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Symptoms » Cramps » Glossary
 

Glossary for Cramps

Medical terms related to Cramps or mentioned in this section include:

  • Abdominal Pain: Pain in the abdominal area or stomach.
  • Abdominal cramps: Painful muscular contractions occurring in the abdomen.
  • Abdominal pain: Pain in the abdominal area or stomach.
  • Acanthosis nigricans muscle cramps acral enlargement: A rare syndrome characterized mainly by muscle cramps, dark velvety patches of skin and large hands and feet.
  • Acid-Base Imbalance: A disruption to the normal acid-base equilibrium in the body. There are four main groups of disorder involving an acid-base imbalance: respiratory acidosis or alkalosis and metabolic acidosis or alkalosis. Obviously the severity of symptoms is determined by the degree of imbalance.
  • Acidic dry cell batteries inhalation poisoning: Acidic dry cell batteries contain toxic chemicals which can cause symptoms if inhaled. The smoke emitted from burning batteries can also cause poisoning symptoms if sufficient quantities are inhaled. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved.
  • Acute tin poisoning: Acute ingestion of tin can cause various adverse symptoms.
  • Adenomyosis: presence of ectopic endometrial tissue in the myometrium
  • Adult progressive spinal muscular atrophy, Aran Duchenne type: A group of inherited motor neuron diseases involving progressive muscle weakness, wasting and paralysis due to degeneration of motor neurons in the spinal cord. Muscle weakness and wasting usually starts in the hands and may gradually spread to other muscle groups.
  • Alcohol abuse: Excessive alcohol as a symptom of other conditions
  • Alcoholic Neuropathy: Neurological changes due to nerve damage from long-term alcohol consumption
  • Amlodipine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Amlodipine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Amoebiasis: An infectious disease caused by a free-living amoebic parasite called Entamoeba histolytica. The organism infects the bowel and causes gastroenteritis. Infection occurs through ingesting contaminated food or water. It is more common in countries with poor sanitation. The incubation period may last from days to weeks before symptoms appear.
  • Amphetamine abuse: Use of the stimulant drugs known as amphetamines or "speed"
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: A degenerative motor neuron disease marked by weakness and wasting of the muscles which starts at the hands and legs and spreads to the rest of the body. Death occurs in 2 to 5 years. Also called Lou Gehrig's disease or wasting palsy.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 3: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 3 is caused by a defect on chromosome 18q21.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 4, juvenile: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 4 is caused by a defect on chromosome 9q34.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 5: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 5 is caused by a defect on chromosome 15q15.1-q21.1.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 6: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 16q12.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 7: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 7 is caused by a defect on chromosome 20p13.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 8: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 9 is caused by a defect on chromosome 20q13.3 and is a dominantly inherited, late-onset form.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis type 1:
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 11: An inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 11 is differentiated by the origin of the genetic defect involved (6q21).
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, 9: An inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 9 is differentiated by the origin of the genetic defect involved (14q11).
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial:
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 1: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 1 is characterized by adult onset and relatively fast progression of symptoms. It usually occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 2: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 2 is characterized by childhood or adolescent onset of symptoms which progress very slowly over decades. It occurs in an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 3: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 3 is characterized late adulthood onset of symptoms which progress slowly over 5 years. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 4: A generally fatal progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 4 is characterized by the onset of symptoms before the age of 25 and slow progression over the next few decades. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 5: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is characterized adolescent onset of symptoms with progression varying between 1 and 20 years. It occurs in an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 6: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is characterized adult onset of symptoms with progression varying between 1 and 20 years. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 7: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 7 is characterized adult onset of symptoms with progression varying between less than 5 years to several decades. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, familial type 8: A generally fatal, inherited progressive disease where destruction of motor nerves in the spinal cord and brain stem cause progressive muscle weakness and wasting. Type 8 is characterized by adult onset and relatively slow progression of symptoms. It occurs in an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance.
  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, type 6: An inherited disorder involving progressive degeneration of motor neurons which results in muscle weakness and wasting. Type 6 is caused by a defect on chromosome 16q12.
  • Anaphylaxis: An immediate hypersensitivity reaction due to the exposure of a specific antigen to a sensitized individual
  • Anchovy poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some anchovies contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the anchovy does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The anchovies are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Angiopathy, hereditary, with nephropathy, aneurysms and muscle cramps: An inherited disorder characterized by kidney disease, aneurysms, blood vessel disease and muscle cramps which can last from seconds to minutes.
  • Anterior pituitary hyperhormonotrophic syndrome: A syndrome characterized by the excessive production of various hormones (gonadotrophic, thyrotrophic, lactotrophic and pancreatrophic hormone).
  • Anterior spinal artery syndrome: Neurological symptoms caused by the blockage of the anterior spinal artery. The blockage may be caused by such things as trauma, cancer, thrombosis and arterial disease. Symptoms are determined by the exact location of the blockage.
  • Arachnidism: Poisoning from a spider bite.
  • Arctic bearded seal poisoning: The Arctic Bearded seal is often used as a food source by the arctic inhabitants. Eating the liver and kidneys of the arctic bearded seal can result in a Vitamin A overdose which can cause serious symptoms and even death in extreme cases. It is believed that eating more than 100-250 grams of the seal liver can result in human death.
  • Arterial insufficiency: Where the arterial blood flow is insufficient.
  • Asherman Syndrome: A condition where adhesions form inside the uterus because of uterine surgery or infection. The adhesions may cause menstruation to cease and/or infertility.
  • Asherman's syndrome: Scarring and adhesions that develop in the uterus and can result in menstrual and fertility problems.
  • Ativan withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Ativan (Lorazepam) use is discontinued or reduced. Ativan is an anti-anxiety drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Australian Sea Lion poisoning: The Australian Sea Lion is sometimes used as a food source and is found in the South-Southwest waters of Australia. Eating the liver of the Australian Sea Lion can result in a Vitamin A overdose which can cause serious symptoms and even death in extreme cases.
  • Autoimmune peripheral neuropathy: Damage to peripheral nerves that occurs when the body's own immune system attacks it.
