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Symptoms » Confusion » Glossary
 

Glossary for Confusion

Medical terms related to Confusion or mentioned in this section include:

  • Abdominal Aneurysm: Dilatation of a section of the abdominal aorta, usually due to a weakness in the wall of the artery
  • Abscess: This is an area of puss collected in a cavity which is constituted by necrotised tissue
  • Acanthamoeba infection: Infection with a microscopic, free-living ameba that is readily found in the environment - soil, air and water. Most people exposed to the ameba will not become infected but when infections do occur, they tend to affect the eyes, central nervous system or can cause widespread infection throughout the body.
  • Acanthamoeba infection of the central nervous system: Infection by an amoebic organism called Acanthamoeba. Infection usually occurs when the amoeba enters through a break in the skin or through the nose. Infection can be localized or systemic where it can involve the central nervous system and cause potentially fatal meningoencephalitis. Infection of the eye can occur by cleaning contact lenses in contaminated water.
  • Aceruloplasminemia: A rare genetic disorder characterized by a lack of the protein ceruloplasmin in the blood resulting in a buildup of iron in the liver, brain and pancreas. This in turn causes diabetes and degeneration of the neural system causing tremors and walking abnormalities.
  • Acid-Base Imbalance: A disruption to the normal acid-base equilibrium in the body. There are four main groups of disorder involving an acid-base imbalance: respiratory acidosis or alkalosis and metabolic acidosis or alkalosis. Obviously the severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of imbalance.
  • Actinomycetales infection: A bacterial infection from the order of Actinobacteria. The range of symptoms is variable depending on which bacteria from the order is involved.
  • Acute Bokhoror: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis: A type of encephalitis that usually follows an acute viral infection and involves an immune attack on myelin tissue which is part of the nervous system. Initial symptoms include fever, headache, vomiting and drowsiness followed by seizures, coma and paralysis. Often results in permanent neurological disorders.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- xylene: Xylene is an ingredient used in certain insecticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute VE: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Viliuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute Vilyuisk Encephalomyelitis: A brain disease caused by an unknown pathogen which is probably from the Picornavirus family of viruses. Mode of transmission is uncertain but genetic susceptibility may be involved. The incubation period appears to be an average of 15 years. The disease can be classified according to rate of progression: acute or subacute, slowly progressive and chronic. Death is common in the acute phase of the infection which can last from four days to four months.
  • Acute fatty liver of pregnancy: A rare complication of pregnancy that can occur in the second half of the pregnancy. It is characterized by excessive fatty deposits in the liver which can be fatal without prompt diagnosis and treatment which involves delivering the baby as soon as possible.
  • Acute mountain sickness: A condition that occurs when an un-acclimatized person climbs to high altitudes.
  • Adrenal crisis: A potentially fatal condition where the adrenal cortex slows or stops functioning resulting in reduced glucocorticoids, decreased extracellular fluid volume and hyperkalemia. Symptoms include shock, coma, low blood pressure, weakness and loss of vasomotor tone. Also called addisonian crisis.
  • Adverse reaction to chemical -- 1-Propanol: 1-Propanol is a chemical used in various antiseptics, polishes, cleaners, cosmetics and lacquer. Some people can suffer an adverse reaction to the chemical which mainly involves irritation to the part of the body exposed to the chemical - eyes, skin and gastrointestinal. The severity of symptoms varies amongst patients.
  • African Sleeping sickness: A disease caused by parasites (Trypanosome brucei gamiense or T. brucei rodesiense) and transmitted to humans by the tsetse fly which is found only in Africa. Causes symptoms such as fever, chills, headache, anemia, edema of hands and feet, enlarged lymph glands, lethargy, sleepiness, convulsions and coma. Also called African trypanosomiasis and sleeping sickness.
  • Aging brain syndrome: Aging processes in the brain can cause various psychological and neurological symptoms.
  • Alcohol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Alcohol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Alcohol Withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when alcohol consumption is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Alcohol abuse: Excessive alcohol as a symptom of other conditions
  • Alcohol drinking: The consumption of a drink containing alcohol. Alcohol consumption can cause varying degrees of impairment depending on the amount consumed. Consuming very large amounts of alcohol can lead to death.
  • Alcohol intoxication: excess intake of alcohol can lead to serious consequences
  • Alcohol-Induced Disorders: Disorders caused by excessive alcohol consumption. The symptoms are variable depending on the disorder involved. Some of the disorders are: alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence, alcohol intoxication, alcohol withdrawal, alcohol intoxication delirium, alcohol withdrawal delirium, alcohol-induced persisting dementia, alcohol-induced persisting amnestic disorder, alcohol-induced psychotic disorder, alcohol-induced mood disorder, alcohol-induced anxiety disorder, alcohol-induced sexual dysfunction, alcohol-induced sleep disorder, liver damage, liver cancer and esophageal cancer.
  • Alcohol-induced pseudo-Cushing syndrome: The excessive consumption of alcohol can result in symptoms similar to a condition called Cushing's syndrome. When alcohol consumption is stopped, symptoms regress.
  • Alcoholic Neuropathy: Neurological changes due to nerve damage from long-term alcohol consumption
  • Alzheimer disease 10: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 10 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 10p13.
  • Alzheimer disease 12: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 12 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 8p12-q22.
  • Alzheimer disease 13: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q21. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 14: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q25. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 15: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 3q22-q24. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 16: Alzheimer disease 16 (late-onset) is a form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome Xq21.3. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 2, late-onset: Alzheimer disease 2 (late-onset) is a form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 19q13.2. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 3, (early-onset Alzheimer disease): Alzheimer disease 3 is an early-onset form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q24.3. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease 5: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 5 has a late onset and is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 12p11.
  • Alzheimer disease 6: A genetic form of Alzheimer's. Type 6 has a late onset and is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 10q24.
  • Alzheimer disease 7: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 7 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 10p13.
  • Alzheimer disease 8: An inherited form of Alzheimer's. Type 8 is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 20p.
  • Alzheimer disease 9: A genetic form of Alzheimer's. Type 9 has a late onset and is caused by a genetic defect on chromosome 19p13.2.
  • Alzheimer disease type 1: A degenerative brain disease characterized primarily by progressive dementia. Type 1 has an early onset (starts before the age of 65). It is caused by mutations in the APP gene which results in the production of a toxic protein (amyloid beta peptide) in the brain which collects into clumps (amyloid plaques) in the brain. These plaques cause damage to nerve cells in the brain.
  • Alzheimer disease type 2: A degenerative brain disease characterized primarily by progressive dementia. Type 2 has a late onset - starts after the age of 65. It is believed to be caused by a combination of genetic mutations and environmental and lifestyle factors. The condition occurs when there is excessive production of a toxic protein (amyloid beta peptide) in the brain which collects into clumps (amyloid plaques) in the brain. These plaques cause damage to nerve cells in the brain.
  • Alzheimer disease type 4: A degenerative brain disease characterized primarily by progressive dementia. Type 4 has an early onset (starts before the age of 65). It is caused by mutations in the PSEN2 gene which results in the production of a toxic protein (amyloid beta peptide) in the brain which collects into clumps (amyloid plaques) in the brain. These plaques cause damage to nerve cells in the brain.
  • Alzheimer disease, early-onset, with cerebral amyloid angiopathy: An early-onset form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 21q21. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial: A degenerative brain disease characterized primarily by progressive dementia. The familial form is very rare and is completely inherited and has an early onset (usually in the 4th decade). It occurs when there is excessive production of a toxic protein (amyloid beta peptide) in the brain which collects into clumps (amyloid plaques) in the brain. These plaques cause damage to nerve cells in the brain.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 1: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 21q. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 11: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 9p22.1. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 3, with spastic paraparesis and apraxia: This form of Alzheimer's is an early-onset form of Alzheimer's that is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q24.3. It is characterized by features which are atypical for Alzheimer's - spastic paraparesis which occurs before the dementia symptoms and apraxia. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 3, with spastic paraparesis and unusual plaques: This form of Alzheimer's is an early-onset form of Alzheimer's that is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q24.3. It is characterized by features which are atypical for Alzheimer's - spastic paraparesis which occurs before the dementia symptoms and unusual plaques in the brain. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, 4: An inherited form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to a defect on chromosome 1q31-q42. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Alzheimer disease, familial, type 3: A degenerative brain disease characterized primarily by progressive dementia. Type 3 has an early onset (starts before the age of 65). It is caused by mutations in the PSEN1 gene which results in the production of a toxic protein (amyloid beta peptide) in the brain which collects into clumps (amyloid plaques) in the brain. These plaques cause damage to nerve cells in the brain.
