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Symptoms » Circulation symptoms » Glossary
 

Glossary for Circulation symptoms

Medical terms related to Circulation symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • 2q deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 2 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • A ?-protein amyloidosis: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage. This particular form involves deposits of ?-proteins in the nerves resulting in Alzheimer's disease or around brain blood vessels which can cause strokes or brain bleeds.
  • ACPS III: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • ACTH Deficiency: A rare endocrine disorder involving a lack of ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone) and low levels of cortisol and steroid hormones.
  • ALL-Down syndrome: The presence of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Down syndrome patients. These patients tend to have a poorer prognosis for the leukemia than patients without Down syndrome.
  • APECED Syndrome: APECED is a recessively inherited genetic disease characterized by the presence of two of the following three conditions: impaired parathyroid function, yeast infection (candidiasis) and impaired adrenal gland function (Addison's disease). It is an autoimmune disease resulting from a genetic defect. The body's immune system malfunctions and attacks it's own body tissues.
  • ATRUS syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by fusion of the forearm bones near the elbow and a blood disorder.
  • Abdomen bleeding: Bleeding due to abdominal wall disorders or due to failure in the body clotting mechanisms.
  • Abdomen bruise: An abdominal injury to underlying tissues or bone in which the skin is not broken, often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations.
  • Abdominal Aneurysm: Dilatation of a section of the abdominal aorta, usually due to a weakness in the wall of the artery
  • Abdominal obesity metabolic syndrome: A syndrome characterized by a group of conditions that are considered major risk factors for diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease.
  • Abdominal pain in mesenteric ischemia: Abdominal pain in mesenteric ischemia is a condition in which a person with mesenteric ischemia is experiencing abdominal discomfort.
  • Abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the abdomen or digestive tract
  • Abdominal wall bruise: An abdominal injury to underlying tissues or bone in which the skin is not broken, often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations.
  • Aberrant subclavian artery abnormality: A rare defect where one the subclavian artery arises from an abnormal location on the aortic arch. The defect may cause compression of organs such as the airway and the voice box.
  • Abnormal pulse: throbbing of the arteries due to the effect of the heart rate
  • Abnormal uterine bleeding: The loss of blood from the uterus that varies from that which is considered normal
  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding: refers to vaginal bleeding at any time during the menstrual cycle other than normal menstruation
  • Abruptio placentae: A condition which is characterized by the premature detachment of the placenta from the uterus
  • Absence of femoral pulse on one side: Absence of femoral pulse on one side is a lack of a pulse that is normally felt in the inguinal area between the hip and the groin on one side.
  • Absence of pedal pulse on both sides: Absence of pedal pulse on both sides is a lack of pulses that are usually felt on the top of both feet.
  • Absence of pedal pulse on one side: Absence of pedal pulse on one side refers to a lack of a pulse that is usually felt on the top of one foot.
  • Absence of pulmonary artery: The absence of a pulmonary artery at birth.
  • Absence of pulse on one side: Absence of pulse on one side is a condition in which there is a lack of a pulse on one side of the body where it is normally expected.
  • Absent carotid pulses: loss of carotid pulsations
  • Absent femoral pulse: the femoral pulse is palpated below the inguinal ligament and about midway between symphysis pubis and anterior superior iliac spine, it is absent in ceratin conditions
  • Absent pedal pulse: the distal pulse of the foot, also referred to as pedal pulse, may be taken at either of two sites: the posterior tibial pulse (located behind the medial ankle) or the dorsalis pedis pulse (located on the anterior surface of the foot, lateral to the large tendon of the great toe), it may be absent in certain conditions
  • Absent pulse: An undetectable pulse.
  • Accelerated hypertension: Accelerated hypertension is a condition characterized by a rapid increase in blood pressure. The condition is a medical emergency which can cause organ damage if not treated promptly.
  • Accelerated silicosis: An occupation lung disease caused by breathing in silica dust over a long period of time. The lung damage becomes symptomatic and affects breathing and often causes weight loss as well.
  • Accentuated fall in systolic pressure: marked fall in the systolic pressure
  • Achalasia -- Addisonianism -- Alacrimia syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized mainly by achalasia, alacrimia (absent tears) and Addison's disease. Addison's disease involves adrenal insufficiency due to a resistance to adrenocorticotropic hormone. Only about 70 cases reported worldwide.
  • Achalasia -- addisonianism -- alacrima syndrome: A rare inherited disorder characterized mainly by achalasia, alacrimia (absent tears) and Addison's disease. Addison's disease involves adrenal insufficiency due to a resistance to adrenocorticotropic hormone. Only about 70 cases reported worldwide.
  • Acid-Base Imbalance: A disruption to the normal acid-base equilibrium in the body. There are four main groups of disorder involving an acid-base imbalance: respiratory acidosis or alkalosis and metabolic acidosis or alkalosis. Obviously the severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of imbalance.
  • Acinic cell carcinoma: A usually slow-growing malignant tumor that that can occur in various parts of the body but is most often found in the pancreas, salivary glands, palate and upper lip. Symptoms are determined by the size and location of the growth.
  • Acquired Aplastic Anemia: A rare disorder involving severe failure of the bone marrow to produce new blood cells. Acquired aplastic anemia means that the condition was not present at birth but developed during the persons lifetime. The condition may be caused by such things as autoimmune reactions, radiation and certain drugs, chemicals or viral infections.
  • Acquired hypoprothrombinemia: A low level of blood prothrombins which is not inherited but occurs as a result of certain medical disorders such as Vitamin K deficiency.
  • Acquired total lipodystrophy: A rare acquired disorder that involves adipose tissue abnormalities and is characterized by loss of adipose tissue through the body. The disorder is very similar to the congenital form but the liver involvement is more severe.
  • Acrocephalopolydactyly -- Cardiac Disease -- Ear, Skin and Lower Limb Defects: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • Acrocephalopolysyndactyly type III: A rare genetic condition characterized by head and digital anomalies as well as other abnormalities.
  • Acrocyanosis: A condition where the body extremities sweat and turn blue and cold. Exposure to cold, emotional stress and smoking may trigger the condition. Also known as Raynaud's phenomenon or Raynaud's sign.
  • Acrodynia: A disease occurring in infants or young children. Symptoms include edema, pruritis, skin rash, extremities are pink, cheeks and nose are scarlet, profuse sweating, digestive disturbance, photophobia, polyneuritis, irritability, listlessness, apathy and failure to thrive.
  • Acrofacial dysostosis Rodriguez type: One of a group of disorders characterized by defective limb and facial development. The Rodriguez type is very rare and primarily involves severe limb and organ malformations.
  • Acromegaly: An abnormal enlargement of the limbs due to increased secretion of growth hormone after the cessation of puberty
  • Acroosteolysis neurogenic: A very rare inherited condition characterized mainly by the loss of all sensations - the lose the ability to feel pain, temperature and touch. The loss of sensation generally starts at the toes and fingers and spreads up the limbs and the trunk may also be involved in some cases.
  • Actinomycosis: A chronic infection usually caused by an organism normally found in human bowels and mouths. The disease usually affects the face and neck and results in deep, lumpy abscesses that emit a grainy pus through multiple sinuses.
  • Acute Silicosis: An occupation lung disease caused by breathing in high levels of silica dust.
  • Acute biphenotypic leukemia: A rare form of leukemia that has myeloid and lymphoid features.
  • Acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis:
  • Acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis: Acute inflammation of the pancreas accompanied by the formation of necrotic areas on the surface of the pancreas and in the omentum and, frequently, also accompanied by hemorrhages into the substance of the gland.
  • Acute hypertension-like symptoms: conditions which cause a rapid rise in the blood pressure and hence lead to various symptoms pertaining to hypertension
  • Acute intermittent porphyria: A rare inherited metabolic disorder caused by a disturbed porphyrin metabolism resulting in increased production of porphyrin or its precursors. Symptoms include abdominal pain, photosensitivity and neurological disturbances such as seizures, coma, hallucinations and respiratory paralysis.
  • Acute kidney failure: The sudden and acute loss of kidney function
  • Acute leukemia: An acute condition which affects a cell line of the blood which shows little or no differentiation
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A malignant disease that starts suddenly and progresses quickly. It is characterized by a high number of immature cells in the organs, bone marrow and blood. Symptoms include fever, pallor, anorexia, fatigue, anemia, hemorrhage, bone pain, splenomegaly and frequent infections. Also called acute lymphocytic leukemia.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21 and type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 1: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q21.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Susceptibility to, 2: Cancer of the white blood cells characterized by the presence of excessive lymphoblasts. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets. There are two subtypes of leukemia linked to a genetic anomaly which increases a person's susceptibility to developing the cancer. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 7p12.2.
  • Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, adult: Cancer of the white blood cells. Precursors to white blood cells are called blasts and are made by the bone marrow but in ALL the blasts are abnormal and do not develop into lymphocytes. Instead, the abnormal blasts or leukemic cells multiply rapidly and reduce the level of other types of blood cells such as red blood cells and platelets.
  • Acute pancreatitis: sudden inflammation of the pancreas
  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome, Infant: A breathing disorder that occurs in infants. The underdeveloped lungs fail to functioning adequately and the body becomes deprived of oxygen. The condition is more likely to affect premature infants and the greater the prematurity, the greater the risk.
  • Adams Nance syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by rapid heartbeat, high blood pressure, small eyes and the presence of excess glycine in the urine.
  • Adenomyosis: presence of ectopic endometrial tissue in the myometrium
  • Adrenal Cancer: A malignant cancer that develops in the adrenal gland. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids. Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal Cortex Diseases: Diseases of the adrenal cortex. Examples includes Addison's disease, Cushing's syndrome and adrenal fatigue.
  • Adrenal adenoma, familial: A benign tumor that develops in the adrenal gland and tends to run in families. The tumor may be nonfunctioning (does not produce hormones) or functioning in which case excessive levels of hormones can cause a variety of symptoms depending on which hormone is involved. Adrenal hormones made in the cortex (outer part of the gland) are aldosterone, corticosteroids and androgenic steroids . Adrenalin and noradrenalin are the hormones made in the medulla (central part of the adrenal gland).
  • Adrenal disorders: Disorders affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adrenal gland hyperfunction: Excessive activity of the adrenal gland which causes excessive production of one or more adrenal hormones (aldosterone, corticosteroids, androgenic steroids, epinephrine and norepinephrine). The increased adrenal gland activity may be caused by an adrenal gland tumor or by excessive stimulation of the gland. Pituitary hormones stimulate adrenal gland activity.
  • Adrenal gland symptoms: Symptoms affecting the adrenal glands
  • Adrenal hemorrhage, neonatal: Hemorrhage of the adrenal gland after birth. The severity of the disorder is varies from a small hemorrhage to damage to the whole adrenal gland. Sometimes the condition is discovered incidentally during ultrasounds for other reasons. The hemorrhage may occur as the result of a variety of causes including adrenal tumor, neonatal stress, and blood coagulation disorder or for no apparent reason.
  • Adrenal hyperplasia: A group of disorder that occur when there is a problem in the process of making adrenal corticosteroids.
  • Adrenal hyperplasia, congenital type 3: A group of disorders that occur when a deficiency of 21-hydroxylase impairs the normal process of making adrenal corticosteroids. The severity of the condition is variable depending on the degree of deficiency.
  • Adrenal hyperplasia, congenital, due to 11-Beta-hydroxylase deficiency: A rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia characterized by a deficiency of 11-Beta-hydroxylase which results in excess androgen production and hypertension. The disorder can occur in virilizing, hypertensive and salt-wasting forms and symptoms may range from mild to severe.
  • Adrenal hypertension: Adrenal hypertension is high blood pressure caused by adrenal gland problems. For example, an adrenal tumor can cause excessive production of aldosterone which in turn causes salt-retention and high blood pressure. Severity of symptoms varies depending on the underlying cause.
  • Adrenal incidentaloma: A tumor of the adrenal gland that is discovered incidentally while performing an imaging examination for reasons other than an adrenal tumor. The tumor may be asymptomatic or can causes excessive secretion of adrenal hormones and resulting symptoms. The tumor may also be malignant or benign.
  • Adrenal medulla neoplasm: A tumor that develops in the part of the adrenal gland called the medulla which produces adrenalin and noradrenaline. The tumor is usually benign but can be malignant.
  • Adrenoleukodystrophy: A rare hereditary metabolic disease that only occurs in male children and is characterized by adrenal atrophy and extensive cerebral demyelination causing progressive loss of mental functioning, aphasia, apraxia and sometimes blindness. The patient usually dies within 5 years.
  • Adult Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic fibrosis is an inherited condition characterized by the production of thick sticky mucus by the mucus glands in the lungs, intestines, liver and pancreas. The condition is most often diagnosed in children or young adults but occasionally, relatively mild symptoms may lead to frequent misdiagnosis or no diagnosis at all unless the symptoms become worse. The condition may be misdiagnosed as emphysema, asthma or chronic bronchitis. It is usually females with a mild form of the disease who tend to be diagnosed at a later age.
  • Adult respiratory distress syndrome: A condition which is characterized by fulminant pulmonary interstitial alveolar oedema.
  • Aicardi syndrome: A rare genetic disorder where the structure connecting the two halves of the brain fails to develop which results in seizures and eye abnormalities .
  • Air embolism: A condition where an air bubble enters the cardiovascular system (via injection, intravenous therapy, surgery or puncture wound) and obstructs the blood flow.
  • Airway obstruction: airway obstruction is a blockage of the upper airway, which can be in the trachea, laryngeal (voice box), or pharyngeal (throat) areas or involve the bronch.
  • Al Gazali Aziz Salem syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by heart disease, short stature and a webbed neck.
  • Albuminuria: The presence of albumin (a blood protein) in the urine.
  • Alcohol drinking: The consumption of a drink containing alcohol. Alcohol consumption can cause varying degrees of impairment depending on the amount consumed. Consuming very large amounts of alcohol can lead to death.
  • Alcohol-Induced Disorders: Disorders caused by excessive alcohol consumption. The symptoms are variable depending on the disorder involved. Some of the disorders are: alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence, alcohol intoxication, alcohol withdrawal, alcohol intoxication delirium, alcohol withdrawal delirium, alcohol-induced persisting dementia, alcohol-induced persisting amnestic disorder, alcohol-induced psychotic disorder, alcohol-induced mood disorder, alcohol-induced anxiety disorder, alcohol-induced sexual dysfunction, alcohol-induced sleep disorder, liver damage, liver cancer and esophageal cancer.
  • Alcohol-induced pseudo-Cushing syndrome: The excessive consumption of alcohol can result in symptoms similar to a condition called Cushing's syndrome. When alcohol consumption is stopped, symptoms regress.
  • Ales dysfibrinogenemia: A rare inherited disorder characterized by abnormal fibrinogen which is a protein essential to the blood clotting process. The Alès type was discovered in Alès.
  • Alkaptonuria: A rare inherited metabolic disease characterized by homogentisic aciduria, arthritis and ochronosis. Symptoms include darkening of urine, alkinization due to overproduction of homogentisic acid, arthritis in the large joints and black ochronotic pigmentation of cartilage and collagen tissue. However, many of these symptoms may not occur until middle age. The condition may also be caused by chronic phenol poisoning.
  • Allain Babin Demarquez syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized by premature fusion of skullbones, abnormal development of skeletal bones and hypertension.
  • Alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase deficiency, Type II: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where deficiency of an enzyme (alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase) causes glycoplids to accumulate in body tissues and result in various symptoms. Type 2 occurs during the second or third decade of life and is milder than type I and doesn't involve neurological degeneration.
  • Altamira syndrome: A disease that occurs in Altamira (Brazil) and is caused by the black fly bite (Simulium). The pathological agent has not yet been determined.
  • Altered vital signs: vital signs are measures of various physiological statistics often taken by health professionals in order to assess the most basic body functions,altered vital signs indicate an underlying abnormality
  • Altered vital signs due to dehydration: Altered vital signs due to dehydration refers to a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of a lack of sufficient fluid in the body.
  • Altered vital signs due to encephalopathy: Altered vital signs due to encephalopathy refers to a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of encephalopathy.
  • Altered vital signs due to road traffic accident: Altered vital signs due to road traffic accident refers to a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of a motor vehicle collision.
  • Altered vital signs in case of diabetic ketoacidosis: Altered vital signs in case of diabetic ketoacidosis is a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of diabetic ketoacidosis.
  • Altered vital signs in meningitis: Altered vital signs in meningitis is a condition in which there is a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of meningitis.
  • Altered vital signs in pulmonary embolism: Altered vital signs in pulmonary embolism refers to a change in the pulse, breathing, blood pressure and/or body temperature as a result of pulmonary embolism.
  • Alveolar capillary dysplasia: The abnormal development of the lung blood vessels. The normal barrier across which air and blood can diffuse fails to develop properly. Death usually results within weeks of birth but rare cases can survive for months.
  • Alveolitis, extrinsic allergic: A lung disease that tends to occur in people with jobs where they are frequently exposed to organic dust inhalation.