  • Autoimmune thyroid disease associated Celiac Disease: Patients with autoimmune thyroid disease are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Bartter's syndrome, antenatal type 1: A rare genetic kidney disorder that causes hypokalemia. A defect in the NKCC2 gene impairs the functioning of the Na-Cl cotransporter and leads to electrolyte imbalance. The rate of death is high prior to diagnosis.
  • Bartters syndrome, antenatal , type 2: A rare genetic kidney disorder that causes hypokalemia. A defect in the ROMK gene impairs the ATP-regulated potassium channel functioning and leads to electrolyte imbalance.
  • Blind loop syndrome: A rare intestinal defect where there is a small loop in the intestines that allow digesting material to enter but not exit. The symptoms are variable depending on the size and location of the pouch.
  • Blood clots: Multiple coagulums that are located in the blood stream due to the aggregation of blood factors
  • Body symptoms: Symptoms affecting the entire body features.
  • Bone pain: Pain affecting the bones
  • Bonefish poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some bonefish contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the bonefish does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The bonefish are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Bowel obstruction: A condition which is characterized by the obstruction of the gastrointestinal system
  • Box Jellyfish poisoning: A sting from the Box jellyfish contains a chemical which is toxic to the nerves, heart and skin. This jellyfish is mainly found in the waters of Northern Queensland in Australia. The tentacles should not be removed from the patient as it can cause further injection of poison.
  • Brain symptoms: Symptoms affecting the brain
  • Brainerd diarrhea: Diarrheal condition of unknown cause.
  • Bumetanide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Bumetanide during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Calcification of basal ganglia with or without hypocalcemia: Calcification of a part of the brain called the basal ganglia. That calcification may be associated with conditions such as hypothyroidism, cytomegalovirus, and AIDS or may occur for no apparent reason. The severity of the condition may vary greatly from asymptomatic to neurological, psychiatric and movement disorders. The disorder may also progress at variable rates or remain stable depending on the underlying disease process.
  • Carukia barnesi sting: The Irukandji jellyfish is a very small type of box jellyfish found mainly in the northern tropical waters of Australia. Their sting is not particularly painful by the ensuing symptoms can be severe and life-threatening.
  • Celiac Disease: Digestive intolerance to gluten in the diet.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 1: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 6p21.3. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 10: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3q25-q26. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 11: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3q28. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 12: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 6q25.3. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 13: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect in the SH2B3 gene on chromosome 12q24. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 2: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 5q31-q33. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 3: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q33. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 4: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 19p13.1. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 5: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 15q11-q13. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 6: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 4q27. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 7: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 1q31. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 8: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 2q11-q12. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Celiac disease, susceptibility to 9: The susceptibility to developing celiac disease due to a genetic defect on chromosome 3p21. Celiac disease is a small intestine disorder where the ingestion of foods containing wheat gluten and similar proteins leads to the inflammation of the small intestine lining. This damage affects absorption of nutrients and can cause symptoms such as diarrhea. Growth in children due to malabsorption may also result. The type and severity of symptoms is variable.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene: 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene is a chemical used mainly as an explosive agent and in the production of dyes and photographic chemicals. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acetylene Dichloride: Acetylene Dichloride is a chemical used mainly in the production of perfumes, dyes and thermoplastics. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Acidic dry cell batteries: Acidic dry cell batteries contain toxic chemicals and eating the batteries can cause various symptoms if the chemical is released from the battery. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Antimony: Antimony is a chemical often used as an alloy with other metals such as lead. It is used in solder, ammunition, pewter, sheet metal, pipe metal and cable sheaths. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Arsine: Arsine is a chemical used in the making of semiconductors and in the metal refining industry. It is considered a possible chemical agent in chemical warfare. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Barium Nitrate: Barium Nitrate is a chemical used mainly in fireworks, sparklers and ceramic glazes. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorfenvinphos: Chlorfenvinphos is a chemical pesticide used as an insecticide and acaricide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chlorpyrifos: Chlorpyrifos is a chemical used mainly in as an insecticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Coumaphos: Coumaphos is used as a pesticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be absorbed readily through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Gasoline: Gasoline is a chemical used as a fuel for combustion engines. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Hexane: Hexane is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of products such as glue, paint, shoes and furniture. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Methyl parathion: Methyl parathion is a chemical used mainly as an insecticide for various crops. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Monocrotophos: Monocrotophos is a chemical insecticide. The chemical is an organophosphorus compound and ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure. The chemical may be absorbed through the skin.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Perming lotion: Perming lotion is a product used to create permanent hair curls. It contains chemicals such as thioglycolate which can cause poisoning symptoms if exposure occurs. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Strychnine: Strychnine is used as a rodenticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Childhood-onset bipolar disorder: Bipolar disorder is a serious mental illness characterized by recurrent episodes of depression, mania, and/or mixed symptom states. These episodes cause unusual and extreme shifts in mood, energy, and behavior that interfere significantly with normal, healthy functioning.
  • Cholera: An acute bacterial disease transmitted through food or water contaminated with human faeces. The intestinal infection is caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae.
  • Chronic Kidney Disease: Long-term and generally irreversible disease of the kidneys due to infection, obstruction, congenital diseases or generalised diseases causing failure of the kidneys' normal functions.
  • Chronic renal failure: Long-term and generally irreversible disease of the kidneys due to infection, obstruction, congenital diseases or generalised diseases causing failure of the kidneys' normal functions.
  • Chronic renal insufficiency: Chronic lack of function of the renal system. Kidneys.
  • Cimetidine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cimetidine (used as an antihistamine and stomach acid secretion inhibitor) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Clupeotoxism: A potentially fatal condition caused by eating fish such as herrings and anchovies from the Clupeidae family of fish. Severe poisoning can result in death within half an hour of ingestion. Outbreaks have been reported in the Caribbean Sea and the Indian-Pacific area.
  • Cocaine overdose: Cocaine is an illegal and highly addictive recreational drug. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Codeine withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Codeine use is discontinued or reduced. Codeine is a sedative pain-killer. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Collagenous celiac disease: Collagenous celiac disease is used to describe progressive celiac disease characterized by the presence of a layer of collagen (scarring) in the intestinal layers. This form of celiac disease usually fails to respond to treatments such as gluten-free diets. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The condition usually fails to respond to treatment and has a poor prognosis.
