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Symptoms » Dilated pupils » Glossary
 

Glossary for Dilated pupils

Medical terms related to Dilated pupils or mentioned in this section include:

  • Abdominal symptoms: Symptoms affecting the abdomen or digestive tract
  • Adhesive abuse: Adhesive abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Adhesives include household glues, rubber cement and model aeroplane glue. These adhesives can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Adhesive addiction: Adhesive addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse adhesives (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Adhesives includes household glue, rubber cement and model airplane glue.
  • Adie syndrome: A rare condition where the pupil of the eye is dilated and reacts very slowly to light and other stimulus. Knee and ankle reflexes are also impaired.
  • Aerosol abuse: Aerosol abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Aerosols include air fresheners, hair spray, spray pain and deodorants. These aerosols can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Aerosol addiction: Aerosol addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse aerosol (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Aerosols are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Aerosols includes spray pain, air freshener, deodorants and hair sprays.
  • Amitriptyline toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Amoxapine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Anchovy poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some anchovies contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the anchovy does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The anchovies are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Anticholinergic syndrome: Symptoms caused by overdose of anticholinergic drugs.
  • Atropine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is strong evidence to indicate that exposure to Atropine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Autonomic seizure: A seizure which has resulted from a functional disturbance or pathological change in the autonomic nervous system
  • Balsam apple poisoning: The Balsam apple is a climbing vine which produces yellowish fruit. The fruit contains toxins - resin, saponic glycoside and alkaloids - which can cause various symptoms if eaten. Large amounts of the fruit or seeds to be consumed to cause toxicity. The leaves of the plant may be cooked, drained and eaten safely.
  • Balsam pear poisoning: The Balsam pear is a climbing vine which produces yellowish fruit. The fruit contains toxins - resin, saponic glycoside and alkaloids - which can cause various symptoms if eaten. Large amounts of the fruit or seeds to be consumed to cause toxicity. The leaves of the plant may be cooked, drained and eaten safely.
  • Black jetbead poisoning: The Black jetbead is a deciduous shrub which bears single white flowers and small groups of shiny black fruit. The fruit contains amygdalin which is very toxic and can cause severe poisoning or even death if eaten.
  • Black locust poisoning: The black locust is a large deciduous tree which has long clusters of scented flowers and flat fruit pods. The young leaves, seeds and inner bark contain various chemicals (robin, robinine and robitin) which can be toxic if large quantities are eaten. The flowers are considered edible if handled correctly.
  • Black nightshade poisoning: The Black Nightshade is a herb which bears small white or purple flowers and dull black berries. The plant originated in South America. The berries contain solanine alkaloid which can be toxic if eaten in large quantities. The leaves and unripe berries are considered toxic whereas the ripe fruit is possibly edible.
  • Bloodroot poisoning: The Bloodroot is a flowering herb that bears fruit and whose stem contains red juices. The plant tends to grow in mountainous areas. The thickened roots (rhizomes) of the plant contain isoquinoline alkaloids which are very toxic and can cause death if eaten in sufficient quantities.
  • Body packer syndrome: Consuming packages of drugs for the purpose of concealing them for transportation.
  • Bonefish poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some bonefish contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the bonefish does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The bonefish are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Bottlebrush buckeye poisoning: The Bottlebrush buckeye is a deciduous shrub which bears clusters of white or pink flowers and smooth, leathery fruit containing shiny seeds. The plant originated in southern USA. The plant contains various toxic chemicals (glycoside esculin, saponin aescin) which can cause potentially fatal toxicity if sufficient quantities of the seeds or leaves are consumed.
  • Botulism food poisoning: Extremely dangerous food poisoning requiring medical attention, but not always recognized because of its non-abdominal symptoms.
  • Box thorn poisoning: The leaves of the Box thorn plant contain a toxic chemical called atropine and possibly other toxic compounds. The box thorn plant is a spiny-stemmed shrub which originated in Europe. Symptoms can be quite serious depending on the quantity of the plant ingested.
  • Brain tumor: A condition which is characterized by the abnormal growth of tissue within the brain
  • Burning bush poisoning: The burning bush is a shrub that has bright red leaves in autumn and bears red berries. The plant contains toxic chemicals such as lobelamine and lobeline which can cause symptoms if eaten in large quantities.