  • Alzheimer's disease: A progressive degenerative disease of the brain of unknown cause
  • Alzheimer's disease without Neurofibrillary tangles: A form of Alzheimer's that involves only plaques and no neurofibrillary tangles. This form tends to have an older age of onset and death and a shorter disease duration.
  • Alzheimer's-like symptoms: symptoms such as dementia
  • Ambien overdose: Ambien is a prescription drug mainly used to treat insomnia. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Ambien withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Ambien (Zolpidem) use is discontinued or reduced. Ambien is a sedative hypnotic drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 1: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 1 is caused by a defect on chromosome 7q11.2.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 10: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 10 is caused by a defect on chromosome 8q12.1.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 2: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 2 is caused by a defect on chromosome 19q13.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 3: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 1p36.13-p34.3.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 4: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 4 is caused by a defect on chromosome 5p15.2-14.3.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 5: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 5 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2p13.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 6: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are now six different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases an individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 9p21.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 7: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 7 is caused by a defect on chromosome 11q24-q25.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 8: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 8 is caused by a defect on chromosome 14q23.
  • Aneurysm, intracranial berry, 9: A bulge in a blood vessel in the brain. The bulge can rupture causing a stroke. They usually form as a result of high blood pressure and weak blood vessel walls in the brain. There are five different subtypes of intracranial berry aneurysms with each one caused by a defect in different gene. The defective gene increases and individuals risk for developing intracranial berry aneurysms. Type 9 is caused by a defect on chromosome 2q33.1.
  • Anoxemia: Lack of oxygen in the blood.
  • Anoxia: A condition marked by a lack of oxygen.
  • Anticholinergic syndrome: Symptoms caused by overdose of anticholinergic drugs.
  • Anxiety: Excessive worry, anxiety, or fear.
  • Anxiety disorder: A mental condition that is characterized by anxiety and avoidance behaviours
  • Anxiety disorders: Anxiety disorders are persistent and excessive feelings of fear, worry or uneasiness that are significant enough to have an impact on day-to-day life. Excessive anxiety can have repercussions on physical and mental health. There are a number of different subtypes of anxiety disorders such as General anxiety, Social anxiety, Phobias, Hypochondria and Obsessive compulsive disorder.
  • Aorta-pulmonary artery fistula: An abnormal opening or connection between the aorta and the main pulmonary artery. It can occur through a traumatic penetrating injury or may be a complication of surgery. Severe cases can lead to heart failure.
  • Apallic syndrome: A persistent vegetative state caused by brain damage.
  • Appian-Plutarch syndrome: Symptoms caused by excessive doses of a drug called atropine.
  • Arbovirosis: An infectious disease caused by an arbovirus. The virus is transmitted by arthropods such as insects and ticks. Examples of arboviruses include Yellow Fever, Japanese encephalitis and tick-borne encephalitis. The symptoms may vary depending on the type of virus involved. The infection can lead to life-threatening brain inflammation.
  • Argentinean hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease caused by the Junin virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (usually the corn mouse) urine, feces or saliva. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks. The disease is most common in rural workers in Argentina.
  • Ativan overdose: Ativan is a prescription drug mainly used to treat anxiety. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Autoimmune Hepatitis: Liver inflammation caused due to autoimmune processes where the body's immune system attacks the liver.
  • Autoimmune limbic encephalitis: Limbic encephalitis is an inflammation of the limbic system which is the part of the brain responsible for basic autonomic functions. In the paraneoplastic type, the inflammation is caused by autoimmune processes.
  • Azotemia, familial: A rare condition where high serum urea level is inherited in a familial pattern. The high level of urea occurs despite normal kidney function.
  • Back tumour: The presence of tumour growth in the vertebra, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast.
  • Baneberry poisoning: Baneberries are toxic and can cause a skin reaction on contact or various poisoning symptoms.
  • Basal ganglia disease, biotin-responsive: A neurological disease that affects the part of the brain called the basal ganglia. The disease responds well to biotin administration but relapses within a month if the biotin is stopped. If the condition is diagnosed late or there are recurring episodes, the patient may suffer ongoing symptoms such as paraparesis, mild mental retardation or dystonia.
  • Basilar artery insufficiency syndrome: A range of symptoms caused by impaired blood flow through the basilar artery. The symptoms may come and go according to variation in blood flow through the basilar artery. The blood flow may be impaired by such things as thrombosis, narrowed artery and blood vessel spasms. Symptoms vary depending on the exact location and extent of the artery involvement as well as whether the onset is gradual or sudden.
  • Behavioral symptoms: Symptoms of personal behavior.
  • Benign astrocytoma: Benign tumors that occur in the brain or spinal cord. Symptoms and severity depends on the location and size of the tumors.
  • Bing-Neel syndrome: A rare disorder involving infiltration of the central nervous system by abnormal leukemia-like cells (lymphoplasmocytoid cells) that occur in Waldenström's macroglobulinemia. The abnormality increases blood viscosity which impairs its circulation through small brain and eye blood vessels.
  • Bleeding in the brain: A condition which is characterized by the abnormal loss of blood from blood vessels located in the brain
  • Blood cancer: Malignancy of one or several of the different types of cells in the blood
  • Blow to the head: usually refers to any blunt injury to head
  • Bolivian hemorrhagic fever: An infectious disease that occurs in Bolivia and is caused by the Machupo virus. Transmission can occur through contact with infected rodent (Calomys callosus) droppings. The incubation period lasts from one to two weeks.
  • Box thorn poisoning: The leaves of the Box thorn plant contain a toxic chemical called atropine and possibly other toxic compounds. The box thorn plant is a spiny-stemmed shrub which originated in Europe. Symptoms can be quite serious depending on the quantity of the plant ingested.
  • Brain Concussion: Trauma resulting in minor injury to the brain which causes a period of interrupted brain function. Simple concussions resolve themselves in about a week whereas more serious ones have persisting symptoms. The onset of symptoms may be delayed.
  • Brain abscess: abscess in the brain may involve any of the lobes of the brain
  • Brain conditions: Medical conditions that affect the brain
  • Brain infection: Inflammation of the parietal layer and the brain tissue.
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • Brain tumor: A condition which is characterized by the abnormal growth of tissue within the brain
  • Brief Psychotic Disorder: Episodes of brief psychosis
  • Brill disease: A form of recurring typhus caused by a bacterium called Rickettsia prowazekii and transmitted by lice. The illness may occur years after the initial sickness and tends to be not as severe.
  • Brill-Zinsser disease: Reoccuring mild form of typhus.
  • Bristowe's syndrome: Symptoms caused by a brain tumor that develops in the corpus callosum which connects the two brain hemispheres.
  • Bubonic plague: Severe flea-borne bacterial disease
  • Burnett's milk drinker's syndrome: Burnett's milk drinker's syndrome is a condition where the body is too alkaline and the blood contains too much calcium which results in impaired kidney function. It can be caused by drinking large quantities of milk or using too many alkaline antacid remedies. High vitamin D intake can make the condition worse. The people most at risk of this condition tend to be older people (especially women) who are taking calcium supplements as well as calcium carbonate containing remedies to treat dyspepsia.
  • Burnett's syndrome: Burnett's syndrome is a condition where the body is too alkaline and the blood contains too much calcium which results in impaired kidney function. It can be caused by drinking large quantities of milk or using too many alkaline antacid remedies. High vitamin D intake can make the condition worse. The people most at risk of this condition tend to be older people (especially women) who are taking calcium supplements as well as calcium carbonate containing remedies to treat dyspepsia.