  • Amebic dysentery: Intestinal inflammation caused by Entamoeba histolytica and often marked by symptoms such as frequent, loose bowel movements that contain blood and mucus. Also called intestinal amebiasis.
  • Amitriptyline toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Amlodipine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Amoxapine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Amphetamine abuse: Use of the stimulant drugs known as amphetamines or "speed"
  • Amphetamine poisoning: Excessive ingestion of amphetamine drugs.
  • Amyloidosis: A disease characterized by the accumulation of insoluble amyloid protein in tissues and organs which in turn affects the functioning of these tissues and organs.
  • Amyloidosis AL: A disease involving the abnormal deposit of amyloid fibrils in virtually any part of the body - the heart, liver, kidney and peripheral and autonomic nerves are most commonly affected. The abnormal amyloid fibrils are produced abnormal plasma cells in the bone marrow. In some cases, the excess growth of abnormal plasma cells can result in a cancerous condition called myeloma resulting in bone pain and infections. A patient with myeloma may develop amyloidosis but it is rare for a patient with AL amyloidosis to go on to develop myeloma.
  • Amyloidosis VII: Amyloidosis involves the abnormal deposit of a substance called amyloid in various parts of the body. In the Ohio type, the amyloid deposits in the leptomeningeal blood vessels, brainstem, spinal cord and eye causing central nervous system dysfunction, brain hemorrhages as well as vision impairment.
  • Amyloidosis beta2-microglobulinic: Amyloidosis is a rare group of metabolic disorders where a protein called amyloid accumulates in body organs and tissues where it can cause damage. The type of amyloid protein involved in this type of amyloidosis is beta-2-microglobulin. The abnormal protein tends to be deposited in parts of the body such as joints, bones and carpal tunnel but can also be found in the gastrointestinal tract and other organs.
  • Amyloidosis, familial visceral: A rare genetic disorder involving widespread amyloidosis (abnormal buildup of amyloid protein in tissues) which tends the affect the kidneys severely.
  • Amyloidosis, oculoleptomeningeal: Amyloidosis involves the abnormal deposit of a substance called amyloid in various parts of the body. In this particular type, the amyloid deposits in the leptomeningeal blood vessels, brainstem, spinal cord and eye causing central nervous system dysfunction, brain hemorrhages and vision impairment.
  • Anal bruise: A haematoma that occurs on the anus.
  • Anal hematoma: Anal hematoma is a collection of blood that has leaked from blood vessels in the anus.
  • Anal triangle bruise: Usually occurs due to trauma.
  • Analgesic nephropathy syndrome: Kidney damage caused by excessive use of pain-killing drugs. Aspirin and phenacetin mixtures are the most common causes.
  • Analgesic syndrome: The use of large quantities of pain-killer drugs can sometimes cause serious kidney damage as well as various other problems.
  • Anaphylaxis: An immediate hypersensitivity reaction due to the exposure of a specific antigen to a sensitized individual
  • Anchovy poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some anchovies contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the anchovy does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The anchovies are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Andrade's syndrome: An inherited condition characterized by deposits of an abnormal protein called amyloid in various parts of the body including organs. The condition mainly involves neurological symptoms.
  • Anemia: Reduced red blood cells in the blood
  • Anemia, Neonatal: Insufficient red blood cells that can carry oxygen around the body. It is common in premature births or can occur as a result of blood loss before, during or just after the birth.
  • Aneurysm: Swelling or ballooning of part of an artery
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 1: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 1 is caused by a defect on chromosome 7q11.2.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 10: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 10 is caused by a defect on chromosome 8q12.1.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 2: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 19q13.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 3: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 1p36.13-p34.3.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 4: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 4 is caused by a defect on chromosome 5p15.2-14.3.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 5: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 5 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2p13.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 6: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are now six different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases an individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 9p21.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 7: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 7 is caused by a defect on chromosome 11q24-q25.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 8: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 8 is caused by a defect on chromosome 14q23.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 9: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 9 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2q33.1.
  • Aneurysmal dissection: an aneurysmal dissection (dissecting aneurysm, dissecting hematoma) is an often fatal disorder in which the inner layer of the vessel wall tears
  • Aneurysms: An area of dilation of the wall of an artery or vein
  • Angiodysplasia: Abnormality of small blood vessels - especially in the intestinal tract - which can result in bleeding. The size of the lesion involved determines the severity of the condition. Small amounts of bleeding from one lesion often goes unnoticed but multiple large lesions may cause heavy bleeding and result in black tarry stool and anemia.
  • Angiokeratoma due to Fabry's disease: Angiokeratoma due to Fabry's disease are small purplish spots that develop due to Fabry's disease.
  • Angioma hereditary neurocutaneous: A rare genetic condition characterized angiomas involving both the skin and nervous system.
  • Angiopathy, hereditary, with nephropathy, aneurysms and muscle cramps: An inherited disorder characterized by kidney disease, aneurysms, blood vessel disease and muscle cramps which can last from seconds to minutes.
  • Angiosarcoma: A rare, aggressive malignant tumor of the blood vessel cells. Also called hemangiosarcoma, malignant hemangioendothelioma.
  • Angiotensin renin aldosterone hypertension: The RAAS (rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone system) is involved in regulating blood volume and vascular resistance and an imbalance of any of these components can cause high blood pressure.
  • Angiotensin/rennin/aldosterone hypertension: A group of disorder characterized by high blood pressure due to abnormalities in angiotensin, rennin and aldosterone levels. Adequate levels of these chemicals help to control blood volume and blood vessel resistance which in turn influences blood pressure.
  • Ankle blueness: A blue discolouration of the ankle
  • Ankle bruise: A haematoma that occurs at the ankle.
  • Ankylostomiasis: A parasitic intestinal infection caused by a hookworm called Ancylostoma duodenale or Necator americanus. Infection usually occurs when larva enter a break in the skin and then travel throughout the body until the reach the intestines.
  • Anophthalmia with pulmonary hypoplasia: A rare disorder characterized by absent or very small eyes and underdeveloped lung tissue.
  • Anorexia Nervosa: A disorder where a distorted sense of body image leads to self-starvation to the point of death in some cases.
  • Anoxemia: Lack of oxygen in the blood.
  • Anthracosis: An often asymptomatic chronic lung disease caused by inhaling coal tust which then deposits in the lungs. Also called black lung disease, coal worker's pneumoconiosis or miner's pneumoconiosis.
  • Antiphospholipid syndrome: An autoimmune disorder characterized by blood clots and pregnancy losses.
  • Antisynthetase syndrome: A rare autoimmune disease that affects the muscles. It involves the development of antibodies to an enzyme (aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase) which is involved in making proteins.
  • Antithrombin III deficiency, congenital: A rare blood disorder where a congenital deficiency of antithrombin III causes excessive blood coagulation which results in blood clot formation.
  • Aorta conditions: Conditions that affect the aorta
  • Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic: Bulging and weakness of the aorta in the area of the chest. The condition is life-threatening as death can occur rapidly if the aneurysm bursts.
  • Aortic Valve Insufficiency: A heart valve disorder where the heart valve is unable to close completely which causes a backflow of some of the blood from the aorta. The condition can be caused by such things as systemic lupus erythematosus, endocarditis, high blood pressure, Marfan's syndrome and aortic dissection.
  • Aortic arches defect: A defect in the top part of the aorta (aortic arch) that consists of several arterial branches. There is a variety of defects that can occur and symptoms will be determined by the particular defect involved. Possible types of defects includes aortic coarctation and aortic arch hypoplasia.
  • Aortic coarctation: A rare inherited birth defect where the heart blood vessel called the aorta has a narrowed area which affects blood flow. The degree of constriction is variable which mild cases asymptomatic until adulthood. The poor blood flow to the lower body gives results in it appearing less developed than that upper body.
  • Aortic valve incompetence: A condition characterized by an inability of the aortic valve to function effectively
  • Aplastic anemia: A blood disorder where the bone marrow produces insufficient new blood cells.
  • Apnea: Periods of absence of breathing
  • Apo A-I deficiency: Low plasma HDL cholesterol that tends to run in families.
  • Apparent Mineralocorticoid Excess, type 2: A form of inherited high blood pressure that starts during early childhood. The condition is caused by a genetic defect which results in an inborn error of metabolism of peripheral cortisol. Type 2 causes similar symptoms to type 1 but the urinary steroid levels are different.
  • Apparent mineralocorticoid excess: A form of inherited high blood pressure that starts during early childhood. The condition results from a genetic defect which causes impaired metabolism of cortisol.
  • Apple seed poisoning: Apple seeds contain a toxic chemical called amygdalin which can cause serious symptoms if eaten in large quantities. Hospital admission is recommended if more than 50 apple seeds have been consumed.
