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Symptoms » Coughing » Glossary
 

Glossary for Coughing

Medical terms related to Coughing or mentioned in this section include:

  • ACE Inhibitors -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that the use of ACE Inhibitors during pregnancy may cause a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Absent alpha 1 band: An absence of alpha-1-antitrypsin the the body
  • Achalasia: A rare condition where the patients muscles, such as the cardiac sphincter of the stomach, are unable to relax.
  • Acute (or transient) urinary incontinence: Acute (or Transient) Incontinence is caused by a new or recent medical problem that can be treated.
  • Acute Chemical poisoning -- Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha: Varnish makers' and painters' Naptha is an ingredient used in certain pesticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute Pesticide poisoning -- xylene: Xylene is an ingredient used in certain insecticides. Exposure to the chemical can cause a range of symptoms depending on the level and route of exposure. Exposure can occur through inhalation, ingestion, the skin or eyes. Acute exposure involves a exposure over a short period of time whereas chronic exposure occurs over a longer period of time.
  • Acute cough: The noisy sudden expulsion of air from the respiratory tract
  • Acute mercury inhalation: Inhalation of mercury vapor can lead to serious symptoms and even death if sufficient quantities are inhaled. Mercury inhalation is more likely in confined or poorly ventilated spaces. Mercury from a broken thermometer can lead to symptoms if it occurs in a confined space.
  • Acute sinusitis: An acute inflammation of the sinuses
  • Adenocarcinoma of lung: A tumor that develops in the lining of the lung. The tumor is usually slow growing.
  • Adenocarcinoma, Bronchiolo-Alveolar: A form of lung cancer that develops in the bronchioles or alveoli.
  • Adult-onset asthma: Adult-onset asthma is a type of asthma that occurs during adulthood. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways. The severity of symptoms is variable. Allergies account for about half the cases of adult-onset asthma.
  • Allergic asthma: A form of asthma caused by inhalation of airborne allergenic substance.
  • Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis: An allergic reaction that occurs in the bronchopulmonary tract due to the occurrence of aspergillosis
  • Allergies: Immune system over-reaction to various substances.
  • Alveolitis, extrinsic allergic: A lung disease that tends to occur in people with jobs where they are frequently exposed to organic dust inhalation.
  • Amyloidosis: A disease characterized by the accumulation of insoluble amyloid protein in tissues and organs which in turn affects the functioning of these tissues and organs.
  • Analgesic asthma syndrome: Asthma caused by the use of pain-killing and anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin.
  • Angiofollicular lymph hyperplasia: A rare disorder of the lymph system characterized by the development of benign tumors in lymph tissue anywhere in the body.
  • Animal allergy: An animal allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to animals such as cats. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, saliva or urine of the animal. Animals frequently lick themselves which results in saliva sticking to the fur. Thus a person allergic to animals will often react to the fur even if it is not attached to the animal. Frequent washing of the animal may reduce symptoms. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • Aortic Aneurysm, Thoracic: Bulging and weakness of the aorta in the area of the chest. The condition is life-threatening as death can occur rapidly if the aneurysm bursts.
  • Ascariasis: Large intestinal roundworm from 6 to 13 inches.
  • Asherson syndrome: The failure of a muscle at the top of the esophagus to relax and allow food and liquid to pass through. Liquid and even food may accidentally be inhaled and can lead to pneumonia and death in some cases.
  • Aspirin-induced asthma: Aspirin-induced asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is triggered by the use of aspirin. A significant number of patients with aspirin-induced asthma also have steroid-dependant asthma where they require regular steroidal asthma medication to maintain normal lung functioning. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Asthma: A condition which is characterized by recurrent attacks of paroxysmal dyspnoea
  • Asthma in Adults:
  • Asthma in Children:
  • Asthma in pregnancy: Asthma in pregnancy refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is occurs during pregnancy. Women who are pregnancy may decide to stop taking their asthma medication in order to reduce the perceived risk of side effects to the developing fetus. The reality is that the potential harmful effects on the fetus are very small compared to the problems caused to mother and fetus if a severe asthma attack develops. Furthermore, uncontrolled asthma during pregnancy may also cause problems such as small birth weight or premature birth. Pregnant women should consult their physician in order to determine the optimal management of their condition. During pregnancy, asthma symptoms may become worse, improve or stay the same.
  • Asthma-like conditions: Medical conditions similar to asthma, or having similar symptoms.
  • Asthma-like cough symptoms: Asthma is a chronic disease causing airway constriction along with inflammation and excess collection of mucus in the airways leading to breathing difficulty.
  • Asthma-related traits, susceptibility to, 1: An increased risk of asthma-related traits such as wheezing and atopic dermatitis are linked to a defect on chromosome 14q22.1.
  • Asthma-related traits, susceptibility to, 2: An increased risk of asthma-related traits such as wheezing and atopic dermatitis are linked to a defect on chromosome 7p15-p14.
  • Asthma-related traits, susceptibility to, 3: An increased risk of asthma-related traits such as wheezing and atopic dermatitis are linked to a defect on chromosome 2p16.
  • Asthma-related traits, susceptibility to, 4: An increased risk of asthma-related traits such as wheezing and atopic dermatitis are linked to a defect on chromosome 1p31.
  • Asthma-related traits, susceptibility to, 5: An increased risk of asthma-related traits such as wheezing and atopic dermatitis are linked to a defect on chromosome 12q14.3.
  • Asthma-related traits, susceptibility to, 6: An increased risk of asthma-related traits such as wheezing and atopic dermatitis are linked to a defect on chromosome 17q21.
