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Symptoms » Conjunctiva symptoms » Glossary
 

Glossary for Conjunctiva symptoms

Medical terms related to Conjunctiva symptoms or mentioned in this section include:

  • Acanthamoeba infection: Infection with a microscopic, free-living ameba that is readily found in the environment - soil, air and water. Most people exposed to the ameba will not become infected but when infections do occur, they tend to affect the eyes, central nervous system or can cause widespread infection throughout the body.
  • Acanthamoeba infection of the eye: Infection by an amoebic organism called Acanthamoeba. Infection usually occurs when the amoeba enters through a break in the skin or through the nose. Infection can be localized or systemic where it can involve the central nervous system and cause potentially fatal meningoencephalitis. Infection of the eye can occur by cleaning contact lenses in contaminated water.
  • Acute Angle Closure Glaucoma: Primary angle closure is defined as an occludable drainage angle and features indicating that trabecular obstruction by the peripheral iris has occurred (ie, peripheral anterior synechiae, increased IOP, lens opacities, excessive trabecular pigmentation deposits).
  • Acute Chemical poisoning -- Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha: Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha is an ingredient used in certain pesticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- xylene: Xylene is an ingredient used in certain insecticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Adenoviridae Infections: Infection with a virus from the Adenoviridae family. The most common sites for infection are membrane linings such as the intestines, respiratory and urinary tract and the eyes. The infection may result in a range of symptoms depending on the particular virus involved. Transmission usually occurs through breathing in the germs or through fecal-oral contact. The infection is contagious.
  • Adenovirus infection in immunocompromised patients: Infection with a virus from the Adenoviridae family that occurs in a patient with a weakened immune system. The infection in these people is serious and can be fatal. The infection may result in a range of symptoms depending on the particular virus involved. Transmission usually occurs through breathing in the germs or through fecal-oral contact.
  • Airborne allergy: An airborne allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to airborne allergens such as pollen, mold spores and house dust mites. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Allergies: Immune system over-reaction to various substances.
  • Angelucci's syndrome: A rare disorder characterized by various symptoms associated with vernal (nonbacterial) conjunctivitis. The conjunctivitis tends to recur seasonally and is believed to have allergic origins.
  • Aureobasidium exposure: Aureobasidium is a type of fungus which is capable of causing a variety of diseases in humans. The fungus is most often found in damp places either inside the home or in the environment. It is often pinkish or blackish. It is a rare cause of disease and is more likely to occur in immunosuppressed patients. It can cause infection in just about any part of the body depending on the nature of the exposure (inhalation, wound, ingestion etc.) and as such the type and severity of symptoms can vary considerably.
  • Autoimmune eye diseases: Eye disease that is caused by an autoimmune disease
  • Bacterial toxic-shock syndrome: A very rare, potentially fatal infection caused by toxins produced by bacteria, especially bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes. The condition is often associated with tampon use but can originate from other sources.
  • Biotinidase deficiency: A metabolic disorder where the body lacks the enzyme biotinidase needed to process the vitamin called biotin (vitamin H) into carboxylase enzymes.
  • Box Jellyfish poisoning: A sting from the Box jellyfish contains a chemical which is toxic to the nerves, heart and skin. This jellyfish is mainly found in the waters of Northern Queensland in Australia. The tentacles should not be removed from the patient as it can cause further injection of poison.