  • Carcinomatous meningitis: Carcinomatous meningitis, is a form of metastatic cancer that has spread to the lining of the brain and spinal cord, the parts of the body that make up the central nervous system.
  • Carnitine transporter deficiency: An inherited deficiency of carnitine caused by the impaired ability of the carnitine transporter protein to carry the carnitine to where it is needed. Instead the carnitine is excreted through the urine. Fasting or illness can trigger a severe attack.
  • Catastrophic Antiphospholipid Syndrome: A very rare disorder where the blood clotting system becomes dysfunctional and clots too easily due to the abnormal presence of antphospholipid antibodies. It results in blood flow blockages to various body organs. It is possible that the condition has autoimmune origins. The disorder is often triggered by infections, certain drugs (e.g. anticoagulants), minor surgery and hysterectomy.
  • Central nervous system lymphoma, primary: A type of lymphoma that occurs in the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). A lymphoma consists of cancerous lymphocytes which are a type of white blood cell. Symptoms vary according to the location of the lymphoma.
  • Central nervous system oxygen toxicity: High oxygen levels which affects the central nervous system. The condition can occur during deep dives with fatal consequences.
  • Cerebral astrocytoma, adult: A very rare tumor that occurs in adults and develops in brain cells called astrocytes. The part of the brain involved is the cerebrum at the top of the head which controls functions such as reading, writing, thinking, learning, speech, emotion and voluntary movement.
  • Cerebral hemorrhage: Bleeding in the brain
  • Cerebrovascular symptoms: Symptoms related to the brain's arteries
  • Chemical addiction: Addiction to and abuse of various substances.
  • Chemical poisoning: Morbid condition caused by chemical.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2,4-Dinitrotoluene: 2,4-Dinitrotoluene is a chemical used the production of explosives, vehicle air bags and polyurethane polymers. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 4,4-Methylenebis: 4,4-Methylenebis is a chemical used in the manufacture of epoxy resins, belt drives, gun mounts, shoe laces and various other manufactured goods. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 4-Aminopyridine: 4-Aminopyridine is a pesticide used mainly to control bird pests. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetylsalicylic Acid: Acetylsalicylic Acid is also known as aspirin and is primarily used to relieve pain, fever and inflammation. Excessive exposure to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acrylamide: Acrylamide is a chemical used mainly in the treatment of waste water, grout agent, paper strengthening agent and adhesive agents. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Adiponitrile: Adiponitrile is a chemical used mainly in the production of hexamethylene diamine which in turn is used mainly to produce nylon. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aldicarb: Aldicarb is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide, nematicide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Aniline: Aniline is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of perfumes, varnishes, resins, dyes, paint removers, herbicides, fungicides, explosives, solvents and photographic chemicals. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Azinphos-methyl: Azinphos-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Boric Acid: Boric Acid is a chemical used mainly in foods (preservative, emulsifier, neutralizer), antiseptics, pesticides and contact lens cleaners. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Application of boric acid directly to damaged skin can cause the chemical to be absorbed rapidly into the body and lead to death. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromethalin: Bromethalin is a chemical used mainly in rodenticides. The chemical is toxic to the human nerve system. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromide: Bromide is a chemical used for many applications - flame retardant, industrial uses, pesticides, sanitary products, fumigants, medicines, dyes, photographic solutions and water purification. Bromides act as central nervous system depressants and the ingestion of excessive quantities can cause serious symptoms. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromophos: Bromophos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Butyl Alcohol: Butyl alcohol is a chemical used mainly in solvents and in pharmaceutical manufacturing processes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Camphor: Camphor is a chemical used mainly in moth repellents, pharmaceuticals (preservative) cosmetics, explosives, varnishes and various therapeutic applications. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbaryl: Carbaryl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbon Tetrachloride: Carbon tetrachloride is a chemical used mainly in grain fumigants, insecticides and in the production of fluorocarbons. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlordane: Chlordane is a poison use to control termites - is banned in the US and many other countries due to its harmful effects. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chloromethane: Chloromethane is a chemical used mainly in the production of silicones as well as agricultural chemicals, butyl rubber and other products. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorpyrifos: Chlorpyrifos is a chemical used mainly in as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Coumaphos: Coumaphos is used as a pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cresols: Cresols are a group of chemicals that occur naturally in mammals and various plants. It is also manufactured and used in the production of disinfectants, deodorizers and pesticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cresylic acid: Cresylic acids are a group of chemicals that are used as solvents and in the manufacture of various products such as deodorants, disinfectants, pesticides, glues, paints, herbicides, pharmaceuticals as well as others. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cyclohexanone: Cyclohexanone is a chemical used mainly as an industrial solvent, in processes involving oxidative reactions and in the manufacture of certain resins, nylons, insecticides, herbicides, paints, varnish, polishes, degreasers and pharmaceuticals. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- DDD: DDD is a chemical used mainly as a pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- DDT: DDT is a chemical used mainly as a pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Demeton-S-methyl: Demeton-S-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diazinon: Diazinon is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dibromochloromethane: Dibromochloromethane is a chemical byproduct of water chlorination processes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dichlorvos: Dichlorvos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dicrotophos: Dicrotophos is a toxic insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dieldrin: Dieldrin is a chemical used mainly to prevent termite infestations. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. This chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diethylene Glycol: Diethylene Glycol is a chemical used mainly in coolants, manufacture of plastic products and resins as well as other uses. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dinitrocresol: Dinitrocresol is a chemical used mainly as a herbicide and fungicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dioxathion: Dioxathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Disulfiram: Disulfiram is a drug used mainly to manage alcoholism. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Disulfoton: Disulfoton is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Endosulfan: Endosulfan is a chemical used mainly as a crop pesticide and wood preservative. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethion: Ethion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylene Glycol Dinitrate: Ethylene Glycol Dinitrate is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of commercial dynamite and blasting gelatin. The chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fensulfothion: Fensulfothion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and nematicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Fenthion: Fenthion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and avicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Gasoline: Gasoline is a chemical used as a fuel for combustion engines. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Glaze: Glazes are used to put a shiny finish on various surfaces such as pottery. Glazes contain chemicals such as lead and zinc oxide which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are eaten. The chemicals cause damage to the gastrointestinal lining and the damage may continue for weeks after the poison was ingested. Death can result in severe cases. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Glycol Ether: Glycol Ether is a chemical used mainly in nail polish removers, products to treat leather, anti-icing agents and as an industrial solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- High Melting Explosive (HMX): High Melting Explosive (HMX) is a chemical used mainly in plastic explosives and rocket fuel propellant. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hydrazine: Hydrazine is a chemical used mainly in rocket fuel, photography, laboratory chemical, corrosion inhibitor, mirror silvering and in the production of pharmaceuticals and pesticides. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hydroquinone: Hydroquinone is a chemical used mainly in photography developing solution, pharmaceuticals, fur processing, paints, fuel, organic chemicals, plastics, stone coatings and styrene monomers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Isofenphos: Isofenphos is an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Jet Fuel-4: Jet Fuel-4 is an aviation turbine fuel used by the US military. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Jet Fuel-5: Jet Fuel-5 is an aviation turbine fuel used by the US military. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Kerosene: Kerosene is a chemical used mainly in paints, pesticides, lighter fluid, illuminating fuel and heating. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Lysergic Acid Diethylamide: Lysergic Acid Diethylamide is a hallucinogenic drug which is often misused. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Malathion: Malathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methidathion: Methidathion is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methiocarb: Methiocarb is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methomyl: Methomyl is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Metobromuron: Metobromuron is a chemical used mainly as a herbicide. The chemical is generally considered toxic only if large amounts are consumed. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- N,N-Dimethyl-P-Toluidine: N,N-Dimethyl-P-Toluidine is a chemical used mainly in artificial nail solutions. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Naphthalene: Naphthalene is a chemical used mainly as a moth repellant, toilet deodorizer and the manufacture of other chemicals. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nickel Carbonyl: Nickel Carbonyl is a chemical used mainly in petroleum and rubber production and in electroplating. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrobenzene: Nitrobenzene is a chemical used mainly in floor polish, shoe dyes, soaps and the production of other chemicals such as cellulose ether and acetaminophen. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitroglycerin: Nitroglycerin is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of explosives, dynamite, rocket propellant and smokeless powders. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrophenol: Nitrophenol is a chemical used mainly in the production of dyes and pigments and also in fungicides and laboratory chemicals. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitrophenol Urea: Nitrophenol Urea is a pesticide. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Oil-based paint: Oil-based paint contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed or if other types of exposure occurs. These paint contain toxic hydrocarbons as well as various other heavy metals depending on the type of paint. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Parathion: Parathion is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phencyclidine: Phencyclidine is often used as an illegal recreational drug. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phosdrin: Phosdrin is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Phosphine: Phosphine is a chemical used mainly in pesticides and rodenticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Profenofos: Profenofos is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Propane: Propane is a chemical used mainly in fuels and as a solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Propoxur: Propoxur is a carbamate pesticide used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Propylene Glycol Dinitrate: Propylene Glycol Dinitrate is a chemical used mainly as a propellant or occasionally in explosives. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Terbufos: Terbufos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and nematicide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetrachloroethane: Tetrachloroethane is a chemical used mainly as a dry cleaning solvent but is also used as a degreaser and in paint strippers and spot removers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetraethyl Pyrophosphate: Tetraethyl Pyrophosphate is a toxic pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thallium: Thallium is an element used for such things as electronic devices, selenium rectifiers, gamma radiation detection apparatus, transmission equipment and infrared radiation detection. It is also used as a catalyst in various manufacturing processes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thallium Sulfate: Thallium Sulfate is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of switches and closures in the semiconductor industry. It has historically also been used as a rodenticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thiram: Thiram is a chemical used mainly in the rubber industry, latex manufacture and as a pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Toluene: Toluene is a chemical used mainly in pesticides, degreasers, glues and pain removers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Trichlorfon: Trichlorfon is an insecticide used mostly in crops. It is considered motderately toxic to humans. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chicken soup poisoning: The consumption of excessive amounts of chicken soup can result in serious symptoms due to very high salt levels in the body. Children and the elderly are more likely to be affected by the high salt levels of chicken soup however the condition is rarely seen. Chicken soup is often promoted as useful for treating colds, asthma or emaciation.