  • Asthma-related traits, susceptibility to, 7: An increased risk of asthma-related traits such as wheezing and atopic dermatitis are linked to a defect on chromosome 1q32.1.
  • Atopic asthma: Atopic asthma is one of the most common forms of asthma and is triggered by exposure to an allergen. Upon exposure to the allergen, the airways become constricted and inflamed which affects breathing. The severity of symptoms is variable. This form of asthma is more common in children than adults.
  • Atypical pneumonia:
  • Aureobasidium exposure: Aureobasidium is a type of fungus which is capable of causing a variety of diseases in humans. The fungus is most often found in damp places either inside the home or in the environment. It is often pinkish or blackish. It is a rare cause of disease and is more likely to occur in immunosuppressed patients. It can cause infection in just about any part of the body depending on the nature of the exposure (inhalation, wound, ingestion etc.) and as such the type and severity of symptoms can vary considerably.
  • Bagassosis: Inhalation of sugarcane dust particles in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the sugarcane dust particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Bagassosis -- Thermoactinomyces sacchari: Inhalation of sugarcane dust particles contaminated with fungus (Thermoactinomyces sacchari) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the contaminated sugarcane dust particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Barley Worker's disease -- Aspergillus spp.: Inhalation of barley particles contaminated with fungus (Aspergillus spp.) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the fungus in the airborne barley particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Beau's syndrome: A syndrome characterized by heart insufficiency and inability of the heart ventricles to completely empty of blood.
  • Berylliosis: Beryllium poisoning which causes granulomas and pulmonary fibrosis.
  • Bird allergy: A bird allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to birds. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, feathers or excrement of the bird. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • Body symptoms: Symptoms affecting the entire body features.
  • Breath symptoms: Breath-related symptoms including breath odor
  • Breathing symptoms: Symptoms affecting the breathing systems.
  • Bronchiectasis: Chronic bronchiole dilation from secretions and blockages.
  • Bronchiolitis obliterans with obstructive pulmonary disease: A rare condition involving the inflammation and thickening of the internal lung structures (bronchioles) which affects breathing. It can be triggered by certain infections, drug reactions or for no obvious reason. The condition often progresses to cause serious respiratory problems or even death though the rate of disease progression is variable.
  • Bronchitis: Inflammation of the bronchi as a symptom
  • Bronchogenic carcinoma: When cells of the lung start growing rapidly in an uncontrolled manner, the condition is called lung cancer .
  • Byssinosis: An occupational lung disease caused by an allergic reaction to the components of cotton. Causes symptoms such as coughing, wheezing and shortness of breath.
  • COPD: Severe obstruction of bronchial air flow typically from bronchitis and/or emphysema.
  • Canary allergy: A canary allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to canaries. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, feathers or excrement from the canary. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • Captopril -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Captopril during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cat allergy: A cat allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to cats. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, saliva or urine of cats. Cats frequently lick themselves which results in saliva sticking to the fur. Thus a person allergic to cats will often react to the fur even if it is not attached to the animal. Frequent washing of the cat may reduce symptoms. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • Cheese Washer's lung: Inhalation of cheese particles contaminated with bacteria in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the bacteria in the airborne cheese particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Cheese Washer's lung -- Penicillium spp.: Inhalation of cheese particles contaminated with bacteria (Penicillium spp.) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the bacteria in the airborne cheese particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical allergy: A chemical allergy refers to an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to a chemical. The specific symptoms that can result can vary amongst patients depending on the type and duration of the exposure and individual response.
  • Chemical burn -- airways: Burns to the airways caused by a chemical - usually through inhalation but can also occur through aspiration if the chemical is swallowed. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures. Immediate medical attention should be sought if chemical burns to the airways are suspected.
  • Chemical burn -- inhalation: Burns to the airways caused by a chemical through inhalation. Symptoms vary depending on the type, quantity and strength of the chemical involved as well as the duration of the exposure to the chemical and promptness of treatment measures. Immediate medical attention should be sought if chemical burns to the airways are suspected.