  • Browntail moth caterpillar poisoning: A hairy, bright-colored caterpillar which can cause skin symptoms on contact with the hair. Inhalation of the hairs can cause respiratory symptoms and eye exposure can also result in symptoms. Patients with pre-existing asthma or atopic allergies may suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetaldehyde: Acetaldehyde is a chemical used in the production of various products - mirrors, disinfectants, plastics, explosives, varnish and food flavoring. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetic Anhydride: Acetic Anhydride is a chemical used mainly in various industrial processes as well as the production of pharmaceutical products such as aspirin and acetyl salicylic acid. It is also used in the production of heroin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ammonia: Ammonia is a chemical used mainly in household cleaning products and bleach. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Anisole: Anisole is a chemical used mainly as a solvent and food additive and also in perfumes and detergents. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Beryllium: Beryllium is an element used mainly in vehicle electronics, optics, ore processing, microwave oven parts, fuel containers and disc brakes for aeroplanes. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Boric Acid: Boric Acid is a chemical used mainly in foods (preservative, emulsifier, neutralizer), antiseptics, pesticides and contact lens cleaners. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Application of boric acid directly to damaged skin can cause the chemical to be absorbed rapidly into the body and lead to death. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Calcium Sulfate: Calcium Sulfate is a chemical with a wide range of applications from soil conditioners and paint pigment to the manufacture of products such as plaster and tiles. It is also often used as a laboratory reagent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorine Dioxide: Chlorine dioxide is a chemical used mainly in water treatment and disinfectant for various processing operations. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Diethylene Glycol Monobutyl Ether: Diethylene Glycol Monobutyl Ether is a chemical used in a variety of applications: cleaning agents, solvent, manufacture of dyes, rubber, soap and printing products . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dimethylamine: Dimethylamine is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of products such as detergent, pharmaceuticals and in leather tanning. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ether: Ether is a chemical used mainly as an anesthetic and industrial solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylene Oxide: Ethylene oxide is a chemical used mainly in detergents, plasticizers, fumigants, inks, cosmetics and brake fluid. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Furfural: Furfural is a chemical used mainly as an industrial solvent and in the manufacture of fuels, foods and ant poisons. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hydroquinone: Hydroquinone is a chemical used mainly in photography developing solution, pharmaceuticals, fur processing, paints, fuel, organic chemicals, plastics, stone coatings and styrene monomers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Lewisite: Lewisite is a very poisonous gas which has the potential to be used in chemical warfare due to its deadly effects. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Metaldehyde: Metaldehyde is a chemical used mainly as a molluscicide, in heating fuel and in fire lighters. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methylene Diisocyanate: Methylene Diisocyanate is a chemical used mainly in the production of hard plastics and polyurethane foams. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Morpholine: Morpholine is a chemical used in a variety of applications: rubber industry, corrosion inhibitor, pharmaceuticals, dyes, crop pesticides and as a solvent in various manufacturing processes. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Osmium: Osmium is a chemical used mainly in alloys to produce very strong metals for such items as fountain pen tips and electrical contacts. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Propylene Glycol Dinitrate: Propylene Glycol Dinitrate is a chemical used mainly as a propellant or occasionally in explosives. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Quinone: Quinone is a chemical used mainly in industrial applications for the manufacture of dyes, chemicals, textiles cosmetics and in the tanning processes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Sulfuric Acid: Sulfuric Acid is a chemical used mainly in car batteries and in the fur and leather industries. It is a significant component of air pollution and results in the production of "acid rain". Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Sulfuryl Fluoride: Sulfuryl Fluoride is a chemical used mainly as a fumigant insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Toluene Diisocyanate: Toluene Diisocyanate is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of elastomers and polyurethane foams. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- acetic acid: Acetic acid is a chemical used for medicinal purposes such as superficial ear infections, jellyfish stings and bladder irrigation. Acetic acid is a also a component of vinegar which is used as a cooking ingredient. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chronic Pesticide poisoning -- xylene: Xylene is an ingredient used in certain insecticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Cluster headache: Also known as alarm headache, more common in young men, presents with unilateral headache, rhinorrhea and lacrimation
  • Cobra poisoning: The Cobra is a poisonous snake which can be found in Africa, Asia and other parts of the world. Some cobras are able to spit venom into the victims eye and cause serious symptoms.
  • Cocky Apple stinging caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Cocky Apple stinging caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Common Variable Immunodeficiency: An immunodeficiency disorder involving low blood gamma globulin levels which results in an increased susceptibility to infections. The condition may be inherited or can be caused by certain drugs (levamisole, hydantoin and carbamazepine).
  • Common Woolly Bear moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Common Woolly Bear moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Conjunctival abrasions: cut or scratch on the conjunctival surface
  • Conjunctival abrasions in both eyes: Conjunctival abrasions in both eyes refers to scratches on the conjunctiva, the membranes that line the eyelids and surfaces of the eyes.
  • Conjunctival abrasions in one eye: Conjunctival abrasions in one eye is a condition in which there are scratches on the conjunctiva, the membranes that line the eyelids and surfaces of the eyes.
  • Conjunctival bleeding: Lesions of the conjunctiva which can cause bleeding.
  • Conjunctival blister: Conditions of the conjunctiva which can cause blisters.
  • Conjunctival bruise: usually occurs due to trauma to the eye.
  • Conjunctival burning sensation: Abnormal sensations felt in the conjunctiva.