  • Apricot seed poisoning: Apricot seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the pit remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Most parts of the apricot plant contain the toxic chemical with the highest concentration in young leaves. Different species of apricots have different levels of toxic chemical. Severe symptoms or even death can occur if children consume more than ten kernels or adults consume more than forty kernels. Theories exist that apricot kernels may help cancer sufferers but there has been no scientific studies that have proven this.
  • Argentinean hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease caused by the Junin virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (usually the corn mouse) urine, feces or saliva. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks. The disease is most common in rural workers in Argentina.
  • Aristolochic Acid poisoning: Aristolochic acid is derived from a forest herb from the Aristocholochia family. It is often used in herbal preparations such as Aristolochia Fang Ch, Bragantia and Asarum. It is usually used in herbal preparations to promote weight loss. The substance is believed to cause kidney failure and urinary tract cancer.
  • Arizona Bark Scorpion poisoning: A bite from the Arizona Bark scorpion contains chemicals toxic to the nerve system and can cause serious, life-threatening symptoms.
  • Arm blueness: A blue discolouration of the arm
  • Arm bruise: Injury or trauma to the arm tissue which is often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations.
  • Arterial dilation: dilatation of the arteries.
  • Arterial dissection -- lentiginosis: A rare inherited condition characterized by arterial dissection and numerous skin macules. An arterial dissection is a blood vessel anomaly where blood leaks into the blood vessel wall through a tear in the inner lining of the blood vessel.
  • Arterial dissections with lentiginosis: A rare familial syndrome characterized by the association of aortic dissection and multiple lentigines (brown skin spots). The aorta can rupture in some cases and result in sudden death.
  • Arterial hypertension: medical condition in which the blood pressure is chronically elevated.
  • Arterial insufficiency: Where the arterial blood flow is insufficient.
  • Arterial luminal narrowing: narrowing of the arteries.
  • Arterial obstruction: Obstruction to the flow of blood due to fatty plaque deposition on the intimal layer of the vessel wall and aggregation of platelets.
  • Arterial occlusive disease, progressive -- hypertension -- heart defects -- bone fragility -- brachysyndactyly: A rare syndrome characterized by narrowing or blockage of a number of arteries (in the kidneys, abdomen, brain and heart) as well as fragile bones, heart defects and finger abnormalities. Fractures and high blood pressure often start during the first years of life.
  • Arterial tortuosity syndrome: A rare disorder which affects the connective tissue that makes up blood vessels resulting in various arterial abnormalities. Connective tissue abnormalities also affect the skin and joints.
  • Arteriosclerosis: A group of medical conditions which are characterized by the thickening and loss of elasticity of arterial blood vessel walls
  • Arteriosclerosis Obliterans: Arteriosclerosis that results in the narrowing and gradual blockage of the artery. Arteriosclerosis involves the deposition of cholesterol plaques and other material on the inside of the artery walls. The symptoms will depend on the location of the arteries affected and how severe the blockage is.
  • Arteriovenous fistula: Connection between artery and vein.
  • Artery burning sensation: Abnormal sensations in the arterial wall which may be due to an autoimmune response.
  • Artery conditions: Any conditions affecting arteries
  • Artery infection: Inflammation of the tunica adventia, tunica media and tunica intima.
  • Artery inflammation: Inflammation of the tunica adventia, tunica media and tunica intima.
  • Artery numbness: Abnormal sensations in the arterial wall which may be due to an autoimmune response.
  • Artery redness: Inflammation of the tunica adventia, tunica media and tunica intima.
  • Artery stiffness: stiffness of the vessel wall due to loss of elasticity or athermatous plaque deposit.
  • Artery swelling: Swelling of the vessel wall due to loss of elasticity or athermatous plaque deposit.
  • Artery symptoms: Symptoms affecting the arteries (large blood vessels)
  • Artery tingling: Abnormal sensations in the arterial wall which may be due to an autoimmune response.
  • Artery weakness: weakness of the vessel wall due to loss of elasticity or athermatous plaque deposit.
  • Arthrogryposis -- renal dysfunction -- cholestasis syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by joint contractures, kidney dysfunction and liver problems.
  • Asbestos conditions: Medical conditions caused be exposure to asbestos dust
  • Asiatic porpoise poisoning: The Asiatic porpoise is eaten mainly in China. Eating the liver, internal organs and muscle tissue of the Asiatic porpoise can cause poisoning symptoms in humans if sufficient quantities are consumed. The nature of the toxin is unknown but it is believed that some cases result from very high levels of vitamin A in the liver.
  • Asphyxia neonatorum: Respiratory failure in a newborn.
  • Asthma: A condition which is characterized by recurrent attacks of paroxysmal dyspnoea
  • Asymmetrical brachial pulses: difference in the reading of the brachial artery on palpation of the right and left brachial artery in the cubital fossae
  • Ataxia Telangiectasia: A rare inherited childhood disorder involving progressive degeneration of the nervous system.
  • Atelectasis: is a collapse of lung tissue affecting part or all of one lung
  • Atherosclerosis: A condition which is a form of arteriosclerosis where atheromas are caused by the aggregation of cholesterol and lipids
  • Atlantic mussel food poisoning: Atlantic mussels contain a toxin called domoic acid which can affect nerve tissue. The mussels are found in the North Atlantic and Pacific coast and the Gulf of Mexico.
  • Atrial Septal Defect 3: A rare heart malformation involving the presence of an abnormal opening between the two atrial chambers of the heart which allows abnormal mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. The severity of the symptoms depends on the size and location of the defect with mild cases being asymptomatic until adulthood. Atrial septal defect 3 is caused by a mutation on chromosome 14q12. There are no other heart abnormalities associated with the condition.
  • Atrial Septal Defect 4: A rare heart malformation involving the presence of an abnormal opening between the two atrial chambers of the heart which allows abnormal mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. The severity of the symptoms depends on the size and location of the defect with mild cases being asymptomatic until adulthood. Atrial septal defect 4 is caused by a mutation on chromosome 7p15-p14. There are no other heart abnormalities associated with the condition.
  • Atrial Septal Defect 5: A rare heart malformation involving the presence of an abnormal opening between the two atrial chambers of the heart which allows abnormal mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. The severity of the symptoms depends on the size and location of the defect with mild cases being asymptomatic until adulthood. Atrial septal defect 5 is caused by a mutation on chromosome 15q14. There are no other heart abnormalities associated with the condition.
  • Atrial Septal Defect 6: A rare heart malformation involving the presence of an abnormal opening between the two atrial chambers of the heart which allows abnormal mixing of oxygenated and deoxygenated blood. The severity of the symptoms depends on the size and location of the defect with mild cases being asymptomatic until adulthood. Atrial septal defect 6 is caused by a mutation on chromosome 4q32-q33.
  • Atrial fibrillation: A rhythm disturbance of the heart that results in irregular and chaotic ventricular contractions.
  • Atrial myxoma, familial: An atrial myxoma benign tumor that develops in the wall that separates the two upper chambers of the heart. The familial form of the condition also involves tumors in other parts of the body such as the skin, both heart atria or the heart ventricles.
  • Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome: A rare condition characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and kidney failure that has no obvious cause.
  • Autoimmune Myocarditis: Inflammation of the heart muscle due to the body's own immune system attacking it.
  • Autoimmune Thrombocytopenia: Autoimmune disorder causing a lack of blood platelets.
  • Autoimmune Vasculitis: A inflammation of the blood vessels caused by an autoimmune reaction
  • Autoimmune enteropathy: A very rare condition that occurs when the body's own immune system attacks the intestinal wall and affect the way it absorbs food.
  • Autonomic dysfunction: disease or malfunction of the autonomic nervous system.
  • Autonomic dysreflexia: Autonomic dysreflexia is a condition characterized by instability of the autonomic nervous system and often results in sudden high blood pressure.
  • Autonomic dysreflexia syndrome: A complication caused by injury to the neck or upper back region of the spinal cord. Symptoms are induced by stimulation below the level of the injury which can be caused by such things as distended bladder, scratching the feet, squeezing the penis, stimulation of the rectum or accumulation of gas.
  • Autonomic neuropathy: A condition which is characterized by a functional disturbance or pathological change in the autonomic nervous system
  • Autosomal Recessive Polycystic Kidney Disease: Severe form of PKD, a genetic kidney disease.
  • Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease: Genetic kidney disease causing kidney cysts.
  • Avasthey syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by pulmonary hypertension, lymphedema and malformation of brain blood vessels.
  • Back blueness: A blue discolouration on the back
  • Back bruise: A haematoma that occurs on the back.
  • Bacterial endocarditis: Infection and inflammation of the inner layers of the heart, most commonly the valves cause by bacteria.