  • Chemical burns: burns causing protein coagulation
  • Chemical pneumonia: Lung inflammation from inhaled chemicals
  • Chemical poisoning -- 1-Amino-2-propanol: 1-Amino-2-propanol is a chemical used mainly in the synthesis of various pharmaceuticals such as methadone and opioid. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2-Amino-2-methylpropanol: 2-Amino-2-methylpropanol is a chemical used mainly in industrial applications. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetylene Tetrabromide: Acetylene Tetrabromide is a chemical used mainly in mineral separation and as a solvent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acrylic acid: Acrylic acid is a chemical used mainly in the production of resins and acrylic acids which are usually used in adhesives and coatings. It is also used in water treatment and in the production of plastics and detergents. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Allyl chloride: Allyl chloride is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of epichlorohydrin and glycerin but is also used in the production of products such as polyester, varnish plastic adhesive, insecticides, perfumes and pharmaceuticals. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Azinphos-methyl: Azinphos-methyl is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Biphenyl: Biphenyl is a chemical used mainly as a fungicide for fruit packaging and in textile dyes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromide: Bromide is a chemical used for many applications - flame retardant, industrial uses, pesticides, sanitary products, fumigants, medicines, dyes, photographic solutions and water purification. Bromides act as central nervous system depressants and the ingestion of excessive quantities can cause serious symptoms. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Button batteries: Button batteries are small round, button-shaped batteries used in various products such as watches and calculators. Generally, swallowing the batteries will cause no problems unless it becomes stuck in the gastrointestinal tract. The batteries may also be shoved up the nose by children which can cause respiratory problems depending on how far the battery is pushed and how long it remains undetected. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Captafol: Captafol is a chemical used mainly as a fungicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chalk: Swallowing chalk can cause a variety of gastrointestinal symptoms in some people if sufficient quantities are eaten. Eye irritation can also result from eye exposure. The chalk dust can also cause respiratory symptoms in some people. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chloralose: Chloralose is a chemical used mainly in poisons for rodents and crows . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Cyclohexanol: Cyclohexanol is a chemical used mainly as an industrial solvent and used in the manufacture of products such as plastic, nylon, soap, varnish, paint, lacquer, degreasers, detergent and insecticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dimethyl Phthalate: Dimethyl Phthalate is a chemical used mainly as an insect repellant . Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Dimethylamine: Dimethylamine is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of products such as detergent, pharmaceuticals and in leather tanning. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylamine: Ethylamine is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of dyes, rayon, rocket propellant, as a fuel additive and in leather-tanning and cellulose treatment. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Ethylene Dichloride: Ethylene Dichloride is a chemical used mainly in fat solvents and as a fumigant. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Furfural: Furfural is a chemical used mainly as an industrial solvent and in the manufacture of fuels, foods and ant poisons. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Metobromuron: Metobromuron is a chemical used mainly as a herbicide. The chemical is generally considered toxic only if large amounts are consumed. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Nitric Acid: Nitric Acid is a chemical used mainly as a cleaning agent for food and dairy equipment, in explosives, metal etching, in liquid fuel rockets and as a laboratory reagent. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Oil-based paint: Oil-based paint contains various chemicals which can cause serious symptoms if sufficient quantities are swallowed or if other types of exposure occurs. These paint contain toxic hydrocarbons as well as various other heavy metals depending on the type of paint. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Polychlorinated Dibenzofurans: Polychlorinated Dibenzofurans are a group of chemicals that are usually formed as a byproduct of various industrial processes. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Rotenone: Rotenone is a naturally occurring chemical found in certain plants (Derris and Lonchocarpus sp.). It gives the plant insecticidal and pesticidal properties and is hence utilized commercially as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Inhalation tends to cause more severe symptoms than ingestion. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Sodium Oleate: Sodium Oleate is a chemical used mainly in insecticides. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tecnazene: Tecnazene is a chemical used mainly to prevent sprouts forming on stored potatoes and as a greenhouse fungicide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is considered only mildly toxic but should nevertheless be handled with care. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thioglycolic Acid: Thioglycolic Acid is a chemical used mainly in leather processing and in the production of hair straightening solutions, hair removal products, polyvinyl chloride, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and in metal detection reactions. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Toluene Diisocyanate: Toluene Diisocyanate is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of elastomers and polyurethane foams. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical worker's lung (Ammonia): Inhalation of a chemical called Ammonia in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical worker's lung (Chlorine): Inhalation of a chemical called Chlorine in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical worker's lung (Formalin vapours): Inhalation of a chemical called Formalin vapours in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical worker's lung (Hydrogen Sulfide): Inhalation of a chemical called Hydrogen Sulfide in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical worker's lung (Methylene Diisocyanate): Inhalation of a chemical called Methylene Diisocyanate in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical worker's lung (Nitrogen dioxide): Inhalation of a chemical called Nitrogen dioxide in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical worker's lung (Ozone): Inhalation of a chemical called Ozone in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical worker's lung (Phosgene): Inhalation of a chemical called Phosgene in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical worker's lung (Sulfur dioxide): Inhalation of a chemical called Sulfur dioxide in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical worker's lung (Trimellitic anhydride): Inhalation of a chemical called trimellitic anhydride)in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical worker's lung -- Lacquer: Inhalation of a lacquer (which contains isocyanates) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chemical worker's lung -- Varnish: Inhalation of a varnish (which contains isocyanates) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the chemical. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Chicken allergy: A chicken allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to chickens. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, feathers or excrement from the chicken. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • Childhood asthma: Childhood asthma is a type of asthma that occurs during childhood. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways. The severity of symptoms is variable. The asthma may be triggered by allergens, pollution, viral infections and many other factors.
  • Chronic berylliosis: A condition that results from long term exposure to beryllium in the form of dust or fumes. The lungs, skin eyes or blood may be affected.
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome: A persistent debilitating fatigue of recent onset
  • Chronic laryngotracheitis: It is inflammation of the mucous membrane lining the larynx, which is located in the upper part of the respiratory tract and the trachea which may cause respiratory obstruction.
  • Chronic sinusitis: Chronic inflammation of the sinuses
  • Chronic tonsillitis: Chronic infection/inflammation of the tonsils.
  • Coal worker's pneumoconiosis: An often asymptomatic chronic lung disease caused by inhaling coal tust which then deposits in the lungs. Also called black lung disease, anthracosis or miner's pneumoconiosis.
  • Coffee Worker's lung: Inhalation of coffee bean dust in occupational settings can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to small air-borne particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Collapsed lung: Deflation of all or part of one lung
  • Common symptoms: The most common symptoms
  • Congenital Antithrombin III Deficiency: A hereditary condition resulting in a deficiency of antithrombin III which affects blood clotting
  • Cor Triatriatum: A rare congenital malformation where the heart has three atria instead of the normal two due to the presence of a separating membrane.
  • Cough: Any type of coughing symptom.
  • Coughing spasms: Spasms of coughing attacks
  • Croup: A condition characterized by an acute partial obstruction of the upper airway on young children
  • Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic fibrosis is a hereditary disease affecting the exocrine (mucus) glands of the lungs, liver, pancreas, and intestines, causing progressive disability due to multisystem failure.