  • Conjunctival deformity: Distortion in the normal appearance of the conjunctiva.
  • Conjunctival disorders: Diseases of the conjunctiva in the eye.
  • Conjunctival edema of both eyes: Conjunctival edema of both eyes is swelling of the membrane that covers the whites of the both eyes and inside of both eyelids.
  • Conjunctival edema of one eye: Conjunctival edema of one eye refers to swelling of the membrane that covers the white part of one eye and inside of the eyelid.
  • Conjunctival follicles: they are hypertrophied lymphoid tissue
  • Conjunctival follicles of both eyes: Conjunctival follicles of both eyes refers to a type of abnormal tissue in the conjunctiva, the membranes that line the eyelids and eye surfaces, that is caused by inflammation.
  • Conjunctival follicles of one eye: Conjunctival follicles of one eye refers to a type of abnormal tissue in the conjunctiva of one eye, the membrane that lines the eyelid and surface of the eye, that is caused by inflammation.
  • Conjunctival foreign body: presence of foreign body in the conjunctiva
  • Conjunctival haemorrhage: A haemorrhage occurring in the conjunctiva of the eye.
  • Conjunctival infection: Infection of the conjunctiva and its structures causing redness.
  • Conjunctival inflammation: Inflammation of the conjunctiva and its structures causing redness.
  • Conjunctival injection: Nonuniform redness of the conjunctiva.
  • Conjunctival itch: Conditions of the conjunctiva which can cause itching.
  • Conjunctival lump: Irregular raised swelling seen conjunctiva.
  • Conjunctival numbness: Abnormal sensations felt in the conjunctiva.
  • Conjunctival pain: Conditions of the conjunctiva which can cause pain.
  • Conjunctival rash: Conditions of the conjunctiva which can cause rashes.
  • Conjunctival redness: an inflammation of the conjunctiva (the outermost layer of the eye and the inner surface of the eyelids)
  • Conjunctival sensitivity: Raised responsiveness of the conjunctiva to external stimuli.
  • Conjunctival tingling: Abnormal sensations felt in the conjunctiva.
  • Conjunctival ulcer: Discontinuity in the lining mucosa of the eye.
  • Conjunctival weakness: Weakness of the conjunctiva.
  • Conjunctivitis: A condition which is characterized by inflammation of the conjunctiva
  • Conjunctivitis in children: Conjunctivitis in children refers to an inflammation or infection of a child's conjunctiva, the membranes that line the eyelids and surface of the eyes.
  • Craniofacial dysostosis type 1: A rare genetic disorder characterized by premature joining of certain skull bones during development which has an impact on the shape of the head and face. Features include poor vision, hypoplasia of maxilla an impaired hearing.
  • Crouzon Syndrome: A condition which is characterized by craniofacial dysostosis
  • Cytosine arabinose syndrome: Symptoms following the use of a chemotherapy drug called cytosine arabinose.
  • Dacryocystitis: Inflammation of the eye's tear sac
  • De Sanctis-Cacchione syndrome: A rare genetic ectodermal disorder characterized by sunlight sensitivity, skin atrophy and pigmentation and skin tumors as well neurologic involvement.
  • Dermatostomatitis, Stevens Johnson type: A rare but serious condition involving inflammation and blistering of the skin and mucous membranes. It is believed to be an allergic reaction that can occur in response to some drugs or infectious diseases.
  • Diffuse conjunctival injection: diffuse redness of the conjunctiva usually associated with inflammation
  • Diffuse conjunctival injection of both eyes: Diffuse conjunctival injection of both eyes refers to the forcing of fluid into scattered areas of the mucous membranes that line the whites of both eyes (sclera) and both eyelids.
  • Diffuse conjunctival injection of one eye: Diffuse conjunctival injection of one eye refers to the forcing of fluid into scattered areas of the mucous membranes that line the white of the eye (sclera) and the eyelid of one eye.
  • Diffuse peripheral conjunctival injection: diffuse redness of the conjunctiva usually associated with inflammation
  • Dust mite allergies: Allergy to dust mites in household dust.
  • Dyskeratosis Congenita: A rare genetic disorder characterized by sking pigmentation abnormalities, nail dystrophy and mucous membrane changes.
  • Ectropion: Outward turning of the eyelid away from the eye.
  • Erythema multiforme: An allergic inflammatory skin disorder which has a variety of causes and results in skin and mucous membrane lesions that affect mainly the hands, forearms, feet, mouth nose and genitals.
