. The infection is most common in children under the age of ten but can occur in teenagers and sometimes in adults.
  • Hantavirus: A genus of viruses from the family Bunyaviridae
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Henoch-Schonlein purpura: A form of vasculitis (blood vessel inflammation) that affects blood capillaries and affects mostly the skin, kidneys, joints and stomach.
  • Hepatitis: Any inflammation of the liver
  • Herpangina: A condition which is infective and caused by the coxsackie virus
  • Herpes stomatitis: Mouth infection with ulcers/blisters due to the herpes virus
  • Hydrocarbon poisoning: Excessive ingestion of hydrocarbon compounds such as turpentine, pine oil, cleaning agents, fuel, polishes, kerosene and car products.
  • Infection: Infections as a symptom.
  • Inflammatory bowel disease: Inflammatory bowel disease refers to digestive symptoms resulting from chronic bowel inflammation. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are two of the main subtypes of the disease. Scientists have discovered an array of genetic mutations which can result in an increased susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease. Not all people with the genetic anomaly will develop the condition but it can increase the risk especially if other environmental factors are also present. The severity of the disease that develops is variable.
  • Injury: Any damage inflicted in the body
  • Intestinal obstruction: Any obstruction that occurs in the gastrointestinal system
  • Joint pain: Pain affecting the joints
  • Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis: Chronic arthritis affecting children and teens
  • Kawasaki disease: A childhood illness that generally affects the skin, mouth and lymph nodes.
  • Leptospirosis: Bacterial infection usually caught from animal urine.
  • Leukemia: Cancer of the blood cells, usually white blood cells.
  • Lymphadenitis: Inflammation that occurs in the lymph nodes
  • Lymphoma: Any neoplastic disorder that occurs in lymphoid tissue
  • Malaria: A parasitic disease transmitted through mosquito bites.
  • Measles: Once common viral infection now rare due to vaccination.
  • Meningitis: Infection of the membrane around the brain (as a symptom)
  • Meningococcemia: A rare infectious disease whose main symptoms are upper respiratory tract infection, fever, rash and eye and ear problems.
  • Mixed connective tissue disease: A rare disorder of the connective tissue which affects a range of body tissues and organs.
  • Mononucleosis: Common infectious virus.
  • Mumps: An acute viral disease that causes the salivary glands to become swollen, sore and inflamed. Immunization had greatly reduced the incidence of this disease.
  • Myocarditis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the muscles of the heart
  • Myositis: One of the underlying causes for muscle weakness/myopathy.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neuroblastoma: neuroblastoma is a malignant (cancerous) tumor of infants and children that develops from nerve tissue
  • Orchitis: Inflammation of the testes.
  • Pancreatitis: Any inflammation that occurs in the pancreas
  • Paracetamol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Paracetamol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Parotitis: Infection or inflammation of one or both parotid salivary glands.
  • Pericarditis: Inflammation of the pericardium that surrounds the heart
  • Periorbital Cellulitis: Bacterial infection of the superficial tissues surrounding the eyes, often following a conjunctivitis or middle ear infection
  • Periorbital cellulitis: Bacterial infection of the superficial tissues surrounding the eyes, often following a conjunctivitis or middle ear infection
  • Peritonitis: Inflammation of the peritoneum.
  • Peritonsillar abscess: also known as quinsy
  • Pharyngitis: Inflammation of the pharynx.
  • Phenothiazine poisoning: Excessive ingestion of a drug called phenothiazine.
  • Pheochromocytoma: pheochromocytoma is a rare tumor that usually starts in the cells of the adrenal glands
  • Plague: Any epidemic disease with a high death rate.
  • Polyarteritis nodosa: A serious blood vessel disease where small and medium-sized arteries become swollen and damaged and are unable to adequately supply oxygenated blood to various tissues in the body. The disease can occur in a mild form or a serious, rapidly fatal form.
  • Postpericardiotomy syndrome: A complication that can occur after open-heart surgery. Symptoms can occur from days to weeks after the surgery. The condition is possibly caused by an autoimmune process triggered by a virus.
  • Psittacosis: An infectious disease caused by Chlamydia psittaci and transmitted mainly by infected birds but also by some mammals.
  • Pulmonary embolism: The occurrence of an embolism which blocks blood vessels in the lungs
  • Pyelonephritis: Any inflammation of the kidney
  • Q fever: A disease caused by Coxiella burnetti which causes fever, headache and muscle pain.
  • Rabies: An infectious disease that can affect any mammal including humans and is transmitted through the saliva of an infected animal. The infectious agent is the Neurotropic lyssavirus which affects the salivary gland and also causes neurological symptoms.