  • Dermatomyositis: A muscle disease characterized by chronic muscle inflammation resulting in progressive muscle weakness and a characteristic rash.
  • Detergent worker's disease: Inhalation of detergent in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Diffuse leiomyomatosis with Alport syndrome: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by multiple tumors (in the esophagus, female genitals, trachea and bronchus) and Alport syndrome which involves progressive kidney dysfunction.
  • Diffuse panbronchiolitis: A pulmonary disease involving chronic inflammation of the airways which causes obstruction and can lead to respiratory failure and even death if untreated.
  • Dog allergy: A dog allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to dogs. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, saliva or urine of dogs. Dogs frequently lick themselves which results in saliva sticking to the fur. Thus a person allergic to dogs will often react to the fur even if it is not attached to the dog. Frequent washing of the dog may reduce symptoms. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • Drug Allergies: Allergies to medications or other drugs.
  • Drug-induced asthma: Drug-induced associated asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is caused by taking a particular drug. There is a large range of drugs that have the potential to produce asthmatic symptoms in susceptible people. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Dry cough: Dry non-productive cough without producing sputum
  • Duck allergy: A duck allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to ducks. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, feathers or excrement from the duck. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • Dust mite allergies: Allergy to dust mites in household dust.
  • Emotional stress related asthma: Emotional stress related asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is caused by emotional stress.
  • Emphysema: Emphysema is a type of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It is defined as an abnormal, permanent enlargement of the air spaces distal to the terminal bronchioles accompanied by destruction of their walls and without obvious fibrosis.
  • Enalapril -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Enalapril (an ACE inhibitor) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Eosinophilic asthma: Eosinophilic asthma is a type of asthma that is characterized by increased levels of eosinophils (a type of white blood cell) in the airways. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways which makes breathing difficult. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Epiglottitis: is the inflammation of the epiglottis and is a medical emergency
  • Esophageal Atresia and/or Tracheoesophageal Fistula: A rare condition characterized by an underdeveloped esophagus where the esophagus is not connected to the stomach. An abnormal opening between the trachea and esophagus may or may not also be present. The two abnormalities usually occur together.
  • Esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula: A rare condition characterized by an abnormal opening between the trachea and esophagus as well as an underdeveloped esophagus where the esophagus is not connected to the stomach.
  • Exercise induced asthma: Exercise-induced asthma is a condition of respiratory difficulty that is triggered by aerobic exercise and lasts several minutes. Symptoms of EIA may resemble those of allergic asthma, or they may be much more vague and go unrecognized, resulting in probable underreporting of the disease.
  • Extrinsic asthma: Extrinsic asthma is a type of asthma that is triggered by an exposure to an allergen. Extrinsic asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways in response to exposure to the allergen. Examples of possible allergens include dust mites, pollen and mould. The severity of symptoms and allergen involved is variable.
  • Face symptoms: Symptoms affecting the face
  • Farmer's lung -- Micropolyspora faeni: Inhalation of moldy contaminated with bacteria (Micropolyspora faeni) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the bacteria in the moldy hay particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Farmer's lung -- Thermoactinomyces vulgaris: Inhalation of moldy contaminated with bacteria (Thermoactinomyces vulgaris) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the bacteria in the moldy hay particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Fascioliasis: A rare parastitic infectious disease caused by liver fluke Fasciola hepatica which can cause blockage of the bile ducts in the liver.
  • Feather Plucker's lung: Inhalation of particles from chicken feathers in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the proteins in the chicken feathers. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Fever: Raised body temperature usually with other symptoms.
  • Fish meal worker's lung: Inhalation of a fish meal particles in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the fish meal particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Food allergy related asthma: Food allergy related asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is caused by an allergic reaction to a particular food. This is a very uncommon cause of asthma.
  • Furrier's lung: Inhalation of a dust from animal fur in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the animal fur. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Gabapentin -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Gabapentin during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Gastroesophageal reflux: Gastroesophageal reflux is the abnormal regurgitation of stomach acid up into the esophagus.
  • Goodpasture's syndrome: A condition which is characterized by glomerulonephritis and pulmonary hemorrhage with circulating antibodies against basement membranes.
  • Goose allergy: A goose allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to geese. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, feathers or excrement of the goose. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • HIV/AIDS: HIV is a sexually transmitted virus and AIDS is the progressive immune failure that HIV causes.
  • Hamman-Rich syndrome: A rare acute lung disease where the lung sufferers progressive inflammation and fibrosis which often leads to death.
  • Hay Worker's disease -- Aspergillus spp.: Inhalation of hay particles contaminated with fungus (Aspergillus spp.) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the fungus in the airborne hay particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Hay fever: A seasonal condition which is a form of allergic rhinitis
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Heartburn: Heartburn is a burning sensation experienced behind the breastbone in the upper chest due to regurgitation of stomach contents.
  • Hookworm: Worm spread through feces with poor sanitation.
  • Human carcinogen -- Cyclophosphamide: Cyclophosphamide is a chemical deemed to be carcinogenic to humans. The carcinogenicity of the substance may be influenced by the nature (e.g. inhalation, ingestion, skin contact), duration and level of exposure. Cyclophosphamide exposure is associated mainly with an increased risk of developing leukemia.
