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Symptoms » Brain atrophy » Glossary
 

Glossary for Brain atrophy

Medical terms related to Brain atrophy or mentioned in this section include:

  • 2-Hydroxyglutaricaciduria: A rare metabolic disorder characterized by high levels of a certain chemical (2-Hydroxyglutaric) which causes a serious progressive neurological disease and damage to the brain. The features of this disorder are variable and some cases are milder than others.
  • 3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase II Deficiency: A rare genetic disorder involving the deficiency of an enzyme (hydroxyacyl-coa dehydrogenase). The severity of the symptoms is highly variable with some cases resulting in death during the first decade while others suffer psychomotor and regression. Symptoms tend to be more severe in males who suffer progressive neurodegeneration whereas females tend to suffer mainly from developmental delay.
  • 3-Hydroxyisobutyric aciduria: A rare inborn metabolic disorder which causes brain and facial anomalies, seizures and growth problems.
  • AIDS: A term given to HIV patients who have a low CD4 count (below 200) which means that they have low levels of a type of immune cell called T-cells. AIDS patients tend to develop opportunistic infections and cancers. Opportunistic infections are infections that would not normally affect a person with a healthy immune system. The HIV virus is a virus that attacks the body's immune system.
  • Acrofrontofacionasal dysostosis syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by abnormalities of the bones of the skeleton as well as mental retardation. Various facial, eye and urogenital anomalies are also present.
  • Alpha-mannosidosis type II: A rare inherited metabolic disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (alpha-mannosidosase) which results in the accumulation of certain chemicals in the body which leads to progressive damage. This form of the condition is less severe than type I (infantile form).
  • Alpha-mannosidosis, adult-onset form:
  • Alport Syndrome: A rare hereditary disorder involving the progressive deterioration of parts of the kidney resulting in chronic kidney disease.
  • Alzheimer's Disease: A progressive degenerative disease of the brain of unknown cause
  • Alzheimer's disease: A progressive degenerative disease of the brain of unknown cause
  • Angelman-Like Syndrome, X-linked: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, mutism, facial anomalies, epilepsy and weak eye muscles. Males tended to have severe mental retardation whereas female carriers had mild or no mental retardation. Patients do eventually walk but then often lose this ability by the age of 10 years. Female carriers tend to have mild symptoms and males have severe symptoms - symptoms are variable to some degree.
  • Arena syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by mental retardation, spastic paraplegia and iron deposits in part of the brain that controls movement (basal ganglia).
  • Arteriosclerosis: A group of medical conditions which are characterized by the thickening and loss of elasticity of arterial blood vessel walls
  • Ataxia -- hypogonadism -- choroidal dystrophy: A very rare disorder characterized by spinocerebellar ataxia, eye abnormalities and a failure of the pituitary to stimulate gonadal development during puberty.
  • Ataxia, spastic, 3, autosomal recessive: A recessively inherited disorder characterized mainly by spasticity and ataxia.
  • Atherosclerosis: A condition which is a form of arteriosclerosis where atheromas are caused by the aggregation of cholesterol and lipids
  • Baraitser-Winter syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by a structural eye defect, droopy eyelids and mental retardation.
  • Behavioral symptoms: Symptoms of personal behavior.
  • Biotinidase deficiency: A metabolic disorder where the body lacks the enzyme biotinidase needed to process the vitamin called biotin (vitamin H) into carboxylase enzymes.
  • Brain conditions: Medical conditions that affect the brain
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • CACH syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by childhood ataxia and reduced myelination of the cerebral nerves. Motor and mental development in the first few years of life is normal with progressive neurodegeneration occurring between 2 and 5 years of age. Fever and trauma to the head can speed up disease progression.
  • CDG syndrome (generic term): Congenital disorders of glycosylation is a group of very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. The main symptom in all the disorders is psychomotor retardation but other variable symptoms also occur depending on the subtype of the disorder.
  • CDG syndrome type 3: Congenital disorders of glycosylation is a group of very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type 3 has variable symptoms.
  • Carbon Monoxide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Carbon Monoxide during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cerebellar ataxia -- intellectual deficit -- optic atrophy -- skin abnormalities: A rare syndrome characterized by ataxia, mental retardation, optic atrophy and skin abnormalities.
  • Cerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive: A group of rare, recessively inherited neurological disorders caused by abnormalities in the cerebellum and spinal cord. In some cases other parts of the body may be affected.
  • Cerebellum agenesis -- hydrocephaly: A rare brain disorder which manifests as reduced muscle tone, ataxia, cataracts and mental retardation.
  • Cerebral Palsy: Any brain disorder causing movement disability
  • Ceroid lipofuscinosis, neuronal 10: A rare metabolic disorder that affects the nerve cells of the body and is characterized by the deposits of lipopigments (lipofuscin). Type 10 involves a deficiency of cathepsin D and involves an initial period of normal development with neurodegenerative symptoms starting during the early school years.
  • Chromosome 1(q12q22) duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q12q22) of chromosome 1 which results in various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 1q duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 1 which results in various abnormalities depending on the size and location of the portion of duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 21 monosomy: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is only one copy of chromosome 21 instead of the normal two leading to various abnormalities.
  • Chromosome 7 ring syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where the ends of chromosome 7 have been deleted and the two broken ends have rejoined to form a ring shape resulting in a range of symptoms determined by the size of the genetic deletion.
  • Chromosome 7, trisomy 7q: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 7 which results in various abnormalities depending on the size and location of the portion of duplicated genetic material.
  • Chromosome 7q duplication syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 7 which results in various abnormalities depending on the size and location of the portion of duplicated genetic material.
  • Chronic Bokhoror: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The chronic form tends not to have acute symptoms but present with symptoms similar to a milder, less progressive form of the later stages of the slowly progressive form.
  • Chronic Viliuisk Encephaliti: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The chronic form tends not to have acute symptoms but present with symptoms similar to a milder, less progressive form of the later stages of the slowly progressive form.
  • Chronic Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The chronic form tends not to have acute symptoms but present with symptoms similar to a milder, less progressive form of the later stages of the slowly progressive form.
  • Chronic Vilyisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The chronic form tends not to have acute symptoms but present with symptoms similar to a milder, less progressive form of the later stages of the slowly progressive form.
  • Chronic Vilyuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. The chronic form tends not to have acute symptoms but present with symptoms similar to a milder, less progressive form of the later stages of the slowly progressive form.
  • Coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ10), deficiency: A rare inherited disorder characterized by the deficiency of Coenzyme Q 10. The range and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Cognitive impairment: General loss of mental or cognitive ability
  • Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 1L: Congenital disorders of glycosylation is a group of very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type Il is caused by a defect on chromosome 11q23 and involves a defect in the ALG9 gene.
  • Congenital disorder of glycosylation type 2H: Congenital disorders of glycosylation is a group of very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type IIh is caused by a defect on chromosome 16q22.1 and involves a defect on the COG8 gene.
  • Congenital disorder of glycosylation type IIH: Congenital disorders of glycosylation is a group of very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type IIh is caused by a defect on chromosome 16q22.1 and involves a defect on the COG8 gene.
  • Del (2) (q32.1-q34): A rare chromosomal disorder characterized by various anomalies. The listed symptoms are those observed in one reported case. The manifestations linked to most genetic defects are often variable to some degree.
  • Del(1) (pter-p36.2): A very rare chromosomal disorder where the end portion of the short arm of chromosome one is missing. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Dementia, familial Danish: A rare inherited form of dementia caused by the deposit of abnormal substances in the brain, spinal cord and retina and the degeneration of brain tissue. Deafness and cataracts usually started in the 20's with severe deafness occurring by the age of 45. Movement problems usually started after the age of 40 with death occurring in the 5th or 6th decade.
  • Dentatorubral Pallidoluysian Atrophy: A condition caused by an abnormality of the DNA sequence on chromosome 12
  • Dup (2) (p22-p21): A rare chromosomal disorder characterized by various anomalies. The listed symptoms are those observed in the few reported cases. The manifestations linked to most genetic defects are often variable to some degree.
  • Duplication 7q: A rare chromosomal disorder involving duplication of the long arm (q) of chromosome 7 which results in various abnormalities depending on the size and location of the portion of duplicated genetic material.
  • Dystonia with cerebellar atrophy: A recessively inherited movement disorder (dystonia) which responds poorly to Levodopa treatment and involves wasting of part of the brain.
  • Dystonia-Parkinsonism, Adult-Onset: A rare condition characterized by the association of parkinsonism and dystonia due to a neurodegenerative disorder which progresses quickly.