  • Eye symptoms: Symptoms affecting the eye
  • Face symptoms: Symptoms affecting the face
  • Fresh Mangrove caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Fresh Mangrove caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Gonorrhea: Common sexually transmitted disease often without symptoms.
  • Grapeleaf skeletonizer caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the grapeleaf skeletonizer caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Grass pollen allergy: A grass pollen allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by various grasses. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Green Lynx spider poisoning: The Green Lynx spider is a green spider most common in Mexico and Southern US. The spider can squirt (up to 40cm) it's venom from inside the mouth or deliver it through the bite.
  • Gypsy moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Gypsy moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Hay fever: A seasonal condition which is a form of allergic rhinitis
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Helminth infections: The infection by a parasitic worm
  • Hickory tussock moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Hickory tussock moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • House dust allergy: House dust allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to allergens dound in household dust such as pet dander, mold and dust mites. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Hyper IgE: Inherited immunodeficiency disorders involving excessive production of IgE and frequent bacterial (staphylococcal) infections mainly involving the skin as well as other problems. Recessively inherited forms of the condition tend to be more serious with bone problems.
  • Hypersensitivity to pollen: Plants produce the microscopic round or oval grains called pollen which lead to allergy in a few individuals
  • Hypopigmented lesions in children: Hypopigmented lesions in children refers are sores or ulcers that are colorless or have lost color in a child.
  • Infectious meningitis: Infectious meningitis is meningitis caused by bacterial, viral, or protozoan infection. Most of the agents known to cause meningitis are infectious, but very few people exposed to them will get meningitis. Those at greatest danger include people with AIDS, infants, transplant patients, and others whose immune systems may be compromised.
  • Inflammatory symptoms: Symptoms related to inflammation.
  • Intermittent conjunctival injection: Intermittent conjunctival injection refers to a periodic red appearance of the whites of the eyes due to dilated blood vessels.
  • Job syndrome: An immunodeficiency disorder characterized by excessive production of IgE and frequent bacterial infections mainly involving the skin.
  • Kawasaki disease: A childhood illness that generally affects the skin, mouth and lymph nodes.
  • Lepidopterism: A systemic illness caused by contact with certain poisonous caterpillar spines or urticating hairs.
  • Leprosy, susceptibility to, 1: A chronic, progressive infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae which causes skin sores and also affects the eyes, mucous membranes and peripheral nerves. The range of manifestations and severity of symptoms is quite variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic mutations linked to an increased susceptibility to leprosy. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10p13.
  • Leprosy, susceptibility to, 2: A chronic, progressive infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae which causes skin sores and also affects the eyes, mucous membranes and peripheral nerves. The range of manifestations and severity of symptoms is quite variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic mutations linked to an increased susceptibility to leprosy. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q25.2-q27.
  • Leprosy, susceptibility to, 3: A chronic, progressive infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae which causes skin sores and also affects the eyes, mucous membranes and peripheral nerves. The range of manifestations and severity of symptoms is quite variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic mutations linked to an increased susceptibility to leprosy. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 4q32 and 4p14.
  • Leprosy, susceptibility to, 4: A chronic, progressive infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae which causes skin sores and also affects the eyes, mucous membranes and peripheral nerves. The range of manifestations and severity of symptoms is quite variable. Researchers have discovered a number of genetic mutations linked to an increased susceptibility to leprosy. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p21.3.
  • Leptospirosis: Bacterial infection usually caught from animal urine.
  • Localised conjunctival injection: local inflamed conjunctival vessels
  • Lyme disease: Lyme disease is an emerging infectious disease caused by at least three species of bacteria belonging to the genus Borrelia.
  • Mayapple poisoning: The Mayapple is a small flowering plant which is often found growing naturally. It bears small single flowers and apple-like fruit which turns yellow when ripe. The unripe fruit and leaves contain a chemical called podophyllin which can cause poisoning if eaten. The plant is considered highly toxic and death can occur if sufficient quantities are eaten. The leaves, roots and unripe fruit are toxic but the ripe fruit is edible. The plant has been used to treat venereal warts.
  • Measles: Once common viral infection now rare due to vaccination.
  • Mesquite Buck moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Mesquite Buck moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Mesquite stinger caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Mesquite stinger caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Milky conjunctival injection: Milky conjunctival injection is a milky redish appearance of the whites of the eyes due to dilated blood vessels.