  • Humidifier lung: Inhalation of humidifier vapors contaminated with pathogens such as amoeba and certain bacteria can cause various lung symptoms in occupational settings. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the pathogens. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Humidifier lung -- Acanthamoeba spp.: Inhalation of humidifier vapors contaminated with a pathogen called (Acanthamoeba spp.) can cause various lung symptoms in occupational settings. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the pathogens. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Humidifier lung -- Bacillus spp.: Inhalation of humidifier vapors contaminated with a pathogen called (Bacillus spp.) can cause various lung symptoms in occupational settings. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the pathogens. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Humidifier lung -- Naegleria gruberi: Inhalation of humidifier vapors contaminated with a pathogen called (Naegleria gruberi) can cause various lung symptoms in occupational settings. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the pathogens. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Humidifier lung -- Penicillum spp.: Inhalation of humidifier vapors contaminated with a pathogen called (Penicillum spp.) can cause various lung symptoms in occupational settings. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the pathogens. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Hydrocarbon poisoning: Excessive ingestion of hydrocarbon compounds such as turpentine, pine oil, cleaning agents, fuel, polishes, kerosene and car products.
  • Idiopathic myopathy: A rare condition involving inflammation of the skeletal muscles which become weak and wasted.
  • IgE mediated gastrointestinal food allergy: An adverse reaction by the body's immune system to food that is driven by IgE. IgE antibodies specific to food molecules bind with the circulating food allergen and cause the release of immune response molecules such as cytokines. Symptoms usually occur soon after exposure to the allergen and usually cause skin symptoms. Severe cases may result in anaphylaxis. It is associated with allergic conditions such as pollen-food allergy and other oral allergies and immediate gastrointestinal hypersensitivity.
  • Infant asthma: Infant asthma is a type of asthma that occurs during childhood. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways. The severity of symptoms is variable. The asthma may be triggered by allergens, pollution, viral infections and many other factors.
  • Intrinsic asthma: Asthma that is not allergy related.
  • Laryngitis: This is where there is an inflammation of the laryngitis
  • Laryngopharyngeal reflux: A gastrointestinal disorder where acid reflux affects the throat and causes irritation.
  • Left heart failure: Failure of the left side of the heart
  • Legionnaires' disease: A severe respiratory disease which is caused by the Legionella pneumophila bacteria. The condition can result in pneumonia and can be life-threatening.
  • Leiomyomatosis of esophagus, cataract and hematuria: A very rare syndrome characterized mainly by cataracts, benign esophageal tumors and kidney cell cancer.
  • Lisinopril -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lisinopril during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Lung abscess: The formation of a localized collection of puss in a cavity in the lungs
  • Lung cancer: Lung cancer is a disease of uncontrolled cell growth in tissues of the lung. This growth may lead to metastasis, which is the invasion of adjacent tissue and infiltration beyond the lungs. Most lung tumors are malignant.
  • Lung scarring: Damage to the lung tissue from and cause can cause scarring of the lung tissue. Small scars generally cause no problems but large or widespread scarring can affect breathing. Causes of lung scarring include pneumonia, lung infections, cystic fibrosis, asbestosis, silicosis and sarcoidosis and tuberculosis. Excessive lung scarring can lead to thickening and stiffening of the lung tissue which can make breathing more difficult. Scar tissue can also be a result of damage due to cancer.
  • Lung symptoms: Symptoms affecting one or both lungs.
  • Lymphangioleiomyomatosis: A very rare progressive disease where an unusual type of muscle cell (smooth muscle) infiltrates the lungs which eventually obstructs the flow of air through the lungs. The cause is unknown and generally occurs in women of child bearing age.
  • Malt Worker's disease: Inhalation of malt particles contaminated with fungus in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the fungus in the airborne malt particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Malt Worker's disease -- Aspergillus spp.: Inhalation of malt particles contaminated with fungus (Aspergillus spp.) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the fungus in the airborne malt particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Measles: Once common viral infection now rare due to vaccination.
  • Mercury poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to mercury.
  • Mixed asthma: Mixed asthma is a type of asthma that can be caused by an exposure to an allergen as well as other intrinsic triggers such as exposure to cold air or cigarette smoke. Mixed asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways that may or may not involve an allergic reaction.
  • Mixed granulocytic asthma: Mixed granulocytic asthma is a type of asthma that is characterized by increased levels of eosinophils and neutrophils (types of white blood cell) in the airways. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways which makes breathing difficult. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Mold allergies: Allergies to airborne or household molds.
  • Mollusk-shell hypersensitivity -- inhalation: Inhalation of sea snail shell dust in occupational settings can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to small air-borne particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Mouldy shower curtain hypersensitivity pneumonitis: Inhalation of mold from mouldy shower curtains can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the wood dust. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Mouth symptoms: Symptoms of the mouth or oral area.
  • Mushroom Worker's lung -- Micropolyspora faeni: Inhalation of mushroom particles and compost contaminated with bacteria (Micropolyspora faeni) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the bacteria in the airborne mushroom particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Mushroom Worker's lung -- Thermoactinomyces vulgaris: Inhalation of mushroom particles and compost contaminated with bacteria (Thermoactinomyces vulgaris) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the bacteria in the airborne mushroom particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Mycoplasma pneumoniae: Bacterial respiratory infection
  • Mycosis fungoides: Mycosis fungoides is a rare form of T-cell lymphoma of the skin. The disease is typically slowly progressive and chronic.