  • East Syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, deafness, ataxia and electrolyte imbalance.
  • Encephalitis: Infection of the brain (as a symptom)
  • Episodic ataxia, type 6: A rare genetic disorder characterized by episodes of incoordination and unsteadiness. Stress and exertion may trigger the episodes which tend to last for about half an hour. Type 6 is extremely rare and is caused by a defect on chromosome 5p13.
  • Face symptoms: Symptoms affecting the face
  • Fetal brain disruption sequence: A very rare syndrome characterized by skull and brain abnormalities.
  • Frontotemporal dementia: A degenerative brain disease involving frontal and temporal brain lobes resulting in dementia. Degeneration of the frontal lobe causes behavioral and personality changes degeneration of the temporal lobe causes semantic dementia.
  • Gangliosidosis, generalized GM1 type 2: A rare biochemical disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (beta-galactosidase 1) which results in the accumulation of harmful chemicals (GM1 gangliosides) in the central nervous system and other body tissues. Type III involves a lesser degree of accumulation than type II or I. Death can occur early in life in severe cases but milder cases can survive into late childhood.
  • Head injury: Any injury that occurs to the head
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Huntington's Disease: Inherited disease causing progressive mental deterioration.
  • Huntington's disease: Inherited disease causing progressive mental deterioration.
  • Hydrocephalus: A condition which is characterized by marked dilatation of the cerebral ventricles
  • Infantile sialic acid storage disorder: A rare inherited biochemical disorder characterized by the accumulation of sialic acid in the tissues and excretion of sialic acid in the urine. The disorder results in death within the first few years of life - usually in infancy.
  • Infantile spasms -- broad thumbs: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by spasms during infancy and broad thumbs.
  • Kearns-Sayre Syndrome: A rare neuromuscular disorder characterized by pigmented deposits on the retina, heart disease and progressive paralysis of some eye muscles.
  • Keratosis follicularis -- dwarfism -- cerebral atrophy: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by dwarfism, brain degeneration and a hair follicle disorder.
  • Krabbe leukodystrophy: A rare inherited biochemical disorder involving the deficiency of an enzyme called galactocerebrosidase. It is a leukodystrophy which refers to a group of genetic disorders that affect the growth of the protective coating around the brain nerves.
  • MRXS-Christianson: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, mutism, facial anomalies, epilepsy and weak eye muscles. Males tended to have severe mental retardation whereas female carriers had mild or no mental retardation. Patients do eventually walk but then often lose this ability by the age of 10 years. Female carriers tend to have mild symptoms and males have severe symptoms - symptoms are variable to some degree.
  • Marinesco-Sjogren-like syndrome (MSLS): A very rare disorder characterized by cataracts (during childhood), mental retardation, muscle weakness and brain degeneration. The disorder is very similar to another syndrome called Marinesco-Sjogren syndrome.
  • Menkes Disease: Genetic disease of copper deficiency.
  • Mental retardation: Reduced mental ability or intelligence.
  • Mental retardation X-linked, South African type: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, mutism, facial anomalies, epilepsy and weak eye muscles. Males tended to have severe mental retardation whereas female carriers had mild or no mental retardation.
  • Mental retardation, Microcephaly, Epilepsy and Ataxia Syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, mutism, facial anomalies, epilepsy and weak eye muscles. Males tended to have severe mental retardation whereas female carriers had mild or no mental retardation. Patients do eventually walk but then often lose this ability by the age of 10 years. Female carriers tend to have mild symptoms and males have severe symptoms - symptoms are variable to some degree.
  • Mental retardation, X-linked -- craniofacial dysmorphology -- epilepsy -- ophthalmoplegia -- cerebellar atrophy: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, mutism, facial anomalies, epilepsy and weak eye muscles. Males tended to have severe mental retardation whereas female carriers had mild or no mental retardation. Patients do eventually walk but then often lose this ability by the age of 10 years. Female carriers tend to have mild symptoms and males have severe symptoms - symptoms are variable to some degree.
  • Microphthalmia syndromic, type 10: A rare inherited syndrome characterized mainly by small eyes and wasting of brain tissue.
  • Movement symptoms: Changes to movement or motor abilities
  • Muscle atrophy: Decrease in size and bulk of muscle.
