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Glossary for Cardiovascular symptoms

Medical terms related to Cardiovascular symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • 10q Partial Trisomy: A very rare genetic disorder characterized by the duplication of genetic material from the long arm (q) of chromosome 10 - the genetic material occurs three times in body cells instead of the normal two. The type and severity of symptoms may vary considerably depending on the exact location and size of the duplicated genetic material.
  • 11q Partial Trisomy: A very rare genetic disorder caused by a duplication of part of chromosome 11q. The characteristic symptoms of the disorder are delayed growth before and after birth, mental retardation (varying severity) and skull and facial defects. The type and severity of symptoms that can occur are variable.
  • 1q deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 1 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • 1q terminal deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where the terminal part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 1 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities.
  • 22q11.2 deletion syndrome: A rare genetic disorder caused by the absence of a small portion of genetic material. A small section of chromosome 22 is missing at a location called q11.2. Chromosome 22 is one of 23 pairs of chromosomes that exist in humans.
  • 2q deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 2 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • 3-alpha-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • 3-alpha-hydroxyacyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency: A rare inherited form of biochemical disorder characterized by the deficiency of a particular enzyme (3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA Dehydrogenase). The enzyme deficiency only affects certain body tissues, in particular the skeletal muscles. The lack of enzyme activity prevents some fats being converted into energy. Symptoms tend to be exacerbated during fasting as during fasting, the body tries to rely more heavily on fats for energy. Fatty acids that are not completely metabolized due to the enzyme deficiency may build up in various organs and cause serious complications.
  • 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type 1: A recessively inherited metabolic disorder characterized by methylglutaconic acid in the urine.
  • 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type 4: A rare genetic disorder where the body's cells are unable to make sufficient energy resulting in an accumulation in the body of 3-methylglutaconic acid. Type 4 is characterized by symptoms which overlap type 1 and 3.
  • 3-methylglutaconic aciduria, type V: A rare genetic disorder where the body's cells are unable to make sufficient energy resulting in an accumulation in the body of 3-methylglutaconic acid.
  • 49,XXXXX syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder that affects only females and involves body cells having five copies of the X chromosome instead of the normal two.
  • 4p16.3 deletion: A rare genetic disorder where a portion of chromosome 4 is deleted at a location called 16.3. The condition is characterized by malformations in most parts of the body as the deletion affects growth and development of the fetus.
  • 8p-Syndrome, partial: A rare chromosomal disorder where there is one copy of part of the short arm (p) of chromosome 8 rather than the normal two. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the location and size of the genetic material deleted.
  • ACAD8 deficiency: An extremely rare metabolic disorder where the body is unable to metabolize certain proteins properly. More specifically, an insufficient level of the enzyme (isobutyryl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase) needed to metabolize the amino acid valine. The onset and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • ACAD9 deficiency: A metabolic disorder involving a deficiency of an enzyme (acyl-CoA dehydrogenase-9). The symptoms are variable and are usually triggered by a viral infection or ingestion of aspirin which can trigger a Reye-like episode which can cause death.
  • ACPS III: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • ACTH Deficiency: A rare endocrine disorder involving a lack of ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone) and low levels of cortisol and steroid hormones.
  • APECED Syndrome: APECED is a recessively inherited genetic disease characterized by the presence of two of the following three conditions: impaired parathyroid function, yeast infection (candidiasis) and impaired adrenal gland function (Addison's disease). It is an autoimmune disease resulting from a genetic defect. The body's immune system malfunctions and attacks it's own body tissues.
  • AV nodal re-entrant tachycardia:
  • Abdominal Aneurysm: Dilatation of a section of the abdominal aorta, usually due to a weakness in the wall of the artery
  • Abdominal obesity metabolic syndrome: A syndrome characterized by a group of conditions that are considered major risk factors for diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease.
  • Abnormal heart rhythm: An abnormal way of the heart beating
  • Abnormal heart sound in children: An abnormal heart sound in children is a sound made by the heart that can be heard through a stethoscope that is irregular or deviates from the normal heart sound, possibly indicating pathology.
  • Abnormal pulse: throbbing of the arteries due to the effect of the heart rate
  • Abnormally shaped QRS complexes: The presence of abnormall shaped QRS complexes on an electrocardiogram
  • Absence of femoral pulse on one side: Absence of femoral pulse on one side is a lack of a pulse that is normally felt in the inguinal area between the hip and the groin on one side.
  • Absence of pedal pulse on both sides: Absence of pedal pulse on both sides is a lack of pulses that are usually felt on the top of both feet.
  • Absence of pedal pulse on one side: Absence of pedal pulse on one side refers to a lack of a pulse that is usually felt on the top of one foot.
  • Absence of pulmonary artery: The absence of a pulmonary artery at birth.
  • Absence of pulse on one side: Absence of pulse on one side is a condition in which there is a lack of a pulse on one side of the body where it is normally expected.
  • Absent P waves on ECG: The absence of a P wave located on an electrocardiogram
  • Absent carotid pulses: loss of carotid pulsations
  • Absent femoral pulse: the femoral pulse is palpated below the inguinal ligament and about midway between symphysis pubis and anterior superior iliac spine, it is absent in ceratin conditions
  • Absent pedal pulse: the distal pulse of the foot, also referred to as pedal pulse, may be taken at either of two sites: the posterior tibial pulse (located behind the medial ankle) or the dorsalis pedis pulse (located on the anterior surface of the foot, lateral to the large tendon of the great toe), it may be absent in certain conditions
  • Absent pulse: An undetectable pulse.
  • Acarophobia: Unfounded fear of tiny parasites or the false belief that they have infested the skin.
  • Accelerated hypertension: Accelerated hypertension is a condition characterized by a rapid increase in blood pressure. The condition is a medical emergency which can cause organ damage if not treated promptly.
  • Accentuated fall in systolic pressure: marked fall in the systolic pressure
  • Accutane -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that the use of Accutane during pregnancy may cause a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Achalasia -- Addisonianism -- Alacrimia syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized mainly by achalasia, alacrimia (absent tears) and Addison's disease. Addison's disease involves adrenal insufficiency due to a resistance to adrenocorticotropic hormone. Only about 70 cases reported worldwide.
  • Achalasia -- addisonianism -- alacrima syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized mainly by achalasia, alacrimia (absent tears) and Addison's disease. Addison's disease involves adrenal insufficiency due to a resistance to adrenocorticotropic hormone. Only about 70 cases reported worldwide.
  • Achluophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of the night or darkness.
  • Achrestic anemia: Achrestic anemia is a form of anemia similar to that caused by Vitamin B12 deficiency but it doesn't respond to treatment with Vitamin B12. The condition tends to progress slowly and can result in death if not treated. There are a variety of possible causes.
  • Acid regurgitation: The regurgitation of stomach contents
  • Acid-Base Imbalance: A disruption to the normal acid-base equilibrium in the body. There are four main groups of disorder involving an acid-base imbalance: respiratory acidosis or alkalosis and metabolic acidosis or alkalosis. Obviously the severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of imbalance.
  • Acousticophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of noise.
  • Acquired Aplastic Anemia: A rare disorder involving severe failure of the bone marrow to produce new blood cells. Acquired aplastic anemia means that the condition was not present at birth but developed during the persons lifetime. The condition may be caused by such things as autoimmune reactions, radiation and certain drugs, chemicals or viral infections.
  • Acquired idiopathic sideroblastic anaemia: A rare disorder where iron is transported into a developing blood cells but because it is unable to be used, it builds up within the cell and tends to stop it from developing into a fully functioning red blood cell. Thus anemia can occur despite adequate or even high iron levels. Acquired cases can occur on exposure to excess alcohol, lead and drugs or can occur to nutritional problems involving a deficiency of folic acid or copper or an excess of zinc. The condition can also be caused by conditions such as kidney problems, endocrine dysfunction, metabolic disorders, rheumatoid arthritis and leukemia.
  • Acquired total lipodystrophy: A rare acquired disorder that involves adipose tissue abnormalities and is characterized by loss of adipose tissue through the body. The disorder is very similar to the congenital form but the liver involvement is more severe.
  • Acrocallosal syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by underdeveloped or absent corpus callosum of brain, duplication of thumb or big toe and extra fingers or toes.
  • Acrocephalopolydactyly -- Cardiac Disease -- Ear, Skin and Lower Limb Defects: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • Acrocephalopolydactyly II: A rare genetic disorder characterized by head, hand and genital anomalies as well as mental retardation.
  • Acrocephalopolysyndactyly type III: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • Acrocephalopolysyndactyly, type 2 (ACPS 2): A rare genetic disorder characterized by premature closing of skull bones, craniofacial abnormalities, heart defects, growth retardation and other disorders.