  • Common symptoms: The most common symptoms
  • Conn's adenoma: An uncommon (but possible highly underdiagnosed) condition characterized by the excessive production of a hormone called aldosterone by the adrenal gland. The condition may result from the presence of an adrenal adenoma. The severity of the condition is variable with some patients simply suffering high blood pressure and no other symptoms. Due to the high degree of variation in presenting symptoms, the condition may be frequently underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed.
  • Conn's syndrome: An adrenal gland disorder where excess aldosterone hormone is produced resulting in symptoms such as headache, fatigue, nocturia and increased urine production. Also called primary hyperaldosteronism.
  • Conn-Louis Carcinoma: An uncommon (but possible highly underdiagnosed) condition characterized by the excessive production of a hormone called aldosterone by the adrenal gland. The condition results from the presence of an adrenal carcinoma. The severity of the condition is variable with some patients simply suffering high blood pressure and no other symptoms. Due to the high degree of variation in presenting symptoms, the condition may be frequently underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed.
  • Cramp-fasciculations syndrome: A rare condition characterized by muscle pain, cramps, twitching, spasms and other abnormal sensations that occur mainly in the limbs.
  • Cramping abdominal pain: a sudden, involuntary, spasmodic muscular contraction causing severe pain
  • Cramps: Refers to abdominal cramps, muscle cramps, or menstrual cramps
  • Cramps in children: Cramps in children is discomfort that may occur in a wide variety of areas of the body that feel like uncomfortable spasms or contractions.
  • Cramps in pregnancy: Painful muscle contractions, usually in the legs, in a woman who is pregnant.
  • Cryptosporiosis: Contagious parasitic digestive infection
  • Cyclosporiasis: A parasitic disease caused by Cyclospora cayetensis which is transmitted by ingestion of food or water contaminated by infected fecal matter. Some cases are asymptomatic while others can be quite severe and untreated cases can suffer relapses.
  • Cyclosporiosis: A parasitic disease caused by Cyclospora cayetensis which is transmitted by ingestion of food or water contaminated by infected fecal matter. Some cases are asymptomatic while others can be quite severe and untreated cases can suffer relapses.
  • Decreased serum phosphate: A decrease in the level of phosphate in the serum plasma
  • Dehydration: Loss and reduction in body water levels
  • Deposition diseases related fibromyalgia: Deposition diseases related fibromyalgia refers to fibromyalgia that is associated with deposition diseases. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues. Deposition diseases involve the abnormal deposit of material in parts of the body such as the joints e.g. gout.
  • Depressive disorders: Depression or its various related conditions.
  • Depressive symptoms: Inappropriate depressed mood.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 1: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 1 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6p21.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 10: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 10 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10p15.1.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 11: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 11 is linked to a defect on chromosome 14q24.3-q31.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 12: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 12 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q33.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 13: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 13 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q34.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 15: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 15 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q21.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 17: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 17 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q25.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 18: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 18 is linked to a defect on chromosome 5q31.1-q33.1.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 19: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 19 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q24.3.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 2: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 2 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11p15.5.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 20: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 20 is linked to a defect on chromosome 12q24.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 21: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 21 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q25.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 22: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 22 is linked to a defect on chromosome 3p21.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 23: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 23 is linked to a defect on chromosome 4q27.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 24: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 24 is linked to a defect on chromosome 10q23.31.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 3: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 3 is linked to a defect on chromosome 15q26.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 4: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 4 is linked to a defect on chromosome 11q13.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 5: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 5 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q25.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 6: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 6 is linked to a defect on chromosome 18q21.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 7: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 7 is linked to a defect on chromosome 2q31.
  • Diabetes Mellitus, Insulin-Dependent, Susceptibility to, 8: Insulin-dependent diabetes is a condition where the body is unable to produce its own insulin in sufficient quantities to regulate blood sugar levels. Researchers have discovered a number of genes which are linked to an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes. The genetic anomaly alone is not enough to cause the disease but simply increases the risk. Type 81 is linked to a defect on chromosome 6q25-q27.
  • Diabetes-like symptoms: Symptoms similar to those of diabetes
  • Diabetic neuropathy: nerve damage which maybe motor, sensory and autonomic
  • Dilaudid withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Dilaudid use is discontinued or reduced. Dilaudid is a pain-killing drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence. Symptoms are usually peak during the second day and last about a week.
  • Dilutional hyponatremia: Low sodium levels due to excessive fluids.
  • Disequilibrium syndrome: A complication that can occur during or after dialysis and probably caused by abnormal water balance within the brain. Swelling of the brain causes a range of neurological symptoms.
  • Distal hereditary motor neuropathy, type V: An inherited condition characterized by progressive muscle weakness in the hands and feet due to nerve cell damage in the spinal cord.
  • Diverticular Disease: Protrusions of the colon wall (diverticulosis) or their inflammation (diverticulitis)
  • Diverticulitis: diverticulitis is inflammation of an abnormal pouch(diverticulum) in the intestinal wall. These pouches are usually found in the large intestine
  • Donepezil toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Down's syndrome associated Celiac Disease: Patients with Down's syndrome have a high degree of susceptibility to developing celiac disease. Up to 17% of Down's syndrome sufferers develop celiac disease but this rate varies amongst age groups and country of origin. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Dysmenorrhea: Excessive menstrual-like cramping pain
  • Dysthymia: Chronic depression usually associated with elderly people suffering stress from a variety of causes.
  • Dystonia 12: A very rare syndrome involving the early start of symptoms of dystonia and parkinsonism. The onset of the symptoms usually occurs suddenly over weeks or even hours and then progresses slowly.
  • Ecstasy addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use ecstasy on a regular basis. Chronic ecstasy use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Ecstasy is a synthetic psychoactive drug often used as a recreational drug. Street names for the drug includes: XTC, Adam, Clarity, Lover's Speed, Hug, Beans and Love Drug. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Ectopic pregnancy: The occurrence of a pregnancy outside that of the uterus
  • Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, classic type: A rare genetic connective tissue disorder characterized by hypermobile joints, joint dislocations and skin hyperextensibility and fragility - a combination of ED types I and II.