  • Bacterial pericarditis: Inflammation and swelling of the pericardium (fibrous sac surrounding the heart) due to a bacterial infection. It can occur as a complication of a bacterial infection in some other part of the body. It is most often a complication of a respiratory infection but skin and oral infections may also be a cause. Bacterial pericarditis may also occur after heart surgery. It occurs predominantly in males aged 20 to 50 years. The condition may be misdiagnosed as a heart attack and vice versa.
  • Bacterial toxic-shock syndrome: A very rare, potentially fatal infection caused by toxins produced by bacteria, especially bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes. The condition is often associated with tampon use but can originate from other sources.
  • Barotrauma: Damage to the lungs, ear or sinuses caused by rapid or extreme changes in air pressure.
  • Bartonella infections: Infection with bacteria from the Bartonella genus of bacteria. Specific bacteria from within this group are Bartonella bacilliforms (Oroya fever), Bartonella Heneslae (Cat-scratch disease). Other conditions caused by this bacteria are endocarditis, bacteremia and angiomatosis. Symptoms vary depending on the type of bacteria involved and the severity of the infection - immunocompromised patients face greater risk of severe infection.
  • Bartonellosis: An infection by Bartonella bacilliformis which is transmitted through sandfly bites. Symptoms include fever, severe anemia, bone pain and skin lesions. Also called Carrion's disease, Oroya fever or verruga peruana.
  • Basilar artery insufficiency: refers to a temporary set of symptoms due to decreased blood flow in the posterior circulation of the brain
  • Battle's sign: ecchymosis over the mastoid process of the temporal bone.
  • Beau's syndrome: A syndrome characterized by heart insufficiency and inability of the heart ventricles to completely empty of blood.
  • Behcet's syndrome: Recurring inflammation of small blood vessels affecting various areas.
  • Benign lung Tumor: Benign lung tumors are a heterogenous group of neoplastic lesions originating from pulmonary structures.
  • Benign mucosal pemphigoid: A rare chronic disease involving blistering and scarring of the mucous membranes especially in the mouth and conjunctiva of the eye.
  • Bernheim's syndrome: Reduced size of right heart ventricle due to enlargement of the left ventricle which encroaches on the space in the right ventricle. Blood flow from the right atrium to the right ventricle is obstructed.
  • Berylliosis: Beryllium poisoning which causes granulomas and pulmonary fibrosis.
  • Besnier-Boeck-Schaumann disease: A rare disease where inflammatory granular nodules form in various organs.
  • Beta-blocker poisoning: Excessive ingestion of Beta-blocker drugs.
  • Biceps bruise: An injury to underlying tissues or bone in which the skin is not broken, often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations.
  • Big toe bruise: Injury to underlying tissues or bone in which the skin is not broken, often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations.
  • Bilateral stroke: rapidly developing loss of brain function due to disturbance in the blood supply of the brain
  • Bindewald-Ulmer-Muller syndrome: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by a heart defect, and mental and growth retardation.
  • Bing-Neel syndrome: A rare disorder involving infiltration of the central nervous system by abnormal leukemia-like cells (lymphoplasmocytoid cells) that occur in Waldenström's macroglobulinemia. The abnormality increases blood viscosity which impairs its circulation through small brain and eye blood vessels.
  • Binswanger Disease: Multi-infarct dementia, caused by damage to deep white matter.
  • Binswanger's Disease: A type of senile dementia characterized by chronic cerebrovascular disease.
  • Bird cherry seed poisoning: Wild cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual.
  • Birth Injury: An injury to the mother caused by childbirth
  • Bitter almond seed poisoning: Bitter almond seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Bitter almond plants grow mainly in Northern America. Various processes can be used to leach the toxic chemical out of the bitter almonds.
  • Black locust poisoning: The black locust is a large deciduous tree which has long clusters of scented flowers and flat fruit pods. The young leaves, seeds and inner bark contain various chemicals (robin, robinine and robitin) which can be toxic if large quantities are eaten. The flowers are considered edible if handled correctly.
  • Black widow spider envenomation: The black widow spider bite is toxic to the nerves and can cause serious symptoms. The black widow spider is most commonly found in North America.
  • Blanching vascular reactions in children:
  • Bleeding after sex: Vaginal bleeding after sexual intercourse
  • Bleeding symptoms: Any type of bleeding symptoms.
  • Bleeding tendencies: defect in the haemostasis mechanism
  • Blood clot: A coagulum that is located in the blood stream due to the aggregation of blood factors
  • Blood clot in pregnancy: Blood clot in pregnancy is relatively common and is caused largely by physiological factors related to pregnancy, but can also be caused by pathology unrelated to pregnancy.
  • Blood clots: Multiple coagulums that are located in the blood stream due to the aggregation of blood factors
  • Blood clots in pregnancy: Blood clots in pregnancy are relatively common and are caused largely by physiological factors related to pregnancy, but can also be caused by pathology unrelated to pregnancy.
  • Blood conditions: Conditions that affect the blood
  • Blood loss: loss of blood can occur through any of the body orifices
  • Blood pressure changes: Changes to the pressure of blood flow around the body
  • Blood pressure symptoms: High (hypertension) or low blood pressure (hypotension).
  • Blood shot ring around the cornea: Red blood-like colored ring around the cornea
  • Blood vessel conditions: Conditions that affect the blood vessels
  • Blood vessel damage: A condition characterized by damage to vessels that transport blood around the body
  • Blood vessel inflammation: A condition characterized by inflammation of the vessels that transport blood around the body
  • Blood vessel symptoms: Symptoms affecting the blood vessels
  • Bloodshot eyes: Red blood-like color of the eyes
  • Bloody vaginal discharge: discharge from the vagina other than normal menstruation
  • Blue baby: Any baby born with blueness
  • Blue face in children: Blue face in children, sometimes called facial cyanosis, can occur due to a lack of oxygen in the cells of the face, among other causes.
  • Blue hands: Blue appearance of the hands
  • Blue hands in children: Blue hands in children, sometimes called cyanosis, can occur due to a lack of oxygen in the cells of the hands, extreme cold, and other causes.
  • Blue lips: Blueness or discoloration of the lips
  • Blue lips in children: Blue lips in children, sometimes called cyanosis, occurs due to extreme cold, a lack of oxygen in the cells of the lips, and other causes in children.
  • Blue nails: A condition which is characterized by the occurrence of nails that are blue in appearance
  • Blue nails in children: Blue nails in children, sometimes called cyanosis, occurs due to extreme cold, a lack of oxygen in the cells of the skin under the nails, and other causes in children.
  • Blue rubber bleb nevus: A very rare congenital vascular disorder characterized by multiple hemangiomas on the skin and internal organs.
  • Blue skin: Blueness of the skin
  • Blue tongue: A symptom which occurs when the tongue is blue in appearance
  • Blue tongue in children: Blue tongue in children, sometimes called tongue cyanosis, can occur due to a variety of conditions, including a lack of oxygen in the tongue cells.
  • Bluish black discoloration of the mucous membrane: decreased in the oxygen saturation of the mucous membrane also known as cyanosis
  • Bluish discoloration of both arms: Bluish discoloration of both arms, sometimes called cyanosis, is an abnormally blue tint or coloring of both arms.
  • Bluish discoloration of both hands: Bluish discoloration of both hands, sometimes called cyanosis, refers to a condition in which there is a blue tone or tint of both hands.
  • Bluish discoloration of one arm: Bluish discoloration of one arm, sometimes called cyanosis, occurs when one arm appears bluish.
  • Bluish discoloration of one hand: Bluish discoloration of one hand refers to an abnormal bluish color of one hand, sometimes called cyanosis.
  • Bluish discoloration of the mucous membrane: decreased in the oxygen saturation of the mucous membrane also known as cyanosis
  • Bluish discoloration of the skin: Cyanosis is a bluish discoloration of the skin or mucous membranes caused by lack of oxygen in the blood .
  • Bluish discoloration of the skin similar to that in case of acute severe asthma: decreased in the oxygen saturation, also known as cyanosis
  • Bluish discoloration of the skin similar to that in the case of acute severe asthma: Bluish discoloration of the skin similar to that in the case of acute severe asthma is an abnormal bluish coloration of the skin that is due to a lack of oxygen that is delivered to the body's cells.
  • Body skin hyperlaxity due to vitamin K-dependent coagulation factor deficiency: A rare inherited connective tissue disorder caused by a deficiency of a blood coagulation factor.
  • Bolivian hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease that occurs in Bolivia and is caused by the Machupo virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (Calomys callosus) droppings. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks.
  • Bone cement implantation syndrome: A complication that can occur after using bone cement during implantation of an internal prosthesis. Circulation may be affected and a blockage in the pulmonary artery may develop.
