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Symptoms » Amenorrhea » Glossary
 

Glossary for Amenorrhea

Medical terms related to Amenorrhea or mentioned in this section include:

  • 18p minus syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of chromosome 18 is missing which is characterized by mental and growth deficiencies, drooping upper eyelid and prominent ears. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount of genetic material that is missing.
  • 47,XXX syndrome: A genetic condition where females have an extra X chromosome in each of their cells. Normally female cells have two X chromosomes. This is not usually an inherited condition but a defect that occurs during cell division. Often the condition is asymptomatic.
  • Abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the abdomen or digestive tract
  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding: refers to vaginal bleeding at any time during the menstrual cycle other than normal menstruation
  • Abrikosov's tumor: A rare condition characterized by superficial, usually benign, slow-growing tumors occurring mostly on oral and genital tract tissue.
  • Achard-Thiers Syndrome: A rare hormonal disorder that occurs in diabetic postmenopausal women where body hair grows in a masculine manner. Hormonal therapy is used to correct the endocrine imbalance.
  • Acromegaly: An abnormal enlargement of the limbs due to increased secretion of growth hormone after the cessation of puberty
  • Adrenal disorders: Disorders affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adrenal gland symptoms: Symptoms affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adrenal hypoplasia congenital, X-linked: A genetic disorder which affects the body tissues that produce hormones. It is characterized by underdeveloped adrenal glands which results adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism.
  • Ahumada-Del Castillo Syndrome: A form of secondary amenorrhea often resulting from a pituitary gland tumor. The condition causes galactorrhea and amenorrhea even when the patient is not pregnant.
  • Alcohol abuse: Excessive alcohol as a symptom of other conditions
  • Amenorrhea: Absence of menstrual periods.
  • Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome: Females with male XY genetics but inability to respond to testosterone.
  • Anorexia: This is known as a lack of or loss of appetite for food
  • Anorexia Nervosa: A disorder where a distorted sense of body image leads to self-starvation to the point of death in some cases.
  • Anovulation: Failure to ovulate
  • Anxiety: Excessive worry, anxiety, or fear.
  • Anxiety disorder: A mental condition that is characterized by anxiety and avoidance behaviours
  • Asherman Syndrome: A condition where adhesions form inside the uterus because of uterine surgery or infection. The adhesions may cause menstruation to cease and/or infertility.
  • Asherman's syndrome: Scarring and adhesions that develop in the uterus and can result in menstrual and fertility problems.
  • Attenuated congenital adrenal hyperplasia: A late onset form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia where insufficient adrenal corticosteroids are produced by the body due to the deficiency of a particular chemical. The severity of symptoms varies from person to person and onset may occur as early as childhood.
  • Autoimmune Hepatitis: Liver inflammation caused due to autoimmune processes where the body's immune system attacks the liver.
  • Autoimmune oophoritis: An autoimmune condition where the body's own immune system attacks the ovaries and causes them to become inflamed. It can lead to ovarian function stopping prematurely.
  • Autoimmune thyroid disease associated Celiac Disease: Patients with autoimmune thyroid disease are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Bearn-Kunkel syndrome: A type of autoimmune liver disease characterized by liver damage, very high blood gammaglobulin levels and increased plasma cells.
  • Bleeding symptoms: Any type of bleeding symptoms.
  • Blepharophimosis, ptosis, epicanthus inversus: A rare genetic disorder characterized by inner canthal folds, lateral displacement of inner canthi and drooping upper eyelid.
  • Brain tumor: A condition which is characterized by the abnormal growth of tissue within the brain
  • Breast Feeding: Nursing an infant with breast milk.
  • Bulimia nervosa: Eating disorder with binging (overeating) and purging (vomiting).
  • CCFDN: A rare, recessively inherited syndrome characterized by cataracts during infancy, unusual facial appearance and neuropathy.
  • Celiac Disease: Digestive intolerance to gluten in the diet.