  • California buckeye poisoning: The California buckeye is a deciduous shrub which bears clusters of white or pink flowers and smooth, leathery fruit containing shiny seeds. The plant originated in California. The plant contains various toxic chemicals (glycoside esculin, saponin aescin) which can cause potentially fatal toxicity if sufficient quantities of the seeds or leaves are consumed.
  • Carolina Cherry Laurel poisoning: The Carolina cherry laurel is an evergreen tree which bears small white flowers and small green fruit which turns black when ripe. Most parts of the plant contain cyanogenic glycoside and amygdalin which can cause symptoms if ingested. The plant is considered highly toxic and eating sufficient quantities can lead to death.
  • Cerebral oedema:
  • Chemical poisoning -- 1,2-Dibromoethane: 1,2-Dibromoethane is a chemical used in gasoline, soil fumigants, fire extinguishers, flue gases and mechanical gauge fluid. Excessive exposure to this chemical can cause serious symptoms. Some people can suffer an adverse reaction to the chemical. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- 5,-Methoxy-N,N-Diisopropyltryptamine: 5,-Methoxy-N,N-Diisopropyltryptamine is a chemical used as a designer drug for its hallucinogen and aphrodisiac effects. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Adiponitrile: Adiponitrile is a chemical used mainly in the production of hexamethylene diamine which in turn is used mainly to produce nylon. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Amitraz: Amitraz is a chemical used mainly as a topical parasitic preventative in livestock and fruit trees. It is also used as an insect repellant and a prevention of mite infestation. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Barium: Barium is an element used in fireworks, glassmaking, contrast X-rays and in the electronics industry . The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Benzene: Benzene is a chemical used mainly in gasoline fuel and as an industrial solvent. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Bromide: Bromide is a chemical used for many applications - flame retardant, industrial uses, pesticides, sanitary products, fumigants, medicines, dyes, photographic solutions and water purification. Bromides act as central nervous system depressants and the ingestion of excessive quantities can cause serious symptoms. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Carbinoxamine: Carbinoxamine is a therapeutic treatment for allergic rhinitis. It is marketed under names such as Histex, Pediatiex and Carboxine. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chloroform: Chloroform is a chemical used mainly as a refrigerant but also as a solvent in various processing and industrial applications. It's use as an anesthetic is relatively uncommon these days. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Chloromethane: Chloromethane is a chemical used mainly in the production of silicones as well as agricultural chemicals, butyl rubber and other products. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The chemical is readily absorbed through the skin. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Jet Fuel-5: Jet Fuel-5 is an aviation turbine fuel used by the US military. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Lysergic Acid Diethylamide: Lysergic Acid Diethylamide is a hallucinogenic drug which is often misused. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Metaldehyde: Metaldehyde is a chemical used mainly as a molluscicide, in heating fuel and in fire lighters. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Pyrimidifen: Pyrimidifen is a chemical used mainly as an insecticide and acaricide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Sodium Monofluoroacetate: Sodium Monofluoroacetate is a chemical used mainly as a rodenticides, often to control mammal pests in crops. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetrahydrofuran: Tetrahydrofuran is a chemical used mainly as a plastic solvent and in the processing of varnish, ink, paint and glue. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine: Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine is a chemical used mainly as a rodenticide in China. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Thallium Sulfate: Thallium Sulfate is a chemical used mainly in the manufacture of switches and closures in the semiconductor industry. It has historically also been used as a rodenticide. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Toluene: Toluene is a chemical used mainly in pesticides, degreasers, glues and pain removers. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chemical poisoning -- Trichloroethylene: Trichloroethylene is a chemical used mainly as an industrial solvent and in adhesives, lacquer, fire retardants and house cleaning solvents. Ingestion and other exposures to the chemical can cause various symptoms. The type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the amount of chemical involved and the nature of the exposure.
  • Chlorpheniramine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Chlorpheniramine (an antihistamine medication) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Chlorpromazine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Chlorpromazine (a neuroleptic drug) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Christmas Cherry poisoning: The Christmas Cherry is a small reddish-orange fruit. The plant contains a compound called solanocapsine which can cause symptoms if excessive amounts are consumed. The compound is found in all parts of the plant - especially the leaves and unripe fruit. Very large amounts would need to be consumed to cause symptoms due to the low toxicity of the compound.