  • Christmas Cherry poisoning: The Christmas Cherry is a small reddish-orange fruit. The plant contains a compound called solanocapsine which can cause symptoms if excessive amounts are consumed. The compound is found in all parts of the plant - especially the leaves and unripe fruit. Very large amounts would need to be consumed to cause symptoms due to the low toxicity of the compound.
  • Chronic renal insufficiency: Chronic lack of function of the renal system. Kidneys.
  • Citrullinemia: Citrullinemia is an inherited urea cycle disorder which causes toxic substances including ammonia to build up in the blood. There are two main subtypes of Citrullinemia (I and II) which are caused by different genetic abnormalities and result in different symptoms. Milder forms may present in childhood and rare late-onset forms (adult-onset) may not cause symptoms until adulthood.
  • Citrullinemia II: A very rare urea cycle disorder involving a deficiency of the transport compound called Citrin. Citrin transports aspartate to where the enzyme argininosuccinic acid synthase can combine it with citrulline to make argininosuccinic acid. The deficiency prevents ammonia being turned into urea which can then be excreted in the urine. The build up of ammonia in the body can cause harmful effects.
  • Classic migraine: Migraine is a neurological disorder that generally involves repeated headaches. Some people also have nausea, vomiting, and other symptoms. Most people with migraines do not have any warning before it occurs. However, some people have a visual disturbance called an aura before the headache starts.
  • Cocaine abuse: Stimulant drug with various effects
  • Cocaine addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use cocaine on a regular basis. Chronic cocaine use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Coenzyme Q cytochrome c reductase deficiency of: A rare genetic defect where an enzyme deficiency (CoQ-Cytochrome C reductase) disrupts cellular processes. Any of a variety of the components of the enzyme may be missing or defective and hence the clinical presentation and severity may vary. The deficiency may result in a variety of symptoms and conditions of variable severity such as cardiomyopathy, fatal infant conditions and Leber's myopathy.
  • Cognitive impairment: General loss of mental or cognitive ability
  • Colchicine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Concentration difficulty: Reduced concentration ability or lack of concentration
  • Confusion: Mental confusion and impaired thinking.
  • Confusion in children: Confusion in children is an abnormal mental condition in a child that can include such features as disorientation, trouble with thinking clearly or quickly, and forgetfulness.
  • Confusion symptoms: Symptoms closely related to mental confusion.
  • Congenital hepatic porphyria: A rare congenital disorder where there is an excess of porphyrin (pigments) in the body. The liver is responsible for making porpyrins.
  • Congenital nonhemolytic jaundice: A rare disorder where the liver is unable to remove bilirubin from the body which results in jaundice. Chronically high bilirubin levels can lead to neurological toxicity which manifests as progressive neurological symptoms.
  • Cope's syndrome: Cope's syndrome is a condition where the body is too alkaline and the blood contains too much calcium. It can be caused by drinking large quantities of milk or using too many alkaline antacid remedies. High vitamin D intake can make the condition worse. The people most at risk of this condition tend to be older people (especially women) who are taking calcium supplements as well as calcium carbonate containing remedies to treat dyspepsia. Severe cases can lead to impaired kidney function (Burnett's syndrome).
  • Corn Lily poisoning: Corn Lily is a poisonous plant native to the Sierra Nevada mountains. It's appearance is similar to the corn grown as a crop. The plant poison primarily affects the nervous system.
  • Crack addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use crack on a regular basis. Chronic crack use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Crack is a form of cocaine - powdered cocaine is heated with ammonia or sodium bicarbonate to make rocks of crack. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: A very rare degenerative brain disease that can be inherited, transmitted (eg in surgical transplants using infected tissue) or as a result of genetic mutations. The condition is fatal.
  • Crigler-Najjar syndrome, type 1: A rare congenital condition involving a total absence of the liver enzyme called glucoronyl transferase which is needed to change bilirubin into a form that can be removed from the body. The bilirubin builds up in the body and causes damage and severe symptoms.
  • Cryptococcosis: A fungal infection caused by Cryptococcus neoformans which primarily affects the central nervous system and the lungs. People with weakened immune systems such as AIDS sufferers are generally more susceptible to this type of infection.
  • Cushing's disease: A condition of hyperadrenocorticism which is secondary to excessive pituitary secretion of ACTH. Cushing's disease is different to Cushing's syndrome which refers to the effects of glucocorticoid excess from any cause.
  • Cysticercosis: An infectious disease caused by the pork tapeworm Taenia solium. If the larvae are ingested then a mild or asymptomatic tapeworm infection occurs. However, ingested eggs pass into the bloodstream where they can then enter various tissues and form the cysts that characterize cysticercosis.
  • Daphne poisoning: Daphne is a shrub that contains a toxin called mezerein (skin irritant) in the bark as well as a toxin called daphnin. The bark, sap and berries are the most toxic parts of the plant. The plant is native to Europe and Asia but is also found in other parts of the world such as America. A single berry or leaf can cause symptoms and 2 or 3 can cause death in a child. About 12 berries or leaves can cause quite severe symptoms in adults.
  • Darvocet overdose: Darvocet is a prescription drug mainly used to treat pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Decreased cardiac output: descreased amount of blood pumped by the heart
  • Decreased folate: Decrease in one of the B vitamins required for red blood cell production
  • Decreased oxygen saturation: decreased amount of oxygen that is dissolved or carried in a given medium
  • Decreased serum phosphate: A decrease in the level of phosphate in the serum plasma
  • Defibrination syndrome: The generation of fibrin in the blood and consumption of pro-coagulants and platelets occurring in complications of obstetrics
  • Dehydration: Loss and reduction in body water levels
  • Delirium: Severe mental deterioration
  • Delirium tremens: A condition which occurs due to the withdrawal of a substance particularly alcohol and results in tremors of the hands and arms
  • Dementia: Mental confusion and impaired thought.
  • Dementia With Lewy Bodies: Second most frequent cause of dementia in elderly adults.