  • Mold allergies: Allergies to airborne or household molds.
  • Mold allergy: A mold allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a mold. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Moller-Barlow disease: Vitamin C deficiency in infants.
  • Newcastle Disease: A type of virus (paramyxovirus) that can infect many mammals, birds and humans. It most commonly affects poultry. Human infections can cause a mild illness and is generally only seen in poultry workers. There has been growing interest in using this virus to kill cancer cells.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Aesculus pollen: An aesculus pollen allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by aesculus trees. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Alder: An alder allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by alder. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Alder tree: An alder tree allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by Alder trees. The pollen from alder trees is considered to have a relatively moderate to high potential for allergy. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- American feverfew: An American feverfew allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by a weed called American feverfew. The pollen from American feverfew is considered to have a moderate potential for allergy. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Ash juniper tree pollen: An ash juniper tree pollen allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by ash juniper trees. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Beet: A beet allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by beet plants. The pollen from beet plants is considered to have a relatively low potential for allergy. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Bermuda grass: A Bermuda grass allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by Bermuda grass. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Bluegrass: A bluegrass pollen allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by bluegrass. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Canary grass: A canary grass allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by canary grass. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Capeweed: A capeweed allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by capeweed which is usually found in Australia. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Cypress tree: A cypress tree allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by cypress trees. The pollen from cypress trees is considered to have a relatively moderate to high potential for allergy. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- English plantain: An English plantain allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by English plantain. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- European Ash tree: A European ash tree allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by the European Ash tree. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Hickory tree: A hickory tree allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by hickory trees. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Hornbeam tree: A hornbeam tree allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by hornbeam trees. The pollen from hornbeam trees is considered to have a moderate potential for allergy. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Johnson grass: A Johnson grass allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by Johnson grass. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Kentucky bluegrass: A Kentucky bluegrass allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by Kentucky bluegrass. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Marsh Elder: A marsh elder allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by marsh elder which is a type of weed. The pollen from Marsh elder is considered to have a relatively low potential for allergy. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Monteroy pine tree: A Monteroy pine tree allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by Monteroy pine tree. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Oak tree: An oak tree allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by oak trees. The pollen from oak trees is considered to have a moderate potential for allergy. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Olea tree pollen: An Olea treepollen allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by Olea trees. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Orache (Atriplex): An orache (Atriplex) allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by weeds called orache. The pollen from Orache is considered to have a relatively low potential for allergy. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Patterson's curse: A Patterson's curse allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by a weed called Patterson's curse. The pollen from Patterson's curse is considered to have a relatively high potential for allergy. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Pecan trees: A pecan tree allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by pecan trees. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Rapeseed oil: A rapeseed oil allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by rapeseed weeds. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Redtop grass: A Redtop grass allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by Redtop grass. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Ryegrass pollen: A ryegrass allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by ryegrass. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Sorrel: A sorrel allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by sorrel which is a type of herb. The pollen from sorrel is considered to have a relatively moderate to high potential for allergy. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Sunflower pollen: A sunflower pollen allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by sunflowers. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- Velvet grass: A velvet grass allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by velvet grass. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- White cedar tree: A white cedar tree allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by the white cedar tree. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- amaranthus: An amaranthus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by a weed called amaranthus. The pollen from amaranthus is considered to have a relatively low potential for allergy. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- ash tree: An ash tree grass allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by ash trees. The pollen from ash trees is considered to have a relatively moderate to high potential for allergy. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- beech tree: A beech tree allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by beech trees. The pollen from beech trees is considered to have a relatively low to moderate potential for allergy. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- birch tree: A birch tree allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by birch trees. The pollen from birch trees is considered to have a relatively high potential for allergy. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- box elder tree: A box elder tree allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by box elder trees. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- cocklebur: A cocklebur allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by a plant called cocklebur. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- daisy: A daisy allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by daisies. The pollen from daisies is considered to have a relatively low potential for allergy. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- dandelion pollen: A dandelion allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by dandelions. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- elm tree: An elm tree allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by elm trees. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Alternaria: An Alternaria fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Alternaria. Alternaria is a common outdoor mold and can cause severe asthmatic symptoms as well as other allergy symptoms. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Aspergillus spp: An Aspergillus spp fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Aspergillus spp. Aspergillus is a common indoor and outdoor mold. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Aureobasidium (Pullularia): A Aureobasidium fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Aureobasidium. Aureobasidium is a common outdoor mold often found on paper, lumber and painted objects. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Candida albicans: A Candida albicans fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Candida albicans. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Cladosporium: A Cladosporium fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Cladosporium. Cladosporium is one of the most common outdoor airborne molds. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Epicoccum: An Epicoccum fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Epicoccum. Epicoccum tends to be found in grassland and agricultural areas. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Fusarium: A Fusarium fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Fusarium. Fusarium is often found on rotting plants. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Helminthosporium: A Helminthosporium fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Helminthosporium. Helminthosporium is a fungus found more often in warmer climates. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Mucor: A Mucor fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Mucor. Mucor is a relatively uncommon fungus but can be found on decaying vegetation and damp indoor areas. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Penicillium: A Penicillium fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Penicillium. Penicillium is a common indoor mold and allergy to this fungus is unrelated to a penicillin allergy. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Phoma: A Phoma fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Phoma. Phoma is an outdoor mold which is predominant during wet periods. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, Rhizopus: A Rhizopus fungus allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called Rhizopus. Rhizopus is relatively uncommon but can be found on decaying vegetation and damp indoor areas. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- fungus, smut: A smut allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to spores produced by a fungus called smut. Smut is common in agricultural areas. Symptoms tend to occur in a seasonal pattern as spore production by molds tends to increase and decrease with changes in seasons. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- goosefoot: A goosefoot allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by a weed called goose foot. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- grass: A grass allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to grass or pollen produced by grass. Grasses are considered to have a relatively high potential for allergy. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- guayule: A guayule allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by guayule which is a type of weed. The pollen from guayule is considered to have a relatively low potential for allergy. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- hazel tree: A hazel tree allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by hazel trees. The pollen from hazel trees is considered to have a relatively moderate to high potential for allergy. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- hemp: A hemp allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by the hemp plant. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- hop shrub: A hop shrub allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by hop shrubs. The pollen from hop shrubs is considered to have a relatively low potential for allergy. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- horse chestnut tree: A horse chestnut tree allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by horse chestnut trees. The pollen from horse chestnut trees is considered to have a relatively low to moderate potential for allergy. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- maple tree: A maple tree allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by maple trees. The pollen from maple trees is considered to have a relatively low to moderate potential for allergy. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- mountain cedar tree: A mountain cedar tree allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by mountain cedar trees. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- mugwort tree: A mugwort tree allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by mugwort trees. The pollen from mugwort trees is considered to have a relatively high potential for allergy. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- nettle: A nettle allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by nettle. The pollen from nettle is considered to have a relatively low potential for allergy. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- olive tree: An olive tree allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by olive trees. The pollen from olive trees is considered to have a relatively high potential for allergy. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- orchard grass: An orchard grass allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by orchard grass. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- pigweed: A pigweed allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by pigweed. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- plane tree: A plane tree allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by plane trees. The pollen from plane trees is considered to have a moderate to high potential for allergy. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- plantago pollen: A plantago pollen allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by plantago which is a type of weed. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- poplar tree pollen: A poplar tree pollen allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by poplar trees. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- ragweed: A ragweed allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by ragweed. The pollen from ragweed is considered to have a relatively high potential for allergy. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- redroot: A redroot allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by redroot. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- sagebrush: A sagebrush allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by sagebrush. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- sweet chestnut tree: A sweet chestnut tree allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by sweet chestnut trees. The pollen from sweet chestnut trees is considered to have a relatively low to moderate potential for allergy. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- sweet vernal grass: A sweet vernal grass allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by sweet vernal grass. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- tilia tree pollen: A tilia tree pollen allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by tilia tree. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- timothy grass: A timothy grass allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by timothy grass. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- tree pollen: A tree pollen allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by trees. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- tumble weed (Russian thistle): A tumble weed allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by tumble weed. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- wall pellitory: A wall pellitory allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by wall pellitory. The pollen from wall pellitory is considered to have a relatively high potential for allergy. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- walnut tree: A walnut tree allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by walnut trees. The pollen from walnut trees is considered to have a moderate potential for allergy. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- willow tree: A willow tree allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by willow trees. The pollen from willow trees is considered to have a relatively low potential for allergy. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Food Allergy -- willow tree pollen: A willow tree pollen allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pollen produced by willow trees. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients.