  • Clomipramine Toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Clupeotoxism: A potentially fatal condition caused by eating fish such as herrings and anchovies from the Clupeidae family of fish. Severe poisoning can result in death within half an hour of ingestion. Outbreaks have been reported in the Caribbean Sea and the Indian-Pacific area.
  • Cocaine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Cocaine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Cocaine addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use cocaine on a regular basis. Chronic cocaine use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Corn Lily poisoning: Corn Lily is a poisonous plant native to the Sierra Nevada mountains. It's appearance is similar to the corn grown as a crop. The plant poison primarily affects the nervous system.
  • Crack addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use crack on a regular basis. Chronic crack use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Crack is a form of cocaine - powdered cocaine is heated with ammonia or sodium bicarbonate to make rocks of crack. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Death: The loss of life.
  • Desipramine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Devil's trumpet poisoning: The Devil's trumpet is a shrubby plant with purple stems and large white or yellow flowers. The fruit is covered by a spiny shell. The plant originated in china and is often used as an ornamental outdoor plant. The plant contains tropane alkaloids which can be poisonous if eaten in large quantities.
  • Diphenhydramine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Diphenhydramine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Doxepin toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Ecstasy abuse: Use of the illicit drug called ecstasy
  • Ecstasy addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use ecstasy on a regular basis. Chronic ecstasy use can lead to dependency in as little as two weeks. Ecstasy is a synthetic psychoactive drug often used as a recreational drug. Street names for the drug includes: XTC, Adam, Clarity, Lover's Speed, Hug, Beans and Love Drug. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • English Ivy poisoning: English Ivy is a poisonous vine fund in Europe, US and Canada. The leaves and berries are the most toxic part of the plant but all parts of the plant are toxic. Falcarinol and polyacetylene are the toxic chemicals found in the plant.
  • English Laurel poisoning: The English Laurel is an evergreen shrub with elongated spikes of flowers and white fruit with a black stone. The seeds, twigs and wilted leaves of the plant contain chemicals (cyanogenic glycoside, amygdalin) which are very poisonous and can cause death if eaten. The chemicals result in cyanide poisoning.
  • Eye symptoms: Symptoms affecting the eye
  • Face symptoms: Symptoms affecting the face
  • False jessamine poisoning: False jessamine is a shrubby plant with small white to purple flowers and red, purple or yellow berries. The plant originated in Europe. The leaves contain chemicals (atropine, scopolamine, hyoscyamine) which can cause symptoms if large amounts are eaten.
  • Fear: Excessive feelings of fear.
  • Fire cherry poisoning: Fire cherry is a tree found mainly in the US. Ti bears round clusters of flowers and fruit with a large pit. The wilted leaves, stems and seeds contain cyanogenic glycoside and amygdalin which can be very poisonous if eaten. Severe cases of poisoning can result in death.
  • Flax poisoning: Flax is slender-stemmed herb which bears blue flowers and capsulated fruit containing smooth brown seeds. The plant originated in Europe but is found in many parts of the world growing wild. The plant contains a chemical called linomarin (a cyanogenic glycoside) which can cause symptoms if eaten in large quantities. Skin irritation can also result from skin exposure.
  • Golden Chain tree poisoning: The Golden Chain tree is a relatively small tree which produces bright yellow flowers. The plant contains a chemical called cytisine which can cause similar effects to nicotine if ingested and can be serious if patients have underlying health problems. All parts of the plant are poisonous if sufficient quantities are consumed.
  • Grand mal epilepsy: A condition characterize by sudden loss of consciousness with tonic-clonic seizures
  • Grand mal seizures: A condition which is characterized by the sudden onset of generalized muscle spasms and loss of consciousness
  • Head symptoms: Symptoms affecting the head or brain
  • Heart attack: An acute myocardial infarction
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Maté: Maté can be used as a herbal agent to treat water retention, purify the blood and as a stimulant. The herbal agent contains various chemicals which can cause an adverse reaction in some people.
  • Herbal Agent adverse reaction -- Sassafras Oil: Sassafras Oil can be used as a herbal agent to treat skin irritation such as insect bites. The herbal agent contains a chemical called safrole which can cause harmful effects if ingested .