  • Endometriosis: Misplaced uterus tissue causing scar tissue.
  • Epstein Barr virus related fibromyalgia: Epstein Barr virus related fibromyalgia refers to fibromyalgia that is associated with infection with the Epstein Barr virus. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues.
  • Exercise: The use of the human muscles to improve ones health
  • Exercise-induced anaphylaxis: Exercise-induced anaphylaxis is a syndrome in which patients experience the symptoms of anaphylaxis, which occur only after increased physical activity. The symptoms include pruritus and urticaria (typically with giant hives), and, without emergency intervention, the patient may develop hypotension and collapse.
  • FOSMN syndrome: A rare neurodegenerative disorder that starts in the face and spreads to the scalp and upper body. The condition progresses slowly.
  • Familial hematuria, autosomal dominant -- retinal arteriolar tortuosity -- contractures: A rare inherited disorder characterized by blood in the urine, contractures and retinal anomalies.
  • Familial hypopituitarism: Impaired pituitary gland hormone-producing activity that tends to run in families. The failure of the pituitary gland in turn affects other hormone-producing glands which rely on the hormones from the pituitary gland for their activity. Symptoms are determined by the degree and type of hormone deficiency involved.
  • Familial hypothyroidism: Impaired thyroid activity that tends to run in families.
  • Food Additive Adverse reaction -- citric acid intolerance: An intolerance to citric acid is an adverse reaction (not an immune response) by the body to citric acid or foods containing citric acid. Citric acid can be found naturally in foods but is also frequently used as an additive to various foods. The adverse reaction results from the body's inability to metabolize the food. The amount of citric acid required to trigger the onset of symptoms and the nature and severity of symptoms may vary considerably between patients.
  • Gastroenteritis: An infection of the bowel
  • Gitelman syndrome: A rare, relatively mild, genetic kidney disorder that causes hypokalemia. The defective gene (NCCT) impairs the function of the Na-Cl cotransporter.
  • Glycogen Storage Disease XIV: A rare genetic disorder where the deficiency of a chemical called phosphoglucomutase-1 results in problems with glycogen storage within the body. The main symptoms tend to revolve around muscle problems.
  • Glycogen storage disease type 7: An inherited metabolic disorder where there is a deficiency of phosphofructokinase-1 in the muscle and a partial deficiency in red blood cells which prevents glucose being converted to energy during exercise.
  • Gonorrhea: Common sexually transmitted disease often without symptoms.
  • Guam disease: A nerve degeneration disorder that occurs particularly in Guam and involves progressive dementia and parkinsonism which ultimately leads to death.
  • Gullner Syndrome: A rare, inherited kidney condition inherited in a familial manner.
  • Hand cramps: The occurrence of muscular cramps that occur in the hand
  • Hashimoto's thyroiditis: Hashimoto thyroiditis is characterized by the destruction of thyroid cells by various cell- and antibody-mediated immune processes. Patients with Hashimoto thyroiditis have antibodies to various thyroid antigens, the most frequently detected of which include antithyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), antithyroglobulin (anti-Tg), and, to a lesser extent, TSH receptor-blocking antibodies.
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Heart attack: An acute myocardial infarction
  • Heartburn: Heartburn is a burning sensation experienced behind the breastbone in the upper chest due to regurgitation of stomach contents.
  • Heat cramps: Muscle cramps related to exertion
  • Heat exhaustion: major cause of preventable morbidity worldwide
  • Heat stroke: it is a life threatening condition. It is hyperthermia in an advanced state
  • Heat syndrome: A condition which is characterized by an elevated body temperature
  • Heatstroke: it is a life threatening condition. It is hyperthermia in an advanced state
  • Helicobacter pylori bacteria: A bacteria that can infect the gastrointestinal system
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Kombucha: Kombucha can be used as a herbal agent to treat insomnia, arthritis, aches, high blood pressure and to improve the immune system. The ingestion of excessive amounts of Kombucha can result in overdose symptoms.
  • Hereditary carnitine deficiency myopathy: An inherited deficiency of carnitine resulting primarily in muscle weakness.
  • Heroin dependence: The physical and psychological dependence to the recreational drug heroin
  • Heroin withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when heroin use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Herring poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some herrings contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the herring does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The herrings are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Horseshoe Crab poisoning: The Asiatic horseshoe crab is eaten mainly in parts of Asia. Various parts of the crab become toxic during the reproductive season - flesh, unlaid green eggs and viscera. Poisoning most often occurs in Thailand. Eating the crabs should be avoided during reproductive season as poisoning can readily result in death.
  • Hyacinth poisoning: The Hyacinth is a bulb plant which bears stalks of colored, funnel-shaped flowers. The plant contains alkaloids such as lycorine which can cause symptoms if ingested. Large amounts need to be eaten to cause toxicity and skin exposure can cause irritation.
  • Hydrochlorothiazide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Hydrochlorothiazide during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Hyperkalemia: Abnormally high levels of potassium in the blood
  • Hypermagnesemia: An excess in the amount of magnesium in the body
  • Hyperoxia: A high level of oxygen in body tissues. It can be caused by exposure to high atmospheric pressure or long term inhalation of high oxygen concentrations. The high levels of oxygen may affect the lungs, nervous system or the eyes and thus can result in varying symptoms.
  • Hypoadrenocorticism -- hypoparathyroidism -- moniliasis: An autoimmune disorder where hormone production by various glands is reduced. The main features of the disorder are Addison disease and/or hypoparathyroidism and/or chronic candidiasis.
  • Hypocalcaemia: Decreased concentration of calcium in the blood.
  • Hypocalcemia: Low blood calcium levels
  • Hypocalcemia, autosomal dominant: A dominantly inherited disorder of phosphate and calcium metabolism which results in low blood calcium levels. The severity of the condition is highly variable with some patients being asymptomatic.
  • Hypoglycemia: Low blood sugar levels
  • Hypokalemia: Abnormally low levels of potassium in the blood.
  • Hypokalemic periodic paralysis: A rare inherited muscle condition characterized by periods of severe muscle weakness or paralysis which can last from hours to days. Episodes can occur as often as daily or only rarely.