  • Bonefish poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some bonefish contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the bonefish does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The bonefish are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Bosviel syndrome: A rare condition where a blood blister on the uvula ruptures. It often occurs as a complication of tracheal intubation.
  • Botulism food poisoning: Extremely dangerous food poisoning requiring medical attention, but not always recognized because of its non-abdominal symptoms.
  • Bounding pulse: Is most often classified as a forceful and strong pulse.
  • Boutonneuse fever: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Box Jellyfish poisoning: A sting from the Box jellyfish contains a chemical which is toxic to the nerves, heart and skin. This jellyfish is mainly found in the waters of Northern Queensland in Australia. The tentacles should not be removed from the patient as it can cause further injection of poison.
  • Brachydactyly -- arterial hypertension: A rare syndrome characterized by the association of hypertension with short digits. Premature death (by the fifth decade) due to stroke occurs in untreated patients.
  • Brachydactyly with hypertension: A very rare disease characterized by the association of hypertension with brachydactyly (abnormally short fingers and/or toes).
  • Brain compression: Internal compression of the brain
  • Brain stem infarction: an usually fatal ischemic event involving the brain stem
  • Breast blueness: A blue discolouration on the breast or breasts
  • Breast bruise: A haematoma that occurs on the back.
  • Bright's Disease: A condition where the parts of the kidneys that are responsible for filtering become inflamed and results in blood and proteins accidentally leaking into the urine. The condition can occur after certain infections and serious kidney dysfunction can result in severe or chronic complications.
  • Bronchial bruise: Injury to underlying tissues or bone in which the skin is not broken, often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations.
  • Bronchiolitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the bronchioles
  • Bronchitis: Inflammation of the bronchi as a symptom
  • Bronchopulmonary dysplasia: A condition which is characterized by dysplasia of the brochopulmonary vessels
  • Brow bruise: Injury or trauma to the brow which is often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations.
  • Brown snake poisoning: The Brown snake is a poisonous Australian snake. They are considered one of the most venomous snakes in the world and their bite can result in death without prompt medical attention. The snake venom contains toxins which affect the blood and nerve systems. Children tend to suffer more severe symptoms due to their smaller body size.
  • Bruch's disease: An infectious disease that is caused by Rickettsia conorii which is transmitted by the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus). The disease occurs predominantly in Mediterranean areas such as India and Africa. The onset of symptoms is usually sudden and the incubation period is usually between 6 and 10 days.
  • Bruit: Audible blood flow through a vessel or the heart, indicating abnormal flow.
  • Bruits: Swishing sounds heard over an artery that may also produce a palpable vibration.
  • Buccal mucosa bruise: Injury to underlying tissues or bone in which the skin is not broken, often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations.
  • Buerger's disease: Buergers's disease is a recurring inflammation and thrombosis (clotting) of small and medium arteries and veins of the hands and feet
  • Bulging abdominal veins: Bulging or protruding abdominal veins
  • Bulging neck veins: Unusual bulging of neck veins or arteries
  • Bulging veins: Abnormal protrusion or bulging of the veins
  • Buttock blueness: A blue discolouration on the buttocks
  • Buttock bruise: A haematoma that occurs on the buttock.
  • CDG syndrome type 1A: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where defective carbohydrate compounds are attached to glycoproteins and thus impairing glycoprotein function. Type 1A involves a phosphomannomutase enzyme defect and affects most body systems especially the nervous system and liver function.
  • CDG syndrome type I: A rare genetic disorder where the body is unable to synthesize glycoproteins which results in multisystem problems.
  • COACH syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized by ataxia, gaps or holes in various eye structures, mental retardation, liver fibrosis and brain abnormalities.
  • COPD: Severe obstruction of bronchial air flow typically from bronchitis and/or emphysema.
  • CREST syndrome: Group of symptoms usually related to systemic sclerosis
  • Cadasil: A rare inherited condition which affects the small blood vessels of the brain. Damage to the vessels causes strokes and other problems.
  • Calcaneal bone bruise: Injury or trauma to the heel bone which is often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations.
  • Calciphylaxis: A rare fatal condition characterized by calcification of skin blood vessels and destruction of skin tissue. The condition is often associated with end-stage kidney disease.
  • Calcium channel blocker poisoning: Excessive ingestion of calcium channel blocker drugs.
  • Calf blueness: A blue discolouration on the calf or calves
  • Calf bruise: A haematoma that occurs on the calf or calves.
  • Campylobacter fetus infection: Campylobacter fetus is a food borne bacterial infection which may vary in severity from mild to severe. The bacteria are opportunistic and mainly affect debilitated patients but can also occur in healthy patients. Abortion due to blood infection in the fetus can occur in pregnant women who become infected. The infection is less likely to cause gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhea than other Campylobacter infections but is prone to causing infection in other parts of the body such as the appendix, abdominal cavity, central nervous system (meningitis), gallbladder, urinary tract and blood stream. Cattle and sheep are the main source of this bacteria.
  • Capecitabine poisoning: Capecitabine is used to treat metastatic colorectal and breast cancer . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Capillary leak syndrome with monoclonal gammopathy: A rare condition characterized by leaky blood vessels and an increased level of certain blood proteins (monoclonal gammopathy). Monoclonal gammopathy itself does not cause any symptoms unless it develops into plasma cell leukemia. The condition may vary from mild to severe enough to cause death.
  • Capillary refill time, increased: An increase in the time taken to refill the capillaries of the peripheries
  • Caput medusae: Dilated veins around the umbilicus.
  • Carbamate insecticide poisoning: Excessive ingestion of carbamate insecticide drugs.
  • Carbon disulfide-induced cardiovascular disease: Chronic exposure to certain chemicals can cause cardiovascular disease. For example, exposure to Carbon disulfide can lead to heart disease and carries a risk of premature death as a result. Chronic exposure to these sort of chemicals is most likely to occur in a work environment. Carbon disulfide is used mainly in viscose rayon manufacturing but is also used as a solvent and in other process. Exposure usually occurs through inhalation of vapours but skin absorption can also occur. Reported cases haf cardiovascular disease has occurred among workers exposed to carbon disulfide concentrations of 20-60 ppm.
  • Carcinoid syndrome: Carcinoid heart disease is a rare, metastatic disease that occurs predominantly in the right heart. The tricuspid and pulmonic valves are affected, leading to right heart failure, which results in increased morbidity and mortality.
  • Cardiac abnormalities: Any abnormalities of the cardiovascular system
  • Cardiac arrest: Sudden loss of cardiac function, where the heart stops beating.
  • Cardiac compression syndrome: Symptoms caused by compression of the heart which can be caused by abnormal curvature of the spine or rib cage deformities which restrict the chest space.
  • Cardiac defect: Cardiac defect refers to a malformation, anomaly, or abnormality of the heart
  • Cardiac malformation: Any malformation or structural defect of the heart or it's structures. Some examples include atrioventricular septal defect, conotruncal malformations, transposition of great vessels and heart valve dysplasia. The symptoms vary in nature and severity depending on the type of malformation.
  • Cardiopulmonary insufficiency: diseases of the heart and lung
  • Cardiotoxicity -- Allylamine: Exposure to Allylamines can have a toxic effect on the heart and may result in degenerative changes in the heart. The degree of toxicity may be influenced the duration and level of exposure to the chemical.
  • Cardiotoxicity -- Aromatic hydrocarbons: Exposure to Aromatic hydrocarbons can have a toxic effect on the heart and may result in degenerative changes in the heart. The degree of toxicity may be influenced the duration and level of exposure to the chemical.
  • Cardiotoxicity -- Carbon Disulfide: Exposure to Carbon Disulfide can have a toxic effect on the heart and may result in degenerative changes in the heart. The degree of toxicity may be influenced the duration and level of exposure to the chemical.
  • Cardiotoxicity -- Carbon Monoxide: Exposure to Carbon Monoxide can have a toxic effect on the heart and may result in degenerative changes in the heart. The degree of toxicity may be influenced the duration and level of exposure to the chemical.
  • Cardiovascular disorder: diseases of the heart function, pumping mechanism or any diseases of the heart valves and conduction mechanism
  • Cardiovascular disorders: diseases of the heart
  • Carnevale-Canun-Mendoza syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by loss of bone tissue in the wrists and ankles as well as kidney problems.
  • Carotid Paraganglioma: A rare, usually benign tumor found in the carotid artery in the neck. The tumor develops from glomus cells which are located along blood vessels involved in automatic body activities such as regulation of blood pressure and blood flow.
  • Carotid artery stenosis:
  • Carotid bruit on one side: Carotid bruit on one side is an abnormal sound made by the flow of blood through the carotid artery on one side.