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Cleistanthus Collinus: Cleistanthus collinus can be used as a herbal agent which is very toxic and has been used to commit suicide or murder. The herbal agent contains toxic chemicals such as dyphyllin, collinusin and glycosides.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Golden Seal: Golden seal can be used as a herbal agent to treat a variety of conditions - bleeding after birth, mucosal inflammation, constipation, hemorrhoids. The herbal agent contains chemicals (alkaloid hydrastine, berberine) which can cause various symptoms if excessive quantities are taken.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Horse Chestnuts: Horse Chestnuts can be used as a herbal agent to treat varicose veins, improve blood circulation through veins and to prevent fluid buildup following operations. The herbal agent contains a chemical called aesculin which can cause various symptoms if excessive quantities are taken. As little as one seed can cause symptoms such as headache and vomiting in some people.
  • Herbal Agent overdose -- Valerian: Valerian can be used as a herbal agent to improve sleep and to treat anxiety, headaches, panic attacks and abdominal cramps. The herbal agent contains chemicals which can cause various symptoms if excessive quantities are taken.
  • Heroin withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when heroin use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence.
  • Herring poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some herrings contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the herring does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The herrings are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Hexamethonium -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Hexamethonium during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Horse nettle poisoning: Horse nettle is a herbaceous plant which has prickles and bears yellow berries. The berries contain solanin alkaloids which can cause symptoms if eaten in large quantities. It is often found growing in the wild in many parts of the world. Death is considered possible if large amounts are eaten, especially in children.
  • Hyacinth bean poisoning: Hyacinth bean is a vine which bears elongated spikes of purple, white or pink flowers. The plant originated in Africa and is often used as an ornamental plant. The seeds and seed pod contain cyanogenic glycoside which can cause poisoning if large quantities are eaten. The seeds can be eaten if they are boiled for a long period of time with frequent water changes.
  • Hydrocodone withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Hydrocodone use is discontinued or reduced. Hydrocodone is pain-killing drug. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence. Symptoms are usually peak during the second day and last about a week.
  • Hydroxyzine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Hydroxyzine (an antihistamine) during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Imipramine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Increased intracranial pressure: Increased pressure inside the skull due to brain swelling or fluid accumulation
  • Indian Hemp poisoning: The Indian Hemp is a herbaceous shrubby plant who's sap contains resin and cardiac glycosides. Eating any part of the plant can result in cardiac arrest. The plant is considered very poisonous.
  • Indian Tobacco poisoning: The Indian Tobacco plant contains alkaloids such as lobeline which can result in similar effects to nicotine. The plant is sometimes used in herbal preparations which is usually how poisoning occurs.
  • Inhalant abuse: Inhalant abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Inhalants include gasoline, adhesives, solvents, and aerosols. These inhalants can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Inhalant addiction: Inhalant addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse inhalants (e.g. inhaling them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Inhalants are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Inhalants includes glues, shoe polish, household cleaners, room deodorizers and nail polish removers.
  • Irish potato poisoning: The common potato is an edible root. However, the potato sprouts and green skin in old potatoes contain chemicals such as solanine which can cause symptoms if eaten. Severe cases can result in death but this is relatively rare.
  • Jimsonweed poisoning: The Jimsonweed is a herb that bears single large white or lavender flowers and seeds surrounded by a spiny shell. The plant contains tropane alkaloids (mainly the seeds and leaves) which can cause symptoms if eaten in large quantities.
  • LSD addiction: LSD addiction is the uncontrollable craving for LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide) which is a hallucinogenic drug which is derived from a type of fungus. Although the drug is not technically classified as addictive as it doesn't cause drug-seeking behaviours but increasing tolerance to the drug means that increasing doses of the drug are required to achieve the desired effects. It causes a psychological addiction rather than a physical addiction.
  • Lantana poisoning: Lantana is a small flowering shrub with spiny stems. It bears small clusters of colorful flowers on a stalk and small green fruit which become dark when ripe. The plant contains a chemical called triterpene which can cause poisoning symptoms if eaten. Death can occur if sufficient quantities are eaten as the chemical is quite toxic. The green berries are considered the most toxic part of the plant but the leaves are also poisonous but less likely to be eaten. Skin irritation can also result from skin contact with the plant.
  • Liver failure: When the liver fails to function
  • Lobelia poisoning: Lobelia is a herbaceous plant which bears elongated shafts of small blue, white or red flowers. The plant contains alkaloids such as lobeline which can result in similar effects to nicotine. The plant is sometimes used in herbal preparations which is usually how poisoning occurs.