  • Mycosis fungoides, familial: A rare form of lymphatic cancer (T-cell lymphoma) that primarily affects the skin and tends to occur with higher than normal frequency within a family. The skin is affected first, then the lymph nodes become inflamed and usually cancerous. The cancer can then spread to organs such as the liver, lungs and bone marrow. Survival depends on how early treatment starts. Patients diagnosed in the early stages can survive more than 12 years whereas once the cancer has spread to other organs, death usually occurs within three years.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neutrophilic asthma: Neutrophilic asthma is a type of asthma that is characterized by increased levels of neutrophils (a type of white blood cell) in the airways. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways which makes breathing difficult. The severity of symptoms is variable. This type of asthma is usually driven by such things as pollution and viral infections rather than exposure to an allergen.
  • Nodular goiter: A condition which is characterized by a goiter with nodules within the gland
  • Non-allergic asthma: Non-allergic asthma is a type of asthma that is not triggered by exposure to an allergen. Non-allergic asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways that can be caused by such things as exercise, cold air, cigarette smoke and inhalation of chemicals.
  • Non-atopic asthma: Non-atopic asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is not caused by exposure to an allergen. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Obesity associated asthma: Obesity associated asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is associated with obesity. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Beauticians: People employed as beauticians may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to henna extract, ammonium thioglycolate, monoethanolamine, hexamethyhlenamine and persulfate salts. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Boiler Cleaners: People employed as boiler cleaners may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to vanadium and vanadium pentoxide. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Brewery Workers: People employed as brewery workers may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to Choloramine T and sulfone chloramides. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Cement Industry: People employed in the cement industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to chromates and dichromates. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Chemical Industry: People employed in the chemical industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to trimellitic anhydride, nickel and nickel compounds. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Chemists: People employed as chemists may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to naphthalene diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Cosmetics Industry: People employed in the cosmetics industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to carmine. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Detergent Industry: People employed in the detergent industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to amylases and proteases. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Dye Industry: People employed in the dye industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to carmine. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Electroplating Industry: People employed in the electroplating industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to chromium and nickel and chromium and nickel compounds. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Epoxy Resin Industry: People employed in the epoxy resin industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to phthalic anhydride, hexahydrophthalic anhydrides, trimellitic anhydride, phthalic anhydride and tetrachlorophthalic anhydride. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Fabric Dying Industry: People employed in the fabric dying industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to anthroquinone. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Fire Retardant Industry: People employed in the fire retardant industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to himic anhydride. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Foundry Workers: People employed as foundry workers may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to diphenylmethane diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Fur Dying: People employed in the fur dying industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to paraphenyl diamine. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Galvanising Industry: People employed in the galvanising industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to Zinc. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Hairdressers: People employed as hairdressers may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to ammonium thioglycolate, monoethanolamine, hexamethyhlenamine and persulfate salts. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Hard Metal Industry: People employed in the hard metal industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to cobalt. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Hospital staff: People employed as hospital staff may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to enfluorane anaesthetic. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Jewellery Industry: People employed in the jewellery industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to platinum, nickel and nickel compounds. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Laminating Industry: People employed in the laminating industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to toluene diisocyanate and diphenylmethane diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Laxative Manufacturing: People employed in the laxative manufacturing industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to psyllium. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Manufacturing Industry: People employed in the manufacturing industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to amylases and proteases. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Medical Sterilisers: People employed as medical sterilisers may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to ethylene oxide. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Nurses: People employed as nurses may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to cephalosporins. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Paint Manufacturing Industry: People employed in the paint manufacturing industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to hexamethylene diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Photocopying workers: People employed as photocopying workers may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to diazonium salt. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Polyurethane Foam Industry: People employed in the polyurethane foam industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to diphenylmethane diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Polyurethane Industry: People employed in the polyurethane industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to toluene diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Refining Industry: People employed in the refining industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to platinum. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Rubber Workers: People employed as rubber workers may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to azodicarboamide and ethylene oxide. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Spray Paining Industry: People employed in the spray painting industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to hexamethylene diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Tanning Industry: People employed in the tanning industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to chromium and chromium compounds. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Turbine Cleaners: People employed as turbine cleaners may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to vanadium and vanadium pentoxide. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational Asthma -- Varnish Manufacture Industry: People employed in the varnish manufacture industry may face an increased risk of developing asthma due to exposure to toluene diisocyanate. The risk may vary depending on the duration and level of exposure of the exposure.
  • Occupational asthma: Occupational asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that occurs in a workplace setting. There is a wide range of chemicals and other airway irritants that are used in a workplace settings and can result in inhalation exposure that can produce asthma symptoms. The severity of symptoms is variable. Occupational exposures can also exacerbate existing asthma symptoms.
  • Oropharyngeal cancer: Oropharyngeal cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the tissues of the oropharynx. The oropharynx is the middle part of the pharynx (throat) behind the mouth, and includes the back one-third of the tongue, the soft palate, the side and back walls of the throat, and the tonsils.
  • OxyContin withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when OxyContin use is discontinued or reduced. OxyContin is a pain reliever but is also used as a recreation drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Paprika splitter's lung: Inhalation of paprika dust in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the contaminated paprika dust. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Paprika splitter's lung -- Mucor Stolonifer: Inhalation of paprika dust contaminated with a pathogen (Mucor Stolonifer) in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the contaminated paprika dust. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Parakeet allergy: A parakeet allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to parakeets. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, feathers or excrement of the parakeet. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • Parrot Breeder's disease: Inhalation of parrot dropping in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the proteins in the parrot droppings. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Parrot allergy: A parrot allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to parrots. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, feathers or excrement of the parrot. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • Paucigranulocytic asthma: Paucigranulocytic asthma is a type of asthma that is characterized by normal levels of eosinophils and neutrophils (types of white blood cell) in the airways. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways which makes breathing difficult. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Pauli's hypersensitivity pneumonitis: Inhalation of Pauli's reagent in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Pet allergy: A pet allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pets such as cats and dogs. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, saliva or urine of the animal. Animals frequently lick themselves which results in saliva sticking to the fur. Thus a person allergic to animals will often react to the fur even if it is not attached to the animal. Frequent washing of the animal may reduce symptoms. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • Phosgene oxime -- inhalation exposure: Phosgen oxime has no useful purpose but may be manufactured for use as a chemical weapon. The chemical is poisonous and exposure can occur through ingestion, inhalation and absorption through the skin. Inhalation causes mainly respiratory symptoms. The severity of symptoms will vary depending on the extent and duration of the exposure.