  • Acrocephaly -- pulmonary stenosis -- mental retardation: A rare syndrome characterized by a pointy skull, narrowed pulmonary valve and mental retardation.
  • Acrodynia: A disease occurring in infants or young children. Symptoms include edema, pruritis, skin rash, extremities are pink, cheeks and nose are scarlet, profuse sweating, digestive disturbance, photophobia, polyneuritis, irritability, listlessness, apathy and failure to thrive.
  • Acromegaly: An abnormal enlargement of the limbs due to increased secretion of growth hormone after the cessation of puberty
  • Acute cholecystitis: Acute inflammation of the gall bladder, usually due to obstruction by a gall stone
  • Acute hypertension-like symptoms: conditions which cause a rapid rise in the blood pressure and hence lead to various symptoms pertaining to hypertension
  • Acute intermittent porphyria: A rare inherited metabolic disorder caused by a disturbed porphyrin metabolism resulting in increased production of porphyrin or its precursors. Symptoms include abdominal pain, photosensitivity and neurological disturbances such as seizures, coma, hallucinations and respiratory paralysis.
  • Acute kidney failure: The sudden and acute loss of kidney function
  • Acute leukaemia of ambiguous lineage: A term used to describe a type of leukemia (a blood cancer) where the leukemic cells cannot be determined as myeloid or lymphoid or where both types of cells are present.
  • Acute lower respiratory conditions: An acute condition that occurs in the lower respiratory tract
  • Acute megacaryoblastic leukemia: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. More specifically, it involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes).
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 1: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of immature blood cells (blast cells).
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 2: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 3: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 3 involves the proliferation of promyelocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 4: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 4 involves the rapid proliferation of myelocytes and monocytes.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 5: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 5 involves the rapid proliferation of monoblasts (immature precursors of monocytes) in particular.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 6: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the rapid proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 6 involves the proliferation of the immature precursors of red blood cells called erythroblasts.
  • Acute myeloblastic leukemia type 7: A rare form of malignant bone marrow cancer involving the proliferation of immature precursors of blood cells. Type 7 involves the rapid proliferation of megakaryoblasts (premature form of megakaryocytes) in particular.
  • Acute myelocytic leukemia: A malignant cancer of blood-forming tissues resulting in a high number of immature leukocytes. Symptoms include soft bleeding gums, anemia, fatigue, fever, dyspnea, moderate splenomegaly, joint and bone pains and frequent infections. Also called acute granulocytic leukemia, acute myelogenous leukemia, acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, myeloid leukemia, splenomedullary leukemia, splenomyelogenous leukemia.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to alkylating agent: The use of alkylating agents to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes related to topoisomerase type II inhibitor: The use of topoisomerase type II inhibitors to treat cancer can result in leukemia in some patients.
  • Acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, therapy related: Certain cancer therapies can result in the development of leukemia in some patients. These therapies includes topoisomerase type II inhibitors and alkylating agents.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute myeloid leukemia, adult: A form of blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute non lymphoblastic leukemia: A form of rapidly progressing blood cancer resulting in the rapid proliferation of granulocytes and monocytes, red blood cells and platelets. It is one of the most common forms of leukemia in adults but can occur in children.
  • Acute pancreatitis: sudden inflammation of the pancreas
  • Acute radiation sickness: Tissue injury can result from exposure to radiation. The radiation dose, rate of dosing and tissues irradiated will determine the severity and type of symptoms. The effects may be chronic, delayed or acute. Acute irradiation sickness usually occurs after abdominal irradiation and lasts for hours or days.
  • Acute rheumatic fever: Bacterial joint infection with risk of heart complications.
  • Acute stress disorder: An acute anxiety state
  • Acyclovir -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Acyclovir during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase, very long chain, deficiency of: A rare inherited genetic condition where the body is unable to convert certain fats to energy i.e. there is not enough of a certain enzyme which is needed to metabolize a type of fat called long-chain fatty acids. The build-up of these fatty acids in the body causes damage. There are three subtypes of the disorder each with varying severity: severe early-onset form, an intermediate form and an adult-onset form.
  • Adams Nance syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by rapid heartbeat, high blood pressure, small eyes and the presence of excess glycine in the urine.
  • Additional Heart Sounds: A heart sound that is heard in addition to the normal two beats.
  • Adhesive abuse: Adhesive abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Adhesives include household glues, rubber cement and model aeroplane glue. These adhesives can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Adhesive addiction: Adhesive addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse adhesives (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Adhesives includes household glue, rubber cement and model airplane glue.
  • Adrenal Cancer: A malignant cancer that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids. Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal Cortex Diseases: Diseases of the adrenal cortex. Examples includes Addison's disease, Cushing's syndrome and adrenal fatigue.
  • Adrenal adenoma, familial: A benign tumor that develops in the adrenal gland and tends to run in families. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids . Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal crisis: A potentially fatal condition where the adrenal cortex slows or stops functioning resulting in reduced glucocorticoids, decreased extracellular fluid volume and hyperkalemia. Symptoms include shock, coma, low blood pressure, weakness and loss of vasomotor tone. Also called addisonian crisis.
  • Adrenal disorders: Disorders affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adrenal gland hyperfunction: Excessive activity of the adrenal gland which causes excessive production of one or more adrenal hormones (aldosterone, corticosteroids, androgenic steroids, epinephrine and norepinephrine). The increased adrenal gland activity may be caused by an adrenal gland tumor or by excessive stimulation of the gland. Pituitary hormones stimulate adrenal gland activity.
  • Adrenal gland symptoms: Symptoms affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adrenal hemorrhage, neonatal: Hemorrhage of the adrenal gland after birth. The severity of the disorder is varies from a small hemorrhage to damage to the whole adrenal gland. Sometimes the condition is discovered incidentally during ultrasounds for other reasons. The hemorrhage may occur as the result of a variety of causes including adrenal tumor, neonatal stress, and blood coagulation disorder or for no apparent reason.
  • Adrenal hyperplasia: A group of disorder that occur when there is a problem in the process of making adrenal corticosteroids.
  • Adrenal hyperplasia, congenital type 3: A group of disorders that occur when a deficiency of 21-hydroxylase impairs the normal process of making adrenal corticosteroids. The severity of the condition is variable depending on the degree of deficiency.
  • Adrenal hyperplasia, congenital, due to 11-Beta-hydroxylase deficiency: A rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia characterized by a deficiency of 11-Beta-hydroxylase which results in excess androgen production and hypertension. The disorder can occur in virilizing, hypertensive and salt-wasting forms and symptoms may range from mild to severe.
  • Adrenal hypertension: Adrenal hypertension is high blood pressure caused by adrenal gland problems. For example, an adrenal tumor can cause excessive production of aldosterone which in turn causes salt-retention and high blood pressure. Severity of symptoms varies depending on the underlying cause.
  • Adrenal incidentaloma: A tumor of the adrenal gland that is discovered incidentally while performing an imaging examination for reasons other than an adrenal tumor. The tumor may be asymptomatic or can causes excessive secretion of adrenal hormones and resulting symptoms. The tumor may also be malignant or benign.
  • Adrenal medulla neoplasm: A tumor that develops in the part of the adrenal gland called the medulla which produces adrenalin and noradrenaline. The tumor is usually benign but can be malignant.
  • Adrenoleukodystrophy: A rare hereditary metabolic disease that only occurs in male children and is characterized by adrenal atrophy and extensive cerebral demyelination causing progressive loss of mental functioning, aphasia, apraxia and sometimes blindness. The patient usually dies within 5 years.
  • Adult Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic fibrosis is an inherited condition characterized by the production of thick sticky mucus by the mucus glands in the lungs, intestines, liver and pancreas. The condition is most often diagnosed in children or young adults but occasionally, relatively mild symptoms may lead to frequent misdiagnosis or no diagnosis at all unless the symptoms become worse. The condition may be misdiagnosed as emphysema, asthma or chronic bronchitis. It is usually females with a mild form of the disease who tend to be diagnosed at a later age.
  • Adult Panic-Anxiety Syndrome: A psychiatric disorder involving anxiety and panic attacks that occur for no obvious reason.
  • Adult onset Still's disease: A form of Still's disease that has a later onset and involves arthralgia or arthritis and a characteristic rash that often appears during periods of temperature increase.
  • Adult respiratory distress syndrome: A condition which is characterized by fulminant pulmonary interstitial alveolar oedema.
  • Aelurophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of cats.
  • Aerophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of fresh air, breezes and flying.