  • Demerol overdose: Demerol is a prescription drug used to treat pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Dentatorubral Pallidoluysian Atrophy: A condition caused by an abnormality of the DNA sequence on chromosome 12
  • Depersonalization disorder: A disorder where the patient suffers episodes of loss of sense of self or reality.
  • Depressive symptoms: Inappropriate depressed mood.
  • Devil's trumpet poisoning: The Devil's trumpet is a shrubby plant with purple stems and large white or yellow flowers. The fruit is covered by a spiny shell. The plant originated in china and is often used as an ornamental outdoor plant. The plant contains tropane alkaloids which can be poisonous if eaten in large quantities.
  • Dexedrine overdose: Dexedrine is a prescription drug mainly used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and narcolepsy. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Dextromethorphan toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Diabetes-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of diabetes
  • Diabetic hypoglycemia: Low blood sugar attack from insulin or diabetes medications
  • Diabetic ketoacidosis: A metabolic acidosis that results from the accumulation of ketones when diabetes mellitus is poorly controlled
  • Dilaudid overdose: Dilaudid is a prescription drug used mainly to treat pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Dilutional hyponatremia: Low sodium levels due to excessive fluids.
  • Disequilibrium syndrome: A complication that can occur during or after dialysis and probably caused by abnormal water balance within the brain. Swelling of the brain causes a range of neurological symptoms.
  • Disorientation: Disorientation is an abnormal mental state in which a person is unaware of or confused to person, place, or date/time.
  • Dissociative Amnesia: The sudden loss of memory
  • Dissociative Identity Disorder: A neurotic mental disorder where a person's field of consciousness is limited in order to fulfill an unconscious goal. Often selective amnesia is involved and the person develops what is called multiple personalities.
  • Dissociative disorder: A sudden change in the state of consciousness and identity
  • Dobriner syndrome: An inherited metabolic disorder involving a deficiency of coproporphyrinogen oxidase. The condition is similar to but milder than intermittent porphyria and sometimes includes photosensitivity.
  • Down's Syndrome associated Alzheimer's disease: Early-onset Alzheimer's is more prevalent in Down's Syndrome sufferers than in the general population. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Drowsiness: Excessive tiredness or sleepiness
  • Drug Allergies: Allergies to medications or other drugs.
  • Drug abuse: Drug use as a symptom of other conditions
  • Drug overdose: A condition characterized by the consumption in excess of a particular drug causing adverse effects
  • Drug poisoning: The poisoning of an individual with a noxious substance
  • Dysbarism: A reaction caused by exposure to a sudden change in environmental pressure.
  • Dysphasia: Dysphasia refers to difficulty swallowing.
  • Early-onset Alzheimer's: Early-onset Alzheimer's is a form of Alzheimer's disease that is linked to genetic defects or occurs in a familial pattern. It is not as common as the non-inherited form of Alzheimer's - occurs in up to 90% of Alzheimer sufferers. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • East African Trypanosomiasis: East African sleeping sickness from the tsetse fly
  • Ecstasy addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use ecstasy on a regular basis. Chronic ecstasy use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Ecstasy is a synthetic psychoactive drug often used as a recreational drug. Street names for the drug includes: XTC, Adam, Clarity, Lover's Speed, Hug, Beans and Love Drug. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Ecstasy overdose: Ectsasy is an illegal and highly addictive recreational drug. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Ehrlichiosis: Bacterial tick-borne disease
  • Electrolyte abnormality: An imbalance in the level of any of a number of chemicals (electrolytes) in the blood stream e.g. chloride, sodium, magnesium, potassium, calcium, phosphate and bicarbonate. Symptoms can vary depending on which electrolyte is involved and the severity of the imbalance - severe cases can readily lead to death. An electrolyte abnormality can be caused by such things excessive loss of body fluid through vomiting or diarrhea, kidney conditions, malabsorption and various drugs such as diuretics and chemotherapy drugs.
  • Electrolyte imbalance: impairment in the level of electrolytes in the body
  • Elephant's-ear poisoning: The Elephant's ear is a common garden plant which has large, heart-shaped leaves on long stalks. The plant contains calcium oxalate and saphotoxin which can cause poisoning if eaten and irritation upon contact with skin or eyes. The toxins are quite poisonous and death can occur if sufficient quantities are eaten.
  • Encephalitis: Infection of the brain (as a symptom)
  • End Stage Liver Failure: Late stage of liver failure characterised by the onset of mental and neurological symptoms, due to build up of toxic metabolites.
  • End-stage renal disease: Final stage of total kidney failure.
  • Epidemic typhus: An infectious disease caused by Rickettsia prowazekii and transmitted by body lice. The severity of the illness may range from moderate to fatal.
  • Epidermoid carcinoma: A non-small-cell type of lung cancer. The cancer develops from cells that line the inside of the lungs.
  • Epilepsy: Paroxysmal transient disturbances of brain function that may manifest as loss of consciousness, abnormal motor phenomena
  • Episodic ataxia, type 6: A rare genetic disorder characterized by episodes of incoordination and unsteadiness. Stress and exertion may trigger the episodes which tend to last for about half an hour. Type 6 is extremely rare and is caused by a defect on chromosome 5p13.
  • Ethanol -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Ethanol during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Familial Forms of Alzheimer's Disease: Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour. Familial forms of the disease tend to run in families and are linked to mutations on various genes. Chromosome 1, 14 19 and 21 are the main chromosomes where mutations resulting in Alzheimer's are located..
  • Familial hypertension: An inherited from of high blood pressure that tends to run in families.
  • Fatigue: Excessive tiredness or weakness.
  • Fentanyl toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Flea-borne diseases: Diseases that are carried by fleas
  • Forgetfulness: Forgetting things or loss of memory ability
  • Foxglove poisoning: The foxglove is a herb which produces fruit in a capsule and colored, tubular flowers. The leaves, flowers and seeds of the plant contain a very toxic chemical called digitalis glycoside which can cause serious symptoms or even death if eaten. Skin irritation can occur if contact with the skin occurs. NOTE: Patients who are taking certain medications (digoxin, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers) are more susceptible to foxglove poisoning.
  • Functioning pancreatic endocrine tumor: Tumors that develop in the pancreas and cause excessive secretion of one or more pancreatic hormones such as insulin, somatostatin, glucagons, gastrin, ACTH (corticosteroids) and vasoactive intestinal peptidase.
  • Fungal meningitis: Fungal meningitis is an infection that causes swelling and irritation of the tissue around the brain and spinal cord. It usually strikes people whose weakened immune systems can't fight off infection. The disease is not common. but it can be very serious.
  • Gangrene: Death (necrosis) of a portion of tissue or entire organ due to decreased perfusion with blood or infectious destruction of tissue.
  • Gastroenteritis: An infection of the bowel
  • Graeck-Imerslund disease:
  • Grand mal epilepsy: A condition characterize by sudden loss of consciousness with tonic-clonic seizures
  • Grand mal seizures: A condition which is characterized by the sudden onset of generalized muscle spasms and loss of consciousness
  • Granulomatous amebic encephalitis: Brain/CNS infection from Acanthamoeba bacteria
  • Granulomatous amoebic encephalitis: A rare opportunistic brain infection caused by certain amoeba - Acanthamoeba or Balamuthia amoebae. The amoeba generally only causes encephalitis in people who are immunocompromised or have a chronic disease such as diabetes. The amoeba initially cause pneumonitis or skin ulcers from with the amebas can spread to the brain to cause encephalitis. The condition is often fatal.
  • Grasbeck-Imerslund Disease: A rare inherited disorder characterized by vitamin B12 deficiency which results from the body's inability to absorb vitamin B12 from the foods eaten.
  • HIV-1, CRF01_AE: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF A/E occurs mainly in Asia and originated in central Africa. It tends to be transmitted mainly through heterosexual contact i.e. infection occurs through mucosal exposure.
  • HIV-1, CRF02_AG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/G involves both And G subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF A/G occurs mainly in west and central Africas well as Taiwan.
  • HIV-1, CRF04_ cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/B involves both And B subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF_cpx is made up of a combination of subtypes A, G, H, K, and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Cyprus and Greece.