  • Muscle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the muscles of the body
  • Musculoskeletal symptoms: Symptoms affecting muscles or bones of the skeleton.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neuroaxonal dystrophy, infantile: An inherited disorder involving progressive muscular and coordination problems, impaired brain function and speech and vision impairment.
  • Neurological symptoms: Any symptoms that are caused by neurological conditions
  • Neurosyphilis: Syphilis affecting the nervous system.
  • Nova syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a birth mark and brain abnormalities.
  • Oculopalatocerebral syndrome: A rare inherited syndrome characterized mainly by short stature, small head, mental retardation, cleft palate and eye problems.
  • Olivopontocerebellar atrophy, type V: A disorder where degeneration of certain parts of the brain results in symptoms such as tremor, ataxia and mental deterioration.
  • Oral facial digital syndrome, type IV: A rare genetic disorder characterized by oral frenula, oral clefts, underdeveloped nose flaps, finger abnormalities, brain defects and short stature.
  • Parkinson disease 9: A genetic form of Parkinson disease (a progressive degeneration of the central nervous system) that progresses rapidly once it starts. Dementia, spasticity and eye movement problems are also characteristic of this form of Parkinson disease.
  • Phosphoserine aminotransferase deficiency: A recessively inherited enzyme (phosphoserine aminotransferase) deficiency which manifests as uncontrollable seizures, psychomotor retardation, small head and increased muscle tone. Treatment from birth can prevent early death and allow a relatively normal life.
  • Pick's Disease: Degenerative dementia condition.
  • SCHAD deficiency: A rare genetic disorder involving the deficiency of an enzyme (hydroxyacyl-coa dehydrogenase). The severity of the symptoms is highly variable with some cases resulting in death during the first decade while others suffer psychomotor and regression. Symptoms tend to be more severe in males who suffer progressive neurodegeneration whereas females tend to suffer mainly from developmental delay.
  • Seizures, Sensorineural Deafness, Ataxia, Mental Retardation, and Electrolyte Imbalance: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by mental retardation, deafness, ataxia and electrolyte imbalance.
  • Spastic paraplegia 32, autosomal recessive: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by progressive stiffness and increased reflexes in the leg muscles.
  • Spastic paraplegia 7, autosomal recessive: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by progressive stiffness and increased reflexes in the leg muscles.
  • Spinocerebellar Ataxia 9: An inherited condition characterized by slowly progressive incoordination and speech and eye movement problems due to degeneration of part of the brain called the cerebellum.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia -- dysmorphism: A rare inherited syndrome characterized by ataxia and unusual facial appearance.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia 5: A genetic disorder involving progressive degeneration of the spinal cord resulting in symptoms such as incoordination and eye movement problems.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy, type 2: A neurological disorder characterized by progressive ataxia, tremor and muscle weakness and wasting. The rate of progression and severity is variable with some needing wheelchairs in their second decade and others still capable of some walking in their 4th decade.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 2: A rare, recessively inherited brain disorder characterized by ataxia and mental retardation. The severity of the disorder is variable and the condition is nonprogressive.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 7: A rare, recessively inherited neurological disorder caused by abnormalities in the cerebellum and spinal cord. The severity of the disorder is variable.
  • Spinocerebellar ataxia, autosomal recessive 9: A rare, recessively inherited neurological disorder caused by abnormalities in the cerebellum and spinal cord. This particular form of the condition is caused by a defect in the CABC1 gene on chromosome 1q42.2.
  • Traumatic Brain Injury: Brain injury from trauma or accident.
  • Tsao-Ellingson syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by spasms during infancy and broad thumbs.
  • Type 10 17b-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency: A rare genetic disorder involving the deficiency of an enzyme (hydroxyacyl-coa dehydrogenase). The severity of the symptoms is highly variable with some cases resulting in death during the first decade while others suffer psychomotor and regression. Symptoms tend to be more severe in males who suffer progressive neurodegeneration whereas females tend to suffer mainly from developmental delay.
  • Whistling face syndrome, recessive form: A rare, recessively inherited syndrome characterized mainly by a characteristic "whistling" face and hand anomalies. The range of symptoms are variable.
  • White matter hypoplasia corpus callosum agenesia mental retardation: A rare disorder characterized by abnormal brain development and mental retardation.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Brain atrophy:

The following list of conditions have 'Brain atrophy' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Brain atrophy:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Brain atrophy' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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