  • Aerosol abuse: Aerosol abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Aerosols include air fresheners, hair spray, spray pain and deodorants. These aerosols can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Aerosol addiction: Aerosol addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse aerosol (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Aerosols includes spray pain, air freshener, deodorants and hair sprays.
  • African Sleeping sickness: A disease caused by parasites (Trypanosome brucei gamiense or T. brucei rodesiense) and transmitted to humans by the tsetse fly which is found only in Africa. Causes symptoms such as fever, chills, headache, anemia, edema of hands and feet, enlarged lymph glands, lethargy, sleepiness, convulsions and coma. Also called African trypanosomiasis and sleeping sickness.
  • Agenesis of the corpus callosum -- mental retardation -- coloboma -- micrognathia: A rare inherited disorder characterized by mental retardation, coloboma, small jaw and a brain anomaly.
  • Agyrophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of crossing roads. It includes a fear of being attacked on the street or being unable to defend oneself while crossing the road.
  • Aichmophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of pointy objects or needles.
  • Air embolism: A condition where an air bubble enters the cardiovascular system (via injection, intravenous therapy, surgery or puncture wound) and obstructs the blood flow.
  • Alagille syndrome: A genetic disorder affecting the liver and characterized by the absence of some or all of the liver bile ducts that transport bile within the liver.
  • Albuminuria: The presence of albumin (a blood protein) in the urine.
  • Albuterol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Albuterol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Alcohol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Alcohol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Alcohol Withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when alcohol consumption is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Alcohol abuse: Excessive alcohol as a symptom of other conditions
  • Alcohol-induced hypertension: Alcohol-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by excessive drinking of alcohol.
  • Alcohol-induced pseudo-Cushing syndrome: The excessive consumption of alcohol can result in symptoms similar to a condition called Cushing's syndrome. When alcohol consumption is stopped, symptoms regress.
  • Aldehyde syndrome: A metabolic anomaly where consumption of alcohol results in high levels of blood acetaldehyde which causes a variety of symptoms.
  • Alektorophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of chickens.
  • Algophobia: An anxiety disorder where the sufferer is fearful of experiencing pain or seeing others experiencing it.
  • Alkaptonuria: A rare inherited metabolic disease characterized by homogentisic aciduria, arthritis and ochronosis. Symptoms include darkening of urine, alkinization due to overproduction of homogentisic acid, arthritis in the large joints and black ochronotic pigmentation of cartilage and collagen tissue. However, many of these symptoms may not occur until middle age. The condition may also be caused by chronic phenol poisoning.
  • Allain Babin Demarquez syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by premature fusion of skullbones, abnormal development of skeletal bones and hypertension.
  • Alopecia, anosmia, deafness, hypogonadism syndrome: A rare
  • Alpers Syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by liver disease, seizures and progressive, episodic psychomotor retardation.
  • Alpha thalassemia: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Alpha thalassemia involves defects in one or more of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The main symptom is anemia, the severity of which can vary amongst patients depending on how many defective genes are involved.
  • Alpha thalassemia -- Hemoglobin H disease: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Hemoglobin H disease involves defects in three of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The main symptom is moderate to severe anemia.
  • Alpha thalassemia major: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Alpha thalassemia major is very rare involves defects in all of the four genes required to make each ? protein chain. The condition leads to infant death before or soon after birth.
  • Alpha-sarcoglycanopathy: A rare genetic disorder involving progressive muscle weakness of the pelvic and shoulder muscles.
  • Alstrom disease: A rage genetic disorder involving a group of abnormalities affecting vision, hearing, kidney function and also characterized by obesity and diabetes mellitus.
  • Alstr÷m Syndrome: A progressive condition which is characterized by deafness, obesity and visual problems in childhood that may lead to diabetes and kidney failure in adulthood
  • Altered vital signs: vital signs are measures of various physiological statistics often taken by health professionals in order to assess the most basic body functions,altered vital signs indicate an underlying abnormality
  • Altered vital signs due to dehydration: Altered vital signs due to dehydration refers to a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of a lack of sufficient fluid in the body.
  • Altered vital signs due to encephalopathy: Altered vital signs due to encephalopathy refers to a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of encephalopathy.
  • Altered vital signs due to road traffic accident: Altered vital signs due to road traffic accident refers to a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of a motor vehicle collision.
  • Altered vital signs in case of diabetic ketoacidosis: Altered vital signs in case of diabetic ketoacidosis is a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of diabetic ketoacidosis.
  • Altered vital signs in meningitis: Altered vital signs in meningitis is a condition in which there is a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of meningitis.
  • Altered vital signs in pulmonary embolism: Altered vital signs in pulmonary embolism refers to a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of pulmonary embolism.
  • Alveolar capillary dysplasia: The abnormal development of the lung blood vessels. The normal barrier across which air and blood can diffuse fails to develop properly. Death usually results within weeks of birth but rare cases can survive for months.
  • Amanita polypyramis poisoning: Amanita polypyramis is a type of large-capped mushroom often found growing in the wild in the US. The mushroom tends to give off a chlorine-like odor. It is poisonous and death can result if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Amantadine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amantadine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amathophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of dust.
  • Amaxophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of riding in a vehicle or being in one.
  • Amiodarone -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amiodarone during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amitriptyline -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amitriptyline during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amitriptyline toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Amlodipine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Amobarbital -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amobarbital during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amoxapine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Amphetamine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amphetamine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amphetamine abuse: Use of the stimulant drugs known as amphetamines or "speed"
  • Amphetamine poisoning: Excessive ingestion of amphetamine drugs.
  • Amphetamine-induced hypertension: Amphetamine-induced hypertension is high blood pressure caused by use of amphetamines. Patients with an existing history of hypertension may suffer further blood pressure increases while taking amphetamines and this can be serious. Severity of symptoms varies amongst patients depending on their susceptibility, underlying health and duration of amphetamine use.
  • Amphetamines -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that the use of Amphetamines during pregnancy may cause a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Ampicillin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Ampicillin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amychophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of being scratched or clawed.
  • Amyloid cardiopathy: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage and is potentially fatal. The cardiac form involves deposits of amyloid in the heart muscle which affects its function. The electrical conduction system of the heart is impaired.
  • Amyloid cardiopathy, familial: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage and is potentially fatal. The familial cardiac form is inherited and involves deposits of amyloid in the heart muscle which affects its function. The electrical conduction system of the heart is impaired.
  • Amyloidosis: A disease characterized by the accumulation of insoluble amyloid protein in tissues and organs which in turn affects the functioning of these tissues and organs.
  • Amyloidosis AL: A disease involving the abnormal deposit of amyloid fibrils in virtually any part of the body - the heart, liver, kidney and peripheral and autonomic nerves are most commonly affected. The abnormal amyloid fibrils are produced abnormal plasma cells in the bone marrow. In some cases, the excess growth of abnormal plasma cells can result in a cancerous condition called myeloma resulting in bone pain and infections. A patient with myeloma may develop amyloidosis but it is rare for a patient with AL amyloidosis to go on to develop myeloma.
  • Amyloidosis, Familial: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage. In the familial form, the type of amyloid involved is usually a plasma protein called transthyretin. The main parts of the body affected are the nerves, heart and kidneys.
  • Amyloidosis, Inherited: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage. In the inherited form, the type of amyloid involved is usually a plasma protein called transthyretin. The main parts of the body affected are the nerves, heart and kidneys.
  • Amyloidosis, familial visceral: A rare genetic disorder involving widespread amyloidosis (abnormal buildup of amyloid protein in tissues) which tends the affect the kidneys severely.
  • Amyloidosis, inflammatory: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage and is potentially fatal. Symptoms depend on the organs involved. Secondary amyloidosis is caused by a chronic infection of inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple myeloma, tuberculosis and osteomyelitis. The main organs affected in secondary amyloidosis are usually the kidneys, liver, spleen and lymph nodes. The peripheral and autonomic nerves and the heart are rarely affected.
  • Anaesthesia complications: Complications that occur due to anaesthesia
  • Analgesic nephropathy syndrome: Kidney damage caused by excessive use of pain-killing drugs. Aspirin and phenacetin mixtures are the most common causes.
  • Analgesic syndrome: The use of large quantities of pain-killer drugs can sometimes cause serious kidney damage as well as various other problems.
  • Anaphylaxis: An immediate hypersensitivity reaction due to the exposure of a specific antigen to a sensitized individual
  • Anchovy poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some anchovies contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the anchovy does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The anchovies are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Ancylostoma duodenale: An infestation with Ancylostoma duodenale which is a parasitic hookwork whichcan cause serious disease in humans - usually occurs in people who work barefoot in damp soil. The hookworms suck blood from the intestines of the host which can result in anemia if there is a large number of worms.