  • Loquat poisoning: Loquat is a shrubby plant which bears clusters of small white flowers and largish yellow fleshy fruit. The plant is often used in gardens as an ornamental plant. The kernel from inside the seeds contains a chemical called cyanogenic glycoside which can be poisonous if eaten in large quantities. The fruit from the plant is actually safe to eat but the seeds should be avoided.
  • Lortab withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when Lortab use is discontinued or reduced. Lortab is a pain-killer and cough reliever. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence. Symptoms are usually peak during the second day and last about a week.
  • Lysergic Acid Diethylamide -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Lysergic Acid Diethylamide during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Marijuana addiction: Marijuana addiction is the uncontrollable desire to use marijuana on a regular basis. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Mescal poisoning: The Mescal is a small rounded cactus which has no spines but has tufts of hairs and a flower in the centre. The plant is grown for use as a narcotic in some parts of the world due to its hallucinogenic effect. All above-ground parts of the plant contain toxic chemicals (mescaline, lophophorine) which can cause symptom if eaten. The plant itself is considered to have a low level of toxicity but the chemical mescaline derived from it can cause strong symptoms if ingested in excessive quantities. The psychic effects following plant ingestion can last from 6 to 12 hours.
  • Morning Glory poisoning: The morning glory is a flowering vine with heart-shaped leaves that originates from tropical areas of America. The seeds contain chemicals (indole alkaloids, LSD) which can cause symptoms if eaten. The seeds are considered to have a low level of toxicity.
  • Mouth symptoms: Symptoms of the mouth or oral area.
  • Movement symptoms: Changes to movement or motor abilities
  • Muscle symptoms: Symptoms affecting the muscles of the body
  • Musculoskeletal symptoms: Symptoms affecting muscles or bones of the skeleton.
  • Mydriasis: A condition which is characterized by prolonged abnormal dilatation of the pupil
  • Narcotic addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use narcotics on a regular basis. The drug may be used as a therapeutic medication for various conditions but it's use is also frequently abused. Examples of narcotic drugs include heroin, morphine, Demerol and codeine. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Nerve symptoms: Symptoms affecting the nerves
  • Nortriptyline toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Oleander poisoning: The oleander is a flowering shrub or small tree which bears clusters of flowers. The plant originated from Eurasia and is often used as an ornamental plant. The plant contains chemicals (cardiac glycosides: nerioside, oleandroside; saponins) which are very toxic if ingested. The plant is considered highly toxic and can result in death if sufficient quantities are eaten. The toxicity within a species can vary depending on the season. As little as seven leaves have been reported to cause poisoning symptoms. Poisoning can occur from inhaling smoke from burning oleander leaves.
  • Opioid withdrawal: Symptoms that occur when opioid use is discontinued or reduced. Symptoms may vary depending on the level of dependence. Opioids includes heroin, methadone and codeine.
  • Persistent Vegetative State: Physically alive with basic mental function but without high mental capacity.
  • Phenylephrine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Phenylephrine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Pinkroot poisoning: Pinkroot is a herbaceous plant which bears elongated flowers which are red on the outside and yellow on the inside. The plant can be found growing in the wild or in gardens. The plant contains a chemical called spigiline which can cause symptoms if eaten in large quantities.
  • Pizotifen -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Pizotifen during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Plant poisoning -- Aesculin: Aesculin is a toxin found in horse chestnuts, California buckeye and in the resin from Daphne mezereum. The toxin causes gastrointestinal symptoms and neurological symptoms.
  • Plant poisoning -- Amygdalin: Amygdalin is a chemical found naturally in various plants e.g. stone fruit kernels and raw almonds. Eating these parts of the plant that contain the chemical can cause symptoms of cyanide poisoning as the amygdalin is converted to cyanide by the digestive process. Obviously, the concentration of the chemical varies amongst species of plant and often, significant quantities are needed to produce symptoms. Nevertheless, severe poisoning can result in death. Amygdalin is believed by some to inhibit cancers but there has been no conclusive proof of this.
  • Plant poisoning -- Cyanogenic glycoside: Cyanogenic glycoside is a toxin found naturally in various plants e.g. cherries, plums, almonds, peaches, apricots, apples and cassava. The chemical is usually concentrated in the seeds, kernels or wilted leaves. Eating these parts of the plant that contain the chemical can cause symptoms of cyanide poisoning as the cyanogenic glycoside is converted to cyanide by the digestive process. Even chewing the leaves can result in conversion to cyanide due to the presence of digestive enzymes in the mouth. Obviously, the concentration of the chemical varies amongst species of plant and often, significant quantities are needed to produce symptoms. Nevertheless, severe poisoning can result in death.