  • Chiari-Frommel syndrome: A hormonal disorder where a woman continues to produce milk even after the child has been weaned.
  • Chromosome 15q duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving an extra copy of genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 15. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 15q, trisomy: A rare chromosomal disorder involving an extra copy of genetic material from the long arm of chromosome 15. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 17p, partial deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder involving deletion of genetic material from the short arm of chromosome 17. The type and severity of symptoms are determined by the amount and location of the lost genetic material.
  • Chromosome 18, Monosomy 18p: A rare chromosomal disorder where a portion of chromosome 18 is missing which is characterized by mental and growth deficiencies, drooping upper eyelid and prominent ears. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount of genetic material that is missing.
  • Chromosome 18p minus syndrome: A rare genetic disorder where a portion of the genetic material from the short arm of chromosome18 is missing. The symptoms or severity may vary somewhat between patients.
  • Chronic Kidney Disease: Long-term and generally irreversible disease of the kidneys due to infection, obstruction, congenital diseases or generalised diseases causing failure of the kidneys' normal functions.
  • Collagenous celiac disease: Collagenous celiac disease is used to describe progressive celiac disease characterized by the presence of a layer of collagen (scarring) in the intestinal layers. This form of celiac disease usually fails to respond to treatments such as gluten-free diets. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The condition usually fails to respond to treatment and has a poor prognosis.
  • Complete androgen insensitivity:
  • Congenital adrenal hyperplasia: A condition where excessive secretion of adrenocortical androgens cause a somatic masculization or ?virilization? effect on a fetus or baby. Symptoms in girls may include masculization of sex organs, low voice, acne, amenorrhea and masculine hair distribution and muscle growth. Symptoms in boys include enlarged penis, small testes. Children with the condition are usually taller than average but develop into short adults. Also called adrenogenital syndrome or adrenal virilism.
  • Congenital adrenal hyperplasia -- non-classical form: A late onset form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia where insufficient adrenal corticosteroids are produced by the body due to the deficiency of a particular chemical. The severity of symptoms varies from person to person and onset may occur as early as childhood.
  • Conn's syndrome: An adrenal gland disorder where excess aldosterone hormone is produced resulting in symptoms such as headache, fatigue, nocturia and increased urine production. Also called primary hyperaldosteronism.
  • Cortisone reductase deficiency: An inborn error of steroid metabolism due to a deficiency of an enzyme called cortisone reductase (11-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase). This enzyme is needed to convert cortisone to cortisol.
  • Cushing's disease: A condition of hyperadrenocorticism which is secondary to excessive pituitary secretion of ACTH. Cushing's disease is different to Cushing's syndrome which refers to the effects of glucocorticoid excess from any cause.
  • Cushing-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of Cushing's disease
  • Denys-Drash Syndrome: A condition which is characterized by gonadal dysgenesis, nephropathy and the occurrence of Wilm's tumour
  • Depressive symptoms: Inappropriate depressed mood.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Noninsulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 1: Noninsulin-dependent diabetes (Type 2 diabetes) is a type of diabetes that doesn't respond to insulin but does tend to respond to dietary measures and diabetes medication. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q37.3.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Noninsulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 2: Noninsulin-dependent diabetes (Type 2 diabetes) is a type of diabetes that doesn't respond to insulin but does tend to respond to dietary measures and diabetes medication. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 12q24.2.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Noninsulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 3: Noninsulin-dependent diabetes (Type 2 diabetes) is a type of diabetes that doesn't respond to insulin but does tend to respond to dietary measures and diabetes medication. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 20q12-q13.1.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Noninsulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 4: Noninsulin-dependent diabetes (Type 2 diabetes) is a type of diabetes that doesn't respond to insulin but does tend to respond to dietary measures and diabetes medication. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 5q34-q35.2.
  • Diabetes-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of diabetes
  • Digestive symptoms: Any symptoms affecting the digestive tract.