  • Andersen-Tawil syndrome: A rare disorder where a genetic mutation causes periods of muscle weakness, heart rhythm abnormalities and various physical development abnormalities. It is believed to be caused by problems with the way the body utilizes potassium.
  • Androphobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of men
  • Anemia: Reduced red blood cells in the blood
  • Anemia of pregnancy: Anemia of pregnancy is anemia that occurs during pregnancy. Women's bodies have a greater demand for iron during pregnancy and if intake is not sufficient, anemia can result. Anemia in pregnant women can lead to infant problems such as premature birth, fetal death, retarded growth and other problems.
  • Anemia, Blackfan Diamond: Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a rare genetic condition where the bone marrow is unable to make sufficient red blood cells which leads low levels of red blood cells. There are eight subtypes of the condition which differ in the location of the genetic defect and the incidence of additional symptoms such as malformations. The severity of symptoms is variable but most cases are serious.
  • Anemia, Hemolytic, Warm Antibody: A rare autoimmune condition where the body's defense system attacks and destroys red blood cells. The onset of the condition is triggered by temperatures 37║C or higher. The severity of the disorder is variable.
  • Anemia, Iron-Deficiency: A lack of fully functioning red blood cells due to a deficiency of iron. The iron allows the body to make hemoglobin in red blood cells which in turn allows the red blood cell to carry oxygen.
  • Anemia, Neonatal: Insufficient red blood cells that can carry oxygen around the body. It is common in premature births or can occur as a result of blood loss before, during or just after the birth.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. There are two types: type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a quarter of cases in type 1 and a third of cases in type 2.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts, type 1: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. Type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a quarter of cases in type 1.
  • Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts, type 2: A bone marrow disease which results in insufficient red blood cells in the blood (anemia). The prognosis is poor with death usually occurring within a couple of years. Type 1 refers to cases where the level of blasts is less than 10% and type 2 refers to cases where the level of blasts is 10-20%. When too many immature blood cells (blasts) are produced by the bone marrow, the condition may progress to acute myeloid leukemia - occurs in about a third of cases in type 2.
  • Anemia, hypochromic microcytic: A blood disorder where red blood cells are too small and lack sufficient iron. It can be inherited or caused by insufficient iron in the diet or from a genetic disorder.
  • Anemias, Sideroblastic: Sideroblastic anemias are a group of rare blood disorders where the bone marrow is unable to produce normal red blood cells. The body has enough iron but the red blood cells are unable to utilize it in a normal manner and anemia results. The red blood cells become overloaded with iron and are unable to carry out their normal functions. Some forms of sideroblastic anemia are inherited but most tend to be acquired due to such things as exposure to toxins and certain drugs, leukemia, inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and nutritional deficiencies (e.g. copper and pyridoxine deficiency). Inherited forms usually appear in childhood whereas acquired forms usually occur in adulthood.
  • Anemic -- hematuria syndrome: An epidemic disease in Argentina which has a prolonged recovery time but usually there are no complications. Symptoms vary between seasons so that affected patients suffer anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea and dehydration in summer but suffer reduced urination, excess blood, albumin and renal casts in the urine. Other symptoms occur irrespective of the season.
  • Aneurysm of sinus of Valsalva: A rare form of aortic aneurysm that occurs in the sinus of Valsalva. An aneurysm is a thinning and bulging of a blood vessel wall. The condition is generally asymptomatic unless it burst and causes life-threatening complications including heart failure. An unruptured aneurysm may affect the blood flow (causing palpitations and syncope) as the bulge pushes against surrounding structures.
  • Angelucci's syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by various symptoms associated with vernal (nonbacterial) conjunctivitis. The conjunctivitis tends to recur seasonally and is believed to have allergic origins.
  • Angina: Angina is a particular type of pain related to heart conditions
  • Angina pectoris: severe chest pain due to ischemia
  • Anginal pain: chest discomfort that occurs when there is a decreased blood oxygen supply to an area of the heart muscle
  • Anginophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of angina, choking or narrowness of the throat.
  • Angiotensin renin aldosterone hypertension: The RAAS (rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone system) is involved in regulating blood volume and vascular resistance and an imbalance of any of these components can cause high blood pressure.
  • Angiotensin/rennin/aldosterone hypertension: A group of disorder characterized by high blood pressure due to abnormalities in angiotensin, rennin and aldosterone levels. Adequate levels of these chemicals help to control blood volume and blood vessel resistance which in turn influences blood pressure.
  • Anglophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of England or the English.
  • Anisocytosis: Abnormal variations in the size of red blood cells.
  • Ankylophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of stiff or immobile joints.
  • Anorexia Nervosa: A disorder where a distorted sense of body image leads to self-starvation to the point of death in some cases.
  • Anotia -- facial palsy -- cardiac defect: A rare syndrome characterized mainly missing ears, facial weakness and congenital heart defects.
  • Anoxemia: Lack of oxygen in the blood.
  • Anthophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of flowers.
  • Anthropophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of people and groups of people.
  • Anticholinergic syndrome: Symptoms caused by overdose of anticholinergic drugs.
  • Anticholinergics poisoning: Excessive ingestion of anticholinergic drugs.
  • Antidiarrheal agent poisoning: Antidiarrheal agents contain chemicals such as atropine and diphenoxylate which can cause various symptoms if excessive quantities are taken. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Antihypertensive drug allergy: Taking antihypertensive drugs (blood pressure-lowering drugs) can cause an allergic response in some people however this is considered rare. It involves the body's immune system overreacting to the drug. The type and severity of symptoms can vary considerable though skin symptoms are the most common allergic response to drugs.
  • Antimony poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to antimony.
  • Antiphospholipid syndrome: An autoimmune disorder characterized by blood clots and pregnancy losses.
  • Antlophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of floods.
  • Anxiety: Excessive worry, anxiety, or fear.
  • Anxiety disorder: A mental condition that is characterized by anxiety and avoidance behaviours
  • Anxiety-tension syndrome: Anxiety associated with physical symptoms such as tense muscles and fatigue.
  • Aorta conditions: Conditions that affect the aorta
  • Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic: Bulging and weakness of the aorta in the area of the chest. The condition is life-threatening as death can occur rapidly if the aneurysm bursts.
  • Aortic Valve Insufficiency: A heart valve disorder where the heart valve is unable to close completely which causes a backflow of some of the blood from the aorta. The condition can be caused by such things as systemic lupus erythematosus, endocarditis, high blood pressure, Marfan's syndrome and aortic dissection.
  • Aortic aneurysm: A localised dilatation of the aorta which results in a 50% increase in its diameter
  • Aortic aneurysm, familial thoracic 4: A rare familial disorder where the aorta has a weak, bulging portion. The condition is asymptomatic but can result in death if it bursts. Type 4 also involves another heart defect (patent ductus arteriosus) and is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 16p13.13-p13.12.
  • Aortic arch interruption: A rare genetic birth defect where a portion of the aortic arch is missing or discontinued which severely impairs the flow of oxygenated blood to the lower body.
  • Aortic arches defect: A defect in the top part of the aorta (aortic arch) that consists of several arterial branches. There is a variety of defects that can occur and symptoms will be determined by the particular defect involved. Possible types of defects includes aortic coarctation and aortic arch hypoplasia.
  • Aortic coarctation: A rare inherited birth defect where the heart blood vessel called the aorta has a narrowed area which affects blood flow. The degree of constriction is variable which mild cases asymptomatic until adulthood. The poor blood flow to the lower body gives results in it appearing less developed than that upper body.
  • Aortic stenosis: A condition which affects the aortic valve of the heart resulting in stenosis of the valve.
  • Aortic valve disease: Disease of the heart's aortic valve
  • Aortic valve incompetence: A condition characterized by an inability of the aortic valve to function effectively
  • Aortic valve stenosis: A congenital condition involving a malformation of the valve that controls the blood flow of the main heart vessel (aorta). The valve doesn't open enough to allow sufficient blood to flow through the aorta which reduces the supply of oxygenated blood to the body.
  • Aortic valves stenosis of the child: A birth defect where the aortic valve is abnormally narrow or unable to fully open. Depending on the degree of narrowing, the symptoms may range from severe to asymptomatic.
  • Aorto-ventricular tunnel: A rare heart defect where a tunnel from between the ascending aorta and the cavity of the left or sometimes right heart ventricle. The severity of the condition is highly variable from asymptomatic for many years to fetal death. Often other heart anomalies are also associated.
  • Apeirophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of infinity.
  • Aphasia-epilepsy, acquired: A rare childhood neurological disorder characterized by aphasia, epileptic seizures and inability to recognize sounds. The symptoms may develop quickly or gradually.
  • Apiophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of bees.
  • Aplastic anemia: A blood disorder where the bone marrow produces insufficient new blood cells.
  • Apnea: Periods of absence of breathing
  • Apparent Mineralocorticoid Excess, type 2: A form of inherited high blood pressure that starts during early childhood. The condition is caused by a genetic defect which results in an inborn error of metabolism of peripheral cortisol. Type 2 causes similar symptoms to type 1 but the urinary steroid levels are different.
  • Apparent mineralocorticoid excess: A form of inherited high blood pressure that starts during early childhood. The condition results from a genetic defect which causes impaired metabolism of cortisol.
  • Appian-Plutarch syndrome: Symptoms caused by excessive doses of a drug called atropine.
  • Apple seed poisoning: Apple seeds contain a toxic chemical called amygdalin which can cause serious symptoms if eaten in large quantities. Hospital admission is recommended if more than 50 apple seeds have been consumed.
  • Arachibutyrophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of peanut butter sticking to the roof of the mouth.
  • Arachnephobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of spiders.
  • Arachnidism: Poisoning from a spider bite.
  • Argentinean hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease caused by the Junin virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (usually the corn mouse) urine, feces or saliva. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks. The disease is most common in rural workers in Argentina.
  • Aristolochic Acid poisoning: Aristolochic acid is derived from a forest herb from the Aristocholochia family. It is often used in herbal preparations such as Aristolochia Fang Ch, Bragantia and Asarum. It is usually used in herbal preparations to promote weight loss. The substance is believed to cause kidney failure and urinary tract cancer.
  • Arizona Bark Scorpion poisoning: A bite from the Arizona Bark scorpion contains chemicals toxic to the nerve system and can cause serious, life-threatening symptoms.
  • Arrhythmia: The occurrence of an irregular heart beat
  • Arrhythmias: The occurrence of irregular heart beats
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood.
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 1: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 1 is linked to chromosome 14q23-q24 (TGFB3 gene).
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 10: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 10 is linked to chromosome 18q12.1-q12 (DSG2 gene).
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 11: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 11 is linked to chromosome 18q12.1 (DSC2 gene).
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 12: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 12 is linked to chromosome 17q21 (JUP gene).
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 2: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 2 is linked to chromosome 1q42.1-q43 (RYR2 gene).
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 3: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 3 is linked to chromosome 14q12-q22.
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 4: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 4 is linked to chromosome 2q32.1-q32.3.
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 5: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 5 is linked to chromosome 3p23.
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 6: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 6 is linked to chromosome 10p14-p12.
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 7: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 7 is linked to chromosome 10q22-3.
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 8: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 8 is linked to chromosome 6p24 (DSP gene).
  • Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, familial, 9: A rare heart muscle disease where the muscle tissue of the right ventricle of the heart is replaced by fibrous or fatty tissue which affects the ability of the heart to pump blood. Some patients are asymptomatic and whereas others experience symptoms and occasionally sudden death can occur. Type 9 is linked to chromosome 12p11 (PKP2 gene).
  • Arrythmia: The occurrence of irregular heart beats
  • Arterial calcification of infancy: A rare disorder involving widespread calcification of arteries which obstructs blood flow.
  • Arterial hypertension: medical condition in which the blood pressure is chronically elevated.
  • Arterial insufficiency: Where the arterial blood flow is insufficient.
  • Arterial occlusive disease, progressive -- hypertension -- heart defects -- bone fragility -- brachysyndactyly: A rare syndrome characterized by narrowing or blockage of a number of arteries (in the kidneys, abdomen, brain and heart) as well as fragile bones, heart defects and finger abnormalities. Fractures and high blood pressure often start during the first years of life.
  • Arteriosclerosis Obliterans: Arteriosclerosis that results in the narrowing and gradual blockage of the artery. Arteriosclerosis involves the deposition of cholesterol plaques and other material on the inside of the artery walls. The symptoms will depend on the location of the arteries affected and how severe the blockage is.
  • Arteriovenous fistula: Connection between artery and vein.
  • Arthritis -- short stature -- deafness: A very rare syndrome characterized by arthritis, short stature, deafness and numerous other abnormalities.
  • Arthrogryposis due to muscular dystrophy: A rare disorder where a non-progressive muscle disease results in the presence of multiple joint contractures at birth.
  • Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita -- pulmonary hypoplasia: A rare congenital syndrome involving degeneration of the brain and spinal cord and characterized by facial, head, skeletal and muscular abnormalities. Reduced fetal activity causes many of the problems.
  • Asbestosis: Lung condition from asbestos exposure
  • Aspergillosis: Infection with a fungus called Aspergillus.
  • Asphyxia neonatorum: Respiratory failure in a newborn.
  • Aspirin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Aspirin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Asternia with Cardiac, Diaphragmatic, and Abdominal defects: A rare disorder characterized by the congenital absence of the sternum (bone that joins the two sides of the ribcage) as well as defects involving the heart, diaphragm and the abdomen.
  • Asthenophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of weakness or fainting.
  • Asthma: A condition which is characterized by recurrent attacks of paroxysmal dyspnoea
  • Asthma in Adults:
  • Asthma in Children:
  • Asthma-like conditions: Medical conditions similar to asthma, or having similar symptoms.
  • Astraphobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of lightning and thunder.
  • Astrophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of stars and celestial space.
  • Asymmetric septal hypertrophy: A disease of the heart muscle characterized by increased thickness of the wall of the heart ventricle which affects the hearts function.
  • Asymmetrical brachial pulses: difference in the reading of the brachial artery on palpation of the right and left brachial artery in the cubital fossae
  • Asymptomatic heart murmurs in children: Asymptomatic heart murmurs in children refers to a child who has extra or unusual heart sounds that do not cause symptoms.
  • Ataxiophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of muscular incoordination (ataxia). This disorder is not to be confused with ataxophobia which is a fear of disorder or untidiness.
  • Ataxophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of disorder or untidiness. This disorder is not to be confused with ataxiophobia which is a fear of muscular incoordination (ataxia).
  • Atelectasis: is a collapse of lung tissue affecting part or all of one lung
  • Atelophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of imperfection.
  • Atenolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Atenolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Atephobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of ruin.
  • Atherosclerosis: A condition which is a form of arteriosclerosis where atheromas are caused by the aggregation of cholesterol and lipids
  • Athyrotic hypothyroidism sequence: A rare congenital disorder characterized by a thyroid gland defect.
  • Atlantic mussel food poisoning: Atlantic mussels contain a toxin called domoic acid which can affect nerve tissue. The mussels are found in the North Atlantic and Pacific coast and the Gulf of Mexico.
  • Atransferrinemia: A rare inherited condition characterized by the absence of a compound called transferring which results in a buildup of iron in the body's tissues as well as anemia.
  • Atrial Fibrillation, Familial 2: A rare inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases. Type 2 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 6q14-q16 and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Symptoms tend to occur in episodes initially and then becomes chronic with increased age.
  • Atrial Fibrillation, Familial 3: A rare inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases. Type 3 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 11p15.5 and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.
  • Atrial Fibrillation, Familial 4: A rare inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases. Type 4 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 21q22.
  • Atrial Fibrillation, Familial 5: A rare inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases. Type 5 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 4q2.
  • Atrial Fibrillation, Familial 6: A rare inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases. Type 6 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 1p36.2 and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.
  • Atrial Fibrillation, Familial 7: A rare inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases. Type 7 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 12p13 and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.
  • Atrial Fibrillation, Familial 8: A rare inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases. Type 8 is linked to a genetic defect on chromosome 16q22 and is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Symptoms tend to occur in episodes initially and then becomes chronic with increased age.
  • Atrial Septal Defect: An abnormal connection between the 2 atria, or upper chambers of the heart
  • Atrial Septal Defect 3: A rare heart malformation involving the presence of an abnormal opening between the two atrial chambers of the heart which allows abnormal mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. The severity of the symptoms depends on the size and location of the defect with mild cases being asymptomatic until adulthood. Atrial septal defect 3 is caused by a mutation on chromosome 14q12. There are no other heart abnormalities associated with the condition.
  • Atrial Septal Defect 4: A rare heart malformation involving the presence of an abnormal opening between the two atrial chambers of the heart which allows abnormal mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. The severity of the symptoms depends on the size and location of the defect with mild cases being asymptomatic until adulthood. Atrial septal defect 4 is caused by a mutation on chromosome 7p15-p14. There are no other heart abnormalities associated with the condition.