  • HIV-1, CRF05_ D/F: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF D/F involves both D and F subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF D/F occurs mainly in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
  • HIV-1, CRF06_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF06_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, G, J and K - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Burkina Faso and Mali.
  • HIV-1, CRF07_BC: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF07_BC involves a combination of type B' and C and is extremely rare.
  • HIV-1, CRF08_BC: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF08_BC involves a combination of type B' and C and is extremely rare.
  • HIV-1, CRF11_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF11_cpx is extremely rare and appears to include a mix of subtypes CRF01 (And E), A, G and J - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes).
  • HIV-1, CRF12_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF B/F has been diagnosed in Uruguay and Argentina.
  • HIV-1, CRF13_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF13_cpx involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E), A, G, J and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes).
  • HIV-1, CRF14_BG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF14_BG involves a combination of subtypes B and G. This subtype has been diagnosed in Spain.
  • HIV-1, CRF15_01B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF15_01B involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E) and B.
  • HIV-1, CRF16_ A2D: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF16_ A2D involves a combination of subtypes A2 and D. This subtype has been diagnosed in Kenyand South Korea.
  • HIV-1, CRF17_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF17_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F.
  • HIV-1, CRF18_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF18_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, E, F, G, H, K and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes).
  • HIV-1, CRF19_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF19_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, E, D and G - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes).
  • HIV-1, CRF20_BG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF20_BG involves a combination of subtypes B and G. This subtype has been diagnosed in Cuba.
  • HIV-1, CRF21_A2D: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF21_A2D involves a combination of subtypes A, D and G.
  • HIV-1, CRF22_01A1: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF22_01A1 involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E) and A1.
  • HIV-1, CRF23_BG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF23_BG involves a combination of subtypes B and G.
  • HIV-1, CRF24_BG: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF24_BG involves a combination of subtypes B and G. This subtype has been diagnosed in Cuba.
  • HIV-1, CRF25_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF25_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, G and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Cameroon and Saudi Arabia.
  • HIV-1, CRF26_AU: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF26_AU involves a combination of subtypes And U.
  • HIV-1, CRF27_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF27_cpx involves a combination of subtypes A, E, G, H, J, K and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
  • HIV-1, CRF28_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF28_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F.
  • HIV-1, CRF29_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF29_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F.
  • HIV-1, CRF30_0206: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF30_0206 involves a combination of subtypes CRF02 (And G) and CRF06 (A, G, J and K).
  • HIV-1, CRF31_BC: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF31_BC involves a combination of subtypes B and C.
  • HIV-1, CRF32_06A1: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF32_06A1involves a combination of subtypes CRF06 (A, G, J, K) and A1.
  • HIV-1, CRF33_01B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF33_01B involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E) and B. This subtype has been diagnosed in Malaysia.
  • HIV-1, CRF34_01B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF34_01B involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E) and B. This subtype has been diagnosed in Thailand.
  • HIV-1, CRF35_AD: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF35_AD involves a combination of subtypes And D. This subtype has been diagnosed in Afghanistan.
  • HIV-1, CRF36_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF36_cpx involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E), CRF02 (And G) and G - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Cameroon.
  • HIV-1, CRF37_cpx: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF37_cpx involves a combination of subtypes CRF01 (And E), CRF02 (And G) and U - (cpx refers to a complex of two or more subtypes). This subtype has been diagnosed in Cameroon.
  • HIV-1, CRF38_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF38_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F.
  • HIV-1, CRF39_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF39_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F. This subtype has been diagnosed in Brazil.
  • HIV-1, CRF40_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF40_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F. This subtype has been diagnosed in Brazil.
  • HIV-1, CRF41_CD: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF41_CD involves a combination of subtypes C and D.
  • HIV-1, CRF42_BF: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF42_BF involves a combination of subtypes B and F1.
  • HIV-1, CRF43_02G: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype CRF43_02G involves a combination of subtypes CRF02 (And G) and G. This type has been diagnosed in Saudi Arabia.
  • HIV-1A: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype A is most prevalent in West Africa.
  • HIV-1A1: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1A1 is a subtype of HIV-1A.
  • HIV-1A2: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1A2 is a subtype of HIV-1A.
  • HIV-1A3: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1A3 is a subtype of HIV-1A.
  • HIV-1B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype B is most prevalent in Thailand, Australia, Japan, Europe and America. This subtype tends to be transmitted mainly by homosexual contact and intravenous drug use i.e. infection occurs mainly through blood exposure.
  • HIV-1C: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype C is most prevalent in Nepal, India and Southern and Eastern parts of Africa. This subtype tends to be a more virulent subtype and is transmitted mainly through heterosexual contact i.e. infection occurs through mucosal exposure.
  • HIV-1D: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype D is most prevalent in the Eastern and Central parts of Africa and tends to be a more virulent subtype.
  • HIV-1E: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype E has to date not occurred on its own but has occurred in combination with subtype A in a subtype called CRF A/E. This subtype occurs mainly in Asia and originated in central Africa. It tends to be transmitted mainly through heterosexual contact i.e. infection occurs through mucosal exposure.
  • HIV-1F: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype F is most prevalent in Eastern Europe, South America and Central Africa.
  • HIV-1F1: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1F1 is a subtype of HIV-1F.
  • HIV-1F2: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1F2 is a subtype of HIV-1F.
  • HIV-1G: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype G is most prevalent in Africa and central parts of Europe. This subtype tends to be a more virulent subtype.
  • HIV-1H: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype H is most prevalent in central parts of Africa.
  • HIV-1J: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype J is most prevalent in central America.
  • HIV-1K: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group M, subtype K is most prevalent in the Democratic Republic of Congo and Cameroon.
  • HIV-1M: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. HIV-1 group M is the most common form of HIV accounting for roughly 90% of cases worldwide.
  • HIV-1N: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group N is very rare and has only been diagnosed in Cameroon.
  • HIV-1O: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-1, Group O is very rare and has only been diagnosed in the western parts of Central Africa. This type is more difficult to diagnose and the standard test kits are not sensitive enough to pick up the virus.
  • HIV-2: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. Group M is further classified into 9 subgroups - A to K and CRFs. CRF's are circulating recombinant forms which are a combination of any two subtypes e.g. CRF A/C involves both And C subtypes. HIV-2 is very rare and is generally only diagnosed in Africa but a number of cases have been diagnosed in the US. HIV-2 is less easily transmitted than HIV-1 and the time between infection and symptoms tends to be longer in HIV-2.
  • HIV-2A: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. HIV-2 has two subtypes - And B and they are found mainly in Western Africa.
  • HIV-2B: HIV is an immune system disease caused by the HIV virus. AIDS is a term used when a person infected with HIV has a CD4+ T cell count below 200 or 14% of lymphocytes. AIDS is an advanced form of HIV. To be classified as AIDS the person must also have an AIDS-related condition such as opportunistic infections. Once a person has been diagnosed with AIDS, even if treatment improved their CD4+ T cell count and infections are under control, the person is still considered to have AIDS. HIV is classified into two subtypes - HIV-1 and HIV-2. HIV-1 is further classified into three groups - Group M, N and O. HIV-2 has two subtypes - And B and they are found mainly in Western Africa.
  • HIV/AIDS: HIV is a sexually transmitted virus and AIDS is the progressive immune failure that HIV causes.
  • Hallervorden-Spatz Syndrome: A rare neurodegenerative disease occurring in children and involving iron accumulation in the brain. It is characterized by dementia, rigidity and athetosis.
  • Hallervorden-Spatz disease: Nerve disorder causing movement problems.
  • Hashimoto's encephalitis: A rare but serious condition that can occur when thyroid antibodies, such as those present in Hashimoto's thyroiditis, involve the brain tissue and cause neurological symptoms.
  • Head Conditions: Conditions that affect the head
  • Head injury: Any injury that occurs to the head
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Head trauma: injury to the haed
  • Headache: Pain affecting the head or brain area.
