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Symptoms » Bloody diarrhea » Glossary
 

Glossary for Bloody diarrhea

Medical terms related to Bloody diarrhea or mentioned in this section include:

  • Abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the abdomen or digestive tract
  • Acorn poisoning: Acorns contain tannic acid which affects the metabolism of proteins and causing serious symptoms if large amounts are consumed. The amount of tannin in the acorn varies amongst species - higher tannin content results in a more bitter tasting acorn.
  • Anal bleeding: The loss of blood per rectum
  • Anal fissure: A painful ulcer linear to the margin of the anus
  • Anal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the anus.
  • Balantidiasis: Intestinal infection with a parasitic protozoa (Balantidium coli) resulting in intestinal inflammation. It is usually transmitted through direct or indirect contact with pig fecal matter.
  • Baneberry poisoning: Baneberries are toxic and can cause a skin reaction on contact or various poisoning symptoms.
  • Black locust poisoning: The black locust is a large deciduous tree which has long clusters of scented flowers and flat fruit pods. The young leaves, seeds and inner bark contain various chemicals (robin, robinine and robitin) which can be toxic if large quantities are eaten. The flowers are considered edible if handled correctly.
  • Bladder symptoms: Symptoms related to the bladder and urination.
  • Bleeding symptoms: Any type of bleeding symptoms.
  • Blood in urine: Hematuria is blood in the urine.
  • Bloody diarrhea: Diarrhea with blood in stool
  • Bloody stool: Blood appearing in the stool.
  • Bowel incontinence: Loss of full control of the bowel
  • Bowel movements: Changes in type or frequency of bowel motions
  • Bowel problems: Symptoms affecting the bowel
  • Breynia officinalis poisoning: Ingestion of the Breynia officinalis plant can cause irritation to mucosal linings and liver problems. The plant is often used as a herbal drug (Chi R Yun) to treat such things as poor growth, heart failure and venereal disease.
  • Bushmaster poisoning: The Bushmaster is a poisonous snake found in America.
  • Buttercup poisoning: The buttercup plant contains a toxic compound called protoanemonin. The plant is most toxic while it is flowering with the sap being poisonous portion of the plant. Poisoning by eating the plant is unlikely due to the fact that skin contact is quite painful.
  • Campylobacter food poisoning: Common bacterial infection usually from chicken.
  • Campylobacter jejuni: Rod shaped bacteria causing diarrhea.
  • Campylobacter jejuni infection: Campylobacter jejuni infection is a common food borne bacterial infection which may vary in severity from mild to severe. Death can occur in severe cases but tends to occur in patients with other existing illnesses such as HIV, cancer or liver disease. The infection can in rare cause infection in other parts of the body such as the appendix, abdominal cavity, central nervous system (meningitis), gallbladder, urinary tract and blood stream. Undercooked chicken is the main source of infection.
  • Celiac Disease: Digestive intolerance to gluten in the diet.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Clinitest tablet: Clinitest tablet are used to test sugar levels in urine. The tablets contain various chemicals (copper sulfate, sodium hydroxide, sodium carbonate) and eating them can cause serious symptoms. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hair Bleach: Hair bleach contain chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested. The chemicals in the hair bleach can continue to cause gastrointestinal damage for weeks after ingestion. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hair Dye: Hair dyes contain chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if ingested. The chemicals in the hair dye can continue to cause damage for weeks after ingestion. Some dyes contain lead or mercury which can cause neurological problems even if low level exposure occurs over an extended period of time. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • China Tree poisoning: The China tree is a deciduous tree which bears clusters of numerous pinkish-purple flowers. It also produces a yellow-green fruit. The fruit and leaves contain a chemical called tetranortriterpene neurotoxin which can cause poisoning symptoms if consumed in large quanitites.
  • Christmas Rose poisoning: The Christmas Rose plant contains proteoanemonin which can cause blisters and saponins which can cause irritation. The plant is found mainly in Europe. All parts of the plant are poisonous.
  • Colibacillosis: Infection with a bacteria called Escherichia coli. Infection can cause severe diarrhea or septicemia. The bacteria can also produce toxins which can affect other parts of the body also. Infections can occur anywhere in the world but some developing countries have endemic areas. Transmission can occur contaminated animal products or contact with infected cats and dogs.
  • Colitis: Inflammation of the colon
  • Colorectal cancer: Cancer of the colon (bowel) or rectum.
  • Crohn's disease: Crohn's disease causes inflammation of the digestive system. It is one of a group of diseases called inflammatory bowel disease. The disease can affect any area from the mouth to the anus. It often affects the lower part of the small intestine called the ileum.
  • Cytomegalovirus: A easily transmissible viral infection that is common but generally causes no symptoms except in infants and people with weakened immune systems.
  • D-plus hemolytic uremic syndrome (D+HUS): A rare condition where gastroenteritis involving bloody diarrhea is caused by a bacteria (usually E.Coli) which leads to toxins being present in the blood. These circulating toxins affect red blood cells, kidneys and occasionally even the brain.