  • Atrial Septal Defect 5: A rare heart malformation involving the presence of an abnormal opening between the two atrial chambers of the heart which allows abnormal mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. The severity of the symptoms depends on the size and location of the defect with mild cases being asymptomatic until adulthood. Atrial septal defect 5 is caused by a mutation on chromosome 15q14. There are no other heart abnormalities associated with the condition.
  • Atrial Septal Defect 6: A rare heart malformation involving the presence of an abnormal opening between the two atrial chambers of the heart which allows abnormal mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. The severity of the symptoms depends on the size and location of the defect with mild cases being asymptomatic until adulthood. Atrial septal defect 6 is caused by a mutation on chromosome 4q32-q33.
  • Atrial arrhythmia: Arrhythmia arising in the atrium.
  • Atrial cardiomyopathy with heart block: Atrial heart disease involving a disruption of the electrical signals in the heart and causes heart rhythm problems.
  • Atrial fibrillation: A rhythm disturbance of the heart that results in irregular and chaotic ventricular contractions.
  • Atrial fibrillation in the elderly: Atrial fibrillation in the elderly is a cardiac arrhythmia in which the upper chambers of an older adult's heart are beating irregularly and rapidly in a quivering manner.
  • Atrial fibrillation, familial 1: A dominantly inherited condition where abnormal electrical activity in the heart causes it to have a fast and irregular beat. The condition may go unnoticed or may cause stroke or sudden death in some cases.
  • Atrial flutter: Heart arrhythmia where atria beat more often than ventricles
  • Atrial gallop: gallop rhythm in which the gallop sound follows atrial systole in late diastole and is an audible fourth heart sound due to forceful ventricular filling
  • Atrial myxoma, familial: An atrial myxoma benign tumor that develops in the wall that separates the two upper chambers of the heart. The familial form of the condition also involves tumors in other parts of the body such as the skin, both heart atria or the heart ventricles.
  • Atrial septal defect 1: A rare heart malformation involving the presence of an abnormal opening between the two atrial chambers of the heart which allows abnormal mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. The severity of the symptoms depends on the size and location of the defect with mild cases being asymptomatic until adulthood. Atrial septal defect 1 is caused by a mutation on chromosome 6p21.3.
  • Atrial septal defect 2: A rare heart malformation involving the presence of an abnormal opening between the two atrial chambers of the heart which allows abnormal mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. The severity of the symptoms depends on the size and location of the defect with mild cases being asymptomatic until adulthood. Atrial septal defect 2 is caused by a mutation on chromosome 8p23.1-p22.
  • Atrial symptoms: Symptoms affecting the atrium of the heart.
  • Atrial tachyarrhythmia with short pr interval: An inherited heart rhythm abnormality characterized by a short PR interval and atrial tachyarrhythmia.
  • Atrioventricular Septal Defects: Defect in the wall between the atrium and ventricle.
  • Atrioventricular septal defect: A congenital heart defect where the valves and walls between the upper and lower heart chambers (atrial and ventricular septa and the atrioventricular valves) don't develop properly. Symptoms are determined by the severity of the malformation.
  • Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: A rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause.
  • Aulophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of flutes.
  • Aureomycin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Aureomycin (an antibiotic) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Aurophobia: An exaggerated or irrational dislike of gold.
  • Auroraphobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of Auroral lights.
  • Austrian syndrome: A condition where alcoholism is associated with heart failure and pneumococcal meningitis.
  • Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia: Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is characterized by an abnormal immune system response which leads to the destruction of red blood cells and hence anemia. The severity of the condition varies depending on the underlying cause e.g. cytomegalovirus, hepatitis, HIV and lupus. The condition may develop gradually or occur suddenly and cause serious symptoms.
  • Autoimmune Myocarditis: Inflammation of the heart muscle due to the body's own immune system attacking it.
  • Autoimmune Vasculitis: A inflammation of the blood vessels caused by an autoimmune reaction
  • Autoimmune thyroid diseases: Autoimmune diseases of the thyroid gland.
  • Automysophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of being dirty.
  • Autonomic dysfunction: disease or malfunction of the autonomic nervous system.
  • Autonomic dysreflexia: Autonomic dysreflexia is a condition characterized by instability of the autonomic nervous system and often results in sudden high blood pressure.
  • Autonomic dysreflexia syndrome: A complication caused by injury to the neck or upper back region of the spinal cord. Symptoms are induced by stimulation below the level of the injury which can be caused by such things as distended bladder, scratching the feet, squeezing the penis, stimulation of the rectum or accumulation of gas.
  • Autophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of being egotistical or being by oneself.
  • Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease: Severe form of PKD, a genetic kidney disease.
  • Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: Genetic kidney disease causing kidney cysts.
  • Avasthey syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by pulmonary hypertension, lymphedema and malformation of brain blood vessels.
  • Axenfeld-Rieger anomaly with cardiac defects and sensorineural hearing loss: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by heart defects, hearing impairment and a congenital eye disorder called Axenfeld-Rieger anomaly.
  • Axial mesodermal dysplasia spectrum: A variable range of defects that occur during fetal development. The defect occurs at a cellular level and affects the way various parts of the body develop.
  • Azathioprine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Azathioprine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Azotemia, familial: A rare condition where high serum urea level is inherited in a familial pattern. The high level of urea occurs despite normal kidney function.
  • BBB syndrome, X-linked: A rare genetic disorder characterized by defects along the midline of the body. The type and severity of symptoms can vary considerably. There are two subtypes of the disorder: type I is inherited in a X-linked manner and type II is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. Females with type I tend to have few if any symptoms - often the only symptom is wide-set eyes.
  • Baby bottle nipples induced allergies: Baby bottle nipples induced allergies are an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to the latex in Baby bottle nipples . Symptoms usually involve the mouth.
  • Bacillophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of missiles.
  • Bacteremia: A condition where bacteria is present in the blood.
  • Bacterial digestive infections: Bacterial infections affecting the gastrointestinal
  • Bacterial diseases: Diseases caused by a bacterial infection
  • Bacterial endocarditis: Infection and inflammation of the inner layers of the heart, most commonly the valves cause by bacteria.
  • Bacterial meningitis: Bacterial meningitis is a form of meningitis caused by bacteria that normally lives in the mouth and throat. When the immune system is unable to supress this bacteria, it travels to the cerebrospinal spinal fluid in the brain. From there it affects the membranes surrounding the brain.
  • Bacterial pericarditis: Inflammation and swelling of the pericardium (fibrous sac surrounding the heart) due to a bacterial infection. It can occur as a complication of a bacterial infection in some other part of the body. It is most often a complication of a respiratory infection but skin and oral infections may also be a cause. Bacterial pericarditis may also occur after heart surgery. It occurs predominantly in males aged 20 to 50 years. The condition may be misdiagnosed as a heart attack and vice versa.
  • Bacterial septicemia: Sepsis of the bloodstream caused by bacteraemia.
  • Bacterial toxic-shock syndrome: A very rare, potentially fatal infection caused by toxins produced by bacteria, especially bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes. The condition is often associated with tampon use but can originate from other sources.
  • Bacteriophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of bacteria.
  • Balance symptoms: Problems with balance or vertigo
  • Baneberry poisoning: Baneberries are toxic and can cause a skin reaction on contact or various poisoning symptoms.
  • Barophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of gravity.
  • Barrow-Fitzsimmons Syndrome: A rare (only one reported case) inherited condition characterized by short limbs, an unusual facial appearance and congenital heart disease.
  • Barth Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder where the body's cells are unable to make sufficient energy resulting in an accumulation in the body of 3-methylglutaconic acid. Type 2 is characterized by its affects on the heart.
  • Bathmophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of walking.
  • Bathophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of depths. This can include a fear of lakes or long hallways.
  • Batophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of passing high buildings.
  • Batrachophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of frogs or toads.
  • Bearn-Kunkel syndrome: A type of autoimmune liver disease characterized by liver damage, very high blood gammaglobulin levels and increased plasma cells.
  • Beau's syndrome: A syndrome characterized by heart insufficiency and inability of the heart ventricles to completely empty of blood.
  • Beck's triad: Symptoms caused by compression of the heart.
  • Becker Muscular Dystrophy: A muscular dystrophy charaterised by enlargement of muscles
  • Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome: An inherited disorder marked by gigantism, exomphalos and macroglossia. Also called EMG syndrome and exophthalmos-macroglossia-gigantism syndrome.
  • Belonephobia: Fear of sharp, point objects such as needles.
  • Benadryl -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Benadryl during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Benazepril -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Benazepril during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Benzodiazepine abuse: Abuse of benzodiazepine tranquiliser medications
  • Benzthiazide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Benzthiazide during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Benztropine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Benztropine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Bergman syndrome: A rare disorder which may be acquired or present at birth. A part of the stomach pushes above the diaphragm and compresses the chest organs which can produce various symptoms.