  • Non-Specific Urethritis: Urethral infection usually sexually transmitted
  • Nonuniform redness of the conjunctiva: varying redness of the conjunctiva
  • Ocular cicatricial pemphigoid: A rare chronic autoimmune eye condition that can result in blindness if not treated. The conjunctival and mucosal layers of the eye (inside of eyelid and outside of eye) become progressively inflamed and scarred. The condition can be very difficult to treat.
  • Oleander caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Oleander caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Omsk hemorrhagic fever: A hemorrhagic fever caused by a virus. A serious outbreak occurred in Omsk and hence the name. Transmission occurs through tick bites. The infection has two phases: the first acute phase involves symptoms such as fever, rash and muscle pain and the second phase occurs after a week or two and involves the central nervous system (e.g. delirium, convulsions).
  • Pale tussock moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Pale tussock moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Palpebral conjunctival follicles: they are hypertrophied lymphoid tissue
  • Paming moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Paming moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Pasteurella multocida: An infectious disease caused by a bacterium called Pasteurella multocida. It is often transmitted through bites and scratches from pets and it can be found in mammals and fowl.
  • Peripheral conjunctival injection: peripheral redness of the conjunctiva
  • Peripheral conjunctival injection of both eyes: Peripheral conjunctival injection of both eyes refers to a red appearance of the lateral areas of the whites of both eyes due to dilated blood vessels.
  • Peripheral conjunctival injection of one eye: Peripheral conjunctival injection of one eye is a condition in which there is a red appearance of the lateral area of the white part of one eye due to dilated blood vessels.
  • Pfiesteria piscicida infection: Pfiesteria piscicida is a tiny marine organism called a dinoflagellate that is found in waters where fresh and salt water mix e.g. at river mouths. It is believed to be responsible for killing fish as well as health problems in humans.
  • Phosgene oxime -- eye exposure: Phosgen oxime has no useful purpose but may be manufactured for use as a chemical weapon. Eye exposure to the chemicals can cause potentially serious complications such as blindness. The severity of symptoms will vary depending on the extent and duration of the exposure.
  • Phosgene oxime exposure: Phosgene oxime has no useful purpose but may be manufactured for use as a chemical weapon. The chemical is poisonous and exposure can occur through ingestion, inhalation and absorption through the skin. Symptoms will vary depending on the method of exposure, degree of exposure and duration of exposure. The chemical can penetrate clothing.
  • Plant poisoning -- Euphorbiaceae: Euphorbiaceae is a family of flowering plants called spurges. They contain various chemicals (alkaloids, glycosides and diterpene ester) which can cause symptoms if ingested.
  • Polychondritis: A serious, progressive, episodic condition characterized by inflammation and degeneration of cartilage in the body. The duration and severity of the episodes can vary.
  • Processionary tree caterpillar poisoning: A dark, grey-black caterpillar which can cause varying symptoms on contact with its hairs or spines.
  • Randa's Eyed Silk moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Randa's Eyed Silk moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Reiterís syndrome: A form of reactive arthritis characterized by arthritis, urethritis, conjunctivitis and skin lesions.
  • Ritter syndrome: A rare infantile skin disorder involving severe redness, inflammation, blistering and peeling of skin and mucous membranes which can result from a variety of infections, malignancies and drugs.
  • SUNCT headache: A syndrome involving a short-lived pain around one eye or on one side of the head as well as well as fluid being forced into the conjunctiva and mucous membranes of the eyelids.
  • Sabia virus: An arbovirus causing fever, rashes and hemorrhagic bleeding
  • Satin moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Satin moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Severe combined immunodeficiency, T- B+ due to JAK3 deficiency: A recessively inherited immunodeficiency disorder characterized by a lack of circulating T and Natural Killer Cells and a normal level of B cells. The disorder is caused by a defect on the JAK3 gene. Infants may display symptoms such as pancytopenia, skin rash and abnormal liver function due to a graft-versus-host reaction to the mother's T cells via the placenta. If the condition is not treated, death occurs.
  • Silver Spotted Tiger moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Silver Spotted Tiger moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Sjogren's Syndrome: Autoimmune disease damaging the eye tear ducts and other glands.
  • Spiny elm caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Spiny Elm caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Staphylococcal infection: Any infection caused by the bacteria staphylococcal
  • Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome: A very rare, potentially fatal infection caused by the bacterial toxins produced by Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus pyogenes. The condition is often associated with tampon use but can originate from other sources.