  • Diarrhea: Loose, soft, or watery stool.
  • Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli: Various E-coli bacteria that can cause diarrhea
  • Digestive symptoms: Any symptoms affecting the digestive tract.
  • Diverticular Disease: Protrusions of the colon wall (diverticulosis) or their inflammation (diverticulitis)
  • Diverticulitis: diverticulitis is inflammation of an abnormal pouch(diverticulum) in the intestinal wall. These pouches are usually found in the large intestine
  • E-coli food poisoning: Type of bacterial food poisoning
  • Ebola: Dangerous virus mostly found in Africa.
  • Entamoeba histolytica: Parasitic digestive infection.
  • Enteropathogenic E. Coli infection: A bacterial infection that results from ingesting contaminated food or water and results in watery and sometimes bloody diarrhea. It most often causes diarrhea in infants in developing countries. Contaminated drinking water and meat products are the main source of infection. Enteropathogenic refers to the way that the bacteria use specific proteins to adhere to the intestinal lining.
  • Escherichia coli O157:H7: A form of bacteria commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract
  • Gardner syndrome: A rare inherited disorder involving polyps in the colon and tumors in various other parts of the body and other abnormalities such as extra teeth.
  • Gastroenteritis: An infection of the bowel
  • Gastrointestinal mucormycosis: An infectious disease caused by fungus from the order Mucorales which is normally found in the soil and in decaying plant matter. Transmission is usually through the inhalation of spores. It is generally harmless to healthy individuals but can cause infection in patients who are immunocompromised or who have a serious chronic illness such as uncontrolled diabetes. Symptoms and severity can vary considerable depending on the part of the body the infection occurs in - gastrointestinal tract, skin, lungs, central nervous system, eye orbit and the paranasal sinuses. Gastrointestinal mucormycosis is very rare and involves infection of the gastrointestinal tract.
  • Gastrointestinal zygomycosis: An infectious disease caused by fungus from the orders Mucorales and Entomophthorales which are normally found in the soil and in decaying plant matter. The infection differs from mucormycosis which only involves the order Mucorales. Transmission is usually through the inhalation of spores. It is generally harmless to healthy individuals but can cause infection in patients who are immunocompromised or who have a serious chronic illness such as uncontrolled diabetes. Symptoms and severity can vary considerable depending on the part of the body the infection occurs in - gastrointestinal tract, skin, lungs, central nervous system, eye orbit and the paranasal sinuses. Gastrointestinal zygomycosis involves infection of the gastrointestinal tract.
  • Glory lily poisoning: The glory lily is a type of vine which bears unusual yellow and red flowers. It is often used as an indoor and outdoor ornamental plant. The plant contains various chemicals that can cause serious symptoms if eaten. The roots are the most toxic part of the plant. The plant is considered very toxic and serious cases can result in death.
  • Helminthiasis: Infection of the human body with a parasitic worm such as roundworms and pinworms. The worms usually only involve the intestinal tract but sometimes they may invade other organs. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the type of worm and the part of the body infected.
  • Hemolytic uremic syndrome: A rare condition characterized by acute kidney failure, hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia (reduced blood platelet count). The condition is often caused by upper respiratory infections or infectious diarrhea.
  • Hemorrhagic shock and encephalopathy syndrome: A very rare severe condition characterized by sudden severe shock, brain disease and liver and kidney dysfunction which occurs in infants. The cause is unknown.
  • Incontinence symptoms: Symptoms related to incontinence.
  • Inflammatory bowel disease: Inflammatory bowel disease refers to digestive symptoms resulting from chronic bowel inflammation. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are two of the main subtypes of the disease. Scientists have discovered an array of genetic mutations which can result in an increased susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease. Not all people with the genetic anomaly will develop the condition but it can increase the risk especially if other environmental factors are also present. The severity of the disease that develops is variable.
  • Inherited Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome: A condition which is characterized by thrombotic microangiography occurring with renal failure, hemolytic anemia and severe thrombocytopenia
  • Intercourse symptoms: Symptoms related to the act of sexual intercourse.
  • Jessamine poisoning: Jessamine is an evergreen shrub which bears aromatic flowers and small white or purplish berries. It is often utilized as a houseplant or grown in gardens. The unripe berries contain various alkaloids which can be toxic if large quantities of the berries are eaten.
  • Lenten rose poisoning: Lenten rose is a herbaceous plant which has light-colored flowers which become purple as they age. The plant is often found in gardens. The plant contains a chemical called protoanemonin which can cause various symptoms if large quantities are eaten. Skin irritation can also result from skin exposure.
  • Lower abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the lower abdominal region.