  • Rat-bite fever: A disease caused by a rat bite where the patient becomes infected by a bacteria (causes skin ulceration and recurrent fever) or a fungus (causes skin inflammation, muscle pain and vomiting). Also called sodokosis.
  • Respiratory symptoms: Symptoms affecting the breathing systems.
  • Retropharyngeal abscess: The high mortality rate of retropharyngeal abscess is owing to its association with airway obstruction
  • Rocky Mountain spotted fever: A bacterial disease caused by Rickettsia rickettsii and transmitted by ticks. The condition causes fever and a characteristic rash and may be fatal in severe or untreated cases.
  • Roseola infantum: Contagious infant conditions
  • Salicylate poisoning: Excessive ingestion of salicylate drugs.
  • Sarcoidosis: Rare autoimmune disease usually affecting the lungs.
  • Sarcoma: Any cancer of the connective tissue.
  • Scarlet fever: A complication of infection from strep bacteria such as strep throat.
  • Sensations: Changes to sensations or the senses
  • Septicemia: A systemic inflammatory response to an infection.
  • Serum sickness: Type of allergic reaction to certain medications or serums
  • Sexually Transmitted Diseases: Various diseases spread by sexual contact.
  • Sinusitis: Inflammation of the sinus passages (as a symptom)
  • Skin problems: Any condition that affects the skin
  • Skin symptoms: Symptoms affecting the skin.
  • Spinal cord injury: spinal cord injury causes myelopathy or damage to white matter or myelinated fiber tracts that carry sensation and motor signals to and from the brain
  • Status epilepticus: A condition which is characterized by a continuous series of generalized tonic clonic seizures
  • Stevens Johnson syndrome: A rare but serious condition involving inflammation and blistering of the skin and mucous membranes. It is believed to be an allergic reaction that can occur in response to some drugs or infectious diseases.
  • Syphilis: A sexually transmitted disease caused by a bacteria (Treponema pallidum). The condition is often asymptomatic in the early stages but one or more sores may be present in the early stages. Untreated syphilis usually results in remission of visible symptoms but further severe damage may occur to internal organs and other body tissues which can result in death.
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus: chronic autoimmune disease that can be fatal, though with recent medical advances, fatalities are becoming increasingly rare.
  • Temperature symptoms: Abnormalities of body temperature including fever.
  • Tetanus: A disease caused by chemicals which are produced by a bacterium (clostridium tetani) and are toxic to the nerves. The infection usually occurs when the bacteria enter the body through a deep wound - these bacteria are anaerobic and hence don't need oxygen to survive.
  • Thyrotoxicosis: hypermetabolic clinical syndrome resulting from serum elevations in thyroid hormone levels, specifically free thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), or both.
  • Tonsillitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the tonsils
  • Toxic Shock Syndrome: Severe immune reaction causing shock
  • Toxic epidermal necrolysis: A skin condition causing widespread blisters to erupt over greater than 30% of the body.
  • Toxocariasis: A parasitic roundworm (Toxocara canis or Toxocara cati) infection that normally occurs in cats and dogs but can be transmitted to humans by ingesting the larvae or eggs. The infection may be asymptomatic or severe and symptoms depend on where the larvae travel to when they migrate through the body.
  • Toxoplasmosis: Infection often caught from cats and their feces.
  • Trichinosis: Worm infection usually caught from pigs
  • Tuberculosis: Bacterial infection causing nodules forming, most commonly in the lung.
  • Tularemia: A rare infections disease caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis (a gram-negative pleomorphic coccobacillus). Transmission occurs through contact with infected animals or there habitats e.g. bites from infected insects or other animals, eating infected wild animals, contact with contaminated water and soil. Symptoms can vary greatly depending on the method of infection. For example infection through inhalation can cause symptoms similar to pneumonia, eating infected animals can cause a sore throat and abdominal symptoms and transmission through the skin can cause result in a painful skin ulcer.
  • Typhoid fever: Fever from bacterial food poisoning.
  • Ulcerative colitis: Ulcerative colitis (Colitis ulcerosa, UC) is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Ulcerative colitis is a form of colitis, a disease of the intestine, specifically the large intestine or colon, that includes characteristic ulcers, or open sores, in the colon.
  • Upper respiratory tract infection: The occurrence of an infection of the upper respiratory tract
  • Urinary tract infection: Infection of the urinary tract
  • Varicella -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that the development of Varicella during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Whooping Cough: An infectious condition caused by the bacteria Bordetella pertussis

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Acute fever in children:

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