  • Stevens Johnson syndrome: A rare but serious condition involving inflammation and blistering of the skin and mucous membranes. It is believed to be an allergic reaction that can occur in response to some drugs or infectious diseases.
  • Stinging Bark caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Stinging Bark caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Stinging Nettle caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Stinging Nettle caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Stinging Rose caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the Stinging Rose caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • Striped Blister Beetle poisoning: The striped blister beetle is native to many parts of America and Canada. Animals that accidentally eat the beetles can become quite ill and they can also cause symptoms in humans if accidentally ingested. The beetles contain toxic substances called cantharidin and pederin which can cause symptoms through skin or eye exposure as well as through ingestion.
  • Sudden onset of eye itchiness related to conjunctival pathology: Sudden onset of eye itchiness related to conjunctival pathology is the rapid development of eye itchiness that is due to a disease or injury of the eye conjunctiva.
  • Superior limbic keratoconjunctivitis: A condition involving the surface of the eye and characterized by periods of inflammation of the conjunctiva - especially the part of the conjunctiva that forms the outermost layer of the whites of the eyes. The exact cause of the condition is unknown. It is important to note that roughly half of patients with this eye condition have and underlying thyroid problem.
  • Sweet Syndrome:
  • The clap: A sexually transmitted infection by the bacteria Neisseria gonorrhoeae.
  • Theodore's syndrome: A condition involving the surface of the eye and characterized by periods of inflammation of the conjunctiva - especially the part of the conjunctiva that forms the outermost layer of the whites of the eyes. The exact cause of the condition is unknown. It is important to note that roughly half of patients with this eye condition have and underlying thyroid problem or some other autoimmune condition.
  • Toxemia: A medical condition that occurs when there is a release of toxins from bacteria within the bloodstream
  • Triangular shiny grey area on conjunctiva: Irregularly shaped foam-like plaques on the conjunctiva of the eye
  • Trichinosis: Worm infection usually caught from pigs
  • Tuberculous uveitis: Eye infection by a tuberculous bacteria called Mycobacteriu tuberculosis. The eye infection may occur secondary to a tuberculous infection of the rest of the body or it may occur only in the eye.
  • Tussock moth caterpillar poisoning: A hairy, bright-colored caterpillar which can cause skin symptoms on contact with the hair. Inhalation of the hairs can cause respiratory symptoms and eye exposure can also result in symptoms. Patients with pre-existing asthma or atopic allergies may suffer more severe symptoms.
  • Vanadium toxicity: Exposure to high levels of the trace element vanadium can occur in certain industrial plants where it can be inhaled. It has not yet been determined if vanadium is an essential element in human diets.
  • Vernal keratoconjunctivitis: A rare allergic type of conjunctivitis (inflammation of the lining of the eyelid and most of the eye) which occurs seasonally in warm weather
  • Violet conjunctival injection: the conjunctival vessels may have a violet tinge appearance
  • Wegener's granulomatosis: A rare disease involving blood vessel inflammation which can affect the blood flow to various tissues and organs and hence cause damage. The respiratory system and the kidneys are the main systems affected.
  • White marked tussock moth caterpillar poisoning: Contact with the poisonous hairs or spines of the White marked tussock moth caterpillar can cause skin rashes or even a hypersensitivity reaction in some cases.
  • X-linked agammaglobulinaemia: A condition that is characterised by the x linked inheritance of the absence of all immunoglobulins in the blood
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum: A rare pigmentary disease that is caused by an enzyme deficiency
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 1: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation - type 1 has the lowest level of repair and the most neurological complications.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 2: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation. Type B is often associated with signs of Cockayne syndrome.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 3: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation. Neurological symptoms are rarely experienced in type 3.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 4: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation. Type D involves neurological symptoms.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 5: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation. Type E is a very rare form of the condition and involves mild skin symptoms with no neurological symptoms.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 6: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation. The skin and neurological symptoms in Type 6 tend to be mild.
  • Xeroderma pigmentosum, type 7: A rare genetic disorder where the enzyme that repairs DNA damage done by UV radiation is defective. It is characterized by sensitivity to sunlight, skin pigmentation and atrophy and actinic skin tumors. The different types of xeroderma pigmentosum vary in the body's ability to repair the damage to DNA done by UV radiation. Type G usually involves severe neurological symptoms.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Conjunctiva symptoms:

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Conditions listing medical complications: Conjunctiva symptoms:

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