  • Down's syndrome associated Celiac Disease: Patients with Down's syndrome have a high degree of susceptibility to developing celiac disease. Up to 17% of Down's syndrome sufferers develop celiac disease but this rate varies amongst age groups and country of origin. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Dystrophia myotonica 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by myotonia, muscle atrophy, cataracts and hypogonadism.
  • Ectopic pregnancy: The occurrence of a pregnancy outside that of the uterus
  • Emotional stress: A condition which occurs when a person is under stress affecting their emotions
  • Emotional symptoms: Symptoms affecting the emotions.
  • Endocrine disorders: Any disorder that affects the endocrine system
  • Ethanol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ethanol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Excessive dieting: Excessive limitation of food intake can lead to problems and effects such as dizziness, depression, intestinal problems, edema and impaired growth.
  • Exercise: The use of the human muscles to improve ones health
  • Exercise symptoms: Symptoms related to or triggered by exercise
  • Female genital symptoms: Symptoms affecting the female genital organs.
  • Female reproductive symptoms: Symptoms affecting the female reproductive organs.
  • Female sexual symptoms: Symptoms of the female sexual organs.
  • Forbes-Albright syndrome: A rare condition where a hormone secreting pituitary or hypothalamic tumor causes galactorrhea and amenorrhea.
  • Frasier syndrome: A rare syndrome involving kidney disease and male pseudohermaphrodism (genetic male with some female sex organs). Kidney failure can occur as early as adolescence.
  • Galactorrhea: This is where there is an excessive or spontaneous flow of milk from the female breast
  • Galactorrhoea-Hyperprolactinaemia: Increased blood prolactin levels associated with galactorrhea (abnormal milk secretion). It may be caused by such things as certain medications, pituitary disorders and thyroid disorders. The condition can occur in males as well as females.
  • Genital symptoms: Symptoms affecting the sex organs.
  • Gonadal dysgenesis: The abnormal development of gonads which means that the sex hormones are not being produced. The gonads are the primary reproductive organs - testes in males and ovaries in females. These organs produced sperm and eggs as well as sex hormones - testes produce the male hormone called testosterone and ovaries produce the female hormone called estrogen. Abnormal gonad development and hence lack of sex hormones can affect sexual differentiation between males and females and puberty may be delayed or fail to occur altogether.
  • Gonadal dysgenesis Turner type: The abnormal development of gonads that occurs in Turner syndrome due to a chromosomal abnormality. It occurs when the there is only one fully functioning X chromosome instead of two which results in underdeveloped female characteristics. The severity of symptoms is determined by how much of the second sex chromosome is missing.
  • Gonadal dysgenesis, XX type: A rare genetic condition involving non-functional ovaries causing a failure of puberty due to the lack of production of sex hormones by the ovaries.
  • Grief or loss: The normal emotional response that occurs to an external loss
  • Hepatocellular carcinoma (fibrolamellar variant): A rare form of liver cancer. The prognosis for this variant of hepatocellular cancer is better than for hepatocellular cancer.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Cottonseed: Cottonseed can be used as a herbal agent used to reduce male fertility in China. The herbal agent contains a chemical called gossyphol which can cause various overdose symptoms if ingested in excessive quantities.
  • Hodgkin's Disease: A form of cancer that affects the lymphatic system.
  • Human carcinogen -- Cyclophosphamide: Cyclophosphamide is a chemical deemed to be carcinogenic to humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the nature (e.g. inhalation, ingestion, skin contact), duration and level of exposure. Cyclophosphamide exposure is associated mainly with an increased risk of developing leukemia.
  • Hydatidiform mole: A rare condition where an abnormal union between an egg and a sperm results in the formation of grape-like cysts instead of a baby. The growth is not malignant.
  • Hypergonadotropic ovarian failure: Premature onset of menopause - occurs before the fourth decade -average age of onset of menopause is about 50 years of age. The condition can occur sporadically or may be inherited in a familial manner.