  • Plant poisoning -- Indole alkaloids: Indole alkaloids are a group of chemicals found naturally in plants such as snakeroot and Madagascar periwinkle. Specific indole alkaloids from this group are vinblastine, reserpine and vincristine.
  • Plant poisoning -- Saponin: Saponin is a toxin found naturally in plants such as the Christmas rose and carnations. It gives plants a bitter taste which makes poisoning relatively uncommon.
  • Plant poisoning -- Solanine: Solanine is a toxin found naturally in plants from the nightshade family - potatoes, tomatoes, eggplant and capsicum. However, the content is usually quite low except for potatoes which have turned green on light exposure.
  • Poison hemlock poisoning: Poison hemlock is a herbaceous plant which has a relatively large taproot and clusters of small white flowers. The plant if often found growing in the wild as a weed. The plant contains various alkaloid chemicals which can cause symptoms if eaten. Severe cases of poisoning can result in death.
  • Prescribed medication addiction: An uncontrollable desire to use prescribed medication in a manner or frequency not prescribed. Drugs such as painkillers are prescribed to treat such things as pain but patients may become physically dependent on the drug and continue to obsessively use it even after the condition it was prescribed for has resolved. Frequent use leads to an increased tolerance to the drug so higher and higher doses are required to achieve the desired euphoric feeling.
  • Prochlorperazine -- Teratogenic Agent: There is evidence to indicate that exposure to Prochlorperazine during pregnancy may have a teratogenic effect on the fetus. A teratogen is a substance that can cause birth defects. The likelihood and severity of defects may be affected by the level of exposure and the stage of pregnancy that the exposure occurred at.
  • Protriptyline toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Pupil constriction: When there is constriction of the pupils
  • Pupil symptoms: Symptoms affecting the pupil of the eye
  • Red buckeye poisoning: The red buckeye is a shrubby plant which bears a cluster of small red flowers and brown seeds with distinctive pale markings. The plant originated in the US. The seeds and leaves contain various chemicals (glycoside aesculin, saponin aescin and alkaloids) which can cause poisoning symptoms if eaten. The plant is considered very toxic and death can result in cases of severe poisoning.
  • Reye's syndrome: is a potentially fatal disease that causes numerous detrimental effects to many organs, especially the brain and liver
  • Ritalin overdose: Ritalin is a prescription drug used to treat ADHD. Excessive doses of the drug can result in various symptoms and even death in severe cases.
  • Sardine poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some sardines contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the sardines does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The sardines are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Serotonin Syndrome: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Shock: Physical and mental reaction to reduced circulation
  • Skull symptoms: Symptoms affecting the skull surrounding the brain.
  • Slickhead poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some slickhead contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the slickhead does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The slickhead are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Solvent abuse: Solvent abuse is the use of various inhalants for the purpose of achieving a "high". They are often used as a cheap, readily available alternative to street drugs but they can cause serious damage to the body. Solvents include nail polish removers, paint thinners, gasoline, typing correction fluid and toxic markers. These solvents can be abused by sniffing them, spraying directly into the mouth, heating them and then inhaling them or injecting them directly into the body.
  • Solvent addiction: Solvent addiction refers to the compulsive need to abuse solvents (e.g. sniffing them). Sufferers have withdrawal symptoms when attempting to stop the habit and feel unable to stop the habit despite knowing the harm it is causing their health. Solvents are very damaging to the body and can readily result permanent brain damage and even death. Death can occur through chronic use and in rare cases can occur after one session of use. Children and teenagers are particular at risk for this type of addiction - it is readily available and users feel it gains them greater acceptance from their peers. Solvents includes paint thinner, toxic markers, gasoline, cigarette lighter fluid, typing correction fluid and nail polish removers.
  • Spotted water hemlock poisoning: Spotted water hemlock is a flowering plant that bears clusters of small, white flowers and tends to grow in wetland areas. The plant contains toxic chemicals (cicutoxin, cicutol) is considered very poisonous. The ingestion of even a bite of the root can result in rapid death in children.