  • Hyponatremia: An electrolyte disturbance involving low sodium levels in the blood. Symptoms are determined by the degree of imbalance. Very low sodium levels can cause water intoxication which can be very dangerous.
  • Hypoparathyroidism: causesd by lack of PTH
  • Hypoparathyroidism X-linked: Low parathyroid levels inherited in a X-linked manner and hence only males are symptomatic and females are asymptomatic carriers.
  • Hypoparathyroidism familial isolated: A rare familial condition involving low levels of parathyroid hormone which upsets the body's ability to regulate calcium and phosphate. The severity of symptoms is determined by the how low the parathyroid hormone level is.
  • Hypophosphatemic rickets: A rare genetic type of rickets involving defective phosphate transport and vitamin D metabolism in the kidneys. Poor calcium absorption from the intestines leads to bone softening.
  • Hypothyroidism: The decreased activity of the thyroid gland
  • Ichthyohepatotoxication: Ichthyohepatotoxication is a condition caused by eating the liver of certain fish. It is believed that the high vitamin A content of the liver leads to vitamin A overdose and the resulting symptoms. Tropical shark livers are associated with this condition.
  • Insulin-resistance syndrome, type A: A syndrome characterized by insulin resistance resulting in distinctive skin lesions called acanthosis nigricans. It is the least severe form of insulin resistance.
  • Intestinal Pseudoobstruction in Adults: A condition characterized by the clinical presentation of obstruction of the intestines when there is no mechanical cause.
  • Intestinal obstruction: Any obstruction that occurs in the gastrointestinal system
  • Intestinal pseudo-obstruction: A digestive disorder where the intestines are unable to contract normally and push food through the digestive system. This results in symptoms similar to an obstruction and hence the name pseudo-obstruction. The walls of the affected gastrointestinal tract becomes thin and the muscles that control its motion start to degenerate.
  • Isaacs syndrome: A rare disorder where muscles suffer from stiffness and cramping, particularly limb muscles.
  • Jejunal diverticulosis: Jejunal diverticulosis is considered to be a generally asymptomatic condition in which the diverticula are pulsion mucosal herniations with walls lacking a muscle layer.
  • Kashin-Bek disease: A type of osteoarthritis occurring mostly in children in China, Korea and Siberia and possibly caused by eating wheat infected with a particular fungus.
  • Kidney symptoms: Symptoms affecting one or both kidneys.
  • Lactate dehydrogenase deficiency type A: A rare genetic disorder where an enzyme deficiency (Lactate dehydrogenase type A) affects the conversion of carbohydrates to energy.
  • Lead poisoning: A type of heavy metal poisoning caused by excessive exposure to lead.
  • Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2C: An autosomal recessive form of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy where muscle weakness and atrophy is caused by mutations of the gamma-sarcoglycan gene. The severity of the condition is greatly variable from wheelchair confinement at the age of 9 years to asymptomatic adults. Most tend to live to their third decade.
  • Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D: An autosomal recessive form of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy where muscle weakness and atrophy is caused by mutations of the alpha-sarcoglycan gene. The severity of the condition is greatly variable from wheelchair confinement at the age of 9 years to asymptomatic adults. Most tend to live to their third decade.
  • Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2E: An autosomal recessive form of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy where muscle weakness and atrophy is caused by mutations of the beta-sarcoglycan gene. The severity of the condition is greatly variable from wheelchair confinement at the age of 9 years to asymptomatic adults. Most tend to live to their third decade.
  • Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2F: An autosomal recessive form of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy where muscle weakness and atrophy is caused by mutations of the delta-sarcoglycan gene. The severity of the condition is greatly variable from wheelchair confinement at the age of 9 years to asymptomatic adults. Most tend to live to their third decade.
  • Limbic encephalitis -- neuromyotonia -- hyperhidrosis -- polyneuropathy: A rare autoimmune disorder involving excessive sweating, dysfunction central nervous system and neuromyotonia. The condition occurs when the body develops antibodies to voltage-gated potassium channels.
  • Lion's mane jellyfish poisoning: The Lion's mane jellyfish is a large stinging jellyfish found in the colder waters of the Atlantic, Arctic and Pacific Oceans. The jellyfish can deliver a painful sting with skin burning and blistering. Prolonged skin exposure can result in breathing problems, muscle cramps and even death.
  • Lipid storage myopathy: A rare condition where the abnormal accumulation of lipids in muscle tissue causes muscle weakness.
  • Magnesium wasting renal: A rare genetic syndrome characterized mainly by excessive loss of magnesium in the urine due to kidney problems.
  • Major depressive disorder related fibromyalgia: Major depressive disorder related fibromyalgia refers to fibromyalgia that is associated with major depression. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues.
  • Malabsorption: Dysfunctional absorption
  • Marine toxins: Toxins produced by marine animals
  • Menstrual cramps: Pelvic or other menstrual-related pains
  • Metabolic disorder: occurs when abnormal chemical reactions occur in the body
  • Miscarriage: Symptoms related to miscarriage or stillbirth.
  • Mitochondrial diseases: Any of a group of mitochondrial disorders affecting cell metabolism and especially muscles.
  • Motor neuron diseases: Any of various disorders of the "motor neurons", nerves that control movement.
  • Motor neuropathy: A rare disorder involving progressive muscle weakness. The rate of progression, severity and age of onset is variable.
  • Movement symptoms: Changes to movement or motor abilities
  • Multifocal motor neuropathy: Disorder of progressive muscle weakness.
  • Multifocal motor neuropathy with conduction block: A very rare disorder involving progressive destruction of the protective sheath around nerves. Usually arms are affected first and occasionally the legs are involved. It is believed to be an immune mediated disorder.
  • Multiple Sclerosis: Autoimmune attack on spinal nerves causing diverse and varying neural problems.
  • Muscle cramps: spasmodic, painful, involuntary contraction of muscles.
  • Muscle pain: Aches or pains affecting the muscles
  • Muscle phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency: A rare inborn error of metabolism where an enzyme deficiency (muscle phosphoglycerate mutase) affects the muscles, especially during periods of strenuous activity.
  • Muscle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the muscles of the body
  • Muscular dystrophy, limb-girdle, autosomal recessive, type 2E: An autosomal recessive form of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy where muscle weakness and atrophy is caused by mutations of the beta-sarcoglycan gene. The severity of the condition is greatly variable from wheelchair confinement at the age of 9 years to asymptomatic adults. Most tend to live to their third decade.