  • Beriberi: Disease due to vitamin B1 deficiency (thiamine)
  • Bernheim syndrome: Overgrowth of the left heart ventricle which results in the tissue separating the two ventricles pushing into the right ventricle. This results in obstruction of blood flow through the right heart ventricle and ultimately can lead to heart failure.
  • Bernheim's syndrome: Reduced size of right heart ventricle due to enlargement of the left ventricle which encroaches on the space in the right ventricle. Blood flow from the right atrium to the right ventricle is obstructed.
  • Beta Thalassemia intermedia: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. There are two subtypes of the disorder (alpha and beta) depending on what portion of the hemoglobin is abnormally synthesized. Beta Thalassemia intermedia involves defects in both of the two genes required to make each ? protein chain. The condition causes varying degrees of moderate anemia.
  • Beta thalassemia: Thalassemia is an inherited blood disorder characterized by abnormal synthesis of hemoglobin. Hemoglobin consists of two main protein chains called alpha and beta. Beta thalassemia involves defects in one or more of the two genes required to make each ? protein chain. The main symptom is anemia, the severity of which can vary amongst patients depending on how many defective genes are involved.
  • Beta-Adrenergic poisoning: Excessive ingestion of Beta-Adrenergic drugs.
  • Beta-blocker poisoning: Excessive ingestion of Beta-blocker drugs.
  • Betaxolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Betaxolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Bibliophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of books.
  • Bicuspid aortic valve: A heart defect where the aortic valve has only two leaflets instead of the normal three. The severity of the disorder is variable.
  • Bidirectional tachycardia: A rare form of abnormal heart rhythm. Causes includes digitalis toxicity, certain heart malformations and hyperkalemic periodic paralysis.
  • Biliary atresia, intrahepatic, syndromic form: Congenital obstruction of the passages in the liver that carry bile. The syndromic form is associated with other congenital abnormalities such as heart and visceral defects.
  • Bindewald-Ulmer-Muller syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by a heart defect, and mental and growth retardation.
  • Binswanger Disease: Multi-infarct dementia, caused by damage to deep white matter.
  • Binswanger's Disease: A type of senile dementia characterized by chronic cerebrovascular disease.
  • Birth Injury: An injury to the mother caused by childbirth
  • Birth symptoms: Symptoms related to childbirth.
  • Bisoprolol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Bisoprolol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Black henbane poisoning: Black henbane is a herb which has hairy stems and bears flowers and fruit. All parts of the plant contain tropane alkaloids which is toxic enough to cause death if eaten. Black henbane is often used for medicinal purposes to treat a variety of health conditions.
  • Black locust poisoning: The black locust is a large deciduous tree which has long clusters of scented flowers and flat fruit pods. The young leaves, seeds and inner bark contain various chemicals (robin, robinine and robitin) which can be toxic if large quantities are eaten. The flowers are considered edible if handled correctly.
  • Black widow spider envenomation: The black widow spider bite is toxic to the nerves and can cause serious symptoms. The black widow spider is most commonly found in North America.
  • Bland-Garland-White syndrome: A rare birth malformation where the left coronary artery comes out of the pulmonary artery instead of the aorta. Usually, infants are usually healthy for a few months after which they start having symptoms of heart problems. Occasionally, patients may be asymptomatic even into adulthood but usually death occurs during infancy.
  • Bland-White -Garland syndrome: A heart disorder where the left coronary artery comes out of the pulmonary artery.
  • Blennophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of slime.
  • Blepharophimosis -- nasal groove -- growth retardation: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by eyelid abnormalities, retarded growth and a nasal groove.
  • Blepharophimosis syndrome Ohdo type: An extremely rare syndrome characterized primarily by mental retardation and eye anomalies. Only a handful of cases have been reported.
  • Blepharoptosis -- aortic anomaly: A rare disorder characterized mainly by the presence of droopy upper eyelids and an abnormal aorta.
  • Blood in the anterior chamber: Blood in the anterior chamber refers to an abnormal condition in which there is blood in the anterior portion of the eye.
  • Blood pressure changes: Changes to the pressure of blood flow around the body
  • Blood pressure symptoms: High (hypertension) or low blood pressure (hypotension).
  • Bloodroot poisoning: The Bloodroot is a flowering herb that bears fruit and whose stem contains red juices. The plant tends to grow in mountainous areas. The thickened roots (rhizomes) of the plant contain isoquinoline alkaloids which are very toxic and can cause death if eaten in sufficient quantities.
  • Blue and bloated syndrome: Heart and breathing problems that occur in obese patients that can cause reduced blood oxygenation especially while sleeping.
  • Body packer syndrome: Consuming packages of drugs for the purpose of concealing them for transportation.
  • Boerhaave syndrome: A rare spontaneous rupture of the esophagus which can occur during violent vomiting or retching.
  • Bogyphobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of demons and goblins.
  • Bolivian hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease that occurs in Bolivia and is caused by the Machupo virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (Calomys callosus) droppings. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks.
  • Bone cement implantation syndrome: A complication that can occur after using bone cement during implantation of an internal prosthesis. Circulation may be affected and a blockage in the pulmonary artery may develop.
  • Bone-Marrow failure syndromes: A disorder where the bone marrow fails to produce enough new blood cells.
  • Bonefish poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some bonefish contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the bonefish does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The bonefish are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Bonnier's syndrome: A range of symptoms caused by damage to Dieter's nucleus (the lateral nucleus of the vestibular nerve) or its connections.
  • Borjeson Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by severe mental deficiency, large ears, hypogonadism and other abnormalities.
  • Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by severe mental deficiency, large ears, hypogonadism and other abnormalities.
  • Bornholm disease: Contagious viral infection
  • Borrone-Di Rocco-Crovato syndrome: A rare progressive syndrome characterized by skin, heart and skeletal defects. Only several reported cases of the condition.
  • Borud Syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by numerous features including hearing and vision problems, heart muscle disease, ataxia and peripheral neuropathy.
  • Bounding pulse: Is most often classified as a forceful and strong pulse.
  • Boutonneuse fever: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Box Jellyfish poisoning: A sting from the Box jellyfish contains a chemical which is toxic to the nerves, heart and skin. This jellyfish is mainly found in the waters of Northern Queensland in Australia. The tentacles should not be removed from the patient as it can cause further injection of poison.
  • Box thorn poisoning: The leaves of the Box thorn plant contain a toxic chemical called atropine and possibly other toxic compounds. The box thorn plant is a spiny-stemmed shrub which originated in Europe. Symptoms can be quite serious depending on the quantity of the plant ingested.
  • Brachycephalofrontonasal dysplasia: A very rare syndrome characterized primarily by widely spaced eyes and other head and face abnormalities.
  • Brachydactyly -- arterial hypertension: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of hypertension with short digits. Premature death (by the fifth decade) due to stroke occurs in untreated patients.
  • Brachydactyly -- mesomelia -- mental retardation -- heart defects: A rare genetic disorder characterized by mental retardation, heart defects, short digits and short limbs.
  • Brachydactyly with hypertension: A very rare disease characterized by the association of hypertension with brachydactyly (abnormally short fingers and/or toes).
  • Brachydactyly, long thumb type: A rare digital anomaly characterized by short fingers and a long thumb.
  • Brachydactyly, mesomelia, mental retardation, aortic dilation, mitral valve prolapse and characteristic face: A rare syndrome characterized by short digits, short limbs, mental retardation, aortic dilation, mitral valve prolapse and a characteristic face.
  • Brachymesomelia-renal syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by kidney abnormalities and forearm and lower leg deformity. The condition describes a single reported case.
  • Bradycardia: Where there is a decreased or slowing of the heartbeat to less than 60 beats perminute
  • Bradycardia in children: Bradycardia in children is a condition in which a child has a slow heart rate, which can be a sign of pathology or normal in some cases.
  • Brain -- bone -- fat: A rare inherited disease characterized by bone cysts and progressive presenile dementia.
  • Brain compression: Internal compression of the brain
  • Brain malformation -- congenital heart disease -- postaxial polydactyly: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by a brain defect, congenital heart disease and extra fingers.
  • Bretylium -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Bretylium during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Brevibloc -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Brevibloc (a heart drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Breynia officinalis poisoning: Ingestion of the Breynia officinalis plant can cause irritation to mucosal linings and liver problems. The plant is often used as a herbal drug (Chi R Yun) to treat such things as poor growth, heart failure and venereal disease.