  • Hyperprolactinemia: High levels of prolactin in the blood.
  • Hyperthyroidism: The excessive activity of the thyroid gland
  • Hypogonadism: medical term for a defect of the reproductive system that results in lack of function of the gonads (ovaries or testes).
  • Hypogonadism -- retinitis pigmentosa: A very rare syndrome characterized by eye disease (retinal pigmentosa) and the absence of puberty caused by a deficiency of hormones that stimulate the sex organs (gonads) into producing the hormones that initiate puberty.
  • Hypopituitarism: A condition characterized by diminished hormonal section by the pituitary gland
  • Hypothyroidism: The decreased activity of the thyroid gland
  • Hysterectomy: The surgical removal of the female uterus
  • Imperforate hymen: Lack of opening in the vaginal hymen
  • Infantile hypothyroidism: A condition in infancy or early childhood due to an in-utero deficiency of thyroid hormones that can be caused by genetic or environmental factors, such as thyroid dysgenesis or hypothyroidism in infants of mothers treated with thiouracil during pregnancy.
  • Insanity: A non specific term used to describe a severely deteriorated mental state resulting from a mental disorder.
  • Insulin resistance, short fifth metacarpals: A rare syndrome characterized by short fifth fingers and fifth hand bones as well as insulin resistance.
  • Intercourse symptoms: Symptoms related to the act of sexual intercourse.
  • Kallmann Syndrome: A rare inherited condition characterized by hypogonadism, eunuchoidism and impaired or absent sense of smell. The condition occurs as a result of failure of a part of the hypothalamus which results in hormonal imbalance.
  • Laron syndrome type 1: Laron syndrome is a rare genetic disease where the body has sufficient growth hormones but lacks receptors to utilize the hormone and hence dwarfism results. Type 1 involves a defect in the growth hormone receptor gene which prevents the hormone from binding and being used. Hence there are high levels of free growth hormone in the plasma. Type II involves a problem with the processing of the growth hormone once it has been bound properly to the cell surface.
  • Laron syndrome type 2: Laron syndrome is a rare genetic disease where the body has sufficient growth hormones but lacks receptors to utilize the hormone and hence dwarfism results. Type 1 involves a defect in the growth hormone receptor gene which prevents the hormone from binding and being used. Hence there are high levels of free growth hormone in the plasma. Type II involves a problem with the processing of the growth hormone once it has been bound properly to the cell surface.
  • Laron-type dwarfism: A rare genetic disease where the body has sufficient growth hormones but lacks receptors to utilize the hormone and hence dwarfism results.
  • Low haemoglobin: Decreased concentration of haemoglobin in the blood.
  • Lower abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the lower abdominal region.
  • Malabsorption syndrome: is an alteration in the ability of the intestine to absorb nutrients adequately into the bloodstream
  • Male pseudohermaphroditism, incomplete hereditary (type 1): A rare condition involving a deficiency of dihydrotestosterone receptor which impairs the function of androgen receptors and hence the androgen (male hormone) is partially or completely ineffective depending on the level of deficiency. The degree of feminization ranges from feminine phenotype through to male phenotype depending on the level of androgen insensitivity.
  • Marasmus: A form of malnutrition caused by a severe deficiency of both protein and calories
  • Masculinisation: Increased male physical appearance in females
  • Menopause: End of female reproductive years
  • Mens health symptoms: Symptoms closely related to men's health.
  • Menstrual irregularities: Various abnormalities of periods and menstruation.
  • Metoclopramide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Metoclopramide during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Missed period: When a female you is menstruating fails to menstruate when expected
  • Mullerian aplasia: A birth defect involving the absence of the uterus, cervix and top part of the vagina but normal external genitals and ovarian function. Secondary sexual characteristics generally develop normally but menstruation is absent.
  • Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1: Rare inherited disease causing tumors in multiple glands
  • Mumps: An acute viral disease that causes the salivary glands to become swollen, sore and inflamed. Immunization had greatly reduced the incidence of this disease.