  • Muscular phosphorylase kinase deficiency: A very rare genetic defect which affects muscles and causes rapid fatigue on exertion and muscle cramping and weakness.
  • Musculoskeletal symptoms: Symptoms affecting muscles or bones of the skeleton.
  • Myasthenia, Limb-Girdle, with Tubular Aggregates: A neuromuscular disease affecting the limb-girdle muscles primarily. The condition is distinguished by the presence of abnormal tubular aggregates in the muscle tissue and the absence of weakness in the eye and eyelid muscles which is a usually a symptom of myasthenia gravis.
  • Myasthenic syndrome, congenital, associated with acetylcholine receptor deficiency: A genetic, nonprogressive neuromuscular disorder causing muscle weakness. The severity of symptoms is variable and stress and illness can exacerbate symptoms.
  • Myoadenylate deaminase deficiency: A deficiency of myoadenylate deaminase which affects the process of energy conversion which in turn can cause muscle problems.
  • Myoglobinuria recurrent: Recurring episodes of high urine myoglobin levels due to muscle destruction. The episodes are triggered by prolong exercise or infection.
  • Myoglobinuria, dominant form: A dominantly inherited condition which causes high levels of myoglobin in the urine due to destruction of muscle tissue. Episodes of muscle destruction was usually preceded by fever, virus, alcohol us end excessive exercise.
  • Myokymia: A form of involuntary muscle movement that is best seen by rippling of the skin.
  • Myopathy tubular aggregates: A muscle condition characterized by aggregates of tubular structures in muscle tissue which can cause muscle problems such as camps and pain after exertion.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Neurological symptoms: Any symptoms that are caused by neurological conditions
  • Neuromyotonia: A condition which is characterized by myotonia caused by electrical activity of the peripheral nerve
  • Niacin toxicity: Excessive consumption of niacin can cause symptoms of toxicity.
  • Nifedipine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Nifedipine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Opium withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Opium use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Pain: Any type of pain sensation symptoms.
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease: A condition which is characterized by an infection which is located in the upper female genital tract
  • Peripheral neuropathy: Any loss in the function of the peripheral nervous system
  • Pfiesteria piscicida infection: Pfiesteria piscicida is a tiny marine organism called a dinoflagellate that is found in waters where fresh and salt water mix e.g. at river mouths. It is believed to be responsible for killing fish as well as health problems in humans.
  • Phosphoglucomutase deficiency type 1: A rare genetic disorder where the deficiency of a chemical called phosphoglucomutase-1 results in problems with glycogen storage within the body. The main symptoms tend to revolve around muscle problems.
  • Phosphoglycerate Kinase Deficiency: A condition which is characterized by a deficiency in the enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase
  • Plant poisoning -- Solanine: Solanine is a toxin found naturally in plants from the nightshade family - potatoes, tomatoes, eggplant and capsicum. However, the content is usually quite low except for potatoes which have turned green on light exposure.
  • Polar bear poisoning: Polar bears are often used as a food source by the arctic inhabitants. Eating the liver and kidneys of the polar bear is believed to result in a Vitamin A overdose which can cause serious symptoms and even death in extreme cases. Eating more than 200 grams of Polar bear liver can result in human death however death is considered rare.
  • Porphyria: A group of disorders characterized by excess production of porphyrin or its precursors which affects the skin and/or nervous system.
  • Postpartum hyperthyroidism: Postpartum thyroiditis is a postpartum condition that results in temporary hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) or hypothyroidism.
  • Postpartum hypothyroidism: Postpartum hypothyroidism is a relatively common disorder that has previously been unrecognized and untreated. Although symptoms are temporary and usually mild, most women are relieved to learn that their symptoms are not all in their heads, that they are not "losing their minds," that they don't have a life-threatening disease, and that there are inexpensive, effective treatments to relieve their discomfort.
  • Postpartum thyroiditis: The occurrence of thyroiditis in a woman that occurs after the birth of a child
  • Pregnancy: Symptoms related to pregnancy.
  • Pregnancy symptoms: Symptoms related to pregnancy.
  • Primary Fibromyalgia: Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues. Primary fibromyalgia is a term given to fibromyalgia that occurs for no apparent reason whereas secondary fibromyalgia has an identifiable cause. The primary form is more common than the secondary form.
  • Primary Hyperaldosteronism: An adrenal gland disorder where excess aldosterone hormone is produced resulting in symptoms such as headache, fatigue, nocturia and increased urine production. Also called Conn's syndrome.
  • Primary aldosteronism: primary aldosteronism is a condition which the body's adrenal glands produce too much of the hormone aldosterone, causing retention sodium and loss of potassium
  • Progressive muscular atrophy: A condition which is characterized by painless, degenerative myopathies.
  • Psychiatric disorders associated Celiac Disease: Patients with Psychiatric disorders are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Puss caterpillar poisoning: The puss caterpillar has hollow, poison-filled spines amongst the hairs along its body. It is found mainly in the southern states of the United states. It is often found feeding on trees such as elm, oak and sycamore. Contact with the poisonous spines can result in various symptoms. The puss caterpillar is one of the more poisonous stinging caterpillars. Children tend to be more severely affected than adults.
  • Refractory Celiac Disease: Refractory Celiac Disease is celiac disease that fails to respond to treatment which involves a gluten-free diet. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The condition is quite uncommon and often the resulting poor absorption of nutrients from the intestines leads to a poor prognosis.
  • Respiratory alkalosis: A condition caused by excessive loss of carbon dioxide from the body.
  • Restless Legs Syndrome: A neurological disorder where legs develop and crawling, aching skin sensation which is relived by moving the legs.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis related fibromyalgia: Rheumatoid arthritis related fibromyalgia refers to fibromyalgia that is associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues. Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory form of arthritis and is an autoimmune disease.
  • Ringed seal poisoning: The Ringed seal is often used as a food source by the arctic inhabitants. Eating the liver of the ringed seal can result in a Vitamin A overdose which can cause serious symptoms and even death in extreme cases.