  • Phosgene oxime exposure: Phosgene oxime has no useful purpose but may be manufactured for use as a chemical weapon. The chemical is poisonous and exposure can occur through ingestion, inhalation and absorption through the skin. Symptoms will vary depending on the method of exposure, degree of exposure and duration of exposure. The chemical can penetrate clothing.
  • Pigeon Breeder's disease: Inhalation of pigeon dropping in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the proteins in the pigeon droppings. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Pigeon allergy: A pigeon allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to pigeons. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, feathers or excrement of the pigeon. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • Plant poisoning -- Lobeline: Lobeline is a chemical found naturally in plants called lobelias. Ingesting plants containing the chemical produces symptoms similar to the effects of nicotine.
  • Pneumonia: Lung infection or inflammation (as a symptom)
  • Postnasal drip: Drip from the nose down the back of the throat
  • Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis: An abnormal condition where phospholipids and proteins are deposited in the alveoli of the lung. More prevalent in males with some patients having no symptoms and others having an unproductive cough and progressive dyspnea with exertion. The condition increases the risk of secondary infection. Also called alveolar proteinosis.
  • Pulmonary embolism: The occurrence of an embolism which blocks blood vessels in the lungs
  • Pulmonary fibrosis: A scarring condition that affects the lungs
  • Pulmonary hypertension: The occurrence of hypertension the blood vessels of the lungs
  • Pulmonary oedema: Caused by changes in the hydrostatic forces in capillaries or increased capillary permeability that results in diffuse oedema in pulmonary tissues and air spaces
  • Pulmonary pseudolymphoma: An uncommon condition characterized by the abnormal accumulation of lymphocytes in the lungs or the lymph glands in the mediastinum. The anomaly may appear similar to a lymphoma.
  • Pulp Worker's disease: Inhalation of pulp particles contaminated with fungus in an occupational setting (paper mill industry) can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the fungus in the airborne pulp particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Pulp Worker's disease -- Alternaria spp.: Inhalation of pulp particles contaminated with fungus (Alternaria spp.) in an occupational setting (e.g. paper mill industry) can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the fungus in the airborne wood pulp particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Respiratory symptoms: Symptoms affecting the breathing systems.
  • Respiratory tract infections:
  • Rhinovirus infection: Infection with the rhinovirus which can be transmitted through direct contact with contaminated secretions from an infected person (e.g. sneezing or nasal or oral secretions on hands). The rhinovirus can cause the common cold and pharyngitis.
  • Rodent allergy: A rodent allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to rodents such as mice and rats. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, saliva or urine of rodents. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • Runny nose: Runny nasal discharge (medically named coryza)
  • Salicylate-sensitive asthma: Salicylate-sensitive asthma is a type of asthma that is triggered by salicylates which can be found in medications such as aspirin as well as many foods. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways which makes breathing difficult. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Seasonal asthma: Seasonal asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is triggered by the presence of airborne allergens such as pollen. This type of asthma tends to occur in a seasonal cycle in response to seasonal increases in levels of pollen and other airborne allergens in the air. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Severe cough: Acute or persistent cough
  • Severe heartburn: When the heartburn persists even after having taken the medication that normally works, it is known as severe heartburn.
  • Severe, refractory asthma: Severe refractory asthma is a type of asthma that is severe and difficult to treat. Asthma involves constriction and inflammation of the airways which makes breathing difficult.
  • Silent asthma: Silent asthma is a type of asthma that occurs suddenly and is usually severe. The wheezing that usually precipitates and asthma attack is usually absent or very mild. Silent asthma involves rapid constriction and inflammation of the airways which makes breathing difficult.
  • Silkworm dropping lung: Inhalation of silkworm dropping particles in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Sinusitis: Inflammation of the sinus passages (as a symptom)
  • Sparrow allergy: A sparrow allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to sparrows. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, feathers or excrement of the bird. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • Stachybotrys chartarum: A toxic black slimy mold that can be found in damp indoor environments. Exposure can occur through the skin, ingestion or inhalation. It can causes conditions such as "sick building syndrome".
  • Steroid-dependant asthma: Steroid-dependant asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that can be managed only through regular use of oral steroids. Excessive use of steroids can lead to side effects so other therapies are often advised e.g. immunoglobulin therapy. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Steroid-resistant asthma: Steroid-resistant asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that does not respond to treatment with steroids. However, higher than normal doses of steroids will alleviate symptoms in most patients but the higher doses carries an increased risk of side effects from steroid use. Other therapies such as immunoglobulin therapy is advised. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Steroid-resistant asthma, type I: Steroid-resistant asthma is a type of asthma that doesn't respond to steroid treatment. Steroids work by attaching to a particular part of the T-cells which make up the immune system. In type I, the T-cells have sufficient attachment points for the steroids but they are ineffective. In type II, there are insufficient attachment points for the steroids. Steroid-resistant asthma (like other forms of asthma) involves rapid constriction and inflammation of the airways which makes breathing difficult.