  • Heart attack: An acute myocardial infarction
  • Heart failure: A condition which is characterized by an inability of the heart to pump blood efficiently and effectively
  • Heart symptoms: Symptoms affecting the heart
  • Heat exhaustion: major cause of preventable morbidity worldwide
  • Heat stroke: it is a life threatening condition. It is hyperthermia in an advanced state
  • Hemiplegic migraine, familial type 1: A rare inherited form of migraine that characteristically causes temporary paralysis on one side of the body and involves the presence of an aura. A migraine episode may be triggered by minimal trauma to the head. The severity of the disorder is variable with some patients experiencing paralysis on one side of the body or coma for weeks.
  • Hemiplegic migraine, familial type 2: A rare inherited form of migraine that characteristically causes temporary paralysis on one side of the body and involves the presence of an aura. A migraine episode may be triggered by minimal trauma to the head. The severity of the disorder is variable with some patients experiencing problems for days. Triggers include tiredness, heat, stress and head injury.
  • Hepatic encephalopathy: Caused by marked liver disease that results in disturbances of consciousness
  • Hepatic failure: loss of normal liver function and metabolism of products by the liver
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Pennyroyal Oil: Pennyroyal Oil can be used as a herbal agent to treat delayed menstruation and as an insect repellent. The herbal agent can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Wormwood: Wormwood can be used to treat worm infestations and as a sedative or hair tonic. The herbal agent contains chemicals which can cause various symptoms if excessive quantities are taken.
  • Hereditary carnitine deficiency: An inherited deficiency of carnitine resulting primarily in muscle problems. Severe symptoms can be triggered by periods of illness or fasting.
  • Hereditary carnitine deficiency syndrome: An inherited deficiency of carnitine resulting primarily in muscle weakness. The carnitine deficiency may be due to excessive loss of insufficient production.
  • Hereditary carnitine deficiency syndrome, systemic: An inherited deficiency of carnitine in tissues other than the muscles resulting primarily in muscle weakness.
  • Heroin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Heroin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Heroin dependence: The physical and psychological dependence to the recreational drug heroin
  • High Blood Pressure/Hypertension:
  • High altitude cerebral edema: Brain condition related to high altitude.
  • High blood pressure: Excessive blood pressure.
  • High fever: Where a patient has an elevated temperature
  • Hip cancer: The presence of tumour growth in the bone of the hip, whether due to primary malignancies e.g. leukaemic or myeloma infiltration of the bone marrow, or due to secondary metastases from another site e.g. lung or breast; cancer affecting bone of hip likely to affect other bones e.g. vertebra, ribs
  • Hoigne syndrome: Embolism (blood vessel blockage) and neurological problems associated with a procaine penicillin injection into the muscle. The condition is believed to be caused by some of the drug getting into the blood stream.
  • Human granulocytic ehrlichiosis: A rare infectious condition caused by infection with a type of bacteria called Ehrlichia (Anaplasma phagocytophilia) which attack granulocytes (a type of white blood cell). The infection is transmitted by the deer and American dog tick.
  • Human monocytic ehrlichiosis: A rare infectious condition caused by infection with a type of bacteria called Ehrlichia (Ehrlichia chaffeensis) which attack monocytes(a type of white blood cell). The infection is transmitted by the Lone Star and American dog tick.
  • Huntington's Disease: Inherited disease causing progressive mental deterioration.
  • Huntington's disease: Inherited disease causing progressive mental deterioration.
  • Hydrocodone overdose: Hydrocodone is a prescription drug used mainly to treat pain. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Hypercalcemia: Raised blood calcium levels
  • Hyperemesis Gravidarum: An extreme form of morning sickness.
  • Hyperinsulinism due to glucokinase deficiency: An inherited condition characterized by high insulin levels due to deficiency of glucokinase. The lack of glucokinase prevents the pancreas from detecting low blood sugar so insulin continues to be secreted which keeps the blood sugar level low. Severe symptoms such as seizures and coma can result if sugar levels drop too low.
  • Hyperinsulinism due to glutamodehydrogenase deficiency: An inherited condition characterized by high insulin and ammonia levels in the blood due to an enzyme deficiency (glutamate dehydrogenase). Episodes of low blood sugar can be triggered by fasting for too long or eating a protein meal. Severe symptoms such as seizures and coma can result if sugar levels drop too low.
  • Hyperinsulinism in children, congenital: A rare inherited condition characterized by high insulin levels which cause low blood sugar. Severe symptoms such as seizures and coma can result if sugar levels drop too low.
  • Hyperornithinemia-hyperammonemia-homocitrullinuria syndrome: A very rare inherited metabolic disorder where ammonia builds up in the body due to a defect in the transport of ornithine which prevents ammonia being converted to urea and being excreted through the urine. The severity of the condition is variable.
  • Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome: A form of diabetic coma seen in type 2 diabetes mellitus
  • Hyperoxia: A high level of oxygen in body tissues. It can be caused by exposure to high atmospheric pressure or long term inhalation of high oxygen concentrations. The high levels of oxygen may affect the lungs, nervous system or the eyes and thus can result in varying symptoms.
  • Hyperparathyroidism: Increased secretion of parathyroid hormone from the parathyroid glands.
  • Hypertension, Essential: Essential hypertension is a type of hypertension that has no detectable cause. Patients have an increased blood pressure for no apparent reason. Most cases of hypertension are of this form.
  • Hypertension, Essential, Susceptibility to: Essential hypertension is a type of hypertension that has no detectable cause. Patients have an increased blood pressure for no apparent reason. Most cases of hypertension are of this form. Researchers have identified a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing hypertension.
  • Hypertension, Essential, Susceptibility to, 1: Essential hypertension is a type of hypertension that has no detectable cause. Patients have an increased blood pressure for no apparent reason. Most cases of hypertension are of this form. Researchers have identified a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing hypertension. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 17q.
  • Hypertension, Essential, Susceptibility to, 2: Essential hypertension is a type of hypertension that has no detectable cause. Patients have an increased blood pressure for no apparent reason. Most cases of hypertension are of this form. Researchers have identified a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing hypertension. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 15q.
  • Hypertension, Essential, Susceptibility to, 3: Essential hypertension is a type of hypertension that has no detectable cause. Patients have an increased blood pressure for no apparent reason. Most cases of hypertension are of this form. Researchers have identified a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing hypertension. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2p25-p24.
  • Hypertension, Essential, Susceptibility to, 4: Essential hypertension is a type of hypertension that has no detectable cause. Patients have an increased blood pressure for no apparent reason. Most cases of hypertension are of this form. Researchers have identified a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing hypertension. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 12p12.2-p12.1.
  • Hypertension, Essential, Susceptibility to, 5: Essential hypertension is a type of hypertension that has no detectable cause. Patients have an increased blood pressure for no apparent reason. Most cases of hypertension are of this form. Researchers have identified a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing hypertension. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 20q11-q13.
  • Hypertension, Essential, Susceptibility to, 6: Essential hypertension is a type of hypertension that has no detectable cause. Patients have an increased blood pressure for no apparent reason. Most cases of hypertension are of this form. Researchers have identified a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing hypertension. Type 6 is linked to a defect on chromosome 5p13-q12.
  • Hypertension, Essential, Susceptibility to, 7: Essential hypertension is a type of hypertension that has no detectable cause. Patients have an increased blood pressure for no apparent reason. Most cases of hypertension are of this form. Researchers have identified a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing hypertension. Type 7 is linked to a defect on chromosome 3p14.1-q12.3.
  • Hypertension, Essential, Susceptibility to, 8: Essential hypertension is a type of hypertension that has no detectable cause. Patients have an increased blood pressure for no apparent reason. Most cases of hypertension are of this form. Researchers have identified a number of genes linked to an increased susceptibility of developing hypertension. Type 8 is linked to a defect on chromosome 18q21.2.
  • Hyperthermia: Hyperthermia is an increase in body temperature in the context of an unchanged thermoregulatory point in the brain.
  • Hypervitaminoses A and D: The excessive physiological effect of vitamin A or D cause by excessive intake of the vitamins
  • Hypoglycemia: Low blood sugar levels
  • Hypoglycemic attack: Hypoglycemic attack is a sudden episode of low blood sugar.