  • Rippling muscle disease: A rare dominantly inherited disorder involving skeletal muscle contractions which produces a visible rippling affect.
  • Rippling muscle disease, 1: A rare dominantly inherited disorder involving skeletal muscle contractions which produces a visible rippling affect. Type 1 involves a defect on chromosome 1q41.
  • Rippling muscle disease, 2: A rare dominantly inherited disorder involving skeletal muscle contractions which produces a visible rippling affect. Type 2 involves a defect on chromosome 3p25.
  • SLE related fibromyalgia: SLE related fibromyalgia refers to fibromyalgia that is associated with systemic lupus erythematosus. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues. SLE is an autoimmune disease that can affect virtually any body system e.g. blood vessels and organs.
  • Sarcoglycanopathy: A form of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy involving abnormalities of the sarcoglycan protein which results in progressive muscle weakness. The severity is greatly variably from wheelchair confinement at the age of 9 years to asymptomatic adults. Most tend to live to their third decade.
  • Sardine poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some sardines contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the sardines does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The sardines are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Sea nettle sting: The Sea Nettle is a poisonous jellyfish found in coastal parts of the Atlantic and Gulf areas - especially eastern US. The jellyfish usually only causes a relatively minor skin rash but prolonged exposure can result in muscle cramps and breathing problems. The severity of the sting depends on the level of exposure.
  • Sea wasp poisoning: The sea wasp can deliver a serious sting and can be found in the waters of Northern Australia and the Philippines. Death can occur in as little as a few minutes if a person is severely stung.
  • Sea wasp poisoning (Chiropsalmus quadrigatus): The Chiropsalmus quadrigatus jellyfish can deliver a serious sting and can be found in the waters of Northern Australia and the Philippines. Death can occur in as little as a few minutes if a person is severely stung.
  • Sea wasp poisoning -- Chironex fleckeri: The Chironex fleckeri jellyfish is one of the deadliest jellyfish in the world. It can deliver a serious sting and can be found mainly in the waters of Northern Australia and the Philippines. Death can occur in as little as a few minutes if a person is severely stung.
  • Secondary Dysmenorrhea: Menstrual-like cramping (dysmenorrhea) from an underlying condition.
  • Secondary Fibromyalgia: Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues. Primary fibromyalgia is a term given to fibromyalgia that occurs for no apparent reason whereas secondary fibromyalgia has an identifiable cause. The primary form is more common than the secondary form.
  • Sensations: Changes to sensations or the senses
  • Sensory symptoms: Symptoms affecting the sensory systems.
  • Shamrock poisoning: The shamrock is a low-growing plant which bears various colored flowers. It is often used as an ornamental garden plant. The plant contains oxalates which can cause symptoms if eaten in large quantities. The plant is considered to have a low level of toxicity and small amounts are generally harmless.
  • Shigella boydii: A form of bacterium
  • Shigella boydii infection: Shigella boydii is a species of bacteria from the Shigella genus. Infection with this bacteria causes diarrhea. The severity of the disease is variable depending on the underlying health of the individual - the young and old tend to be more severely affected. Infection usually occurs through the fecal-oral route. Infection can be transmitted between people unless appropriate hygiene measures are undertaken. Some infected patients are asymptomatic and are those more likely to transmit infection to other people.
  • Shigella dysenteriae infection: Shigella dysenteriae is a species of bacteria from the Shigella genus. Dysenteriae is the most common cause of epidemic dysentery in condensed populations such as refugee camps. Infection with this bacteria causes diarrhea. The severity of the disease is variable depending on the underlying health of the individual - the young and old tend to be more severely affected. Infection usually occurs through the fecal-oral route. Infection can be transmitted between people unless appropriate hygiene measures are undertaken. Some infected patients are asymptomatic and are those more likely to transmit infection to other people.
  • Shigella flexneri: A form of bacterium
  • Shigella flexneri infection: Shigella flexneri is a species of bacteria from the Shigella genus. Flexneri is the most common cause of Shigellosis in the world. Infection with this bacteria causes diarrhea. The severity of the disease is variable depending on the underlying health of the individual - the young and old tend to be more severely affected. Infection usually occurs through the fecal-oral route. Infection can be transmitted between people unless appropriate hygiene measures are undertaken. Some infected patients are asymptomatic and are those more likely to transmit infection to other people.
  • Shigella sonnei: A form of bacterium
  • Shigella sonnei infection: Shigella sonnei is a species of bacteria from the Shigella genus. Sonnei is the most common cause of Shigellosis in the developed world. Infection with this bacteria causes diarrhea. The severity of the disease is variable depending on the underlying health of the individual - the young and old tend to be more severely affected. Infection usually occurs through the fecal-oral route. Infection can be transmitted between people unless appropriate hygiene measures are undertaken. Some infected patients are asymptomatic and are those more likely to transmit infection to other people.
  • Short Bowel Syndrome: Disorder of shortened bowel usually from bowel surgery.
  • Sleep disturbance related fibromyalgia: Sleep disturbance related fibromyalgia refers to fibromyalgia that is associated with sleep disturbance. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues.
  • Slickhead poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some slickhead contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the slickhead does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The slickhead are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Small bowel bacterial overgrowth syndrome: The small bowel is a part of the digestive system. A healthy small bowel contains some bacteria but in bacterial overgrowth syndrome, there are an excessive number of bacteria. Abnormal small bowel muscle function is often associated with conditions such as intestinal motility problems due to neurological diseases and muscular diseases, diabetes mellitus, small intestine obstruction and diverticulitis. It may also be caused by certain medications and abdominal surgeries.
  • Spastic paraparesis: A rare disorder where parts of the body develop spasticity and weakness. Usually the limbs are involved. The disorder is usually an inherited condition.
  • Staphylococcus aureus food poisoning: Common type of food poisoning.