  • Steroid-resistant asthma, type II: Steroid-resistant asthma is a type of asthma that doesn't respond to steroid treatment. Steroids work by attaching to a particular part of the T-cells which make up the immune system. In type I, the T-cells have sufficient attachment points for the steroids but they are ineffective. In type II, there are insufficient attachment points for the steroids which make them less effective or completely ineffective. Steroid-resistant asthma (like other forms of asthma) involves rapid constriction and inflammation of the airways which makes breathing difficult.
  • Steroid-sensitive asthma: Steroid-sensitive asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that responds well to treatment with steroids. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Stress incontinence: The occurrence of incontinence when the bladder is under stress
  • Strongyloidiasis: A parasitic infectious disease involving the intestines and caused by the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis. Infection usually occurs in crowded, unsanitized populations.
  • Suberosis: Inhalation of cork particles contaminated with mould in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the mould in the airborne cork particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Thatched Roof disease: Inhalation of thatched roof particles in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Throat symptoms: Symptoms affecting the throat
  • Thymic epithelial tumor: A tumor that develops in the outer layers (epithelial) layers of the thymus. The tumor may be malignant or benign. The thymus produces white blood cells.
  • Thyroid hormone plasma membrane transport defect: Thyroid problems caused by a defect in the transport of a thyroid hormone called T4 (thyroxine) within the body. The thyroid produces excessive hormones to try to compensate for that inability of the body to utilize the hormone.
  • Tobacco Worker's disease: Inhalation of mold on tobacco in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Tobacco smoke associated asthma: Tobacco smoke associated asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is caused by exposure to tobacco smoke. The severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Torulopsis: A type of yeast infection caused by Torulopsis glabrata. The fungus is often found in normal healthy skin, respiratory system, genitourinary system and gastrointestinal system and it generally only becomes a problem in weakened or immunocompromised people. They type of symptoms are determined by where and how severe the infection is.
  • Tourette Syndrome: A neurological disorder involving vocal and movement tics where where uncontrollable movements or verbal utterances are made.
  • Tubatoxin poisoning: Tubatoxin is a naturally occurring chemical found in certain plants (Derris and Lonchocarpus sp.). It gives the plant insecticidal and pesticidal properties and is hence utilized commercially as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. Inhalation tends to cause more severe symptoms than ingestion. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Tuberculosis: Bacterial infection causing nodules forming, most commonly in the lung.
  • Turkey allergy: A turkey allergy is an adverse reaction by the body's immune system to turkeys. The allergy is usually associated with the skin, feathers or excrement from the turkey. The body's immune system produces immunoglobulin E (IgE - an antibody) and histamine in response to contact with the allergen. The specific symptoms that can result can vary considerably amongst patients e.g. skin and respiratory symptoms.
  • Type A influenza subtype H1: The H1 subtype of influenza is a strain of the type A influenza virus that can cause cause serious illness and result in pandemics. Influenza is viral respiratory infection. The virus is very contagious and can cause severe illness especially in patients who are very young or old or have some other medical condition as well. The severity of symptoms can vary but usually involves respiratory and constitutional (e.g. headache, aching muscles) symptoms. The influenza virus can mutate and produce different strains though the symptoms are the same. This frequent mutation means that people need regular vaccinations to ensure they are protected against new strains as they arise.
  • Upper respiratory tract infection: The occurrence of an infection of the upper respiratory tract
  • Urinary incontinence: Inability to fully control urination.
  • Virus-induced asthma: Virus-induced asthma refers to inflammation and constriction of the airways that is triggered by a viral respiratory infection. This form of asthma usually has a sudden onset and is relatively severe. Viral respiratory infections can also exacerbate existing asthma symptoms.
  • Visceral leishmaniasis: A tropical disease caused by a protozoan organism and transmitted to humans through sand fly bites. Also called Assam fever, black fever, dumdum fever, ponos or kala-azar.
  • Wegener's granulomatosis: A rare disease involving blood vessel inflammation which can affect the blood flow to various tissues and organs and hence cause damage. The respiratory system and the kidneys are the main systems affected.
  • Wet cough: Wet productive cough producing sputum
  • Whooping Cough: An infectious condition caused by the bacteria Bordetella pertussis
  • Wine Grower's lung: Inhalation of grape mold particles in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Wood trimmer's disease: Inhalation of wood trimming particles in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Woodworker's lung: Inhalation of a wood particles in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the wood particles. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Woodworker's lung -- Cedar dust: Inhalation of a wood dust from the Cedar tree in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the wood dust. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Woodworker's lung -- Mahogany dust: Inhalation of a wood dust from the mahogany tree in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the wood dust. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Woodworker's lung -- Maple dust: Inhalation of a wood dust from the maple tree in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the wood dust. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Woodworker's lung -- Oak dust: Inhalation of a wood dust from the oak tree in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the wood dust. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Woodworker's lung -- Pine dust: Inhalation of a wood dust from the pine tree in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the wood dust. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.
  • Woodworker's lung -- Spruce dust: Inhalation of a wood dust from the spruce tree in an occupational setting can cause various lung symptoms. The severity of symptoms varies depending on the duration of the exposure. The lung symptoms result from the body's immune system reacting to exposure to the wood dust. Chronic exposure can lead to progressive lung symptoms which can gradually lead to symptoms such as weight loss and eventually lung scarring and possibly even respiratory failure in severe cases. Acute exposure results in symptoms such as fever, chills, shortness of breath and body aches.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Coughing:

The following list of conditions have 'Coughing' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Coughing:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Coughing' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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