  • Myxedema: The most severe form of hypothyroidism characterized by swelling of extremities and face.
  • Nipple discharge: Discharge of fluid or milk from one or both breasts
  • Non Classic Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: A late onset form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia where insufficient adrenal corticosteroids are produced by the body due to the deficiency of a particular chemical. The severity of symptoms varies from person to person and onset may occur as early as childhood.
  • Obesity: Excessive body weight especially fat.
  • Ovarian cancer: A condition which is characterized by a malignancy that is located in the ovary
  • Ovarian insufficiency due to FSH resistance: A rare disorder where the ovaries fail to function normally as they are unable to respond to follicle stimulating hormones.
  • Ovarian insufficiency, familial: A rare inherited disorder where the ovaries fail to function normally despite normal levels of hormones that stimulate ovarian activity. Ovarian failure is a normal phase of aging and is associated with menopause but it is termed ovarian insufficiency when it occurs in a female under the age of 40.
  • Ovarioleukodystrophy: A rare syndrome characterized by ovarian failure and degeneration of the brain white matter which causes mental and motor problems.
  • Ovary symptoms: Symptoms affecting the ovaries
  • Panhypopituitarism: A rare condition where all pituitary hormones are absent or reduced. The condition may be congenital or acquired through such things as pituitary tumors. The pituitary gland regulates the activity of other endocrine glands as well as controlling growth. Other endocrine glands include adrenal, parathyroid, thyroid, pancreas, ovaries and testes. Symptoms can vary greatly depending on the degree of deficiency of the various hormones.
  • Perimenopause: The start of onset of menopause
  • Perphenazine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Pentazocine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Pituitary Cancer: Cancer of the pituitary gland.
  • Pituitary conditions: Any condition that affects the pituitary
  • Pituitary tumors, adult: A benign or cancer tumor that develops in the tissue of the pituitary gland in adults. The pituitary gland produces various hormones and some pituitary tumors (functioning tumors) can affect the secretion of one or more of these hormones resulting in a range of symptoms depending on the exact location of the tumor. Some pituitary tumors do not affect hormone production (nonfunctioning tumors).
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is an endocrine disorder that affects approximately 5% of all women.
  • Possible human carcinogenic exposure -- Medroxyprogesterone acetate: Some evidence indicates that exposure to Medroxyprogesterone acetate has a possible link to an increased risk of developing cancer in humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the duration and level of exposure.
  • Prader-Willi syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by reduced muscle tone, obesity and small hands and feet.
  • Pregnancy: Symptoms related to pregnancy.
  • Pregnancy symptoms: Symptoms related to pregnancy.
  • Progeria short stature pigmented nevi: A very rare inherited disorder characterized by premature aging, short stature, and immune system deficiency. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Prolactinoma: Benign cancer of the pituitary gland producing prolactin.
  • Pseudohermaphroditism, female -- skeletal anomalies: A rare disorder characterized by skeletal anomalies and ambiguous female genitals with female gonads.
  • Psychiatric disorders associated Celiac Disease: Patients with Psychiatric disorders are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Refractory Celiac Disease: Refractory Celiac Disease is celiac disease that fails to respond to treatment which involves a gluten-free diet. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The condition is quite uncommon and often the resulting poor absorption of nutrients from the intestines leads to a poor prognosis.
  • Resistance to LH (luteinizing hormone): A genetic abnormality where the body is unable to respond to luteinizing hormone which affects ovarian and testicular function.
  • Satoyoshi syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by alopecia, diarrhea, skeletal abnormalities and painful leg cramps caused by physical exercise or emotional stress.
  • Secondary amenorrhea: Secondary amenorrhea refers to a woman who has menstruated in the past but has not had a menstrual period for at least six months and who is not pregnant, breastfeeding, or menopausal.