  • Carotid bruits: a carotid bruit is a noise caused by turbulent blood flow in the carotid artery
  • Carotid bruits on both sides: Carotid bruits on both side is a condition in which there is an abnormal sound by the flow of blood through the carotid artery on both sides.
  • Cast syndrome: Obstruction of the third part of the duodenum by an artery following the use of a body plaster cast or a Bradford frame.
  • Catastrophic Antiphospholipid Syndrome: A very rare disorder where the blood clotting system becomes dysfunctional and clots too easily due to the abnormal presence of antphospholipid antibodies. It results in blood flow blockages to various body organs. It is possible that the condition has autoimmune origins. The disorder is often triggered by infections, certain drugs (e.g. anticoagulants), minor surgery and hysterectomy.
  • Cathinone poisoning: Cathinone comes from the leaves of the Khat plant which is native to eastern Africa. Cathinone is a stimulant as well as have pain killing, weight loss and neuromuscular effects. The psychoactive effects are usually utilized by chewing on the leaves of the plant but sometimes dried leaves are used.
  • Central cyanosis: bluish discoloration of the skin and the mucous membrane.
  • Cerebellar vermis hypoplasia -- oligophrenia -- congenital ataxia -- coloboma -- hepatic fibrosis: A very rare syndrome characterized by ataxia, gaps or holes in various eye structures, mental retardation, liver fibrosis and brain abnormalities.
  • Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy, Familial: A rare disorder where abnormal deposits of amyloid in the brain blood vessels causes spasticity, incoordination and dementia. Brain hemorrhage and strokes may also result in severe cases.
  • Cerebral Arteriosclerosis: Hardening or blockage of arteries in the brain.
  • Cerebral Autosomal Recessive Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy: A rare inherited condition characterized primarily by progressive degeneration of the brain white matter and disease of the brain blood vessels as well as additional symptoms not involving the brain e.g. thin skin, alopecia and spinal disc disease.
  • Cerebral hemorrhage: Bleeding in the brain
  • Cerebral ventricle neoplasm: A tumor that occurs in the fluid-filled spaces of the brain called the ventricles. Symptoms vary depending on the size and exact location of the tumor and whether it is cancerous or not.
  • Cerebrovascular disorders: diseases affecting the vascular system of the brain
  • Cerebrovascular symptoms: Symptoms related to the brain's arteries
  • Cervical bruit: Audible blood flow through a cervical vessel, indicating abnormal flow.
  • Cervical cancer: A condition which is characterized by the occurrence of malignancy on the cervix
  • Cervicitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the cervix
  • Cervix bruise: Inflammatory conditions which cause cervical pain
  • Cervix conditions: Conditions of the cervix (entrance) of the female uterus.
  • Chafing: Skin chafing from friction or rubbing
  • Chagas Cardiomyopathy: Heart disease that can occur as a complication of a chronic parasitic infection caused by the protozoa Trypanosoma cruzi and transmitted by insect bites or blood transfusions.
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with ptosis and parkinsonism: CMT is an inherited neurological disease characterized by the gradual degeneration of nerves which starts in the hands and feet and results in progressive numbness, muscle weakness and loss of function. This particular type of CMT also involves a drooping upper eyelid and parkinsonism.
  • Cheekbone bruise: Injury to underlying tissues or bone in which the skin is not broken, often characterized by ruptured blood vessels and discolorations.
  • Chemical adverse reaction -- Cesium: Cesium is a chemical used mainly in the photosterilization of foods such as wheat and potatoes and in the manufacture of photoelectric cells. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount (and concentration) of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical burn -- airways: Burns to the airways caused by a chemical - usually through inhalation but can also occur through aspiration if the chemical is swallowed. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures. Immediate medical attention should be sought if chemical burns to the airways are suspected.
  • Chemical burn -- ingestion: Burns to the mouth and gastrointestinal system caused by swallowing a chemical. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures. Immediate medical attention should be sought if chemical burns to the gastrointestinal system are suspected.
  • Chemical burn -- inhalation: Burns to the airways caused by a chemical through inhalation. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures. Immediate medical attention should be sought if chemical burns to the airways are suspected.
  • Chemical burns: burns causing protein coagulation
  • Chemical pneumonia: Lung inflammation from inhaled chemicals
  • Chemical poisoning -- 1,3-Dinitrobenzene: 1,3-Dinitrobenzene is a chemical used mainly in explosives. The chemical can be readily absorbed through the skin and cause systemic symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene: 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene is a chemical used mainly as an explosive agent and in the production of dyes and photographic chemicals. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2,4-Dinitrotoluene: 2,4-Dinitrotoluene is a chemical used the production of explosives, vehicle air bags and polyurethane polymers. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 4,4-Methylenebis: 4,4-Methylenebis is a chemical used in the manufacture of epoxy resins, belt drives, gun mounts, shoe laces and various other manufactured goods. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetaldehyde: Acetaldehyde is a chemical used in the production of various products - mirrors, disinfectants, plastics, explosives, varnish and food flavoring. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acrylonitrile: Acrylonitrile is a chemical used mainly in the production of acrylic and modacrylic fibers but also in the production of certain plastics, nylon dyes, drugs and pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Adiponitrile: Adiponitrile is a chemical used mainly in the production of hexamethylene diamine which in turn is used mainly to produce nylon. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ammonia: Ammonia is a chemical used mainly in household cleaning products and bleach. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ammonium Nitrate: Ammonium Nitrate is a chemical used mainly in explosives, fireworks and fertilizers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aniline: Aniline is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of perfumes, varnishes, resins, dyes, paint removers, herbicides, fungicides, explosives, solvents and photographic chemicals. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Anisidine (o,p-Isomers): Anisidine (o,p-Isomers)is a chemical used mainly in the production process of pharmaceuticals and azo-dyes . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Anticoagulant rodenticide: Anticoagulant rodenticide is a chemical used to control rodents. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Antifreeze: Antifreeze is used in vehicles to prevent freezing or boiling over of the cooling system. The chemicals (methanol, ethylene and propylene glycol) in the antifreeze can cause severe poisoning symptoms if ingested. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Antu: Antu is used as a rodenticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Azinphos-methyl: Azinphos-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Calcium hypochlorite: Calcium hypochlorite is a chemical used mainly in bleaching products, fungicides, algicides, disinfectants and deodorants. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbaryl: Carbaryl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorate salts: Chlorate salt is a chemical used mainly in herbicides and in the manufacture of matches and explosives. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorine: Chlorine is a chemical used mainly in bleaches, water disinfectants and in pulp mills. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Chlorine is very corrosive and extensive damage to body tissues can result. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorobenzene: Chlorobenzene is a chemical used mainly as a solvent and in the production of various other chemicals. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cresols: Cresols are a group of chemicals that occur naturally in mammals and various plants. It is also manufactured and used in the production of disinfectants, deodorizers and pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cresylic acid: Cresylic acids are a group of chemicals that are used as solvents and in the manufacture of various products such as deodorants, disinfectants, pesticides, glues, paints, herbicides, pharmaceuticals as well as others. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Demeton-S-methyl: Demeton-S-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diazinon: Diazinon is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dichlorvos: Dichlorvos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dicrotophos: Dicrotophos is a toxic insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diethylene Glycol Monobutyl Ether: Diethylene Glycol Monobutyl Ether is a chemical used in a variety of applications: cleaning agents, solvent, manufacture of dyes, rubber, soap and printing products . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dimethyl Phthalate: Dimethyl Phthalate is a chemical used mainly as an insect repellant . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dimethylnitrosamine: Dimethylnitrosamine is a chemical used mainly as a solving in the manufacture of plastics, rubbers, lubricants and rocket fuel. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dinitrocresol: Dinitrocresol is a chemical used mainly as a herbicide and fungicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dioxathion: Dioxathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Disulfoton: Disulfoton is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Endosulfan: Endosulfan is a chemical used mainly as a crop pesticide and wood preservative. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Endothall: Endothall is a chemical used mainly as a pesticide and rodenticide but it is rarely used today. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Epichlorohydrin: Epichlorohydrin is a chemical used for a variety of applications - epoxy production, insecticides, solvent and agricultural chemical. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethion: Ethion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylene Glycol: Ethylene Glycol is a chemical used mainly in antifreeze, coolants and as a solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. Symptoms tend to occur in three phases: the first 12 hours involves inebriation, seizuresand brain swelling; the second and third day involves deterioration of lung and heart function and the third stage involves kidney damage and possibly failure. Death can occur during any of the stages.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylene Glycol Dinitrate: Ethylene Glycol Dinitrate is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of commercial dynamite and blasting gelatin. The chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylene Oxide: Ethylene oxide is a chemical used mainly in detergents, plasticizers, fumigants, inks, cosmetics and brake fluid. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fensulfothion: Fensulfothion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and nematicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fenthion: Fenthion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and avicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Jet Fuel-4: Jet Fuel-4 is an aviation turbine fuel used by the US military. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Malathion: Malathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methidathion: Methidathion is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methiocarb: Methiocarb is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methomyl: Methomyl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Mineral-Based Crankcase Oil: Mineral-Based Crankcase Oil is a chemical used mainly as a fuel . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Mouth Wash: Mouth wash contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- N,N-Dimethyl-P-Toluidine: N,N-Dimethyl-P-Toluidine is a chemical used mainly in artificial nail solutions. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nickel Carbonyl: Nickel Carbonyl is a chemical used mainly in petroleum and rubber production and in electroplating. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrates: Nitrates are chemicals used mainly in explosives and ammunitions but are also an ingredient in cold packs. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitric Acid: Nitric Acid is a chemical used mainly as a cleaning agent for food and dairy equipment, in explosives, metal etching, in liquid fuel rockets and as a laboratory reagent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrites: Nitrite is a chemical used in many applications: manufacture of dyes, fabric manufacture, corrosive inhibitors, photography and cyanide antidote kits. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrobenzene: Nitrobenzene is a chemical used mainly in floor polish, shoe dyes, soaps and the production of other chemicals such as cellulose ether and acetaminophen. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitroethane: Nitroethane is a chemical used mainly as in industrial solvent, fuel additive, propellant, manufacture of pharmaceutical products and in artificial nail removers . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitroglycerin: Nitroglycerin is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of explosives, dynamite, rocket propellant and smokeless powders. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrophenol: Nitrophenol is a chemical used mainly in the production of dyes and pigments and also in fungicides and laboratory chemicals. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrophenol Urea: Nitrophenol Urea is a pesticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrotoluene: Nitrotoluene is a chemical used mainly in industrial applications for the production of things such as agricultural chemicals, explosives, rubber chemicals, sulfur dyes and azo dyes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Paraphenylenediamine: Paraphenylenediamine is a chemical used mainly in photographic developing solutions, hair dye, photocopying and printing ink, black rubber, grease, temporary tattoos and car cosmetics. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Parathion: Parathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pepper Spray: Pepper Spray is a chemical used mainly in riot control. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Petroleum Distillates -- Naphtha: Petroleum Distillates - Naphtha is a chemical used mainly in . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phenol: Phenol is a chemical used mainly in the production of fertilizer, explosives, rubber, paint, paint remover, perfumes, asbestos products, wood preservatives, resins, textiles, pharmaceuticals and drugs. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phosdrin: Phosdrin is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Potassium Permanganate: Potassium Permanganate is a chemical used in various applications: topical antibacterial, photography, laboratory chemical, wood dye, water purification and bleaching processes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Profenofos: Profenofos is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Propane: Propane is a chemical used mainly in fuels and as a solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Propylene Glycol Dinitrate: Propylene Glycol Dinitrate is a chemical used mainly as a propellant or occasionally in explosives. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Solder: Solder contains various chemicals and heavy metals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Strychnine: Strychnine is used as a rodenticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Sulfur Dioxide: Sulfur Dioxide is a chemical used mainly as a disinfectant, food preservative, fumigant, antioxidant and in the manufacture of some cements. It is also found as an air pollutant associated with smelters. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Terbufos: Terbufos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and nematicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetraethyl Pyrophosphate: Tetraethyl Pyrophosphate is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thioglycolic Acid: Thioglycolic Acid is a chemical used mainly in leather processing and in the production of hair straightening solutions, hair removal products, polyvinyl chloride, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and in metal detection reactions. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Trichloroethylene: Trichloroethylene is a chemical used mainly as an industrial solvent and in adhesives, lacquer, fire retardants and house cleaning solvents. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- m-Anisidine: o-Anisidine is a chemical used mainly in the production process of pharmaceuticals and azo-dyes . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- o-Anisidine: o-Anisidine is a chemical used mainly in the production process of pharmaceuticals and azo-dyes . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- p-Anisidine: p-Anisidine is a chemical used mainly in the production process of pharmaceuticals and azo-dyes . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical-induced cardiovascular disease: Chronic exposure to certain chemicals can cause cardiovascular disease. For example, exposure to Carbon disulfide can lead to heart disease and carries a risk of premature death as a result. Chronic exposure to these sort of chemicals is most likely to occur in a work environment.
  • Cherry laurel seed poisoning: Wild cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Wild cherry plants grow mainly in eastern Europe, Western Asia and Britain.
  • Cherry seed poisoning: Cherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually only occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual.
  • Chest blueness: A blue discolouration on the chest
  • Chest bruise: A haematoma that occurs on the chest.
  • Chest bruise in children: A chest bruise in children is a uncomfortable and discolored area of skin on the chest that is the result of broken blood vessels.
  • Chin bleeding: Bleeding from the chin
  • Chin blueness: A blue discolouration on the chin
  • Chin bruise: A haematoma that occurs on the chin.
  • Chlamydia: Common sexually transmitted disease often without symptoms.
  • Chlamydial infection: Infection from Chlamydia genus.
  • Chokecherry seed poisoning: Chokecherry seeds contain a chemical called amygdalin which breaks down into cyanide in the human body. The toxic chemicals are not released if the seed remains intact and therefore poisoning usually occurs if the seeds are crushed and eaten. Accidental ingestion is very unusual. Chokecherry plants grow mainly in Northern America.
  • Choking: Sensation of blockage or inability to breathe.
  • Cholera: An acute bacterial disease transmitted through food or water contaminated with human faeces. The intestinal infection is caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae.
  • Cholesterol and lipids: Levels of blood or urine cholesterol or lipids as a symptom
  • Cholesterol pneumonia: Lung inflammation caused by cholesterol.
  • Choriocarcinoma: Rare cancer of the placenta
  • Choroideremia -- hypopituitarism: A rare inherited disorder characterized by eye disease and hypopituitarism.
  • Chromosome 13, Partial Monosomy 13q: A rare chromosomal disorder where the long arm (q) of chromosome 13 is deleted resulting in various physical, neurological and developmental abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount and location of the deleted genetic material.
  • Chromosome 13q deletion: A rare chromosomal disorder where the long arm (q) of chromosome 13 is deleted resulting in various physical, neurological and developmental abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount and location of the deleted genetic material.
  • Chromosome 13q deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where the long arm (q) of chromosome 13 is deleted resulting in various physical, neurological and developmental abnormalities. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the amount and location of the deleted genetic material.
  • Chromosome 2, monosomy 2q: A rare chromosomal disorder where part of the long arm (q) of chromosome 2 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities which are determined by the size of the deleted portion.
  • Chromosome 22, trisomy: A very rare disorder where there is an extra copy of chromosome 22 in all the body cells. The condition is usually fatal soon after birth or during the fetal stage.
  • Chromosome 22q11 Deletion Spectrum: A rare chromosomal disorder where a small piece of genetic material is missing from chromosome 22 at the q11 location.
  • Chromosome 5q deletion syndrome: A rare chromosomal disorder where the long arm (q) of chromosome 5 is deleted resulting in various abnormalities.
  • Chronic Idiopathic Myelofibrosis: The bone marrow is consists of tissues which make blood cells and fibrous tissue supports these tissues that make the blood cells. In chronic idiopathic myelofibrosis, abnormal cells and fibres build up inside the bone marrow resulting in the production of fewer normal blood cells.
  • Chronic Kidney Disease: Long-term and generally irreversible disease of the kidneys due to infection, obstruction, congenital diseases or generalised diseases causing failure of the kidneys' normal functions.
  • Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders: A group of blood cancers where excessive numbers of blood cells are made by overactive or cancerous bone marrow. The number of excess blood cells tends to grow slowly. Examples of such disorders includes chronic myelogenous leukemia, polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia. The symptoms are determined by which particular blood cancer is involved.
  • Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia: A rare form of leukemia characterized by excessive levels of mature neutrophils.
  • Chronic berylliosis: A condition that results from long term exposure to beryllium in the form of dust or fumes. The lungs, skin eyes or blood may be affected.
  • Chronic bronchitis: A condition which is characterized by the chronic inflammation of ones or more of the bronchi
  • Chronic hypertension-like symptoms: conditions which cause a prolonged rise in the blood pressure and hence lead to various symptoms pertaining to hypertension

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Circulation symptoms:

The following list of conditions have 'Circulation symptoms' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Circulation symptoms:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Circulation symptoms' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.
Last revision: Nov 21, 2003

 

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