  • Stomach cramps: Cramping or other stomach discomfort
  • Strain: Muscle or tendon injury; compare sprain
  • Strychnine poisoning: Excessive ingestion of strychnine.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 1: Susceptibility to celiac disease 1 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 6p21.3) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 10: Susceptibility to celiac disease 10 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 3q25-q26) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 11: Susceptibility to celiac disease 11 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 3q28) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 12: Susceptibility to celiac disease 12 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 6q25) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 13: Susceptibility to celiac disease 13 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 12q24) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 2: Susceptibility to celiac disease 2 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 5q31-q33) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 3: Susceptibility to celiac disease 3 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 2q33) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 4: Susceptibility to celiac disease 4 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 19p13.1) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 5: Susceptibility to celiac disease 5 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 15q11-q13) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 6: Susceptibility to celiac disease 6 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 4q27) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 7: Susceptibility to celiac disease 7 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 1q133) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 8: Susceptibility to celiac disease 8 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 2q11-q12) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Susceptibility to Celiac Disease 9: Susceptibility to celiac disease 9 is a term allocated to a genetic defect on a particular chromosome (chromosome 3p21) which makes a patient more susceptible to developing celiac disease. However, it is important to note that having the genetic anomaly does not mean a person will definitely develop celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Swollen bone: Enlarged, swollen, or misshapen bones
  • Systemic Capillary Leak Syndrome: A rare disease where episodes of leaking blood capillaries results in a rapid drop in blood pressure which can be life-threatening. Episodes usually last for a few days. The range and severity of symptoms experienced may range somewhat amongst patients.
  • Tacrine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Tarpon poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some tarpon contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the tarpon does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The tarpon are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Tension myositis related fibromyalgia: Tension myositis related fibromyalgia refers to fibromyalgia that is associated with tension myositis. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized mainly by pain mainly in the muscles which involves no associated damage to the tissues. Tension myositis is a chronic pain syndrome that tends to mainly affect the back, neck, arm and pelvis.
  • Tetanus: A disease caused by chemicals which are produced by a bacterium (clostridium tetani) and are toxic to the nerves. The infection usually occurs when the bacteria enter the body through a deep wound - these bacteria are anaerobic and hence don't need oxygen to survive.
  • Tetany: Involuntary cramps of the muscles caused by low blood calcium levels.
  • Thyroid disease: Any medical condition which affects the thyroid
  • Thyroid disorders: Any medical condition which affects the thyroid
  • Thyroid hormone plasma membrane transport defect: Thyroid problems caused by a defect in the transport of a thyroid hormone called T4 (thyroxine) within the body. The thyroid produces excessive hormones to try to compensate for that inability of the body to utilize the hormone.
  • Timme syndrome: A syndrome involving insufficiency of the thymus, adrenal and pituitary glands. The disorder has involves three phases, each of which has varying symptoms: phase 1 is before puberty, phase 2 occurs after puberty and phase 3 tends to occur in the third decade.
  • Torsion dystonia: A movement disorder where the muscles contract and contort uncontrollably due to neurological dysfunction.
  • Torsion dystonia, X-linked: An inherited movement disorder where the muscles contract and contort uncontrollably due to neurological dysfunction. The first symptom in this form is spasmodic eye blinking.
  • Torsion dystonia, autosomal dominant: An inherited movement disorder where the muscles contract and contort uncontrollably due to neurological dysfunction. Neck and torso muscle are affected first and progression is slower and occurs over a longer period of time than in the autosomal recessive form.
  • Torsion dystonia, autosomal recessive: An inherited movement disorder where the muscles contract and contort uncontrollably due to neurological dysfunction. Muscle contractures start in the hands and feet and spread quickly to the trunk and extremities. Progression tends to slow down during adulthood.
  • Trichinosis: Worm infection usually caught from pigs
  • Troell-Junet syndrome: A disorder involving enlarged extremities, diabetes, skull abnormalities and excessive thyroid hormone production.
  • Turner syndrome associated Celiac Disease: Females with Turner syndrome are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Type 1 diabetes related Celiac Disease: Patients with Type 1 diabetes are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Ulcerative colitis: Ulcerative colitis (Colitis ulcerosa, UC) is a form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Ulcerative colitis is a form of colitis, a disease of the intestine, specifically the large intestine or colon, that includes characteristic ulcers, or open sores, in the colon.
  • Uremia: Build up of toxins usually excreted by the kidneys, associated with real failure in a woman who is pregnant.
  • Varicose veins: Appearance of veins in the skin
  • Venous insufficiency: A condition which is characterized by inadequacy of the venous valves which impairs venous drainage
  • Viral diseases: Any disease that is caused by a virus
  • Visceral pain: Pain perceived in the viscera.
  • Vitamin A embryopathy: A morbid condition of the embryo caused by the consumption of excess Vitamin A during pregnancy
  • Vitamin B12 Deficiency: A deficiency of Vitamin B12 primarily causes anemias the body is unable to make sufficient quantities of normal red blood cells. Severe cases can lead to permanent nervous system problems. The vitamin B12 deficiency can result from absorption problems, insufficient dietary intake, certain medications (e.g. metformin), inherited conditions (e.g. transcobalamin deficiency) and certain chronic parasitic intestinal infestations.
  • Walrus poisoning: The walrus is used as a food source in some parts of the world. Eating the liver of the walrus can result in a Vitamin A overdose which can cause serious symptoms and even death in extreme cases.
  • Water Intoxication: Excessive water intake can lead to water intoxication and ultimately death.
  • William's syndrome associated Celiac Disease: Patients with William's syndrome are more susceptible to developing celiac disease than the average population. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten by the small intestine. The type and severity of symptoms varies amongst people - some people have severe gastrointestinal symptoms from infancy whereas other have no symptoms other than fatigue or anemia during adulthood.
  • Y chromosome pericentric inversion: A genetic abnormality that usually results in the miscarriage of a fetus
  • Yellow sac spider poisoning: The yellow sac spider is a small spider found in Hawaii, eastern US, Utah and New England. The spider tends to hold on very tightly when it bites and often has to be physically removed. The venom contains a toxin which kills cells. Skin and sometimes systemic symptoms result - symptoms experience can vary amongst patients.
  • Young Simpson syndrome: A condition that is characterised by mainly mental retardation and physical signs of hypothyroidism
  • Zadik Barak Levin syndrome: A condition that affects the endocrine system as well as some facial characteristics

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Cramps:

The following list of conditions have 'Cramps' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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Conditions listing medical complications: Cramps:

The following list of medical conditions have 'Cramps' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database.

 

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