  • Marsh marigold poisoning: Marsh marigold is a low growing plant with rounded leaves and small yellow flowers. The plant can be found growing in the wild or in gardens. The leaves from the plant contain a chemical called protoanemonin which can cause symptoms if large quantities are eaten. The young leaves are actually edible if they are boiled with frequent changes of water.
  • Methacycline -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Methacycline during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Oak poisoning: The oak is a large tree which has distinctive leaves and bears acorns. The acorns and young leaves contain chemicals (gallotannins, quercitrin and quercitin) which can cause symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a low level of toxicity. The nuts are edible if the tannins have been leached out.
  • Oleander poisoning: The oleander is a flowering shrub or small tree which bears clusters of flowers. The plant originated from Eurasia and is often used as an ornamental plant. The plant contains chemicals (cardiac glycosides: nerioside, oleandroside; saponins) which are very toxic if ingested. The plant is considered highly toxic and can result in death if sufficient quantities are eaten. The toxicity within a species can vary depending on the season. As little as seven leaves have been reported to cause poisoning symptoms. Poisoning can occur from inhaling smoke from burning oleander leaves.
  • Plant poisoning -- Anthraquinone: Anthraquinone is a toxin found naturally in plants such as aloe vera, senna, rhubarb and Cascara buckthorn. The main symptoms are gastrointestinal which can range in severity depending on the amount consumed. Severe cases can result in kidney damage and gastrointestinal bleeding.
  • Plant poisoning -- Tannin: Tannin is a bitter-tasting chemical found in many types of plants. Most plants contain insufficient quantities to cause any real problem. Acorns contain tannins and can cause symptoms if sufficient quantities of untreated nuts are eaten.
  • Plant poisoning -- Tetranortriterpene: Tetranortriterpene is a toxin that occurs naturally in some plants (e.g. Chinaberry tree). It functions as a natural insect repellant but is toxic to the human nervous system. Ingesting plant parts with this chemical can cause poisoning symptoms.
  • Privet poisoning: Privet is a shrubby plant which bears elongated clusters of small white flowers and black berries. The plant can be found growing in the wild or in gardens. The berries contain chemicals (ligustrin, syringin and other glycosides) which can cause symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to be very toxic and death can result if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Proctitis: Inflammation which occurs in the rectum
  • Pseudomembranous Colitis: Diarrhoeal illness caused by the bacteria Clostridium difficile, usually following a recent course of antibiotics and disruption of normal bowel bacteria
  • Rectal bleeding: Bleeding from the anus or rectum.
  • Rectum symptoms: Symptoms affecting the rectum at the end of the digestive tract.
  • Rhodococcus equi: A rare form of bacterial infection that usually affects horses and foals but can cause infection mainly in immunocompromised people. Infection usually starts at the site of some sort of trauma. Symptoms and severity may vary considerably depending on the location and extent of the infection.
  • Salmonella food poisoning: Common type of food poisoning.
  • Severe diarrhea: A condition which is characterized by severe diarrhoea
  • Sexual symptoms: Symptoms affecting the sexual organs
  • Shigellosis: An infectious disease which affects the intestinal tract and is caused by the Shigella bacteria. The condition may be severe, especially in children, but may be asymptomatic in some cases. The disease can be transmitted through fecal-oral contact.
  • Stool color: Stool color changes as a symptom
  • Stool symptoms: Changes to stool such as diarrhea
  • Toxic mushrooms -- Gastrointestinal irritant: Some mushrooms contain a chemical which cause gastrointestinal irritation. Mushroom species from this group include certain species of Agaricus, Amanita, Boletus, Entoloma, Gomphus, Lactarius, Omphalotus, Tricholoma, Tylopilus and Verpa.
  • Ulcerative colitis: Ulcerative colitis (Colitis ulcerosa, UC) is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Ulcerative colitis is a form of colitis, a disease of the intestine, specifically the large intestine or colon, that includes characteristic ulcers, or open sores, in the colon.
  • Urinary difficulty: Various difficulties with urination
  • Urinary problems: Any problems which occur to the urinary tract
  • Urinary symptoms: Symptoms affecting urination or related organs.
  • Vibrio: An organism of the genus Vibrio or other spiral motile organism
  • Vibrio mimicus food poisoning: Ingestion of food or water contaminated with a particular bacteria (Vibrio mimicus).
  • Vibrio vulnificus infection: The infection by the vibrio vulnificus bacteria
  • Viral digestive infections: Any virus that infects the gastrointestinal tract causing a medical condition
  • Wheat intolerance: A condition that is characterised by an intolerance to wheat
  • Whipworm: Any nematode of the genus trichuris
  • Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome: An inherited immune system disorder that affects only males and is characterized by recurring infections, eczema and reduced level of blood platelets (thrombocytopenia).
  • Worm conditions: Any condition that is caused by infestation of worms
  • Yersiniosis: A condition which is characterized by infectious diarrhea, enteritis, ileitis and occasionally septicaemia

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Bloody diarrhea:

The following list of conditions have 'Bloody diarrhea' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Last revision: May 10, 2004
 

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