  • Hypomagnesemia primary: Low blood magnesium levels which is caused by the abnormal absorption and excretion of the mineral and can be caused by such things as kidney problems and intestinal malabsorption.
  • Hyponatremia: An electrolyte disturbance involving low sodium levels in the blood. Symptoms are determined by the degree of imbalance. Very low sodium levels can cause water intoxication which can be very dangerous.
  • Hypoparathyroidism: causesd by lack of PTH
  • Hypoparathyroidism, autoimmune: A rare autoimmune condition characterized by the inflammation of the parathyroid glands and resulting in a deficiency of parathyroid hormones (parathormone). Parathormone helps controls calcium and phosphorus levels in the body. Symptoms become progressively worse as calcium and phosphorus levels become increasingly imbalanced.
  • Hypophosphatemia: Low blood phosphate levels. Causes include malnourishment, chronic alcoholism excessive carbohydrate consumption, malabsorption, phosphaturia, liver failure, respiratory alkalosis and certain genetic disorders.
  • Hypopituitarism: A condition characterized by diminished hormonal section by the pituitary gland
  • Hypothermia: Low body temperature
  • Hypothyroidism: The decreased activity of the thyroid gland
  • Hypovolemia: a state of decreased blood volume; more specifically, decrease in volume of blood plasma
  • Hypoxemia: low oxygen levels in the arterial blood in the body
  • Hypoxia: This is where there is a reduction of oxygen supply to parts of the body below what is required for adequate perfusion
  • Immunosuppressive Measles Encephalitis: A rare complication of the measles virus. Some patients with a history of measles before the age of two develop progressive brain inflammation. The condition is rare and tends to only occur only in immunosuppressed children e.g. those who have acute lymphocytic leukemia. Symptoms may develop suddenly and tends to occur from weeks to months after the measles has resolved.
  • Impramine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Inborn urea cycle disorder: A genetic disorder involving a deficiency of one of the enzymes needed in the urea cycle. The urea cycle is the process of removing ammonia from blood stream by converting it to urea and excreting it via urine. A build-up of ammonia in the blood is toxic to the body and can cause serious brain damage. The progressively severe symptoms usually become obvious within the first few weeks of birth. Nevertheless, mild or partial enzyme deficiencies may cause little or no symptoms or symptoms that don't start until later in life.
  • Increased intracranial pressure: Increased pressure inside the skull due to brain swelling or fluid accumulation
  • Infection: Infections as a symptom.
  • Injury: Any damage inflicted in the body
  • Insulinoma: A rare form of pancreatic cancer that causes excessive secretion of the hormone insulin. A relatively small number of cases are malignant.
  • Intermittent confusion: Intermittent confusion is a mental state that comes and goes in which a person is disorientated to time, person, or place.
  • Interstitial nephritis: Any primary or secondary condition which affects the renal interstitial tissue
  • Intracranial arachnoid cysts: A rare disorder involving a fluid-filled cysts on the arachnoid membrane which is one of the thin layers of tissue that form a membrane which covers the brain. The type and severity of symptoms is determined by the size and location of the cyst.
  • Japanese pagoda tree poisoning: A deciduous tree which bears clusters of fragrant, pea-like flowers. The plant originated in China and is often used as an ornamental tree. The seeds contain a chemical which can cause symptoms if eaten. The seeds are considered to have a low level of toxicity.
  • Jaundice: yellowish discoloration of the skin and mucous membrane
  • Junin virus:
  • Kentucky coffee tea poisoning: Kentucky coffee tea is a large, deciduous tree which bear small flowers and a flattened seed pod. The sticky, sweet substance surrounding the seeds in the seedpods contains a chemical called alkaloid cytosine which can cause symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered to have a relatively low level of toxicity.
  • Kidney failure: The inability of the kidney to function correctly in its function of excreting metabolites from the blood
  • Kidney symptoms: Symptoms affecting one or both kidneys.
  • King Cobra poisoning: The King Cobra is a large venomous snake usually found in southeast Asia and India. Most bites from this snake results in envenomation due to the ferocity of their bite. The poison primarily affects the neuromuscular system but can also affect blood clotting.
  • Late-onset Alzheimer's: Late-onset Alzheimer's is a form of Alzheimer's disease that doesn't appear to be linked to any genetic defects or familial pattern. It is by far the most common form of Alzheimer's - occurs in up to 90% of Alzheimer sufferers. Alzheimer's disease is a progressive disorder involving degeneration of the brain. The disease mainly affects brain functions involving thinking, memory, personality and behaviour.
  • Lead poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to lead.
  • Learning disabilities: Difficulty with learning or schooling.
  • Legionella adelaidensis infection: Legionella adelaidensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella anisa infection: Legionella anisa is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella beliardensis infection: Legionella beliardensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella birminghamensis infection: Legionella birminghamensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella bozemanii infection: Legionella bozemanii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella bruneiensis infection: Legionella bruneiensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella brunensis infection: Legionella brunensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella busanensis infection: Legionella busanensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella cherrii infection: Legionella cherrii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella cincinnatiensis infection: Legionella cincinnatiensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella donaldsonii infection: Legionella donaldsonii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella donaldsonil infection: Legionella donaldsonil is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella drancourtii infection: Legionella drancourtii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella drozanskii infection: Legionella drozanskii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella dumofii infection: Legionella dumofii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella erythra infection: Legionella erythra is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella fairfieldensis infection: Legionella fairfieldensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella fallonii infection: Legionella falloni is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella feelei infection: Legionella feelei is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella feeleii infection: Legionella feeleii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella gesstiana infection: Legionella gesstiana is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella gormanii infection: Legionella micdadei is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella gratiana infection: Legionella gratiana is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella gresilensis infection: Legionella gresilensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella hackeliae infection: Legionella hackeliae is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella impletisoli infection: Legionella impletisoli is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella isrealensis infection: Legionella isrealensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella jamestowniensis infection: Legionella jamestowniensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella jordanis infection: Legionella jordanis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella lansingensis infection: Legionella lansingensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella londinensis infection: Legionella londinensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella longbeachae infection: Legionella longbeachae is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment, especially potting mixes and compost. Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella lytica infection: Legionella lytica is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella maceachemii infection: Legionella maceachemii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella maceachernii infection: Legionella maceachernii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella micdadei infection: Legionella micdadei is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella monrovica infection: Legionella monrovica is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella moravica infection: Legionella moravica is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella nautarum infection: Legionella nautarum is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella oakridgensis infection: Legionella oakridgensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella parisiensis infection: Legionella parisiensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella quateirensis infection: Legionella quateirensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella quinlivanii infection: Legionella quinlivanii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella rowbothamii infection: Legionella rowbothamii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella rubrilucens infection: Legionella rubrilucens is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella sainthelensi infection: Legionella sainthelensi is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella santicrucis infection: Legionella santicrucis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella shakespearei infection: Legionella shakespearei is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella spiritensis infection: Legionella spiritensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella steigerwaltii infection: Legionella steigerwaltii is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella tauriensis infection: Legionella tauriensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.
  • Legionella tusconensis infection: Legionella tucsonensis is a type of bacteria which can cause infection in susceptible humans. Risk factors include diabetes, certain cancers, old age, immunosuppression, emphysema and smoking. Infection is rare and can occur at any age but the elderly or those with a weak immune system are more susceptible. These particular bacteria are commonly found in the environment (e.g. water and soil). Infection usually occurs through inhalation of the bacteria which results in a lung infection called pneumonia or may result in a flu-like illness. The bacteria may also cause respiratory system irritation, inflammation or sensitization. The nature and severity of symptoms may vary amongst patients. Some people may have the bacteria in their body but may have no symptoms. The incubation period lasts from 2 to 10 days but is usually 5 to 6 days. The infection cannot be transmitted from person to person.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Confusion:

The following list of conditions have 'Confusion' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions which include a symptom of Confusion or choose View All.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Confusion:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Confusion' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.
Last revision: Nov 26, 2003

 

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