  • Syncope: Loss or interruption of consciousness.
  • Tapioca poisoning: Tapioca is a shrubby plant which bears inconspicuous flowers. The tubers contain chemicals (cyanogenic glycosides) which are turned into cyanide by the digestive process. Ingestion of the raw roots of this plant can result in death if sufficient quantities are eaten. The tubers are edible if they are boiled first. Toxicity varies within the species depending on growing conditions and other factors.
  • Tarpon poisoning (clupeotoxin): Some tarpon contain toxins (Clupeotoxin) which can be poisonous to humans if eaten. Heat does not destroy the toxin and there is still uncertainty as to the origin of the toxin. The toxin appears to be present in higher concentrations in summer and is believed to be possible linked to the consumption of toxic food in its food web. The size and age of the tarpon does not appear to be related to the toxicity. The tarpon are found in coastal waters off Africa and the Caribbean, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
  • Temporal lobe epilepsy: A condition which is characterized by complex partial seizures
  • Tomato leaf poisoning: Tomatoes are an edible fruit but the leaves and stems contain chemicals (solanine and demissine) which can cause symptoms if eaten in large quantities.
  • Tonic seizure: Abnormal electrical activity in a part of the brain which results mainly in muscle stiffness and rigidity. Tonic seizures are considered relatively uncommon. They can occur at any age but are more common in childhood. Patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome or multiple sclerosis are particularly susceptible to this type of seizure. Episodes usually only last for a matter of minutes and recovery can vary from minutes to hours.
  • Tonic-clonic seizure: formerly known as grand mal seizures. It involves the entire body causing muscle contraction and loss of consciousness
  • Toxic mushrooms -- Anticholinergic: Some mushrooms contain a toxic chemical called ibotenic acid which causes anticholinergic symptoms. Ibotenic acid is converted to muscimol during digestion. The two toxins have opposing actions which results in initial excitation symptoms followed by a prolonged coma-like sleep. Mushroom species from this group include certain species of Amanita sp. - cothurnata, crenulata, frostiana, gemmata, muscaria and pantherina. Eating two to four mushrooms can result in impaired senses and eating more than twenty usually results in death.
  • Toxic mushrooms -- Psychedelic: Some mushrooms contain chemicals called psilocybin and psilocin which produce effects similar to LSD. Mushroom species from this group include certain species of Conocybe syanopus, Conocybe spectabilis, Gymnopilus, Panaeolus, Pluteus, Psilocybe and Stropharia. About five dried mushroom caps can result in hallucinations.
  • Trimipramine toxicity: The toxic reaction of the body to the substance, possibly via allergic reaction or overdose.
  • Trumpet flower poisoning: The trumpet flower is a flowering vine-like plant that bears fairly large, colorful, trumpet-shaped flowers. It is often grown in gardens as an ornamental plant. The leaves and flowers of the plant contain chemicals (solanine, solanidine) which are highly toxic. Ingestion of sufficient flowers and leaves can result in death.
  • Weber syndrome: A rare genetic disorder characterized by excessive blood vessel growth, calcium accumulation inside the brain and seizures.
  • White Chameleon poisoning: The white chameleon is a type of thistle found mainly in dry areas of the Mediterranean. The rhizomes contains chemicals which can cause poisoning symptoms if eaten. The plant is often mistaken for a wild artichoke. The root extract is sometimes used in alternative medicine and excessive doses can also result in poisoning.
  • Wild Lima bean poisoning: Wild Lima beans are a legume similar to the common lima beans which are considered safe to eat. The wild lima contains much higher levels of a chemical called cyanogen than the common lima bean. The cyanogen can cause symptoms and if sufficient quantities are eaten, death can result. Some people are so sensitive to cyanogen that eating even the relatively safe common lima bean may result in symptoms though usually they are not severe. Cooking destroys the toxic chemical in lima beans. Raw lima bean sprouts should be avoided.
  • Yellow jessamine poisoning: The Yellow Jessamine is a woody vine which bears aromatic, funnel-shaped yellow flowers and flat fruit capsules. The plant contains alkaloids which are very toxic and potentially fatal if eaten in sufficient quantities.

Conditions listing medical symptoms: Dilated pupils:

The following list of conditions have 'Dilated pupils' or similar listed as a symptom in our database. This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete. Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the cause of any symptom.

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