  • Sertoli-leydig cell tumors: A rare form of ovarian cancer where excessive male sex hormones are produced by the cancerous cells.
  • Sexual symptoms: Symptoms affecting the sexual organs
  • Sheehan Syndrome: A rare condition that occurs in women who suffer a severe uterine hemorrhage during childbirth. The resulting blood loss may damage the pituitary gland and result in hypopituitarism.
  • Sick: Feeling ill or off color
  • Spironolactone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Spironolactone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Stress: Emotional stress (sometimes refers to physical stress)
  • Sudden onset of amenorrhea: Sudden onset of amenorrhea is the rapid development of the absence of a menstrual period in a woman who has had at least one menstrual period.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 1: Susceptibility to celiac disease 1 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 6p21.3) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 10: Susceptibility to celiac disease 10 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 3q25-q26) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 11: Susceptibility to celiac disease 11 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 3q28) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 12: Susceptibility to celiac disease 12 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 6q25) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 13: Susceptibility to celiac disease 13 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 12q24) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 2: Susceptibility to celiac disease 2 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 5q31-q33) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 3: Susceptibility to celiac disease 3 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 2q33) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 4: Susceptibility to celiac disease 4 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 19p13.1) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 5: Susceptibility to celiac disease 5 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 15q11-q13) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 6: Susceptibility to celiac disease 6 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 4q27) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 7: Susceptibility to celiac disease 7 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 1q133) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 8: Susceptibility to celiac disease 8 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 2q11-q12) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 9: Susceptibility to celiac disease 9 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 3p21) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Swyer syndrome: A rare disorder where a female has all the normal external femal characteristics but has non-functioning gonads. This means that none sex hormones needed for puberty are produced.
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus: chronic autoimmune disease that can be fatal, though with recent medical advances, fatalities are becoming increasingly rare.
  • Tetrasomy X: A rare chromosomal disorder which causes mental retardation, small head and various other anomalies.
  • Thinness: Underweight and thin
  • Thyroid disorders: Any medical condition which affects the thyroid
  • Thyrotoxicosis: hypermetabolic clinical syndrome resulting from serum elevations in thyroid hormone levels, specifically free thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), or both.
  • Tubal ligation syndrome: A complication that can occur after sterilization using tubal ligation in females.
  • Tuberculosis: Bacterial infection causing nodules forming, most commonly in the lung.
  • Turner Syndrome: Rare chromosome syndrome with one X but no second X or Y chromosome.
  • Turner syndrome associated Celiac Disease: Females with Turner syndrome are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Type 1 diabetes related Celiac Disease: Patients with Type 1 diabetes are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Uterus symptoms: Symptoms affecting the female uterus
  • Vagina, absence of: A condition characterised by the absence of a vagina at birth
  • Vaginal bleeding: Bleeding in or from the vagina.
  • Vaginal symptoms: Symptoms related to the vagina
  • Virilizing ovarian tumor: An ovarian tumor made up of hormone secreting cells which results in excessive male hormone (androgen) production.
  • Vitamin A embryopathy: A morbid condition of the embryo caused by the consumption of excess Vitamin A during pregnancy
  • Weight Gain: Gain of body weight.
  • Weight gain: Gain of body weight.
  • Weight loss: Loss of body weight.
  • Werner syndrome: A form of premature aging where sufferers start aging during adolescence or soon after and appear old by the time they reach their 30's or 40's. Milder forms of the condition may also occur.
  • William's syndrome associated Celiac Disease: Patients with William's syndrome are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Women's health symptoms: Symptoms related to women's health.
  • XY female: A person who has a chromosome composition of 46 XY and who is phenotypically female

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Amenorrhea:

The following list of conditions have 'Amenorrhea' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions which include a symptom of Amenorrhea or choose View All.

View All A B C D E F G H I K L M N O P R S T U V W X #

Conditions listing medical complications: Amenorrhea:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Amenorrhea' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.
Last revision: Nov 10, 2003

 

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