  • Bright's Disease: A condition where the parts of the kidneys that are responsible for filtering become inflamed and results in blood and proteins accidentally leaking into the urine. The condition can occur after certain infections and serious kidney dysfunction can result in severe or chronic complications.
  • Broad QRS complex: A broad QRS complex is an abnormal widening of a specific EKG waveform.
  • Broad QRS complexes: The presence of broad QRS complexes on an electrocardiogram
  • Bromides -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Bromides during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Bromidrosiphobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of having unpleasant body odor.
  • Bromocriptine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Bromocriptine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Bronchopulmonary dysplasia: A condition which is characterized by dysplasia of the brochopulmonary vessels
  • Brontophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of thunder and thunderstorms.
  • Brown snake poisoning: The Brown snake is a poisonous Australian snake. They are considered one of the most venomous snakes in the world and their bite can result in death without prompt medical attention. The snake venom contains toxins which affect the blood and nerve systems. Children tend to suffer more severe symptoms due to their smaller body size.
  • Bruch's disease: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Brugada Syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by heart rhythm abnormalities which can result in sudden death if untreated. The condition may be inherited in some cases. The mean age of sudden death is 40 years of age.
  • Brugada syndrome 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by heart rhythm abnormalities which can result in sudden death if untreated. Type 1 is caused by a mutation in the SCN5A gene on chromosome 3p21. Symptoms most often occur during the night and the condition is most prevalent in Japan and Southeast Asia.
  • Brugada syndrome 2: A rare genetic disorder characterized by heart rhythm abnormalities which can result in sudden death if untreated. Type 2 is caused by a mutation in the GPD1L gene on chromosome 3p22.3. Symptoms most often occur during the night and the condition is most prevalent in Japan and Southeast Asia.
  • Brugada syndrome 3: A rare genetic disorder characterized by heart rhythm abnormalities which can result in sudden death if untreated. Type 3 is caused by a mutation in the CACNA1C gene on chromosome 12p13.3. Symptoms most often occur during the night and the condition is most prevalent in Japan and Southeast Asia.
  • Brugada syndrome 4: A rare genetic disorder characterized by heart rhythm abnormalities which can result in sudden death if untreated. Type 14 is caused by a mutation in the CACNB2 gene on chromosome 10p12. Symptoms most often occur during the night and the condition is most prevalent in Japan and Southeast Asia.
  • Bruit: Audible blood flow through a vessel or the heart, indicating abnormal flow.
  • Bruits: Swishing sounds heard over an artery that may also produce a palpable vibration.
  • Brun's syndrome: Various neurological symptoms caused by an obstruction of the flow of cerebrospinal fluid with certain head postures. The obstruction is often due to some sort of brain tumor or cyst. Symptoms come and go depending on the position of the head.
  • Budd chiari syndrome: A disorder where the main vein leaving the liver becomes blocked leading to symptoms such as liver enlargement and fluid buildup in the abdomen. Also called Chiari's syndrome or Rokitansky's disease.
  • Buffalo pea poisoning: The buffalo pea is a poisonous plant which contains a toxic compound called quinolizidine alkaloid. The plant is mainly found in Western Canada.
  • Bufotenine poisoning: The skin glands of certain toads (Cane toad and Colorado river toad) contain a poison called bufotoxin.
  • Bulimia nervosa: Eating disorder with binging (overeating) and purging (vomiting).
  • Bumetanide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Bumetanide during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Burn-McKeown syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by choanal atresia (narrowing or blockage of nasal airway), deafness, heart defects and eye, ear and facial anomalies.
  • Butriptyline -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Butriptyline during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • CATCH 22: A term used to describe a group of disorders resulting from a deletion on chromosome 22q11 and involving heart and face abnormalities, T cell deficit due to an underdeveloped thymus, cleft palate, low blood calcium due to hypothyroidism. This term tends to include disorders such as Shprintzen syndrome, velocardiofacial syndrome, DiGeorge syndrome and Takao syndrome.
  • CCF: When the heart is no longer able to pump enough blood to meet the needs of the body.
  • CDG syndrome type 1A: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type 1A involves a phosphomannomutase enzyme defect and affects most body systems especially the nervous system and liver function.
  • CFS subtype 1 (cognitive, musculoskeletal, sleep, anxiety/depression): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 1 tends to be more severe with the dominant symptoms being anxiety, depression and cognitive, musculoskeletal and sleeping problems.
  • CFS subtype 2 ( musculoskeletal, pain, anxiety/depression): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 2 tends to be more severe with the dominant symptoms being anxiety, depression, pain and musculoskeletal problems.
  • CFS subtype 3 (mild): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 3 tends to have milder symptoms than other subtypes.
  • CFS subtype 4 (cognitive, musculoskeletal, sleep, anxiety/depression): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 4 tends to be dominated by cognitive symptoms.
  • CFS subtype 5 (musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 5 tends to be dominated by musculoskeletal and gastrointestinal symptoms.
  • CFS subtype 6 (postexertional): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 6 tends to be dominated by excessive fatigue following exertion.
  • CFS subtype 7 (pain, infectious, musculoskeletal, sleep, neurological, gastrointestinal, neurocognitive, anxiety/depression): Chronic fatigue syndrome is a chronic condition which is characterized by symptoms such as severe persistent fatigue, depression, weakness, muscle pain and lack of energy. The condition is often debilitating and may be difficult to diagnose due to lack of specific tests for the condition. There is no known cause but it appears to be associated with a previous infection in some cases. CFS subtype 7 tends to be more severe with the dominant symptoms being pain, infections, anxiety, depression and musculoskeletal, sleep, neurological, gastrointestinal and neurocognitive problems.
  • CHARGE Syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by choanal atresia, coloboma, ear and genital abnormalities and congenital heart defects.
  • CHILD syndrome ichthyosis: A rare genetic disorder characterized by unilateral hypomelia, underdeveloped skin and heart defects.
  • COPD: Severe obstruction of bronchial air flow typically from bronchitis and/or emphysema.
  • Caffeine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to caffeine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Caffeine poisoning: Excessive ingestion of caffeine.
  • Cainophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of novelty.
  • Calcific aortic disease with immunologic abnormalities, familial: A rare familial condition characterized by the abnormal calcification of the aorta and aortic valve. The calcification can narrow the aortic valve opening and hence affect blood flow. The condition also includes immunological abnormalities
  • Calcium channel blocker poisoning: Excessive ingestion of calcium channel blocker drugs.
  • Camptodactyly -- fibrous tissue hyperplasia -- skeletal dysplasia: A rare syndrome characterized by a hand deformity and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Camptodactyly, fibrous tissue hyperplasia, and skeletal dysplasia: A rare syndrome characterized by a hand deformity and skeletal abnormalities.
  • Cancerophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of cancer.
  • Cancerphobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of cancer.
  • Cantu Sanchez-Corona Garcia-cruz syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by mental retardation, short stature, large skull, heart anomaly and various other abnormalities.
  • Cant˙ syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by excessive growth of hair, enlarged heart and abnormal development of bone and cartilage
  • Capillary leak syndrome with monoclonal gammopathy: A rare condition characterized by leaky blood vessels and an increased level of certain blood proteins (monoclonal gammopathy). Monoclonal gammopathy itself does not cause any symptoms unless it develops into plasma cell leukemia. The condition may vary from mild to severe enough to cause death.
  • Captopril -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Captopril during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Carbamate insecticide poisoning: Excessive ingestion of carbamate insecticide drugs.
  • Carbamazepine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Carbamazepine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Carbenicillin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Carbenicillin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Carbon Monoxide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Carbon Monoxide during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Carbon disulfide-induced cardiovascular disease: Chronic exposure to certain chemicals can cause cardiovascular disease. For example, exposure to Carbon disulfide can lead to heart disease and carries a risk of premature death as a result. Chronic exposure to these sort of chemicals is most likely to occur in a work environment. Carbon disulfide is used mainly in viscose rayon manufacturing but is also used as a solvent and in other process. Exposure usually occurs through inhalation of vapours but skin absorption can also occur. Reported cases haf cardiovascular disease has occurred among workers exposed to carbon disulfide concentrations of 20-60 ppm.
  • Carcinoid crisis: Carcinoid crisis can occur spontaneously or as a response to stress, such as anesthesia or chemotherapy.
  • Carcinoid syndrome: Carcinoid heart disease is a rare, metastatic disease that occurs predominantly in the right heart. The tricuspid and pulmonic valves are affected, leading to right heart failure, which results in increased morbidity and mortality.
  • Carcinomatophobia: An exaggerated or irrational fear of cancer.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Cardiovascular symptoms:

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Conditions listing medical complications: Cardiovascular symptoms:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Cardiovascular symptoms' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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